David Prain William Jackson Hooker.

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bracteis calycibusque corolla parum brevioribus, staminibus exsertis.

a. bracteis supeme flavis.

TiLLAMDSiA psittacina. Hook. Bot. Mag. L 2841.

p. bracteis omnino oocdneis. (Tab. Nostb. 6108.)

Vbiesia psittacina. Undl. Bot. Beg. v. 29. i. 10.



Native of Brazil, and a very great ornament to our stoves, by
bearing its handsome scarlet and yellow spikes of flowers in the
winter months. Our figure, given in the * Botanical Magazine,'
of this plant thirty years ago, does not do justice to its beauty.
That here given is, like that of Dr. Lindley in the ' Botanical
Register,' a variety, in which the bracteas are of the same rich
scarlet all over as the rachis ; and I am glad to have the oppor-
tunity of giving a more perfect representation, and referring it
to the genus Vriesia of Dr. Lindley, so named in commemora-
tion of the merits of Dr. W. de Vriese, Professor of Botany at
Leyden, an excellent botanist and physiologist, now on a govern-
ment botanical mission to Java.

Desce. Leaves all radical, eight and ten inches to nearly a foot
long, oblongo-lingulate, waved, acuminate, entire, dark-green,
much inflated or ventricose at the base, of a coriaceo-membra-
naceous texture. Scape one foot to one and a half foot high,

apeil IsT, 1859.

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erect, arising fipom the centre of the plant, bearing from ten to
twenty distichous flowers, opening from below upwards in suc-
cession, of which only two or three are expanded at one time.
BacAis&exnose; powers scarlet, distant. Bradeas large, sheath-
ing the flower and a little shorter than it, rich scarlet even to the
apex. Sepals and corolla bright-yellow, the former the length of
the bract, oblong, obtuse. Petals linear, acute, recurved, and
with a tinge of blue at the tips ; at the base having two spathu-
late scales. Stamens and style exserted. Ovary almost entirely
free. Stigma in three, cuneate, glandular lobes.



Fig. 1. Petal and stamen. 2. Pistil: — magnified.



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Tab. 5109.
NEPENTHES ampullaria.

AnypuUaceous Nepenthes^ or Pitcher-plant



Nat. Ord. NEPEMTHACEiE. — ^DlCEOIA MONABELPHIA.

Oen. Char, (Fide iupra. Tab. 4285.)



Nepenthes ampullaria ; caule basi repente saperne ascendente scandente, asci-
diis radicalibus late ovato-ventricosis reliquis ovali-cylindraceis antice alls
duabus membranaceis longe pectinato-ciliatis, ore subcontracto, margine
angusto inflexo striato, operculo parvo lanceolato demum reflexo, racemis
pubescentibua.

Nepenthes ampullaria. JT. Jacky in Hook. Comp. to BoL Mag, v. I. p. 271.
Lamberi, Finua, o. 2. Jpp. t. 8. KorthaU, BoL p. 39. t 13.



As compared with the noble pitchers of Nepenthes Bccfflesiana,
Jack (see our Tab. 4285 of this work), and our still more striking
Nepenthes villosay^ given at Tab. 5080, N. ampullaria claims few
attractions ; and it has unfortunately happened that our artist took
his drawing too late in the sepson for the more perfect pitchers,
which are collected in numbers about the base of the plant at
an earUer season, on small and abortive leaves, and then disap-
pear. These are sometimes almost globose, singularly inflated
or ampuUaceous, whilst the pitchers springing from the end of a
fully-formed cauline leaf, where they are always less perfect, are
narrower and oval-oblong; and no others were present on the
plant at the flowering-season (August). The species is a native
of the forests of Singapore ; also at Rhio, on the island of Bin-
tang, Malay Archipelago. We owe our plants to the liberality
of Lady Dorothy NevUl, Pangstein, and of Messrs. Veitch and
Sons, of the Nurseries, Exeter and Chelsea.

Desce. The lower part of the plant is more or less creeping,

* And even these are very inferior to some magnificent pitchers from two
new species lately sent to us by Hugh Low, Esq., which he collected on Kina
Balloo, in Borneo ; one of them more than 14 inches long, and of a form as re-
markable as the size.

APRIL 1st, 1859.

