Copyright
David J. (David Josiah) Brewer.

A directory for the city of Buffalo : containing the names and residence of the heads of families and householders, in said city, on the first of July 1832 : to which is added a sketch of the history of the village from 1801 to 1832 online

. (page 1 of 7)
Online LibraryDavid J. (David Josiah) BrewerA directory for the city of Buffalo : containing the names and residence of the heads of families and householders, in said city, on the first of July 1832 : to which is added a sketch of the history of the village from 1801 to 1832 → online text (page 1 of 7)
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CITY OF BFJFFAI.'



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CONTAININO TEE NAMES AND RESfflENCE



OF THE3



HEADS OF FAMILIES



AND



HOUSEIIOI.I> ERS,



IN SAID ClTy> ON THE FIRST OF JULY 1832.



TO WHICH IS IDOCD A SKETCH OF THK



HISTORY OF THE VILLAGE,






FROM 1801 TO 1832.






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'HIS BOOK, BEING AN
EXACT REPRODUCTION OF

THE Buffalo City Di-
rectory FOR the year
1832, has been set up,
printed and bound by
the

J. W. Clement Co.,

COMBINED Wn H THE
MATTHEWS-NORTHRUP WORKS

IN THEIR PLANT AT THE

CORNER OF Seneca, Lord
AND Seymour Streets,
Buffalo, New York,

TO ASSIST IN commemo-
rating the City of
Buffalo Centennial

AND IS one of A LIMITED
EDITION PRESENTED, WITH
THE COMPLIMENTS OF THE
PRINTERS,
/ TO



Buffalo, New York,
mcmxxxii



@



DUIBUK^^MIE^



FOB THB



CITY OF BUFFALO;



CONTAINING THE NAMES AND RESIDENCE



OF THE



HEADS OF FAMILIES

AND

HOUSEHOLDERS,

IN SAID CITY> ON THE FIRST OF JULY 1832.

TO WHICH IS ADDED A SKETCH OF THE

HISTORY OF THE VILLAGE.

FROM 1801 TO 1832.



SSufCalo:

PUBLISHED BY I« P. CRARY.

STEELE & FAXON, PRINTERS.



1S32.



SRLF
URL



OFFICERS OF THE CITY OF BUFFALO.



Aldermen.



EBENEZER JOHNSON. Mayor
1st Ward— ISAAC S. SMITH,

JOSEPH W. BROWN,
2d Ward— HENRY ROOT.

JOHN G. CAMP.
Sd Ward— IRA A. BLOSSOM,

DAVID M. DAY.
4th Ward- MAJOR A. ANDREWS,

HENRY WHITE.
ath Ward— EBENEZER WALDEN.

THOMAS C. LOVE,

D. TILLINGHAST. Clerk.
GEORGE P. BARKER, Attorney.
HENRY R. SEYMOUR. Treasurer.
DAVID M. DAY, City Printer.

ISAAC S. SMITH, Chief Eng. of Fire Department.

JOHN W. REALS, Ussistants
SAMUEL JORDAN, ;^^^'^^°'^^-

WILLIAM JONES. \ Constables
NELSON ADAMS, ) '-onstaDies.

EDWARD BALDWIN, Street Commissioner.
JAMES J. BALDWIN. City Surveyor.
JOSEPH DEAN, Clerk of the Markets.

E. JOHNSON. (Mayor) )

f-^-^fJU^^' Board of Health.

L. F. ALLEN, C

3. CLARY. )

J. E. MARSHALL. Health Physician.



INTRODUCTION



The City of Buffalo is situated in the county
of Erie, and state of New-York; is built upon the
land adjoining Buffalo Creek and Lake Erie, at the
junction of these waters, and contains 10,119 inha-
bitants. Most of the City is situated upon a bluff
of table land that rises about fifty feet above the
level of the Lake. The low lands that extend
from the foot of this bluff, (or Terrace, as it is gene-
rally called,) to the margin of the Creek and Lake,
offering many inducements to particular business
pursuits, have been overspread with buildings, and
are becoming thickly populated.

