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David Livingstone.

Livingstone's travels and researches in South Africa : including a sketch of sixteen years' residence in the interior of Africa, and a journey from the Cape of Good Hope to Loanda on the west coast, thence across the continent, down the river Zambesi to the eastern ocean online

. (page 1 of 36)
Online LibraryDavid LivingstoneLivingstone's travels and researches in South Africa : including a sketch of sixteen years' residence in the interior of Africa, and a journey from the Cape of Good Hope to Loanda on the west coast, thence across the continent, down the river Zambesi to the eastern ocean → online text (page 1 of 36)
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Presented by
The Friends of the Library

Professor
Ro^bert l^. Moody



\



LIYIMSTOIE'S
IN SOUTH AFRICA;

INCLUDING

I SKETCH OF SIXTEEN TEARS' RESIDENCE IN THE INTERIOR OF AFRICA,

AND A JOURNEY IROil THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE TO LOANDA

ON THE WEST COAST, THENCE ACROSS THE CONTINENT,

DOWN THE RIVER ZAMBESI TO THE

EASTERN OCEAN.

OF

DAVID LIVmGSTOKE, LL.D., D.C.L.

tWUATT OP THB FACULTT OP PHYSICIANS AKD 8UEQE0N8, QULSQCV^; COEEESPONDIIfO "^WTB

0* THE GEOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETT OP NEW YORK; GOLD MEDALUSl

USD CORBESPOKDINQ MEMBER OP THE ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCISIIBa

OP LONDON AND PARI9, SIC. £IC

TO WHICH IS ADDED

A HISTORICAL SKETCH OF DISCOVERIES IN AFRICA :




G. G. EVANS,

489 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA.

1851).



June V(a, '^'f <o



Entered acoowcung (o Act of Congress, in the year 1859, by
J. W. BRADLEY,

in tne Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United Statea in and for the
Eastern District of Peuusylvauia.



BTEREOTYPED BY L. .T'lHNSON & CO.

PfIII,Al>I.L!>HlA.

PRIMTED BY KIXU & BAIK.D.



PREFACE



OF THE



AMERICAN PUBLISHER.



Dr. Livingstone is the most remarkable of all the
travellers who have visited Africa. His personal nar-
rative is the most important and interesting of all that
have jet been published. It will prove the most influ-
ential on future discovery. His great journey across
the continent was almost entirely over ground hitherto
untrodden by the foot of the white man. The infor-
mation which he gives is therefore fresh, and, in
many instances, refutes and explodes the theories of
previous travellers. In the matter of personal adven-
tures and hairbreadth escapes it is much richer than
the doctor could have desired.

Dr. Livingstone is a very pleasing writer, a man of
true Christian benevolence, a man of extensive scien-
tific information, and an indefatigable laborer m the
cause of discovery and civilization. His personal nar-
rative contains a vast amount of information on the
geology, meteorology, zoology, and history of the coun-
tries which he visited, which will be esteemed highly



Vi PREFACE.

valuable by scientific inquirers. The edition of his
book now ofifered to the public, by omitting a con-
siderable amount of scientific matter and mmor de-
tails, has been compressed into a compass which will
render it perhaps more acceptable to the general
reader than if the whole had been given, and at the
same time bring it within the reach of those who find
it necessary to consult economy in their purchases of
books.

The reader will observe that the narrative is all
given in the language of Dr. Livingstone, and that it
forms a complete account of his various journeys,
omitting only incidental details and scientific matter.*

* Since the above Preface was written and published, the publisher ha3
issued a work which forms an excellent companion to Dr. Livingstone's Travels
and Researches, as the Author has explored thoroughly, and described with
wonderfully graphic power, the whole of North Central Africa, while Dr. Liv-
ingstone was engaged in his useful labors in South Central Africa. The con-
trast between the nations and tribes which they respectively visited, in manners,
character and civilization, is of the most striking kind. The following is the
title of Dr. Earth's work : ♦' Travels and Discoveries in North and Central
Africa, from the Journal of an Expedition undertaken under the auspices of
H. B. M. Government in the years 1849-1855. By Henry Barth, Ph. D.,
D. C. L., Fellow of the Royal Geographical and Asiatic Societies, etc. j with
notes a«d extracts from Mr. Richardson's Account of the Expedition, and a
Sketch of Denham and Clapperton's Expedition by the American editor.''



CONTENTS.



