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David Thomson.

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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES



FREDERIC THOMAS BLANCHARD
ENDOWMENT FUND



l^






MUSINGS AMONG THE HEATHER.



MUSINGS AMONG THE HEATHER;



niCINT,



locius cbicfliT in tlic .Scottisb ilialcct.



BY THE LATE



DAVID THOMSON.

HILLEND, NEAR AIRDRIE.



ARRANGED AND EDITED.



(!:binbur0b :

THOMSON BROTHERS, lo ST. GILES STREET

l88i.



EDINBURGH :
rRINTEl) BV LORIMER AND GILLIES,
31 ST. ANDREW SQUARE.







\c^ t PREFATORY. S )




AVID THOMSON, the Author of the follow-
ing Poems, was born at Roseneath, Dumbarton-
shire, in iSo6, the youngest of a family of seven sons
and four daughters. His father was a shepherd, and
belonged to Little Clyde, in the Upper Ward of Lanark-
shire, but for a number of years resided at various places
in the West Highlands, ^^'hcn about four years of age
his father removed to Burnfoot, near Caldercruix, and
shortly afterwards to Forrestfield, in the parish of Shotts,
at which place David received the little education he got.
As he grew up tu manhood he was engaged in the various
labouring employments usual in country life. In 1S29
he married, and after a short time settled at Caldercruix,



7657G9



VI PREFATORY.

where he remained until 1S49, when he removed to
Hillend, on being appointed keeper of Hillend Reservoir,
Lily and Black Lochs, for supplying the Monkland and
Forth and Clyde Canals, and where he remained until
his death, which took place in 1870. Hillend is situated
in the parish of Shotts, 4^ miles east from Airdrie on the
Edinburgh and Glasgow road.

Of a genial disposition, he was much respected in the
district among a large circle of friends. From early
manhood he was a close observer and great lover of
nature, but it was only late in life that he attempted
poetical composition, and on the encouragement of several
of his acquaintances he persevered to gain that facility
of expression so necessary for that form of composition.
His earliest efforts appeared in the local newspapers, and
attracted considerable attention, several of his pieces
having established themselves as favourites, and even
beyond his own district their merits commanded atten-
tion. As a poet he appears in his happiest mood in those
pieces descriptive of rural scenery, wherein he depicts
with great accuracy the scenes in which he so delighted



PRKFAIORY. VU

to revel — the rugged hill, the rocky glen, the winipling
hum, the shaggy wood, with feathery warblers adding
their chorus to the hymn of universal nature — but he is
not the less successful when he descends to social scenes
and phases of life where his warm heart and sympathy
with the poor, op[)ressed, and helpless, find ready expres-
sion ; and even in his humorous pieces he shows himself
to be no one-sided sentimentalist, but one who saw the
various shades of human nature, who could detect its
foibles, avoid its errors, and laugh at its vagaries.

He took great interest in all the political and social
movements of his time, and gives expression to his senti-
ments on them with a vigour and directness which leaves
no room for misunderstanding as to the leaning of his
sympathies. A healthy moral tone per\'ades all his works,
and the biography of the later years of his life may be
said to be contained therein. Full of kindliness and
charity, his heart was grieved and wci)t at the miseries to
be seen in this life, and he did his utmost to overcome or
alleviate those conditions on which they are contingent.
In a life so smooth and void of incident there is little to



via PREFATORY,

chronicle beyond the few facts above given. Content
with the sphere in life which Providence had assigned
him, his years were passed as his days in the quiet
retirement and routine of the duties of his situation.
Though still hale and vigorous, his death took place
after a short illness, somewhat suddenly, in the beginning
of August, 1870. The legacy of Poems left behind him,
have now been arranged and gathered together in this
volume, the merits of which judicious readers are now
confidently invited to judge of for themselves.

W. W.

LOCHEE, March, iSSi.



^<^^a<^C?lg^^r^^-










I'ACE


To the Muse, ...... i


The Wee Orphan Wean,






2


The Bonnie Blue Bell, .






4


The Beauties of Winter, .






4


Hame, ....






5


Rural Depopulations,






7


December,






8


Unhappy Jock,






10


The Road o' Life,






1 1


The Emigrant's Farewell,






12


To the Ocean,






'3


Sutherland Evictions,






• 13


My Native Land,






14


Scotland's Bairns,






'5


A Storm at Night,






• 17


The Highlander's Return,






•7


Winter, ....