The village was originally surveyed and laid out,
by the Holland Land Company, to whom the site
belonged in 1801 ; and the settlement may be said
to have begun in the following year. Owing to
the usual causes which retard new settlements in
their advancement, the village made but inconsider-
able progress in its growth, until the commence-
ment of the war, in 1812, when it became a mili-
tary resort. In December, 1813, the place was en-
tered by the British and Indians, and every building
but two was burnt. The inhabitants were many
of them carried captives to Montreal, while others
preserved their liberty by a precipitate flight. The
loss of property fell mostly upon individuals, and
was not only severe, but, in its consequences, truly



calamitous — leaving in many instances, families
destitute of house, clothing or provisions, with
which to combat the severity of the season. From
this period to the close of the war, nothing like a
regular and permanent attempt was made to rebuild
the town, although such of the inhabitants as could,
returned and made temporary locations upon the
sites of their former habitations. The news of
peace was the signal for renewed exertions to re-
build the place, but pecuniary embarassments, and
remoteness from market, paralyzed all efforts so
effectually as to keep back the place, and retain for
it the character of a hamlet only, until the near
approach of the Grand Canal, in its progress west-
ward, in 1822, gave brighter prospects to those on
whom exertions devolved. In 1825, payment was
received from the United States, under certain re-
strictions, for the buildings destroyed in 1813, but
all remuneration for other property lost, was rigidly
withheld. Exertions for public advancement now
became more visibly efficient; and the attempts
which had been several years making to render
Buffalo Creek a commercial resort, were now first
completely successful. The mouth of that stream
had been obstructed by a sand bar which shut out
most vessels that navigated the lake, and forced
them to resort to Black Rock, where a temporary
shelter only could be afforded them, in the open
river. To effect the desired object, a loan had been
procured from the state, of $12,000, which, aided by
private donations, had so far perfected a pier on the
south side of the mouth of the Creek, as to exclude
sand, and leave an open channel for vessels into the
mouth of the harbor. The consequences of thia



were to create a new resort for vessels, and to arrest
them in their passage to Black Rock. This neces-
sarily caused the building of wharves, store houses,
and such other conveniences as were required by
the new business pursuits thus created.

GENERAL VIEW.

The village of Buffalo was incorporated in 1822
and its municipal government was administered by
a President and board of trustees. The Act to in-
corporate the City of Buffalo, was passed April 20,
1832. The common council were elected on the
26th day of May, and held their first meeting for the
choice of Mayor, &c. on the 28th.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

The Public Buildings consist of 6 houses of pub-
lic worship, and 1 now building; Court House,
jail, U. S. Branch Bank, Bank of Buffalo, Buffalo.
Literary and Scientific Academy, Land OflBce, 2_;
Markets, 3 Engine Houses, and a Light-House.

PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS.

The U. S. Branch Bank, was established here in
1829.

OFFICERS.

Wm. B. Rochester, President.
J. R. Carpenter, Cashier.

Directors. — Wm. B. Rochester, J. Wadsworth,
D. E. Evans, C. Townsend, H. B. Potter, A. H.
Tracy, W. A. Bird, Wm. HoUister, Geo. Palmer,
Wm. Ruxton, B. D. Coe, E. Walden, Geo. B.
Webster.

1*



6

The Bank of Buffalo, was incorporated in 1831.
Capital $200,000.

OFFICERS.

G. H. Goodrich, President.

Hiram Pratt, Cashier.
Directors. — G. H. Goodrich, R. H. Heywood,
Henry Root, Wm. Ketchum, George Burt, N. P.
Sprague, Hiram Pratt, Thaddeus Weed, J. Stock-
ing, Augustus Porter, M. A. Andrews, Henry
Hamilton, S. G. Austin.

Buffalo Fire and Marine Insurance Company, in-
corporated in March, 1830. Capital $100,000.

E, Walden, President. L. F. Allen, Secretary.

Directors. — E. Walden, C. Townsend, Sheldon
Thompson, Henry Root, Hiram Pratt, Lyman A.
Spalding, G. H. Goodrich, Joseph Clary, George
Palmer, Wm. Hollister, Thomos C. Love, Joseph
Dart, Horatio Shumway.