INTRODUCTION.



pergonal Sketch— Highland Ancestors — Family Traditions- -Grandfather T^
moves to the Lowlands — Parents — Early Labors and EflForts — Evening
School — Love of Reading — Religious Impressions — Medical Education —
Youthful Travels — Geology — Mental Discipline — Study in Glasgow — London
Missionary Society — Native Village — Medical Diploma — Theological Studiea
— Departure for Africa No Claim to Literary Accomplishments Page tf



CHAPTER I.

The Bakwiin Country — Study of the Language — Mabdtsa Station — A Lion
Encounter — Virus of the Teeth of Lions — Sechele — Baptism of Seehele —
Opposition of the Natives — Purchase Land at Chonu^ne — Relations with
the People — Their Intelligence — Prolonged Drought — Consequent Trials —
The Hunting Hopo 18



CHAPTER 11.

The Boers— Their Treatment of the Natives — The Tale of the Cannon — The
B^ers threaten Sechele — In violation of Treaty, they expel Missionaries —
They attack the Bakwains — Their Mode of Fighting — The Natives killed
and the School-Children carried into Slavery — Destruction of English Pro-
perty — Continued Hostility of the Boers — The Journey North — Prepara-
tions — Fellow-Travellers 28



CHAPTER IIL

Departure from Kolobeng, 1st June, 1849 — Companions — Our Route — Serotli,
a Fountain in the Desert — The Hyena — The Chief Sekomi — Dangers — The
Wandering Guide — Cross Purposes — Slow Progress — Want of Water — The
Salt-Pan at Ncbokotsa — The Mirage — Reach the River Zouga — The Quakers
of Africa — Discovery of Lake Ngami, 1st August, 1849 — Its Extent — Small
Depth of Water — The Bamangwato and their Chief — Desire to visit Sebi-
tuane, the Chief of the Makololo — Refusal of Lechulatebe to furnish us with
Guides — The Banks of tho Zouga S4



'O^



CHAPTER IV.

Leave Kolobeng again for the Country of Sebituane — Reach the Zouga — The
Tsetse — A Party of Englishmen — Death of Mr. Rider — Obtain Guides —
Children fall sick with Fever — Relinquish the Attempt to reach Sebituane — •
Return to Kolobeng — Make a Third Start thence — Reach Nchokotsa — Ouf

rii



▼i^ CONTENTS.

Guide Shobo— The Banaj6a— An Ugly Chief— The Tsetse— Bite fatal H
Domestic Animals, but harmless to Wild Animals and Man — Operation of
the Poison — Losses caused by it — The Makololo — Our Meeting with Sebi-
tuane — His Sudden Illness and Death — Succeeded by his Daughter — Her
Friendliness to us — Discovery, in June, 1851, of the Zambesi flowing in the
Centre of the Continent — Determine to send Family to England — Return to
the Capo in April, 1852 — Safe Transit through the Cafire Country during
Hostilities — Need of a " Special Correspondent" — Kindness of the London
Missionary Society — Assistance afforded by the Astronomer-Royal at the
Cape Page 44

CHAPTER V. \

Start, in June, 1852, on the Last and Longest Journey from Cape Town —
Companions — Wagon-Travelling — Migration of Springbucks — The Orange
River — Territory of the Griquas and Bechuanas — The Griquas — The Chief
Waterboer — His Wise and Energetic Government — His Fidelity — Success
of the Missionaries among the Griquas and Bechuanas — Manifest Improve-
ment of the Native Character — Dress of the Natives — Articles of Commerce
in the Country of the Bechuanas — Their Unwilii^jtness to learn and Readi-
ness to criticize £*7



CHAPTER VL

Kuruman — Its fine Fountain — The Bible translated by Mr. Moffat — Capa-
bilities of the Language — Christianity among the Natives — Disgraceful
Attack of the Boers on the Bakwains — Letter from Sechele — Details of the
Attack — Destruction of House and Property at Kolobeng — The Boers vow
Vengeance against me — Consequent Difficulty of getting Servants to accom-
pany me on my Journey — Start in November, 1852 — Meet Sechele on hia
way to England to obtain Redress from the Queen — He is unable to proceed
beyond the Cape — Meet Mr. Macabe on his Return from Lake Ngami — Reach
Litubaruba — The Cave Lepelole — Superstitions regarding it — Impoverished
State of the Bakwains — Retaliation on the Boers — Slavery — Attachment of
the Bechuanas to Children.. 63