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and that, together with the lower portion of the erect and scan-
dent stem, bears whorls of abortive or very imperfect leaves, ter-
minated by an inflated, broad, ampullaceous pitcher, three inches
long, green, membranaceous, sometimes faintly tinged with red,
obliquely striated, slightly contracted above ; the mouth at first
small, and closed with an oblong or lanceolate lid, which soon
opens, and becomes erect, at length reflexed ; bearing just above
the base a soft bristle. Leaves on the stem remote, broad-
lanceolate, sessile, costate, with a few lateral, longitudinal veins,
and several transverse ones ; these leaves are terminated by a
filament (or prolongation of the costa), either clubbed at the apex
or bearing a pitcher, narrower and more cylindrical than those
just described. Female plant : panicle or raceme downy, bear-
ing flowers similar in structure to those of other species already
described.



Our figure represents terminal leaves and a panicle of male flowers, and a leaf
with a pitcher : — not, me. Fig. 1. Male flower : — magnified.



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Tab. 5110.
HOWARDIA Caracasensis.

Caracas Howardia.



Nat. Ord. Eubiacsjb. — ^Psktandbia Momootnia.

Gen. Char. Calyx tabo turbinato cum ovario connaio, limbo sapero breviter
5-dentato,' dente uno in folium ooloratum cordato-rotundatum petiolatumque
expauso. Corolla supera, tubuloea, pubescens, limbo brevi 5-lobo, lobis eestiva-
tione yalTatis, tubo interne crassiusculo (in flore sicoo chartaoeo) iniusque glabro
et nitido superne molliter membranaoeo, pagina intima glabra vel pilosa.
Stamina 5, ex annulo densissimo pilorum basim partis membranaces oorollse
vestientium orta, JUammtii glabns, anikerii oblongis introraiB fere medio
dorso affixis exsertis. Ovarium disco pulviniformi coionatum, biloculare. Ovula
plurima, horizontalia, in plaoentis membranaceis ellipticis margine involntis
sspiusque bifidis dissepimento medio secundum lineam verticalem adnatis, ana-
tropa. Stylus filiformis, coroUse longitndine, glaber, stigmate bifido. G^iula
rotundato- vel oblongo-turbinata, hino et inde snloo plus minusve profundo no-
tata, obsolete oostulata, vertice truncato-areolata* areola (sen pulvine persistente)
limbo calyds reliauio annulari integro aut dentato arete drcumcincta, ab apioe
ad basim looulicide debiscens, plaoentis simul longitrorsmn fissis, Talvis dein
septidde bifidis. Semina subcompressa, oblonga, angulosa, aptera. — ^Arbores
vel frutices America tropicalis, foliis oppositia, peHolatis, pubeicentiiw ; stipulis
imterpetiolmius, permtenHbut^ parum carupicuii, tricmgularibuB^ abrupte acum*
natii; floribus cymao-paMieulaUs, peduncuUs ierminaUbut, Wedd.



HowABDiA Caracoieiuis ; foliis ovatb Tel obovato-eUiptids longiuscule acumi-
natis, acumine acutissimo, basi ouneatis supra nisi in costa glabratis subtus
pub^centibus, dentibus calyds triangularibus acuminatis, lobo foUaoeo
ovato (vel cordato-ovato), corolla tubidosa hirsnta, capsulis (exemplaribus
Panamensibus) elliptico-globods pedicellisque yerrucosis.

Howardia Caracasensis. Weddell, Ann, des Sc. Nai, ser. 4. Bot. v. Lp. 74.

Galtcophtllum tubulosum. Seemann^ Bot. qf H,M,S, Herald, p. 135 (vix
Ik Cand., and excluding the locality of Peru, M'Lean).

PiNGKNBTA ionautba, Sort. Makoy.



This is indeed a very lovely stove-plant, with gracefully droop-
ing panicles of flowers, whose beauty is very much increased by
the remarkable enlargement of one of the minute teeth of the
calyx into a heart-shaped, petiolated, deep rose-coloured, folia-

APRIL IST, 1859.



