Copyright
Dedham (Mass.).

Proceedings at the celebration of the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the incorporation of the town of Dedham, Massachusetts, September 21, 1886 online

. (page 12 of 13)
Online LibraryDedham (Mass.)Proceedings at the celebration of the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the incorporation of the town of Dedham, Massachusetts, September 21, 1886 → online text (page 12 of 13)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


preserved in the years to come.

THE FAIRBANKS HOUSE.

This picturesque old house with its antique furniture is
an object of great interest to its many visitors. The date
of its erection is not known from any historic record. For
many reasons, however, which might be adduced, it is
believed not to have been one of the rude houses of the
first settlers; for all these disappeared in the first cen-



1 86 THE TOWN OF DEDHAM.

tury. This house probably was not built earlier than 1664,
though it may have been built before Philip's War. The
land, however, on which it stands, from the time of its
allotment to Jonathan Fairbanks in 1637, has remained in
the hands of his descendants. Jonathan Fairbanks the
progenitor died Dec. 5, 1668.

Mr. Fairbanks came to Boston in 1633 from Sowerby,
in Yorkshire, England. He was admitted and subscribed
to the Covenant, March 23, 1637. Through John, Joseph,
Ebenezer, Ebenezer 2d, and his three daughters — Prudence,
Sally, and Nancy — the house has come into the possession
of its present owner and occupant. Miss Rebecca Fair-
banks, who is of the seventh generation in direct descent
from Jonathan.

The small wing with a gambrel-roof on the side toward
East Street was added to the house when Ebenezer Fair-
banks, born Jan. 5, 1758, and married March 3, 1777,
became of age, or at the time of his marriage. Though
additions have from time to time been made to the house,
the main structure is perhaps the same that Jonathan Fair-
banks, the first of the name in Dedham, built for the use
of his family.

HOUSES OF THE MINISTERS OF THE DEDHAM
CHURCHES.

Tradition assigns to a spot near the present Orthodox
Congregational Church the site of the house of John Allin,
the revered first minister of the church; and that Mr.
Adams afterwards occupied the same house is a well-
known fact. The house built by Rev. Mr. Belcher, the
third minister of Dedham, and afterwards occupied suc-
cessively by Dexter and Haven, the fourth and fifth
ministers, and in which they all died, stood near the
site of the church ; it was taken down about the time



25OTH ANNIVERSARY. 1 8/

the new church was built in 18 19. It is an interesting
fact that we are thus able to identify, with a reasonable
degree of certainty, the dwelling-places of the first five
ministers of the Dedham Church, covering a period of
more than one hundred and sixty years.

THE HOUSE OF TIMOTHY DWIGHT, THE ANCESTOR
OF THE DWIGHT FAMILY IN AMERICA.

This house stood on the east side of East Street, a few
feet northwest of the northerly abutment of the railroad
bridge, on land granted by the proprietors in the first allot-
ments made to John Dwight, the father of the first Timothy,
who erected the house. Both father and son were for many
years prominent in Dedham affairs. Timothy Dwight died
in 171 8, at the age of eighty-eight.

In 1664 a valuation of the houses in town was recorded,
in which the house of Timothy Dwight appeared by far
the most valuable in the town at that time. The house
was taken down about 1849, when the West Roxbury
Branch of the Boston and Providence Railroad was built.
It was once owned and occupied as a place of business by
Benjamin Bussey.

THE DEXTER HOUSE.

This fine mansion was built about the year 1765 by
Samuel Dexter. He was the son of Rev. Samuel Dexter,
fourth minister of the Dedham Church, and was born in
Dedham in 1726. He entered mercantile life at an early
age, and having acquired considerable property came
Nov. 4, 1762, to reside in his native town, where for many
years he exercised great influence, and held many impor-
tant offices in the church and the town. Mr. Dexter was
a representative in the General Court for several years.