CHAPTER VIL

Departure from the Country of the Bakwains — Large Black Ant — Habits of
Old Lions — Cowardice of the Lion — Its Dread of a Snare — Major Vardon'a
Note — The Roar of the Lion resembles the Cry of the Ostrich — Seldom
attacks full-grown Animals — Buffaloes and Lions — Sekomi's Ideas of Ho-
nesty — Gordon Cumraing's Hunting Adventures — A Word of Advice for
Young Sportsmen — Bushwomen drawing Water 73



CHAPTER VIIL

Biffects of Missionary Efforts — Belief in the Deity — Departure from their
Country — Nchokotsa — The Bushmen — Their Superstitions — Elephant-Hunt-
ing — The Chief Kaisa — His Fear of Responsibility — Severe Labor in cutting
our Way — Party seized with Fever — Discovery of Grape-Bearing Vines —
Difficulty of passing through the Forest^ — Sickness of my Companion — The
Bushmen — Their Mode of destroying Lions — Poisons — A Pontooning Ex-
pedition — The Chobe — Arrive at the Village of Moremi — Surprise of the
Makololo ai our Sudden Appearance — Cross the Chobe on our way to
Lin;^anti • ^^



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER IX.



Reception at Linyanti — The Court Herald — Sekeletu obtains tbe Chioftaiuship
from his Sister — Sekeletu's Reason for not learning to read the Bible —
Public Religious Services in the Kotia — Unfavorable Associations of the
Place — Native Doctors — Proposals to teach the Makololo to read — Sekeletu's
Present — Reason for accepting it — Trading in Ivory — Accidental Fire —
Presents for Sekeletu I*age 96



CHAPTER X.

The Fever — Its Symptoms — Remedies of the Native Doctors — Hospitality of
Sekeletu and his People — They cultivate largely — The Makalaka or Subject
Tribes — Sebituane's Policy respecting them — Their Aflfection for him — Pro-
ducts of the Soil — Instrument of Culture — The Tribute — Distributed by the
Chief — A AV'^arlike Demonstration — Lechulatebe's Provocations — The Ma-
kololo determine to punish him 104



CHAPTER XI.

Departure from Linyanti for Sesheke — Level Country — Ant-Hills — Wild Date-
Trees — Appearance of our Attendants on the March — The Chief's Guard —
They attempt to ride on Oxback — Reception ut the Villages — Presents of
Beer and Milk — Eating vyith the Hand — The Chief provides the Oxen for
Slaughter — Social Mode of Eating — Cleanliness of Makololo Huts — Their
Construction and Appearance — The Beds — Cross the Leeambye — Aspect of
this part of the Country — Hunting — An Eland 109



. CHAPTER XIL

Procure Canoes and ascend the Leeambye — Beautiful Islands — Winter Land-
scape — Industry and Skill of the Banyeti — Rapids — Falls of Gonye — Naliele,
the Capital, built on an Artificial Mound — Santuru, a Great Hunter — The
Barotse — More Religious Feeling — Belief in a Future State and in the
Existence of Spiritual Beings — Hippopotamus-Hunters — No Healthy Loca-
tion — Determine to go to Loanda — Buffaloes, Elands, and Lions above
Libonta — Two Arabs from Zanzibar — Their Opinion of the Portuguese and
the English — Reach the Town of Ma-Sekeletu — Joy of the People at thfl
First Visit of their Chief — Return to Sesheke — Heathenism IW



CHAPTER XIIL

Preliminary Arrangements for the Journey — A Picho — Twenty-Seven Men
appointed to accompany me to the West — Eagerness of the Makololo for
Direct Trade with the Coast — EflFects of Fever — A Makololo Question — Re-
flections — The Outfit for the Journey — 11th November, 1853, leave Linyanti
and embark on the Chobe — Dangerous Hippopotami — Banks of Chobe —
Trees — The Course of the River — The Island Mparia at the Confluence of
the Chobe and the Leeambye — Anecdote — Ascend the Leeambye — Public
Addresses at Sesheke — Attention of the People — Results — Proceed up the
River — The Fruit which yields JS'iuc vomica — The Rapids — Hippopotami and
(heir Young 129



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER XIV.