BuffaloLiterary and Scientific Academy, incoTpoTSL-
ted in 1827. Capital $25,000.

Officers.
Ebenezer Johnson, President.
D. Tillinghast, Secretary.
J. W. Clark, Treasurer.
Trustees. — Ebenezer Johnson, Charles Townsend,
Henry White, S. Wilkeson, David Burt, Sheldon
Thompson, Lewis F. Allen, Bela D. Coe, Hiram
Pratt, Thomas C. Love, Heman B. Potter, R. W.
Haskins, David M. Day, William Ketchum, John
W. Clark, Dyre Tillinghast.

Theodotus Burwell, Principal.

Buff alo Hydraulic Association,'incoTpovaied[nl827 .
Capital $25,000, which may be increased to 50,000.



The object of this association was to create mill
privileges within the city. This object was accom-
plished by taking the water out of the Buffalo Creek
about four miles from the city, and conveying it by
a canal to the eastern boundary about a mile from
the city, where there is suflBcient fall for the pur-
poses intended. This canal was begun in 1828,
and is now in successful operation.

There is now in full operation on this canal, the
following works: — 1 Woolen Factory; 1 Hat body
do; 1 Pail do; 1 Last do; 1 Grist Mill; 1 Brewery.
The village which has grown up in its vicinity con-
tains nearly 500 inhabitants.

Buffalo and Black Rock Jubilee Water Works
Company, incorporated in 1827. Capital $20,000.
The object of the company is to supply Buffalo and
Black Rock with water. It has already been gene-
rally introduced, into both places, nearly 16 miles of
aqueduct being already laid.

OFFICERS.

Peter B. Porter, President. Donald Fraser, S. C.
Brewster, Peter B. Porter, Directors. Absalom Bull,
Secretary & Treasurer. Donald Fraser, Superinten-
dent.

Buffalo Lyceum, incorporated 1832.

OFFICERS.

Oran FoUett, President. James Stryker, Millerd
Fillmore, Vice President. Alfred Handy, Recording
Secretary. Lucien W. Caryl, Corresponding Sec-
retary. Wm. Ketchum, Treasurer. John W. Clark,
Oliver G. Steele, William Hull, Curators.

This Institution was commenced in the winter of
1830 — 31 by a number of enterprising citizens, and
has gradually risen in value and importance. The



8

objects of the Institution are mutual improvement
in useful knowledge, the advancement of popular
education, and the promotion of science generally.
There is now belonging to the institution a library
of several hundred volumes, and a quantity of chem-
ical and philosophical apparatus. Weekly lectures
are delivered before the Lyceum during the winter
season, which are extremely well attended.

BuffaloLibrary Association, incorporated in 1816,
and now contains nearly 700 volumes.

Trustees. — H. B. Potter, John G. Camp, George
Stow, Joseph Dart, Jr., H. A. SaHsbury, Nathaniel
Vosburgh, James Miller.

J. Wilcox, Librarian.

Religious Societies. — There are, 1 Episcopal, 1
Presbyterian, 1 Free Congregational, 1 Baptist, 1
Bethel, 1 Methodist, 1 Universalist, 1 Unitarian, and
1 Roman Catholic.

Schools . — There are 1 6 district and private schools ,
exclusive of the Buffalo L. & S. Academy, embracing
1 Female Seminary, conducted on the most approved
plan, by competent teachers, in which the higher
branches of female education are taught.

Mails. — There are 60 mails per week, received at,
made up and despatched from, the Post OflSce in this
city, during the winter season, and during the sum-
mer, or season of navigation, there are 88 per week.
The first mail received here was in March, 1803, on
horseback. It was conveyed from the east once in
two weeks in this manner, until 1805. A weekly
route was thenestablished,andcontinued until 1809.
In 1810, the mode of conveyance was changed, and
a stage wagon was used. As the country advanced



9



in improvements, the route was changed to twice and
three times a week, and subsequently to a daily route .

The following is a list of mails arriving and depart-
ing from the Post Office in this city in each week :

Eastern Mail, two large and one small, daily.