1 88 THE TOWN OF DEDHAM.

was five years a delegate to the Provincial Congress, was
a member of the Supreme Executive Council of the State,
and was active in directing military operations at the
beginning of the Revolutionary War. He was deeply in-
terested in the cause of education, and was a frequent
benefactor of the schools of Dedham, and in recognition
of the service which he had rendered, his name was given
to the school at the Upper Village. On the death of his
wife in 1784 he removed to Mendon, where he died
June 10, 1 8 10, in the eighty-fifth year of his age. In his
will he bequeathed five thousand dollars to found the
Dexter Professorship in Harvard College.

Mr. Dexter was the father of Samuel Dexter, the third of
the name, and the distinguished lawyer and statesman, who
was born during his father's residence in Boston, but who
came to Dedham when but a year old, where he remained
during his boyhood and until his entrance to Harvard Col-
lege in 1777, from which institution he was graduated in
1781. Until his sudden death in 1816 he was one of the
most distinguished men in public life, having been a Sena-
tor and Representative in Congress, Secretary of War and
Secretary of the Treasury during the administration of the
elder Adams.

After the removal of Samuel Dexter, 2d, from Dedham
in 1784, the house was successively occupied by Dr. John
Sprague, Samuel Swett, and others, and for several years
past has been owned and occupied by the family of the
late Dr. Ebenezer G. Burgess.

HOUSE OF DR. NATHANIEL AMES.

This house was built in 1772 by Dr. Nathaniel Ames, 2d,
and was occupied by him until his death, July 21, 1822, at
the age of eighty-one years. It is now owned and occu-
pied by Dr. J. P. Maynard. Dr. Ames was the elder



25OTH ANNIVERSARY. 1 89

brother of Fisher Ames, of whom he was in poHtics a vio-
lent opponent. He was first clerk of the courts of Nor-
folk County, and a physician in large practice. Dr. Ames
was a son of Dr. Nathaniel Ames, known as the almanac
maker, who removed from Bridgewater to Dedham in 1732,
and published almanacs from 1726 to 1765. His son. Dr.
Nathaniel Ames, 2d, continued the same some ten years
afterward. He was a brother of Fisher Ames, and brother-
in-law of Jeremiah Shuttleworth, the first postmaster, hav-
ing married Meletiah Shuttleworth. By his will his estate
passed to his niece, Hannah Shuttleworth, and by her will
many interesting documents pass to the Dedham Histori-
cal Society, including a diary kept by Dr. Ames from
the time he was in college, 1758, to the time of his death
in 1822.



HOUSE OF FISHER AMES.

This house, now owned by Mr. F. J. Stimson, has been
so enlarged and reconstructed that it bears no resemblance
to the mansion completed by Fisher Ames in 1795. Still,
the frame of that house is in the main portion of the pres-
ent structure, and the form of the drawing-rooms remains.
The Ames mansion was a square house, having a hip roof
with a balustrade. It had capacious outbuildings, and a
carriage-house with a high-arched doorway. Here Fisher
Ames lived until his death, July 4, 1808. His widow and
family continued to live in it for many years ; but after the
death of John Worthington Ames, the eldest son, in 1833,
several of the children having died previously, Mrs. Ames
went to reside with her son, the late Judge Seth Ames,
then a practising lawyer in Lowell. The house was
afterward owned and occupied for a short time by Gen.
William Gibbs McNeill, who was the chief engineer in
the construction of the Boston and Providence Railroad.



IQO THE TOWN OF DEDHAM.

It was next owned and occupied by Ellsha Turner, but
after his death it was sold to John Gardner, who occupied
it for many years, and in his hands the estate under-
went many changes, the houses on both sides having
been built by him. Finally, in 1868 it came into the hands
of Edward Stimson, who so remodelled, enlarged, and
enriched the house by costly improvements as completely
to transform its appearance.



THE HAVEN HOUSE.