L-creasing Beauty cf the Country — Mode of spending the Day — The PoopU
and the Falls of Gonye — A Makololo Foray — A second prevented, and Cap-
tives delivered up — Politeness and Liberality of the People — The Rains —
Present of Oxen — Death from a Lion's Bite at Libonta — Continued Kindnes*
— Arrangements for spending the Night during the Journey — Cooking and
Washing — Abundance of Animal Life — Alligators — Narrow Escape of one
of my Men — Superstitious Feelings respecting the Alligator — Large Game —
Shoals of Fish — Hippopotami Page 138



I
CHAPTER XV.

Message to Masiko, the Barotse Chief, regarding the Captives — Navigation of
the Leeambye — Capabilities of this District — The Leeba — Buffalo-Hunt —
Suspicion of the Balonda — Sekelenke's Present — Message from Manenko, a
Female Chief — Mambari Traders — A Dream — Sheakdndo and his People — ■
Interview with Nyamodna, another Fem.ale Chief — Court Etiquette — Hair
versus Wool — Increase of Superstition — Arrival of Manenko : her Appear-
ance and Husband — Mode of Salutation — Anklets — Embassy, with a Present
from Masiko — Roast Beef — Manioc — Magic Lantern — Manenko an Accom-
plished Scold: compels us to wait , 148



CHAPTER XVI.

Nyamoana's Present — Charms — Manenko's Pedestrian Powers — Rain — Hunger
— Dense Forests — Artificial Bee-Hives — Villagers lend the Roofs of their
Houses — Divination and Idols — Manenko's Whims — Shintdfs Messengers
and Present — The Proper Way to approach a Village — A Merman — Enter
Shinte's Town: its Appearance — Meet two Half-Caste Slave-Traders — The
Makololo scorn them — The Balonda Real Negroes — Grand Reception from
Shinte — His Kotla — Ceremony of Introduction — The Orators — Women —
Musicians and Musical Instruments — A Disagreeable Request — Private In-
terviews with Shinte — Give him an Ox — Manenko's New Hut — Conversa-
tion with Shinte — Kolimb6ta's Proposal — Balonda's Punctiliousness — Selling
Children — Kidnapping — Shinte's Offer of a Slave — Magic Lantern — Alarm
of Women — Dolay — Sambdnza returns intoxicated — The Last and Greatest
Proof of Shinte's Friendship 1{)2



CHAPTER XVIL

Leave Shinte — Manioc-Gardens — Presents of Food — Punctiliousness of th«
Balonda — Cazembe — Inquiries for English Cotton Goods — Intemese's Fiction
— Loss of Pontoon — Plains covered with AVater — A Night on an Island —
Loan of the Roofs of Huts — A Halt — Omnivorous Fish — Natives' Mode of
catching them — The Village of a Half-Brother of Katema : his Speech and
Present — Our Guide's Perversity — Mozenkwa's Pleasant Home and Family
• — A Messenger from Katema — Quondende's Village : his Kindness — Crop
of Wool — Meet People from tho Town of Matiamvo — Fireside Talk— Ma-
tiamvo's Character and Conduct — Presentation at Katema's Court : his Pre-
eent — Interview on the following Day — Cattle — A Feast and a Makololo
Dance — Sagacity of Ants. 180



CONTENTS-



CHAPTER XVIII.

The Watershed between the Northern and Southern Rivers — A Deep VU'.«y—
Rustic Bridge — Fountains on the Slopes of the Valleys — Village of i^abinjo
— Demand for Gunpowder and English Calico — The Kasai — Vexatious Trick
— Want of Food — No Game — Kateude's Unreasonable Demand — A Grave
Offence — Toll-Bridge Keeper — Greedy Guides — Flooded Valleys — Swim the
Kuana Loke — Prompt Kindness of my Men — Makololo Remarks on the rich
Uncultivated Valleys — Difference in the Color of Africans — Reach a Village
of the Chiboque — The Head Man's Impudent Message — Surrounds our En-
campment with his Warriors — The Pretence — Their Demand — Prospect of a
Fight — Way in which it was averted — Change our Path — The Ox Sinbad —
Insubordination suppressed — Beset by Enemies — A Robber Party — More
Troubles — Detained by longa Panza — His Village — Annoyed by Bangala
Traders — My Men discouraged — Their Determination and Precaution Pagel99



CHAPTER XIX.