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ceous lobe^ similar to what takes plaoe (except in respect of co-
lour) in the well-known Mmsanda of our stoves. It is a plant,
too, interesting in another point of view, as one of a new ge-
nus of which the typical species, Howardia febrifugay^^AA!^^
of Bolivia, has been detected as one of the medicinal barks of
commerce, and much used by the Bolivians in intermittent
fevers.* To this plant Dr. Weddell has assigned the generic name
Howardia. " Parmi les genres,'* says Dr. Weddell, " que j'ai
fait connaitre dans ma Monographic des Quinquinas, il en est un
auquel j'appliquai, par megarde, un nom {Chrysosylon) apparte-
nant a une plante d'une autre famille. Pour mettre fin a oe double
emploi, je vais aujourd'hui donner a ma Rubiacee un nom nou-
veau ; et je ne fais, ce me semble, qu'un acte de justice en lais-
sant tomber mon choix sur celui de Texcellent quinologiste qui
vient de publier, en Angleterre, un memoire aussi judicieux
qu'approfondi, sur la collection de Quinquinas de Jose Pavon,
leguee par Lambert au Musee Britannique/* No compliment
could be better deserved. Another described plant referred to
this genus by M. Weddell is the CcdycophyUum tubulomm of
De Candolle, from Brazil A third species is the Hotcardia
grandijlora, Weddell, readily distinguished by its linear calycine
teeth ; and a fourth species is the Hotmrdia Caracasemisy cer-
tainly our plant of Venezuela, but so nearly allied to Hotoardia
tubtdosa that Dr. Seemann has united the two, as well as a
Peruvian species in my herbaria, which latter, I think, will prove
difierent.

Howardia CaracasensiSy as its name implies, is a native of the
province of Caracas, in Venezuela, where it was detected by
Funcke (PL Exsicc. n. 463, in Herb. Paris., n. 372, Herb. Hook.).
We possess specimens also from Fendler, from the same country,
and from our collector, M, Birschell, and from the banks of the
river Chagres, in Panama, gathered by Seemann,



Fig. 1. Flower, from which the foliaceoiw lobe is removed above the base of
its petiole. 2. Stamen. 3. Pistil : — magnified.



• For an account of the analysis, by Mr. Howard, see Annales des Sciences
Nat. 1. c. p. 68, note.



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Tab. 5111.

STEPHANOPHYSUM Baikibi.

JDt. Baikies Stephanqphymm,



Nat. Ord. Aoajythaoejb.-^Didtnakia Gymnospebmia.

Gen, Char, Cahfx 5-partitu8, lacmm angustifl seqnalibos. CoroUainho brevi,
faucibns in plerisque campanulato-inflatis deorsum ventricosis aliis ovalibus ob-
loDgisve sequalibus ; Umbi lacinUs brevibus sequalibos erectis (v. magis minusve
patentibus). Stamina 4, didynama, faudbus inserta, coroUam plerumqne sequantia ;
filamenta per paria basi connata ; anihera hTlocvlares^loculis parallelis, lineares, basi
sagittatse, demum recuryse. Stigma bilabiatom, labiis planis acuminatis, supe-
riore breviore. Capsula a basi ad medium contracta, elocolaris, hinc bilocularis,
4-12-sperma. Semina plana, orbicolata, retinaeulis fulcrata. — Herbs America
{et Africa) tropica^ foliis plm minus dentatia {v. integerrimi»), Gymse umbellarea,
lateralesy pedunculata, ^-fida^ ab<niu bifida, radiis b^dis, bracteis parvis subulatis,
bracteolis nulUs : abortu evaduni pedunculi unifiori, sub flore bibracteaii, velflores
ierminalesy aggregati, subracemosi, pedioellis ebracteatis. Corolla digiial\formis,
coccinea, Nees in Be Cand,



Stephanophtstjm Baikiei; suffirutexP glaber, ramis 4-angulati8, foliis ovato-
lanceolatis acuminatis integerrimis basi in petiolum longum attenuatis,
panicnla composita terminali multiflora, calyce piloso-glanduloso, coroUis
elongatis infandibuliformi-tubulosis curvatis lateraliter compressis basi an-
gusto-attenuatis medio subventricoso, laciniis patenti-recurvis, glandula hy-
pogyna magna cupuliformi carnosa, anthers loculis basi brevi-calcaratis.



One of the many highly interesting plants lately sent home
from the present Niger Expedition by its successful Comman-
der Dr. Baikie, and collected by the indefatigable naturalist,
Mr. Barter. Seeds accompanied the dried specimens, and these
have germinated, and the plants flowered in great beauty during
the winter months of 1858-9. The structure is in every essen-
tial particular so much of that of StepAanopAymm, Pohl (of which
however the thirteen species described by Nees are all South
American), that I can have no hesitation in referring the plants
to that genus.

