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The quarrel between the Earl of Manchester and Oliver Cromwell: an episode of the English Civil War online

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No. 38. — To the Earle of Manchester.

My Lord,

Sending this bearer, Mr. Cullemburg, Cheife Engineere, to Mr. Cullen-
view the towne of Reading and to give his judgment concerning l ™ r ^? to view

CAMD. SOC. F



34 CROMWELL AND THE EARL OF MANCHESTER.

the fortificacion thereof, wee doe recommend him to your favour,
desiring your LoP to speake in his behalfe with the Committee
there, that when hee shall give his opinion therein meanes may bee
providing for the perfecting thereof, and himselfe favoured for his
safe journey from thence to Abbington.
Derby House, 30° Septemb', 1644.



No. 39.— To the Earle of Manchester.

My Lord,

Your Loi 15 lettre of the 30th of September from Reading wee
have received, and touching the orders of this Committee for
recalling of Colonell Fleetwood's regiment of horse, they were
conditionall upon information from Lieutenant-Generall Cromwell
that Sir Thomas Glemham with 21 colours of horse was marched
from Newarke by Ashby to joyne with other forces, which if it
should have proved true Colonell Fleetwood was to returne, and
not otherwise. Wee have upon receipt of your LoP s lettre written
to Colonell Fleetwood, if that former information doe not prove
true and the enemie bee still in Lincolneshire, to proceed in his
journey to Lincolneshire, and there to use his best endeavours
against the enemie and for the secureing of those parts. Wee have
likewise thought fitt to renew our former desires to your LoPP to
Send your send your horse and foot according to our former orders. Your
horse and foote L p ^ receive here inclosed a copie of the Ordnance past both

according to F . . . c

our former Houses, according to the intent whereof wee are considering ot
orders. persons and instrucions wherewith your LoPP shall bee acquainted

speedily.

Derby House, 1° Octobris, 1644.

By his LoP s owne messenger.



MANCHESTER S CORRESPONDENCE. 35



No. 40. — To the Earle of Manchester.

My Lord,

Having taken into consideration how prejudiciall delayes have
alwaies proved to the publique service, and how necessary it is that
your Lo? should advance speedily westward, wee have thought fitt
againe to renew our desires to your LoP to send your horse and foot Send your
according to our former orders, which wee hope you will doe with ^ordirT 1 t f ° ot
that expedition that wee shall not need to iterate ytt againe to your former orders.
LoPP. Wee have sent your LoP here inclosed a copie of my Lord
Generall's lettre with our answer to the same, and of the information
wee have received from Sir William Waller.
Derby House, 2° Octobris, 1644.

By Mr. Binding.



No. 41. — For the Comittee of both Kingdomes, &c.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

Since my last letter to your Lo ps I have received a lettre from
Sir William Waller, by the which he certifies me that the Kino- is
marching eastward. I had it likewise from my owne scoutes that
he quartered upon Wednesday night five miles on this side Dor-
chester, and that he marches very fast. It is thought by the most
and it is reported at Oxford that he will come by Newberry and
Abbington, and soe to Oxford. Others think he will bend his
course to Winchester, but it is most probable that he will come this
way ; and therefore I thinke it may be very necessary to hasten the
marching of the Citty foote up hether. I shall be ready to doe
the best service I can with those forces I have, and therefore I have
sent Lieut.-Generall Cromwell to make what hast he can unto me
with those horse and dragoones that are with him. This gentleman,



36 CROMWELL AND THE EARL OF MANCHESTER.

Colonell Sparrow, coming this day to me and acquainting me with
the condition of Abbington, I thought it my duty to desire him to
wayte upon your Loi ,s and to make a true relacion to you of it,
considering I had intelligence of the Kinges march this way.
Your Lo ps may be pleased to thinke of sending downe match and
powder for your forces in these partes, for I have lessened my store
I brought with me by furnishing of them, and I shall not have
enough to serve them and my selfe, I shall dilligently inquire after
the King's motions and give your Lo ps an accompt of them.
My Lords and Gentlemen, I am

Your LoP s most humble servant,
Manchester.

Reading, 3° Octobr. 1644.

I desire to know your Lo ps pleasure whether you will have my
horse goe to Malborough.