Guides Prepaid — Bark Canoes — Deserted by Guides — Native Traderf — Valley
of the Quango — The Chief Sansawe — His Hostility — Pass him safely — The
River Quango — Chief's Mode of dressing his Hair — Opposition — Opportune
Aid by Cj'priano — His Generous Hospitality — Arrive at Cassange — A Good
Supper — Kindness of Captain Neves — Portuguese Curiosity and Questions —
Anniversary of the Resurrection — No Prejudice against Color — Country
around Cassange — Sell Sekeletu's Ivory — Makololo's Surprise at the High
Price obtained — Proposal to return Home, and Reasons — Soldier-Guide —
Tala Mungongo, Village of — Civility of Basongo — Fever — Enter District of
Ambaca — Good Fruits of Jesuit Teaching — The Tampan: its Bite — Uni-
versal Hospitality of the Portuguese — A Tale of the Mambari — Exhilarating
Effects of Highland Scenery — District of Golungo Alto — Fertility — Forests
of Gigantic Timber — Native Carpenters — Coffee-Estate — Sterility of Country
near the Coast — Fears of the Makololo — Welcome by Mr. Gabriel to
Loanda 224



CHAPTER XX.

Continued Sickness — Kindness of the Bishop of Angola and her Majesty's
Officers — Mr. Gabriel's Unwearied Hospitality — Serious Deportment of tho
Makololo — They visit Ships of War — Politeness of the Officers and Men — •
The Makololo attend Mass in the Cathedral — Their Remarks — Find Employ-
ment in colle<!ting Firewood and unloading Coal — Their Superior Judgment
respecting Goods — Beneficial Influence of the Bishop of Angola — The City
of St. Paul de Loanda — The Harbor — Custom-House — No English Merchants
— Sincerity of the Portuguese Government in suppressing the Slave-Trade —
Convict Soldiers — Presents from Bishop and Merchants for Sekeletu — Outfit
— Leave Loanda 20th September, 1854^ — Accompanied by Mr. Gabriel as far
as Icollo i Bengo — Women spinning Cotton — Cazengo : its Coffee-Planta-
tions — South American Trees — Ruins of Iron-Foundry- — Native Miners —
Coffee-Plantations — Return to Golungo Alto — Self-Complacency of the Ma-
kololo — 'Fever — Jaundice — Insanity 251



CHAPTER XXL

^isit a Deserted Convent — Favorable Report of Jesuits and their Teaching-
Marriages and Funerals — Litigation — Mr. Canto's Illness — Bad Behavior of
his Slaves — An Entertainment — Ideas on Free Labor — Loss of American

1*



ISS. " CONTENTS.

Cotton-Seed— Abundance of Cotton in the Country — Sickness of Sekeletn g
Horse — Eclipse of the Sun — Insects which distill Water — Experiments with
them — Proceed to Ambaca — Present from Mr. Schut, of Loanda — Visit Pungo
Andongo — Its Good Pasturage, Grain, Fruit, &c. — The Fort and Columnar
Rocks — Salubrity of Pungo Andongo — Price of a Slave — A Merchant-Prince
— His Hospitality — Hear of the Loss of my Papers in " Forerunner" — Nar-
row Escape from an Alligator — Ancient Burial-Places — Neglect of Agricul-
ture in Angola — Manioc the Staple Product — Its Cheapness — Sickness —
Friendly Visit from a Colored Priest — The Prince of Congo — No Priests in
the Interior of Angola Page 265

CHAPTER XXII.

Leave Pungo Andongo — Extent of Portuguese Power — Meet Traders and Car-
riers — Descend the Heights of Tala Mungongo — Cassange Village — Quinine
and Cathory — Sickness of Captain Neves's Infant — Loss of Life from the
• Ordeal — Wide-Spread Superstitions— The Chieftainship — Receive Copies of
the "Times" — Trading Pombeiros- Present for Matiamvo — Fever after
Westerly Winds — Capabilities of Angola for producing the Raw Materials
of English Manufacture — Trading-Parties with Ivory — More Fever — A
Hyena's Choice — Makololo Opinion of the Portuguese — Cypriano's Debtr -
A Funeral — Dread of Disembodied Spirits — Crossing the Quango — Amba-
kistas called "The Jews of Angola" — Fashions of the Bashinje — Approach
the Village of Sansawe — Ilis Idea of Dignity — The Pombeiros* Present —
Long Detention — A Blow on the Beard — Attacked in a Forest — Sudden
Conversion of a Fighting Chief to Peace-Principles by means of a Re-
volver — No Blood shed in consequence — Rate of Travelling — Feeders of the
Congo or Zaire — Obliged to refuse Presents — Cross the Loajioia — Appear-
ance of People: Hair-Fashions 280

CHAPTER XXIIL

Make a Detour southward — The Chihombo — Cabango — Send a Sketch of the
Country to Mr. Gabriel — The Chief Bango — Valley of the Loembwe — Fune-
ral Observances — Agreeable Intercourse with Kawawa — His Impudent De-
mand 298

CHAPTER XXIV.