Samuel Haven, who in 1795 built the stately mansion
now owned by Mr. John R. Bullard, was born in Dedham,
April 3, 1 77 1. He was the son of Rev. Jason and Cath-
erine Haven, was graduated at Harvard College in 1789,
and studied law with Fisher Ames, of Dedham, and with
his cousin, Samuel Dexter, in Boston. On the formation
of Norfolk County in 1793, he was appointed Register of
Probate. In 1802 he was commissioned as a Justice of the
Court of Common Pleas, and in 1804 was appointed Chief
Justice, which office he held until 181 1, when the court was
abolished. Mr. Haven continued in the office of Register
of Probate until 1833, a period of forty years, but retired
almost wholly from legal practice when he resigned, and
not long after removed to Roxbury, where he continued
to reside with his daughter until his death, which occurred
Sept. 4, 1847, at the age of seventy-six years. Judge
Haven's intellectual tastes were for theology rather than
law ; but the chief occupations of practical interest to him
were horticulture and architecture. He spent much time
and money in the construction of his house, and the laying
out and embellishment of the grounds, making it one of
the most beautiful estates in Norfolk County. The vener-
able and beautiful English elms standing in front of the
house were set out by Judge Haven in 1789, the year in



25OTH ANNIVERSARY. I9I

which he was graduated from college. In 1844 he sold
the house to the late Freeman Fisher, who occupied it
until 1854, when it passed into the possession of the late
John Bullard, and thence into the hands of the present
owner, who has done much still further to beautify and
adorn it.



THE DOWSE HOUSE.

This beautiful estate, now owned and occupied by Dr.
Henry P. Quincy, was probably built very early in the
present century by Edward Dowse, who was born in
Charlestown in 1756, and who during his early life was
engaged in commerce in China and the East Indies. He
married Sarah, daughter of Hon. William Phillips, of Boston.
Mr. and Mrs. Dowse left Boston at the time of the yellow
fever in 1797, and went for a few weeks' residence to the
old house on the Sprague Farm at Dedham Low Plain.
The owner having occasion to use the house, Mr. Dowse
came to the village, and purchasing land on both sides of
High Street, built this house, — living, until it was ready
for occupancy, in a smaller one standing near the present
front gate, and which was afterward removed to the upper
village. These narrow quarters did not limit the hospi-
tality in which he delighted, and he used to entertain the
principal members of Boston society there at dinner,
though the company had to sit on the stairs and on the
bed in one of the rooms while the table was laid in the
other.

The clock on the steeple of the meeting-house of the
First Parish was the gift of Mr. Dowse and his wife and
her sister, in giving which they said that they wished to
give something to the town which would benefit all sects
and parties alike.

The late Edmund Quincy, the grand-nephew of Mr.



192 THE TOWN OF DEDHAM.

Dowse, and who subsequently became the owner of the
property, in his admirable biography of his father, Josiah
Quincy, gives the following interesting reminiscences of
Mr. Dowse and his family : —

" Mrs. Dowse and her sister, Mrs. Shaw, were twins, and so
closely resembled each other as to be undistinguishable, the one
from the other, by their nearest friends, excepting by a slight dif-
ference of dress. The country people around were accustomed to
speak of the three as * Mr. Dowse and his two wives.' Yet they
never spoke of them but with love and gratitude ; for their bounty
was only limited by their means, and their charity neither begun
nor stayed at home. Any Life of my father would be imperfect with-
out a tribute of affectionate remembrance to those beloved rela-
tives, and, least of all, any written by me, who am daily reminded
of them by the roof that shelters me, by the trees they planted, and
by the river that they loved. . . . Mrs. Dowse and Mrs. Shaw did
not change to the end of their lives the fashion of the dress of
their prime ; and they remained until long into this century in
look and manner examples of the gentlewomen of the pre-Revolu-
tionary period."

Mr. Dowse was elected to Congress from this district as
a Democrat in 18 19, but disliking life at Washington, he
resigned at the close of the long session and returned to
Dedham. He died here in 1828, in the seventy-third year
of his age. Mrs. Shaw died in 1833 and Mrs. Dowse in
1839, when the estate passed into the possession of their
nephew, Hon. Josiah Quincy, and thence into that of his
son, the late Edmund Quincy. Mr. and Mrs. Dowse and
Mrs. Shaw were buried in the Dowse tomb in the village
cemetery, and on the monument covering their remains
Mr. Quincy, the elder, inscribed a touching tribute to their
worth.