19


To Mountain Daisies in December, 185;


t




-^ ->


A Star in the Storm,






• 23


I'll tune my Rustic Reed and Sing,






::4


The Fareweel,






• ^5


Highland Desolations, .






26



X CONTENTS.






PAGE


A Calm 'midst the Storm, . . . .28


A Keek at the Poets,


.




30


To a Friend,


.




31


New Year's Hymn,






32


A Daisy in Winter,







33


Address tae Straught Howe Ice,




34


To Rothesay Castle, ....




35


Elegy to the honour of Robert Burns, .




37


Address to the Rev. Fergus Ferguson, .




41


To Robin Redbreast,




42


Careless Johnny's Courtship,




43


Answer to Careless Johnny,




44


The Auld Maid's Advertisement,




45


She's hardly what she should ha'e been,




47


Winter's Storms, ....




■ 47


Cauld Winter's Win',


.




49


The Works of Time,


.




51


To a Daisy,


.




• 53


To William Hogg (Bellshill),







• 54


To Willie (Hogg),


.




• 55


Sunshine and Shade,







• 56


The Storm,


.




• 57


Contentment ; or a Calm 'midst


the Storm,




. 58


To a Rainbow,


.




. 60


Will Warldsworm's Dream,


.




. 61


The Herald of Spring,







• 65


To a Primrose,


.




. 66


A Name by the Wayside,


.




. 67


The Mists 0' Love,


.




. 68


Bonnie Doon,







. 69


The Parting,


.




• 70


The Hazel Shaw,






• 71


Hope,







• 72



CONTENTS.


XI




I'AGE


Middle Braco, .....


74


Address to Auld Scotland on the Prince of Wales




Marriage, .....


75


The Wise Men o' (lotham,


77


To Pride, ......


78


Address to 'Lithgow Palace,


79


To a Friend on his Marriage,


8i


Morning, ......


82


Contemplation, .....


83


The Ravages of Time, ....


85


A Mother's Lament, ....


86


Spring's Welcome, ....


88


The Beauties of Evening,


89


Address to the Laverock,


90


Spring,


92


Gowd canna gi'e Happiness,


94


Uinna Marry for Siller, ....


95


To a Snowdrop, .....


97


The Patriot's Address, ....


98


The Lover's Soliloquy, ....


99


Self,


lOI


A Fathei-'s Address, ....


102


The Exile, .....


'03


Fragment, ......


104


The Cheerfulness of Spring,


105


The Tribute, .....


106


To the Mavis, .....


107


The Mother's Soliloquy, ....


109


An Appeal in behalf of the Unemployed,


1 10


Miss E. Logan's Farewell,


1 1 1


Friday Nicht, .....


1 12


A Morning in Spring, ....


'"3


To William Hogg, ....


J14



Xll



CONTENTS.



To Willie (HoggX

To William Hogg,

Rab's Boose,

To John Bull,

Summer, .

Marion,

To the Cuckoo,

To the Sun,

The Closing Day,

The Landscape ; or, A View in Summer

Address to Edinburgh,

Wild Flowers,

To a Friend on the Birth of a Child,

A P.S. to a Letter,

True Love,

To a very lean Cow,

To Mrs. Robson, .

Hillend, .

My Evening Walk,

My Bonny Marj^, .

Elegy to Summer,

To the Lovers of Nature,

The Falls of Clyde,

Simmer's Return, .

A Morning Soliloquy,

Willie Gordon's Address,

The Voice of Flowers,

To Robert Tennant (Glasgow),

The Shepherd's Address to a Dying Lark,

A Voice from the Field of Bannockburn,

A Summer Scene,

To a Woodlark, . . . •

Evening, , . . • •



PAGE

ii6
117

117
120
121
123
124
125
127
129
132
134
135
135
136

137
138

139
141

141
143

145
146

148

149

150

152

•53
•54
156

157
•59
159



CONTENTS.



Mil



The Cheerfulness o' Simmer,

To the Laverock, .

To Francis Cowan (Newarthill),

Fear Nocht, Auld John Bull,

Nature's Charms when Summer smiles,

The Beauties of Nature in the Wilderness,

To the Heather, .

Summer's Morn, .

Human Wisdom, .