Northern " one " " "

Western " " " " "

One large mail for the West by water to Portland
Harbor, daily.

Two small do. to Dunkirk and Portland Harbor,
daily.

One large do. for Michigan, by steamboat, daily.

There is also a mail leaving three times a week
to Batavia, via Cayuga Creek and Alexander; one
do three times a week, to Warsaw, via Aurora; one
do. three times a week, to Olean and the north of
Pennsylvania, via Springville ; and one twice a week
to Fredonia, via Lodi.

Newspapers. — There are the Buffalo Patriot, Buf-
falo Journal, Buffalo Republican, and Buffalo Bulle-
tin, all published weekly. The Patriot is the oldest
establishment, having been commenced in 1811, un-
der the name of the Buffalo Gazette. The Journal
was commenced in 1815, under the name of the
Niagara Journal.

Public Works. — The principal of these is the pier,
built to protect the entrance of the harbor from en-
croachments of sand, and upon which the United
States have bestowed the following appropriations:
May 20, 1826, $15,000; March 2, 1827, $6,500;
May 19, 1828, $34,206; April 23, 1830, $15,488;
Total $71,194. It is built with great strength, with
stone, and is }^ of a mile in length. A Light-House
is to be built on the outer extremity of the pier the



10



base of which will connect with and strengthen that
work. To this must be added the termination of the
Erie canal, and its dependencies.

The Erie Canal approaches the village across the
low lands which form the shore of the Niagara river
at its head, and terminates in the Little Buffalo
Creek, a few rods from the foot of the Terrace.
From the point of intersection with the Little Buf-
falo, to where that stream is lost in Big Buffalo Creek,
extensive excavations have been made, which render
the whole distance a continued basin, and the same
is true of a considerable distance above the point of
intersection; making in all one of the most exten-
sive and convenient resorts for boats to be found
upon the Canal. From this basin, boats pass when
necessary into the harbor, and assume their sta-
tions either by the side of lake vessels, or at the
wharves of store-houses, as convenience of dis-
charging and receiving cargoes may require.

Buffalo Harbor, with which the Canal thus com-
municates, is formed by Buffalo Creek, which is of
sufficient depth to receive the lake vessels for a dis-
tance of about one mile from its mouth, and is con-
sidered by mariners as affording the most secure
and convenient harbor to be found on the Ameri-
can shore of the lake. The present Light-House is
situated on the shore of the lake, upon a tongue of
landformedbytheshoreofthelakeandBuffaloCreek.

STATISTICS.

The number of vessels of various descriptions
employed in the commerce of Lake Erie and the
upper Lakes is about 100, and the amount of ton-
nage about 8000. The increase of lake commerce at
Buffalo may be seen by the following table, show-



11



ing the number of arrivals and departures from
1815 to the present year.





No


. of arrivals and




No


of arrivals and


Years.




departures.


Years.




departures.


1815




- 64


1824




-286


1816


-


80


1825


-


- 359


1817




- 100


1826




-418


1818


-


- 100


1827


-


- 972


1819




- 96


1828




1520


1820


-


- 120


1829


-


- 1800


1821




- 150


1830




2052


1822


-


- 200


1831


-


- 3486


1823




-236









Of the amount of property shipped from this
port, no certain information can be obtained; suf-
fice to say, all vessels employed in the navigation
of the Lake are constantly and actively employed.

Table of Canal Clearances from the Collector's
Office, Buffalo, from 1826 to 1831 inclusive.
Clearances. Clearances.

1826 - - 1100 1829 - - 1608

1827 - 1426 1830 - 2083

1828 - - 1880 1831 - 2425
Buffalo and Detroit Steam Boat Line. — The follow-
ing Steam Boats comprise the above line, one of
which leaves each port every day during the season
of navigation.



Wm. Penn Capt. Wight.
Enterprize " Miles.
Ohio " Tyler.



Superior Capt. Pease.
Henry Clay " Norton.
S.Thompson" Walker.
Niagara " Stanard.

The Steam Boat Wm. Peacock, Capt. Wilkins,
leaves Buffalo every evening for Portland Harbor,
connecting at that place with a line of stages to



u



Erie. Pa. and also with a line of stages to Mayville,
and from thenoe by the Chautauqua Steam Boat
to Jamestown.