Descr. Our plant is between two and three feet high, her-
baceous at present, but will probably prove to be suflfruticose,
erect, branched with opposite, square or tetragonous, erecto-patent

APRIL 1st, 1859.

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branches. Leaves in opposite pairs, sometimes nearly a span
long, including the petiole, ovato-lanceolate, submembranaceous,
entire, penniveined, acuminate, attenuated at the base. Panicle
terminfiJ, with copious bracU and bracteoleSy and composed of
many-flowered opposite racemes or spikes. Flowers opposite,
sessile. Calyw cut nearly to the base into five, narrow, erect,
linear-subulate, glanduloso-pilose segments. Corolla more than
two inches long, scarlet, tubuloso-infiindibulifonn, curved, very
slender and much tapering at the base, inflated or ventricose in
the middle, the five triangular lobes of the limb patent and even
recurved. Stamens included within the tube. Anthers with a
small spur at the base of each cell. Ovary sunk into a large,
fleshy, cup-shaped disc. Ovules about four in each cell.



Fig. 1. Calyx, incladlDg the pistil. 2. Stamens. 8. Two-celled anthers.
4. Ovary surrounded at the base by the cup-like fleshy disc : — magmfied.



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Tab. 5112.

LINUM PUBBSCENS; fi. SiUhorpianum.

Pubescent Flax ; Sidtkorpe's var.



Nat. Ord. Linejb. — ^Dsoandbia Pbntagtnia.
Om. Char. (Vide wpra. Tab. 4966.)



LiNUM (Dasylinum, FL) pubeseens; " anDaom, caalibos teretibas IsBvibus Bupeme
oorymboso-diyisis inter folia densa patenti-pilosulis, foliis alternis intermediis
ovato-oblongis basi obtosis apice acutiusculis 5-nerviis pneter villos raros
submarginales v. in disco sparsos glabresoentibus snpremis glanduloso-
ciliatis, pymse compositae lamis apice oonfertifloris, sepaUs e basi lanoeolato-
lineaii in acumen Uneare longom basi snboontinuum et multo longius ber-
baceumprodnctis piloso-ciUatis sobglandolosis, antheiis ovato-oblongis basi
profunde emarginatis, stylis ad medium connatis, ovario stipitato glabro."
Planch.

LiNUM pubesoens. Rus$. Aleppo, ex SchuUz, Syst Vegei, v, 6. p. 758. De Cand.
Frodr. v. l.p, 428. Flanch. in Hook, Lond. Joum. Boi.p, 519.

Yar. j8. Sibtkorpianum ; humilius, foliis caolinis oblongis 8-nerviis, coiymbi
floriferi ramis laxioribns minns ramosis. Flanck. in Hook. Lond. Joum.
Bot. V. 7. p. 529. (Tab. Nostb. 5112.)

LiNUM piliferam. Fred^ M. Sic. p. 171.

LiNUM Sibthorpianum. Better in Mim. de Gen. v. S, p. 283. t. 3, ex JTalp.
Bepert. Bot. v. l.p. 287, et in Herb. Nostr.

LiNUM deooloratom. Griseb. SpieU. Fl. Bum. v. \.p. 117.

LiNUM hirsntnm. Sibth. Fl. Oraea, t. 302 (non Linn.) manente Benter et Grise-
bach.



Our knowledge of the species of Idnum has been considerably
increased since the publication of the * Prodromus * of De Can-
doUe, who enumerated forty-six, independent of " species non
satis notfie.'* But the numerical amount in books must not be
considered that of the really good and distinct kinds. The
genus required weeding ; and our friend Dr. Planchon has done
great service to the cause of botany in his excellent * Revisio
Ordinis Linearum,' and this he has elaborated with great in-
dustry and perseverance in the 'London Journal of Botany'
above quoted. I cannot do better than copy his character and
synonyms of the present species, the correct name of which he

APBIL 1st, 1859.



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htts established after a careful examination of RusseFs original
species in the Banksian Herbarium. The specific character
above introduced, and the accompanying figure, render any more
minute description, needless. The species seems to have an ex-
tensive range, — ^Aleppo, Mount Lebanon {Herb. Hook.), Sicily,
throughout Greece and the Greek islands, in Macedonia and
Bithynia, at elevations of fifteen hundred to seventeen hundred
feet above the level of the sea.