Level Plains — Vultures — Twenty-Seventh Attack of Fever — Reach Katema's
Town — His Renewed Hospitality — Ford Southern Branch of Lake Dilolo — •
Hearty Welcome from Shinte — Nyamoana now a Widow — Purchase Canoea
and descend the Leeba — Despatch a Message to Manenko — Arrival of her
Husband Sambanza — Mambawe Hunters — Charged by a Buflfalo — Reception
from the People of Libonta — Explain the Causes of our Long Delay — Pit-
sane's Speech — Thanksgiving Services — Appearance of my " Braves" — Won-
derful Kindness of the People 303

CHAPTER XXV.

Colony of Birds called Linkololo — The Village of Chitlane — Murder of Mpo-
lolo's Daughter — Execution of the Murderer and his Wife — My Companions
find that their Wives have married other Husbands — Sunday — A Party from
Masiko — Freedom of Speech — Canoe struck by a Hippopotamus-^Appear-
ance of Trees at the End of Winter — Murky Atmosphere — Surprising Amount
of Organic Life — The Packages forwarded by Mr. Moffat — Makololo Suspi-
cions and Reply to the Matebele who brought them — Convey the Goods to
an Island and build a Hut over them — Ascertain that Sir R. Murchison had



CONTENTS. XW

recognised tho True Form of African Continent — Arrival at Linyanti — A
Grand Picho — Shrewd Inquiry — Sekeletu in his Uniform — A Trading-Party
sent to Loanda with Ivory — Mr. Gabriel's Kindness to them — Two Makoiolo
Forays during our Absence — The Makoiolo desire to be nearer the Market — •
Opinions upon a Change of Residence — Sekeletu's Hospitality — Sekeletu
wishes to purchase a Sugar-Mill, &c. — The Donkeys — Influence among the
Natives — *<Food fit for a Chief" — Parting Words of Mamire — Motibe's
Excuses Page 311



CHAPTER XXVI.

Peparture from Linyanti — A Thunder-Storm — An Act of Genuine Kindness —
Fitted out a Second Time by the Makoiolo — Sail down the Leeambye — Vic-
toria Falls — Native Names — Columns of Vapor — Gigantic Crack — Wear of
the Rocks — Second Visit to the Falls — Part with Sekeletu — Night-Tra-
velling — Moyara's Village — Savage Customs of the Batoka — A Chain of
Trading-Stations— "The Well of Joy"— First Traces of Trade with Euro-
peans — Knocking out the Front Teeth — Facetious Explanation — Degrada-
tion of the Batoka — Description of the Travelling-Party — Cross the Unguesi
—Ruins of a Large Town 326



'■o'-



CHAPTER XXVIL

Low Hills — A Wounded Buffalo assisted — Buffalo-Bird — Rhinoceros-Bird — ■
The Honey-Guide — The White Mountain — Sebituane's Old Home — Hostile
Village — Prophetic Frenzy — Friendly Batoka — Clothing despised — Method
of Salutation — The Captive released — The Village of Monze — Aspect of the
Country — Visit from tiie Chief Monze and his Wife — Central Healthy Loca-
tions — Friendly Feelings of the People in reference to a White Resident — ■
Kindness and Remarks of Monze's Sister — Generosity of the Inhabitants — ■
Their Anxiety for Medicine — Hooping-Cough 339



CHAPTER XXVIII.

Beautiful Valley — Buffalo — My Young Men kill two Elephants — The Hunt —
Semalembue — His Presents — Joy in prospect of living in Peace — Trade — His
People's Way of wearing their Hair — Their Mode of Salutation — Old En-
campment — Sebituane's former Residence — Ford of Kafue — Prodigious
Quantities of Large Game — Their Tameness — Rains — Less Sickness than in



Online LibraryDavid LivingstoneLivingstone's travels and researches in South Africa : including a sketch of sixteen years' residence in the interior of Africa, and a journey from the Cape of Good Hope to Loanda on the west coast, thence across the continent, down the river Zambesi to the eastern ocean → online text (page 1 of 36)