Storf Houses. — There are ten Store Houses for
the transaction of Lake and Canal business.

The following is a list of Forwarding and Com-
mission Merchants, and of the Canal lines of which
they severally are agents:

Townsend. Coit & Co. ^ Troy & Erie Line.

S. Thompson i^ Co. >

Joy «!sc Webster. — Pilot Line.

I*ratt, Taylor & Co. — Washington Line.

Richard Sears.

James L. Barton. — Western Line.

Smith & Macy, — New-York & Ohio Line.

Barker & Holt. — Merchants Line.

Norton ic Carlisle. — Hudson & Erie Line.

Augustus Eaton. — Clinton Line.

Taremg. — There are a great number of Hotels
and Taverns in this city, which the great influx of
travellers renders necessary. The Eagle Tavern.
Buffalo House. Mansion House, and City Hotel are
the principal houses and are kept and furnished in
a style equal to any others of the kind in the State.



CHARTER

OF THE CITY OF BUFFALO.



The People of the State of New- York, repreaerded
in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows :

Section 1. The District of countrj' in the county
of Erie, within the following bounds, that is to say:
Beginning at a point in the west bounds of the
State, due west from the southwesterly termination
of York Street ; thence to the northwesterly line of
said York Street at its southwesterly termination;
thence along the northwesterly bounds of York St.,
to the northerly side of the Guide Board Road;
thence easterly along the northerly bounds of said
road to the westerly line of lot number 22, in the
eleventh township and eighth range: thence south-
erly along the west bounds of lot number 22, and
part of lot number 16, in said town ship and range
to the easterly termination of the north line of
Eagle Street; thence easterly along a line which
would be a continuation of the north line of Eagle
Street to the Buffalo Creek Reservation; thence
southwesterly along the line of said Reservation to
the south bank of big Buffalo Creek, thence down
the south bank of said creek to the northeasterly
comer of a piece of land called the Gore; thence
along the northwesterly bounds of said Gore to
Lake Erie; thence due west to the State hne;
thence northerly to the place of beginning: shall

2



14



hereafter be known by the name of the City of
Buffalo.

§ 2. The inhabitants of said City shall be a Cor-
poration by the name of the "City of Buffalo," and
may sue and be sued, complain and defend, in any
court; make and use a common seal, and alter it at
pleasure; and take, hold, purchase and convey,
such real and personal estate, as the purposes of
the corporation may require.

§ 3. The said city shall be divided into five
wards, as follows, to wit : all that part of the city
which lies south and east of the following lines,
to wit: Beginning at a point in the said Reserva-
tion, where a line drawn through the centre of Crow
Street would strike said Reservation ; thence along
said line to the centre of Crow Street; thence pro-
ceeding westwardly along the centre of said street
to Cazenovia Terrace : thence to the centre of Caze-
novia Terrace; thence westwardly and northerly
along the centre of said Terrace to the centre of
Erie Street; thence along the centre of Erie Street
to the centre of Erie Canal ; thence along the cen-
tre of the Canal to the west bounds of York Street;
thence down the west bounds of York Street to
Lake Erie; thence due west to the State line, shall
be denominated the first ward of said city ; all that
part of said city which lies east of the centre of
Main Street, and north of the centre of Crow Street,
and north of a line drawn through the centre of
Crow Street to the said Reservation, and south of
the centre of Eagle Street, and south of a line to
be drawn in continuation of the north line of Eagle
Street, to the Buffalo Creek Reservation, shall be
denominated the second ward of said city; all that



15



part of said city, lying westerly of the centre of
Main Street, and northeasterly of the bounds of the
first ward, and southeasterly of the northwesterly
bounds of said York Street, and southwesterly of
the centre of Niagara Street, shall be denominated
the third ward of said city; all the residue of said
city lying east of the centre of Main Street, and
north of the centre of Eagle Street, shall be denomi-
nated the fourth ward of said city; all the residue
of said city lying west of the centre of Main Street
and northeasterly of the centre of Niagara Street,
shall be denominated the fifth ward of said city.