No. 42. — For the Comittee of both Kingdomes, &c.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

I have received your Loi' s lettres, by which I perceive your Loi )S
remaine unsatisfied with mee for my not marching further west-
ward. In a lettre lately to your Loi )S I did humbly represent my
condicion to you. I have since that time received other lettres
from the county of Norfolke by which they represent unto me their
feares with their desires that their forces may not be carryed soe
farre from them as they heard they were intended ; and they did
request me to improve my interest in effecting their desires, other-
wise they feared they should be disabled as to further recruites or
payments of mony. I should faile in my duty both to them and
your Loi 5S if I should not declare this unto you. As to my marching
further westward, which I conceive is to Newberry, because I had
intimacion in a letter that that place was appointed for a rendezvous
for my Lord Generalles foote and mine. I have ordered two



MANCHESTER'S CORRESPONDENCE. 6 (

regiments of foote to lye in Newberry, which is more then the towne
can well hold with those forces that are there already of Major-Generall
Browne's. The rest of my foot are quartered in this towne and the
villages hereabouts, and they shall be within a dayes march of the
rendezvous. I confesse I have ordered it in this manner because it
gives some satisfaction to the countyes who intrust mee and it
refreshes the foote, for whom I have not as yet mony nor clothes,
which I expect within few dayes. As for those horse your Loi )S
appoint me to send to Malborough, they are thus disposed at this
present: Fower troopes I have sent to Baseing at the earnest request
of the Comittee of that county; nine troopes lye quartered as near
Newberry as they well can, that they may be assistant either to
Newberry or Abbington if there be occasion. The rest of those
that are with mee lye quartered about this towne. There are
twenty troopes of horse and dragoones with Lieut.- Generall
Cromwell about Banbury according to your Loi ,s comand. Since I
came into these partes I have in what way I could beene serviceable
to those guarrisones. I received this day a lettre from Major-
Generall Browne, which, according to his desire, I thinke fitt to
send unto your Loi )S . My Lords and Gentlemen, I hope the
publique shall not suffer by my delayes, for I hope it shall appear
that I shall not be the last at the rendezvous your LoP s have
appointed. I intend (God willing) to goe myselfe to morrow to
Newberry, but shall be here againe by Saturday.
My Lords and Gentlemen, I am

Your Lo ps most humble servant,

[Manchester.]

Reading, 3° Octobris, 1644.



No. 43. — To the Earle of Manchester.

My Lord.

Wee are advertised from Major-Generall Browne that hee, by a
lettre from the Comittee of Essex, understands that Colonell



38



CROMWELL AND THE EARL OF MANCHESTER.



Colonell Spar-
rowes regiment
to make upp
recreuts.

Comittee of
Essex written
too to let it bee
where it is.



Keepe intelli-
gence with Sir
W. Waller
and my Lord
Generall.
Joyne your
horse with
theirs.

Citty brigade
to march on
Monday,
appoint two
troopes to meet
them art Cole-
brooke.

Citty forces to
joyne with
your Lpp.
Colonell
Washborne's
troope to
attend that



brigade.



Sparrowes regiment is to recreut your L p and to bee putt under
new officers. In regard of the consequence of the keeping the
towne of Abbington, where that regiment is employed, wee have
written to the Committee of Essex that they will take some other
course for your Lo ps recreuts, and that the same regiment may not for
the present bee broken, but left as it is for the service of Abbington,
from which it cannot bee as yet spared. Wee desire also that you
will keepe a constant intelligence with Sir W. Waller and my
Lord Generall ; and, their horse being now joyned, you will soe
order the march of your horse as you may also joyne with them in
one body att such place as shall bee most fitt, and to give us speedy
notice of what you doe herein. The brigade of the cittie is appointed
to march on Monday next; wee desire your Lo p to appoint two
troopes of your horse to bee ready to meet them when they shall bee
at Colebrooke. They are, by the order of the House, to bee joyned
to your Lo p or Sir W. Waller, and wee have appointed them to
joyne with your Lo p . Wee have also appointed a troope of horse
of Colonell Washborne's to attend that brigade, and desire your Lo p
to appoint the troope of Captayne Middleton to bee another to
attend them, unlesse your Lo p knowes some cause to the contrary,
and then wee desire you to appoint some other troope as your
Lo p please for that service.
Derby House, 4° Octobris, 1644.



Xo. 44. — For the Comittee oe both Kingdomes, &c.