The seeds firom which our plant were raised, were received
firom M. Renter, collected in the plain of Mersina, Cilicia. It
is a pretty hardy annual, but the flowers are sadly wanting in
that brilhancy of colour which renders the Linum grandiflorufn
(see our Tab. 4956) such a favourite in our gardens.



Fig. 1. Flower, from which the petals are removed. 2. Stamens and pistil.
3. Ovary; — magnyied.



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Tab. 5113.

ANGRJECUM sesquipedale.

Sesquipedalian AngrcBcum,



Nat. Ord. Obchidsa. — Gtnandbia Monandeia.
Qtn. Char. (Vide supra. Tab. 4761.)



AKGBiECUM sesquipedale; canle subsimplici radicoso, foliis distiche imbricatis
oblongis basi attenaatis carinatis apioe obtusissime bilobis, pedonculis axil-
laribus 2-4-floris, floribus inter maximos albis, petalis sepalisque patentibus
subsBqualibus e basi latis sensim acuminatis, labello cordato-ovato acuminato
maipnibus utrinque versos medium grosse crenato-serratis, calcare longis-
simo flexuoso yiridi.

Angrjecum sesquipedale. Aub. du Pet Thouars, Hist, des PL Orchid, 4fr. 8ro,
<. 66 (Jh¥)er, not, size) and 67 {reduced figure) ; ejusd. Orchid* (large folio
coloured plates), t, 1, 2. Lindl, in Gard, Chron, 1857, i'. 253 (with woodcut
of the flower, not, size),

Abkakthtts sesquipedalis. IMU, Gen, et Sp, Orchid, p, 244.



I spoke of the Angrcecum ebumeum (see our Tab. 4761) with
admiration on account of its noble aspect. Bnt it shrinks into
insignificance in comparison with the present Madagascar rarity,
known to botanists only through the figures above quoted of
Aubert du Petit-Thouars (published about 1822), till the Rev.
William Ellis, the distinguished traveller and historian of Mada-
gascar, on his last return from that wonderful island, made us
acquainted with the living plant, which that gentleman has twice
flowered, first in 1857, when the interesting account and figure ap-
peared in the * Gardeners' Chronicle,' and now again in the winter
(February) of 1859, at his residence, Hoddesdon, Herts. There
our figure was taken, and though not one of the figures quoted,
not even the original ones of Du Petit-Thouars (though there

♦ In neither of these two works of M. Aubert du Petit-Thouars is there any
description of the plant. The first of them stops short at the thirty-second page,
and before any descriptive matter of the genera and species appears, and Pritzd
notices this deficiency. Of the second work, in large folio, with six coloured
figures of Orchideous plants of Madagascar presented to me by the author, and
probably neyer published), Pritzel has no record, nor of any work in folio by
this author.

MAY 1st, 1859.

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was ample space in the large folio page), exactly warrants the
sesquipedalian specific name, still there is enough to excite as-
tonishment in the great size of the flower, and extraordinary
length of the spur. The former, in the specimen before us,
measures seven inches across, and the spur one foot in length,
so that if the spur were set on at the edge of the flower, instead
of the middle, it would rather exceed than fall short of the size
attributed to it. This flower is of a uniform, pure ivory or yel-
lowish white, and it has the merit of possessing the odour of
the white Garden Lily, Lilium candidum. The plant continually
attracted the attention of Mr. Ellis as he travelled through its
native woods ; more than one of his photographs includes trunks
of trees loaded with this prince of Orchideous plants, and it is
frequently the subject of his description and admiration. Indeed
no one has travelled in tropical regions, possessed of a greater
love of nature, especially of vegetable forms, than this gentle-
man. It should be borne in mind also that he introduced to our
stoves the still more remarkable Lace-leaf, Ouvirandra fenestrcdis,
and other rarities.