§ 4. There shall be in and for said city, one
Mayor, ten Aldermen, one Clerk, one Treasurer,
one or more Collectors, five Assessors, and such
other officers as are hereinafter authorized to be ap-
pointed. Which Mayor, Aldermen and Assessors
shall be freeholders in said city.

§ 5. An election shall be held in each of the
wards of said city on the first Tuesday in March, in
each year, after the year eighteen hundred and
thirty two, at such place as the common council of
said city shall appoint, and of which six days pre-
vious public notice shall be given in writing, in
three public places in each ward, by the inspectors
thereof.

§ 6. At the first election under this act, and at
each annual election thereafter, there shall be
elected two Aldermen and one Assessor for each
ward, each of whom shall be an actual resident of
the ward in which he is elected.

§ 7. Thealdermenof each ward, or such persons
as the common council shall for that purpose ap-
point, shall be inspectors of such election after the



16



first; such inspectors shall have the same powers
and authority as the inspectors of a general state
election.

§ 8. The electors shall vote by ballot, and each
person offering to vote, shall deliver his ballot, so
folded as to conceal the contents, to one of the in-
spectors, in the presence of the board.

§ 9. The ballot shall be a paper ticket, which
shall contain, written or printed, or partly written
and partly printed, the names of the persons for
whom the elector intends to vote, and shall desig-
nate the office to which each person so named is
intended by him to be chosen; but no ballot shall
contain a greater number of names of persons as
designated to any office, than there are persons to
be chosen to fill such office.

§ 10. The polls of such election shall be opened
at nine o'clock in the forenoon, and continue open
until four o'clock in the afternoon of the same day,
and no longer. Poll lists shall be kept in the same
manner, as nearly as may be, as is provided by law
for keeping poll lists at the general state election.

§ 11. Every person voting at such election, shall
be an actual resident of the ward in which he so
votes, and shall, if required by any person qualified
to vote thereat, before he is permitted to vote, take
the following oath : "You do swear (or affirm) that
you are a citizen of the United States, of the age
of twenty-one years; that you have been an inha-
bitant of this state for one year next preceding this
election, and for the last six months a resident of
this county, that you are now a resident of this
ward, and tliat you have not voted at this election."
If the person be a colored man, he shall, (if re-



17

quired as aforesaid,) before he is permitted to vote,
take the following oath: "You do swear (or affirm)
that you are of the age of twenty-one years, that
for three years you have been a citizen of this
state; that you have been an inhabitant of this
state for one year next preceding this election, and
during that time have been and now are seized and
possessed of a freehold estate of the value of two
hundred and fifty dollars, over and above all debts
and incumbrances charged thereon, and have been
actually rated and paid a tax thereon; that you
have been for the last six months a resident of this
county; that you now are a resident of this ward,
and that you have not voted at this election."

§ 12. After the poll of any such election is
closed, the inspectors holding the same in each of
said wards, shall on the same or next day, canvass
the votes given at such election. The canvass
shall be public, and shall commence by a compari-
son of the poll lists, and a correction of any mis-
takes that may be found therein, until they shall
be found or made to agree. The ballots shall be
counted unopened, except so far as to ascertain that
each ballot is single, and if two or more ballots
shall be found so folded as to present the appear-
ance of a single ballot, they shall be destroyed.

§ 13. If the ballots shall be found to exceed in
number the whole number of votes on the poll lists,
they shall be replaced in the box, and one of the
inspectors shall publicly draw out and destroy so
many ballots unopened as shall be equal to such
excess. The ballots and poll lists being found or
made to agree, the inspectors holding such election
shall then proceed to canvass and estimate the
votes. 2*



18



§ 14. The canvass being completed, a statement
of the result shall be drawn up in writing by the
inspectors, which they shall certify to be correct,


1 3 4 5 6 7

Online LibraryDavid J. (David Josiah) BrewerA directory for the city of Buffalo : containing the names and residence of the heads of families and householders, in said city, on the first of July 1832 : to which is added a sketch of the history of the village from 1801 to 1832 → online text (page 1 of 7)