Improve Time,

To William Hogg,

To William Hogg,

Be Honest,

Address frae Mark the Barber tae Luke

Emblems in Nature,

Song,

My Bonnie Jean,

The Beauties of Night,

Loch Lomond,

Autumn, .

To the Comet of 1S58,

Johnny's Appeal,

Additional Verses to Auld Langsyne,

October, ,

Under a Cloud,

to a Little Bird,

Ben Lomond,

(iloamin', .

On a Broken Flower,

Influence, .

To Dunoon Castle

Margaret, .

Nobleness,



the Lab



ourer,



PAGE
161
162

•63
163
165
166
167
168

171
171

•74

175
177

•79
180

181
182
184
186
188
189
190
191

193
194

•95
•97
198
199
200
201



XIV



CONTENTS.



A Keek at Intemperance,


, 202


To Tobacco, .....


• 203


God seen through Nature,


. 205


Lines on seeing a Monumental Stone near the Head o


f


Craignish Loch, ....


. 207


Night,


. 209


All Things Change, ....


. 210


Memory', ......


21 1


Be Content, .....


. 213


Airdrie at Eleven o'clock, p.m., .


214


True Greatness, .....


• 215


Fareweel Address to the Swallow,


216


Beauty in Universal Nature,


217


A Friendly Address to Archie, .


219


The Auld Session House,


220


The Hole in the Wa', ....


221


Brotherhood, .....


223


To David Morrison, . . ...


224


My Auld Frien', .....


22 15


Discontentment ; or, Warl's Cares,


227


The Best Men for Sodgers,


228


The Orbs of Night,


229


On Geology,


230


I lo'e my Jock, .....


230


Love, ......


232


The Absent Muse, . . . . .


233


The Lover's Address, ....


234


To Bothwell Castle, . . . . .


235


On the Falkirk Burghs Election, 1857, .


236


To Joseph Findlay, . . . . ■ .


237


Another to the Same ; a Fragment,


237


Reform, .......


238


Address to the British, . . . . .


239



CONTENTS.


XV




lAGE


The Hypocrite Tyrant, ....


239


The Dreaded Invasion, ....


241


The Great Fight, .....


242


The Lover's Lament, ....


244


Flora's Lament, .....


245


Samuel Safthead tae the Electors o' Lanarkshire,


247


Sawney's Address to Jonathan, .


248


Barney's Address to Jonathan, .


. 250


Fragments, .....


• 251



^'A



-3



§p



V^^



~yr^



V/'J



^HO' poor, I court not favour from the great,

Nor dread that ruthless scourge, the critic's pen,
But launch these poems forth to meet their fate.
To stand or fall as suits the tastes of men.



MUSINGS AMONG THE HEATHER.



TO THE MUSE.




\\'AKE, my drowsie muse, and sing ;
Why will you dormant lie,
While the sweet lark is on the wing,

And soaring to the sky,
With cheerful heart her voice to raise,
And sing her morning hymn of praise?

Rise with the morn ; and soar away.

In contemplation's flight,
Before the glorious orb of day

Bursts from the womb of night, .
And breaks with might her gloomy bars,
And with his light seals up the stars.

And when he from his brilliant rim
Throws wide his sparkling fire,

Which makes the orbs of night grow dim
And in his beams expire.

Then on sweet nature look abroad.

And sing of all the works of God.

B



THE WEE ORPHAN WEAN.

Siiig of the sky, the sea, and land,
Streams, lakes, and leafy bowers ;

Of woods, and glens, and mountains grand.
Birds, beasts, and blooming flowers ;

And of the lovely rainbow mild,

The sunny calm, and tempest wild.

Let cheerful Spring inspire your lays
With something new and grand.

And Summer's flowers call forth your praise
Of an Almighty hand ;

Let Autumn's bounty be your song,

And Winter's storms your notes prolong.

And when light fades far in the west.

When day is at its close,
And wearied labour sinks to rest.

In silent sweet repose,
Then view the moon and stars so bright.
And sing the beauties of the night.



THE WEE ORPHAN WEAN.

^^HE cauld win' was blawin', the sleet fast was fa'in';
-eJ The kye a' stood coorin' in biel o' ilk stane,
^Vhen, cripplin' wi' sair feet, an' dreepin' wi' cauld sleet,
•Cam' toddlin' alang a bit wee orphan wean.