My Lords and Gentlemen,

I have received your Lo ps lettre of the 4th of October. As
concerning that regiment under Colonell Sparrow the Comittee
for Essex doe much desire that I would take it for part of recreutes
for my regiment. But 1 shall not take upon mee the disposeing of
it without your Lo ps approbation, and shall expect some other
course to be taken for my recreutes. I doe observe your Lo ps




MANCHESTER S CORRESPONDENCE. 39



coinands in keeping constant correspondence with my Lord
Generall and Sir William Waller. Most of my horse are quartered
in Hungerford and thereaboutes. And I have written to Sir
William Waller to let him know that upon any occasion, if he will
appoint whether they shall come to him, they shall be ready to
serve him. I have appointed two troopes to be ready to wayte
upon the citty brigade when they shall be at Colebrooke. As for
Captaine Middleton's troope I left it at Huntington to be recreuted,
and he is now there. And I beleive those parts at this tyme are in
soe great feares as if I shall call him from thence it may prove
inconvenient, but if your Lo ps please to comand mee I shall doe it,
being always ready to observe your Lo ps comands as

Your LoP s most humble servant,

Manchester.

Reading, 5° Octob. 1644.



No. 45. — To the Earle of Manchester.

My Lord,

Upon consideracion of the information wee have received from
Sir William Waller, whereof this enclosed is an extract, wee have
thought fitt to desire your Lo ps without any further delay to send s en d all your
all your horse to joyne with my Lord Generall and Sir William h °|'*° *° }?J ne
Waller's, leaving onely 500 about Banbury and 500 to guard your Generalls's
foot, concerning which wee have likewise written to Lieut.- Generall ^j^ *^ Y
Crormvell, whereof wee desire your Lo pp to have extraordinary care
that it may bee put speedily in execution, and to give us from tyme
to tyme notice of your proceedings. Upon advertisement of the
surprizall of Crowland wee have written to the Comittee of
Cambridge to send 300 foot to Horsey bridge to keepe that passe, Cambridge to
or to such place as Lieut.-Governor Treton or Colonel Walton shall send 300 foote -
appoint And if any recreuts intended for your Lo p may bee in Recreuts, if
readinesse to send them to the Isle of Ely, and to call in the j^JseTfto'the
countrey thither and to the towne of Cambridge. Wee have Isle of Ely.



40 CEOMWELL AND THE EARL OF MANCHESTER.

SfSfrt™ likewise written to the Yorkshire, Nottingham, and Darbyshire
shire forces, which are joyned in Lincolnshire with your LoP 5 forces, to

j^ynl^aiT t0 attend tlie enemi es forces in those parts. Upon receipt of your LoP s
attend the lettre of the [5th] of this instant, wherein your Lo p doth informe
us that Captaine Middleton's troope is att Huntingdon, wee desire

MddleSs ain y0ur L ° PP t0 leave that troo P e t0 bee dis P osed of by the Comittee
troope att of Cambridge for opposeing the enemie that is now fallen into their
Huntington. assoc i at i on< These two troopes which your LoP hath appointed to
attend the Citty brigade wee desire that they may bee sent to Cole-
brooke against the morrow att night to convey the [train of
artillery] to Reading, to bee sent to my Lord Generally army,
which wee desire your Lo p to keepe safely till your Lo p shall under-
stand from my Lord Generall to what place to send the same.
Derby House, 7° Octobris, 1644.



No. 46. — To the Earle of Manchester.

My Lords,
Send jour According to our former orders we desire your Lo p , if your horse

SiTw! Waller bee not already marched, to send them speedily upp to Sir AVilliam
speedily. Waller. Your Lo p will receive here inclosed the Order of the

HouTe torn areh House of Commons for y our L o ps marching forthwith westward
west with all w ith your forces, which we desire you accordingly to pursue with
Two troopes a11 ex P edition 5 for tne more sa fe conveighing of my Lord Generally
att Colebrooke trayne of artillery and other carriages we have appointed those two
Brainford to troopes sent by your LoP to Colebrooke to come to Brainford, from
convey Lord whence they are to convey the same to your LoP. And wee desire
traine. your LoP to send other two troopes to Colebrooke on Thursday

Send two night to attend the Cittie Brigade.

other troopes

to Colebrooke Derby House, 8° Octobris, 1644.

for the cittie

brigade. By Hanbury, sen.



Manchester's correspondence. 41



No. 47. — For the Committee of both King-domes, &c.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

I have received your LoP s letter, together with an order of the
House of Commons, by which I am directed to march westward.
I have often received orders from the House of Commons for my
marching westward, but they never designed any place to which 1
should march. I have received comands from your Lo ps formerly
to march with my foote to Newberry, which was the place your
LoP s did designe for a rendezvous of my Lord Generall's foote, the
Citty forces, and these forces of the associated countyes. According
your LoP s comands my foote have beene, and are still ready at any
time within a few howers to be at the rendezvous. If it be your
Lo ps intention that I should march further then the place you first
appointed, if you please to assigne the place whither you will have
me to march I shall obey your comands. I have according to your
LoP s comands ordei*ed two more troopes to march to morrow night
to Colebrooke. I did yesterday send orders to those horse that lay
at Hungerford to march to Salisbury, and that they should give
notice to Sir W. Waller of their readiness to obey his comands.
My Lords and Gentlemen, I am,

Your LoP s humble Servant,

Manchester.