Descr. The plant, including the leaves, does not appear to ex-
ceed two feet in length, — so that the flowers are sometimes as long
as the plant, — simple or bearing one or two branches ; attached
to the trunks of trees by wiry fibres, rather densely clothed with
distichous, spreading, more or less recurved leaves^ of a broad
oblong form, thick and fleshy, dark-green, imbricated, carinated
at the base. Peduncles solitary, axillary, bearing from two to
four gigantic ivory-white fragrant JlowerSy each subtended, at
the base of the ovary, by a broad, ovate, coloured bract Sepals
and petals equally spreading, nearly uniform, three inches long,
from a broad base, gradually acuminated, somewhat fleshy. Lip
equal in size with sepals and petals, from a cordate base, ovate,
acuminated, near the middle, on each side, coarsely and irregu-
larly serrated ; from the base of this, beneath, depends the very
long, terete, but gradually tapering spur, one foot in length, green
in colour. Column very short, thick, with two broad wavy wings
on each side the stigma, which almost conceal that organ. An-
ther-case helmet-shaped, white, with a narrow orange-coloured
margin. Pollen-masses two, ovate, waxy, each attached to a
somewhat linear gland.



Our plate represents a leaf, of the natural me; the upper part of a peduncle,
with flowers, also natural me. Fig. 1. Entire plant, on a very reduced scale.
2. Apex of an ovary, column and anther. 3. Pollen-masses : — magn^ied.



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Tab. 5114.

BILBERGIA macrocalyx.

Long-calyxed Bilhergia.



Nat. Ord. BROMELiACEiE. — Hexandeia Monooynia.
Qm, Char, {Fide aupra. Tab. 4756.)



BiLBEEGiA tnaeroealyx ; rluzomate crasso cylindraoeo repente, foliis erecto-pa-
tulis lato-lingulatis acutissimis concnvo-canaliculatis apice planiosculis re-
curvis remote spiauloso-serratis viridibos pallide maculatis dorso subfastuosis,
bracteis amplis ovato-oblongis breyi-acuminatissimis concavis intense roseis,
bracteolis subnullis, spica simplici thyrsiformi, ovario infero calyceque biun-
. ciali farinosis, sepalis lineari-oblongis, petalis calyoe ^ longioribus spatulatis
apice patentibiis pallide viridibus ad marginem purpuieo-tinctis, squamis
petalorum elongatis bidentatis ad basin squamula ciliata auctis.



None of the described Bromeliacea, whether under Puya^
Bilberyia, or Tillandsia (for the genera need a thorough revi-
sion to render them intelligible), seem to correspond with this
species, which our garden owes to the kindness of our friend
J. Wetherell, Esq., when he was our Consul at Bahia, where it
it is a native on the mossy branches of trees. Brazil indeed
seems to abound in novelties of this family ; and we have had
more than once occasion to remark how well the species are
worthy of cultivation, from the great beauty of the flowering
spikes : the beauty however is generally due more to the rich
colouring of the large bracts, or spathes as they are sometimes
called, than to that of the blossoms. The present one may vie
with any other in this particular, and will rank near to our
B. JFethereUi (see our Tab. 4835), and still more near perhaps
to B. thyrsoidea (Tab. Nostr. 4756); but is very distinct fix)m
both.

Descr. Bhizome thick, elongated, terete. Leaves a foot or a
foot and a half long, broad-lingulate, erecto-patent, canaliculately
concave, swollen and inflated, ad it were^ at the amplexicaul
base, plane towards the apex, and recunred at the very acute or
shortly acuminated point ; the margin is rather remotely spinu-

MAY IST, 1859.



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loso-serrate ; the colour darkish-green, with scattered pale spots,
somewhat transversely fasciated at the back. Spikes simple, but
thyrsiform ; below are several large, laxly imbricated, very con-
cave, deep rose-coloured bracts. Bracteoles at the base of each
flower small, deciduous. Rachis and cal^x very farinoso-tomentose.
Ovary quite inferior. Sepals very large, linear-oblong, erect, ap-
pressed. Petals one-third larger than the calyx, spathulate, Kght
yellow-green, edged with pale blue livid-purple. Scales of the
petals very long, each two-toothed, and with ciliated appendages
at the base. ^«/Aer« bright -orange.



Fig. 1. Base of a petal, with scales, and two stamens, — magnyied.



Digitized by LjOOQIC



sns



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Tab. 5116.

GESNERIA PURPUREA.

Purple^Jlowered Gesneria.



Nat. Ord. GssNBEiAOEiB. — ^Didtkamia Anoiospeemia.
Oen. Char. (Vide 9upra, Tab. 4217.)



Gesnebia purpurea ; herbacea moUiter Telutino-pabescens, caule simplici infeme


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Online LibraryDavid Prain William Jackson HookerCurtis's botanical magazine, Volume 85 → online text (page 4 of 10)