His auld shoon were sair worn, his thin claes were a' torn
The cauld win' gaed thro' them the same's he had nane ;
Aft hungry an' no fed, an' wearied an' nae bed ;
Oh hard is the lot o' the wee orphan wean !



THE WEE ORPHAN WEAN. 3

There is nane noo tae care when his wee head is sair,
Or hungry or cauld, since his parents are gane ;
There's nane noo but strangers tae shield him frae dangers;
An' few are the frien's o' the wee ori)han wean.

When weans dae forgcther tae play a' thegither,
The puir thing is dowie, an' stauns aye his lane ;
An' tho' they are cheerie, an' play till they're wearie,
There's nane try tae cheer up the wee orphan wean.

An' when, in the gloamin', they hameward are roamin',
Ilka ane but himsel' their ain road hae ta'en ;
But frien'less, an' eerie, an' hungry, an' wearie,
He's nae hame tae gang tae, the wee orphan wean.

The rich are respected, the puir aft neglected ;
The wealthy hae frien's, but the needy hae nane ;
When poverty pinches, maist ilka ane flinches
Tae succour the puir, or a wee orphan wean.

A' ye that hae plenty o' a' that is dainty,
Gie some tae the puir, ye'll ne'er miss't when it's gane ;
Ye will aye get far mair than the morsel yc spare
Tae puir needy wand'rer or wee orphan wean.

Let your pity extend, an' the orphan befriend,
Bring him in tae the bink beside your hearthstane;
Yc'U ne'er hae reflection for gi'en your protection
Tae puir hooselcss wand'rer or wee orphan wean.

May, iSjs.




THE BEAUTIES OF WINTER.



THE BONNIE BLUE BELL.



CARENA for those wha in foreign lands travel,
An' o' their rich verdure an' bonnie flowers tell,
O' roses an' lilies, and bricht oleanders,

They canna compare wi' the Scottish blue bell.

Or bonnie red heather, the rich blooming heather,
An' modest wee daisie that dapples the dale ;

Or queen o' the meadow, wi' snawie white feather.
That flings its perfume on the wings o' the gale.

Or yet the fox-glove, or the mild lovely snowdrop.

That rises ere winter's awa, for tae tell
That spring will soon wauken the bashfu' wee primrose,

Tae bloom in rich beauty, in glen, wud, an' vale.

An' what tho' auld Scotland's baith rugged an' rocky,
When wild storms sweep o'er her they act as a spell,

Tae rouse in her brave sons the spirit o' freedom
That guards frae a' tyrants her bonnie blue bell.



THE BEAUTIES OF WINTER.

^)C^^HEN winter's frosty win's do blaw,
«^<-5 An' a' the lochs an' burnies freeze,

An' heighs an' howes are clad wi' snaw,
An' cranreuch fringes shrubs an' trees.

Then if aroun' we take a view
O' nature in her robes sae bricht,

Contrasted wi' the sky sae blue,
It really is a bonnie sicht.



HAME.

O how enchantin' an' sublime

Is sic a bonnie fairy scene,
When wuds are a' clad ower wi' rime,

Tho' birds are mute, an' flowers are gane.

The trees in hoary mantles stan',
An' fling their silvery heads on high,

Superbly rich, an' wondrous gran',
Like marble tracery on the sky.

The same Almighty hand that forms
The feathery cranreuch an' the snaw,

Can bridle up the wildest storms.
An' mak' even dreary winter braw.



HAME.



LSi



WEET Scotland, my country, I ever will lo'e thee.
An' wha for sic fond love, wad me ever blame,
For freedom blooms there, that has never been blighted,
An' there stauns the wee hoose, my ain native hame.

O, weel, weel I like the bit wee thackit biggin',
The snug cosie biel, whaur I first saw the licht,

For tho' it had naething but turfs on its riggin'.

It stood winter's storms, tho' they blew a' their micht.

O, far hae I wander'd o'er laun an' o'er ocean,
An' seen mony braw places weel kent tae fame,

But a' their rich beauty aye faded an' vanished,
Whenever I thocht on my ain native hame.



6 HAME.

When we are awa' frae oor country an' kindred,

Oor heart aye loups hcht when we hear but their name,

An' fond recollections spring up thick as gowans,
As soon as we hear but the mention o' hame.

O, hame, dearest hame, thou hast power like the loadstone
Wi' sweet bauns o' love, the affections tae draw,

Ye win the young heart, for your charms are resistless,
An' aye are the stronger, the farer awa'.