Reading, 9° Octob. 1644.

Since I writt this letter I received intelligence from Sir W.
Waller that the King is advancing with his army, and that he
intends to retreat according to your LoP s orders to Marlborough.
I only offer this as my humble opinion to you that the sooner your
foote come up altogether it will be the more advangeous to your
affaires.



camd. sue.



42



CROMWELL AND THE EARL OF MANCHESTER.



King march-
ing eastward.

Agree upon a
convenient
place where
your foot may
meet together
to keepe the
Kiug west.



Xo. 48. — To The Earle of Manchester.
My Lord,

Wee understand by the postscript of your Lo ps letter of the 9th
of this instant, that the King's army is marching eastward, upon
consideration whereof wee have thought fitt to desire your Lo pp
by correspondence with my Lord Generall to agree betweene
yourselves upon a convenient place where ycur foote may meet
together soe as they may best keepe the King's army westward.
Wee shall use our best endeavours to hasten the citty forces to
follow you speedily. Your Lo? will receive here inclosed the vote
this day past the House of Commons.

Derby House, 10° Octobris, 1644.

Bv Craven.



King
advanceth east

Order Lieut. -
Generall Crom-
well's horse
left about
Banbury to
march to him.



Agree with
Lieut.-
Generall for a

place to joyne
your forces.



No. 49. — To the Earle of Manchester.
My Lord,

Having received certaine of the King's advance with all his
forces, wee thinke it fitt to send what forces wee can to oppose
his march. And therefore desire you immediately to give order to
the horse of the regiment of Lieutenant Generall Cromwell that
are left behind att or about Banbury, or any of your Lo ps horse
that are there, that they forthwith with all expedition march up to
the rest of your horse to goe along with the rest of the horse in
this service according to former directions. Wee desire your Lo?
according to our former orders by correspondence with my Lord
Generall to agree upon a convenient place where your forces may
meet together, soe as they may best keepe the King's forces west-
ward, and will bee most for the advantage of the publique service,
and soe to looke to the enemies motions as you may not bee hindered
to joyne with my Lord Generall for that end.

Derby House, 11° Octobris, 1G44.

By Mr. Potter.



MANCHESTER'S CORRESPONDENCE. 43



No. 50. — For the Comittee of both Kingdomes, &c.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

I have received your Lo ps letter of the 10th of this instant, and
shall accordingly send unto my Lord Generall to know where he
will coraand me to wayte upon him with those foote I have here.
I have likewise received a vote of the House of Commons which
orders me to observe such orders as I shall from tyme to tyme
receive from your Lo ps , which I am ready to obey. 1 sent my
horse, according to your Lo ps comands, towards Salisbury, but upon
the receipt of a letter from Sir W. Waller, by which he gave mee
notice he was marched from Shaftesbury towards Maryborough, I
called backe my horse to their former quarters, which were neare
unto Marlborough. This day I heard from Sir W. Waller, and
he desires me to send my horse to Woodford, which accordingly I
shall doe. I heare the King with his army is about Blandford.
My Lords and Gentlemen, I am,

Your Lo ps most humble servant,

Manchester.

Reading, 11° Octob. 1644.

I heare that my Lord Generall's traine of artillery will be heare
this night. I shall immediatly give nay Lord Generall notice of it.



No. 51. — For the Committee of both Kingdomes, &c,

My Lords and Gentlemen,

I have received your letter of the 11th of this instant. I can give
you this account, that I have kept intelligence with Lieut.- Generall
Cromwell, and as I have heard of the King's advance I have sent
him advertisemt thereof and wished him to advance hither. And
when I have heard of the King's retreating backe or lyeing still I
wished him to remainc in his quarters, because I had no positive



44 CROMWELL AND THE EARL OF MANCHESTER.

orders to remove his horse from thence. Yet, having intelligence
on Thursday last that the King was advanced as farre as Blandford,
I sent an order to him to march away with all his horse with what
convenient speed he could. And, though I have not heard from
him since, yet I believe he is upon his march. I have now this
day upon the receipt of your Lo ps letter sent him a copie of it, and
have renewed my orders to him for his present marching up to the
rest of the horse. I have sent unto my Lord Generall to know
what place he will appoint me to attend his comands with the
forces I have here, and I cannot tell which way to march untill I
doe receive notice from my Lord Generall which way he will direct
mee to wayte on him. Those souldiers that are here with mee doe
thinke that I am in as fitt a posture to joyne with my Lord Generall
as I can be. I take all the care I can to have certaine informacion
of the King's motions. I thinke fitt to give your Lo ps notice that
my Lord Generall's traine of artillery, money, and carriages came
hither the last night.