Yes, hame is aye hame, tho' it's never sae humble,
There's something aboot it that makes the heart fain.

An' when in life's journey, we lang frae't are absent,
We're aye unco keen tae come back tae't again.

Where'er we are plac'd, an' whatever oor station,

There's aye something there, oor affections tae claim,

There's nae ither place, tho' we travel the warl thro'.
That e'er we can loe like oor ain native hame.

Then Scotland, my country, I'll aye sing thy praises.
Thy beauty and freedom will aye be my theme.

An' tho' I hae nocht but a wee thackit biggin',

I'll aye be content, for there's nae place like hame.




Tl^ Y*^*




RURAL DEPOPULATIONS.

RURAL DEPOPULATIONS.

REAT changes come wi' passing years,
As noo in many a place appears,
If Scotland roon we scan ;
For whaur ance dwelt a hardy race,
Is noo a' wild, an' made a place,

For deer instead o' man.

Great tracks o' laun' can noo be seen,
Whaur crofters ance dwelt snug an' bien,

A' clad wi' bent an' heather ;
An' here an' there, a nowt or sheep,
A muircock, plover, or peesweep,

Whaur folk in bauns did gather.

The places whaur their hooses stood,

The crofts whaur com wav'd rank an' guid,

Can hardly noo be trac'd ;
An' whaur a' ance look'd blythe an' fair,
Is noo wild, barren, bleak, and bare,

A solitary waste.

^Vhat sin an' shame that laun' sae good,
That lots o' wark, an' walth o' food,

Tae man an' beast wad yield ;
Shou'd be allow'd tae lie a waste,
Tae suit some selfish noble's taste,

O' bein' a huntin' field.

But nobles yet may sairly rue,
That crofters on their launs are few.

An' may yet come to ken
That grouse an' deer can ne'er oppose.
Nor staun' against invading foes,

Sae firm as hardy men.




DECEMBER.

S^HE bonnie, mild, an' gentle spring,
■■^ Sweet simmer, blythe an' braw,
An' autumn, wi' her gouden load,
Are noo a' fled awa'.

An' nature's bonnie smiling face,

Sae lately fu' o' bloom.
Is noo grown pale an' waefu' like,

An' shaded ower wi' gloom.

For fleeting time wi' hurrying haste,

On rapid wings flees past,
An' brings ilk season in its turn.

An' winter at the last.

Sae cauld December raging wild.
Sweeps ower baith sea an' laun,

An' rives tae rags sweet nature's robes,
Wi' his destroying haun'.

His wild an' ruthless howling storms,

'Mang leafless wuds I hear.

In raging wrath as if they wou'd.

Them a' tae pieces tear.
8



DECEMBER.

An' noo the dnimlic drowsy sun,

Quite wearied like does rise,
An' wades deep through the watery clouds,

Alang the gloomy skies.

For rain an' hail in torrents fa'.
An' sleet drives ower the plains

Till burns row doon in foaming floods,
An* roar lood through the glens.

Ilk place aroond is dreary like,
Baith mountain, glen, an' shaw,

Nae bonnie flowers noo deck the braes,
For they are a' awa'.

December storms like wasting wars, '

Amang the human kind.
Spread desolation in their track.

An' leave sad wrecks behind.

But bonnie smiling spring will yet,

Awake the sleeping flowers,
Arouse again the warbler's sang,

An' dead the leafless bowers.

Then let December dae his worst.

Short will be his career;
For aff he'll gang wi' the last groan

O' the expiring year.




lO UNHAPPY JOCK.

UNHAPPY JOCK.

t'wHERE'S mony ups an' doons in life
"^ Between the cradle an' the grave,
As Jock said tae his drucken wife

When she fell, an' began tae rave
Aboot her lads she had langsyne,
An' counted owre some aucht or nine.

Blin' fortune's wheel is aff the fair,
An' waggles sair as it rins roon ;

Sae flings tae ilka ane their share
O' luck, as it babs up or doon.

Tae some a rich unhappy lot.

An' some content wi' scarce a groat.

But Jock in pairt was cause hinisel'
O' ae big trouble o' his life,

For he for siller courted Nell,
An' got wi' it a drucken wife.

Noo it wad be a doonricht shame

To gie blin' fortune a' the blame.