My Lords and Gentlemen, I am,

Your humble servant,

Manchester.

Reading, 12° Octob. 164L

Post. — If your Lo p3 thinks fitt that I should march to Basing or
that way to meet my Lord Generall I shall observe your Lo ps
comands. I shall desire to know what your LoP s will have me doe
with the money and traine of artillery.



No. 52. — For the Committee of both Kingdomes, &c.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

Since I writt my last letter to your Lo ps I received a letter from
my Lord Generall by which he is pleased to let me know that he
will not be ready to begin his march till "Wednesday. Hee hath
likewise sent mee the places of his march from day to day. I intend
(God willing) to be about Basiugstoake upon Wednesday and soe



MANCHESTER'S CORRESPONDENCE. 45

to have our foote to lye betwixt Newberry and Basingstoake, and
there to meet with my Lord Generall. Lieut. -Generall Cromwell
is come hither this night. His troopes are yet at Henly, but I
have given order they shall march forwards to-morrow, according to
your Lo ps direction. I heard this day from Sir W. Waller, who
remaines still in the same quarters he was in, and the King
remaines still at Blandford, and these quarters he formerly was in.
I hear likewise that P. Kupert is bringing the remainder of his
forces from Bristoll to the King.

My Lords and Gentlemen, I am,

Your humble servant,
Reading, 14° Octobr. 1644. MANCHESTER.



No. 53. — To the Earle of Manchester.
My Lord,

Your Lo ps of the 12th instant wee have received, whereby we

perceive you have written to my Lord Generall for a place of

rendezvous. Wee desire you, according to our former orders, that

you will in the meane tyme be marching westward the more to

hinder the King's advance this way and the sooner to meete the westwar( j to

Lord Generall, and for the particular place wee leave that to your hinder the
x t • i t i n n King's ad-

Lo p upon your corresponding with my Lord Generall. vance.

Derby House, 14° Octobris, 1644.

By Mr. Newman.



No. 54. — For the Right Honourable the Comittee of
both Kingdomes, &c.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

I received your Lo ps letter yesterday in the afternoone of the 12th
of this instant and shall humbly offer your Lo ps this account that
upon the receipt of your Lo ps first letter I sent to his Excellency to
know where he would appoint me to wayte on him with these
forces under my comand. But I have not received any answere



46 CROMWELL AND THE EARL OF MANCHESTER.

from my Lord as yet. Upon the comeing hither of my Lord
Generall's traine of artillery and mony, I sent againe unto him to
let him know of their being here, neither have I received an answere
of these letters as yet ; therefore, feareing my former messengers
might be intercepted, Mr. Gerrard, who brought the mony, and the
Comptroller of the Artillery are gone to Portsmouth to my Lord,
and I have againe written to my Lord to certifie him that where-
soever he please to appoint his rendezvous I shall not faile (God
willing) to wayte upon him. As for the forces under my command
the most of the horse that were with mee are with Sir W. Waller,
according to your LoP s comands. The most of the foote are
advanced forward excepting three regimentes that are here for the
guard of my Lord Generall's artillery, my owne, and the carriages.
Nor can I tell which way to order my march untill I know where
my Lord Generall please to appoint me to joyne with him. If the
King march this way before wee be conjoyned or before the citty
forces come up, I shall desire to know your LoP s directions whether
you will have me engage with those foote and horse I have, joyning
my selfe with Sir W. Waller's horse, if I can, If you please to
give me a possitive command in this particular I shall punctually
observe it, for I hope it shall never be justly sayd that I either
decline action or retard it. I shall be glad to serve any of your
Lo ps number when they doe come downe.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

Your humble servant,
Reading, 14° Octpb. 1644. MANCHESTER.

My Lords and Gentlemen, I am desired to offer this unto your
Lo ps that in regard of our great want of money, whether your
LoP s would be pleased that wee might make use of two thousand
pound of this money of my Lord Generall's, and it shall be payd
here againe within one weeke. Or if your Lo ps please to furnish
us with soe much from London it shall be repayd againe there by
Mr. Leman, the treasurer of the association, within a weeke.



Manchester's correspondence. 47


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Online LibraryDavid MassonThe quarrel between the Earl of Manchester and Oliver Cromwell: an episode of the English Civil War → online text (page 12 of 17)