Some folk think walth maks them genteel,
An' witty, noble, wise, an' braw,

While base ambition gars them speel
Tae heights frae whilk they aften fa'.

Wi' shattered pride, an' grief intense,

The sport o' folk o' common sense.

Wha let pride lift them owre far up
Are sure tae get a dirty fa' ;

Wha drinks o' wine the biggest cup,
Their senses soonest gang awa'.

Sae keep doon laigh, the wine-cup spare.

An' court for love, but naething mair.



THE ROAD O' LIFE. 1 1



THE ROAD O' LIFE.




PON the rugged road o' life,
We've hills tae spcel, an' howes tae cross,
Fause frien's tae meet, wi' troubles rife,
An' whaur tae gang whiles at a loss.



But upricht men keep on their road,
Wi' joy 'midst sunshine, or 'mang snaw.

Are aye content an' trust in God,

An' fearna storms though wild they blaw.

An' honest man, wi' just intent,

Tae ilka body, big or sma',
Speels hardship's brae, tho' geyan faint,

An' tho' he slides, he doesna fa'.

Far different is the selfish loon.

That cheats his neebours ane an' a',

Tho' gey far up, he tumbles doon
'Mang dirt, an' canna rise ava.

Ill-gotten gear is never bless'd

In cottage, tent, or lordly ha'.
It vanishes like morning mist,

Or else taks wings an' flees awa'.

Then let me try as far's I can,

Tho' gey thin shod for life's rough road,
Tae imitate the honest man.

Aye be content, an' trust in God.



12 THE emigrant's FAREWELL.



THE EMIGRANT'S FAREWELL.

JjTpAREWELL my native land, I must away,
^^^ Far, far from thee, o'er raging seas' wild foam,
To seek some place, where I may find repose.
But still I'll love thee, thou'rt my dearest home.

Misfortunes gather'd as my years advanc'd,
Stern, ruthless tyranny has crush'd me sore ;

Base, sneaking avarice has grasped my all,
And poverty now drives me from your shore.

Farewell my humble cot, and meadows gay.
Where oft in youth, I've gather'd lovely flowers,

Farewell ye rocky hills, and placid lakes,
Ye bushy glens, with all your leafy bowers.

Flow on 'midst blooming flow'rs, bright sparkling streams
Unite your murmurs with the sighing breeze ;

And join your music with the warbling throng,
Who sweetly sing among the leafy trees.

Rise from thy dewy nest, sweet warbling lark,
Hail with thy sweetest song, the coming day,

Breathe forth your sweet perfume, gay, blooming flowers,
To cheer some wand'rer when I'm far away.

I yet will cast one ling'ring look behind,

Before your heath-clad hills fade from my view,

And with a bleeding heart, and tearful eyes,
Will bid you then, a long, a last adieu.



SUTHERLAND EVICTIONS. I3



TO THE OCEAN.



MIGHTY sea ! thy swelling tide,
Doth nations far apart divide,
And yet thou art the road,
That joins them in commerce and trade.
And where is vividly display'd

The wisdom and the power of God.

For He has fixed by His decree,
A bound'ry all around for thee,

Which thou can ne'er pass o'er ;
Eut must obey His great command,
And stop when thou com'st to the sand.

That lies along thy wave-wash'd shore.

Then tho' the howling tempest raves,
And lash to fury thy wild waves,

Till foam is o'er thee spread ;
Thus far in ^vrath thou mayest flow,
But farther thou shalt never go,

For here shall thy proud waves be stayed.



SUTHERLAND EVICTIONS.

TrOURN, Scotia, for your Celtic race,
^ Now forced from their fatherland,
And brand for ever with disgrace,
The cruel lairds of Sutherland.

Such traitors of their country ought
Be held in scorn and censured be,

For banishing a race who fought,
To set their own lov'd country free.



14 MY NATIVE LAND.

Grieve that such petty tyrants may
The noble name of Britons claim ;

While vividly their acts display,
That they disgrace a Briton's name.

Their deeds will never be forgot,

But to posterity remain
In Scottish history a blot,

A black and everlasting stain.

August, i8sj.



MY NATIVE LAND.

i^|y native land ! your hills and plains ;
"-^^ Your lochs an' burnies clear ;


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Online LibraryDavid ThomsonMusings among the heather, being poems chiefly in the Scottish dialect → online text (page 1 of 11)