Mr. Edmund Quincy came with his family from Boston
to reside in this house in 1840, and remained here until his
death, which took place May 17, 1877, in the seventieth
year of his age. Mr. Quincy was an accomplished and



25OTH ANNIVERSARY. 1 93

elegant scholar, a brilliant writer, an earnest advocate of
the abolition of slavery, a good neighbor and citizen. His
memory will long be cherished in our midst.

THE SHUTTLEWORTH HOUSE.

This house stood at the junction of High and Church
streets. It was built by Jeremiah Shuttleworth, the first
postmaster of Dedham, and here the post-office was kept
for more than forty years. For many years afterward it
was owned and occupied by his daughter Hannah. At
her decease, in the early part of the present year, she be-
queathed the house, land, and ten thousand dollars to the
Dedham Historical Society. The house has been removed,
and upon the lot a substantial fire-proof brick building will
soon be erected by the Society.

THE WOODWARD TAVERN.

On the estate formerly owned by Fisher Ames, near the
corner of High and Ames streets, formerly stood the Ordi-
nary, or Tavern, first kept by Joshua Fisher and his descen-
dants from 1658 to 1730; by Dr. Nathaniel Ames, Sr., " the
Almanack maker," from 1735 to 1764; known as Ames's
Tavern to 1772, afterward as Woodward's Tavern. Here
the Suffolk Convention assembled Sept. 6, 1774. Here
Fisher Ames was born, 1758. The house was demolished
in 1817.

From the early settlement and until a very recent period
the Tavern was a recognized and, it may be said, an
Ordinary institution of Dedham. But Woodward's Tav-
ern became historic, not merely as having been the birth-
place of Fisher Ames and the dispensary of good cheer,
but as having been the place where the famous Suffolk
Convention was organized Sept. 6, 1774, to which Dedham
sent five delegates. A large committee was chosen to



194 THE TOWN OF DEDHAM.

prepare resolutions, and the convention then adjourned to
meet at the house of Daniel Vose, in Milton, where on
Friday, Sept 9, 1774, Gen. Joseph Warren reported to the
convention the Suffolk resolutions which he had drafted.
They were read several times and unanimously adopted.

" Those who now or in after times shall examine the journal of
the earliest Continental Congress in search of the first recorded
resolution to try the issue with Great Britain, if need be at the point
of the sword, will find the doings of this convention entered at
length upon its pages, appearing as the medium through which the
object of their assembling was first presented to their deliberations,
and serving as the basis of their subsequent proceedings. The
house of Richard Woodward most of us remember. In it was
born Fisher Ames. Was it not the birthplace of the American
Revolution?"^

Site of the First Meetiftg-Hotise, built in 1638 on or near
the site of the present Unitarian Church.

Site of the First Episcopal Church, on Church Street,
near the grain store of Amory Fisher. Built in 1761.

Site of the First Court House, built in 1795, and occupied
until the dedication of the new Court House, in 1827, on
Court Street, fronting Meeting-House Common.

Site of the First Schoolhoiise, built in 1648, and standing
near the site of the Unitarian Vestry.

Site of the First Jail, built in 1795, and standing near
the junction of Court and Highland streets.

Site of the Law Office of Horace Mann, standing at the
junction of Court and Church streets, now the dwelling-
house of Mrs. L. C. Weeks. Mr. Mann began the practice
of law in Dedham in 1828, where he remained until his re-
moval to Boston in 1835. He represented Dedham in the
General Court during five of the seven years in which he
resided here.

1 Haven's Centennial Address, 1836, p. 45.



25OTH ANNIVERSARY. 1 95

Site of the Law Office of Fisher Ames, built in 1794, on
the corner of Court and High streets, near the Pitt's Head.
The building was afterward remodelled and reconstructed
as a dwelling-house. It was removed when the new Court
House was built, and again when the Dcdham Bank build-
ing was erected. It was a perfect sample of the old time
country lawyer's office. After the death of Fisher Ames
it was occupied by his son, John Worthington Ames, and
then by James Richardson ; and subsequently by Theron
Metcalf, afterward Judge of the Supreme Court. The late
Ex-Governor Clifford, Judge Seth Ames, and many other
lawyers of eminence in this and other States there read
law with Judge Metcalf.



196 THE TOWN OF DEDHAM.



FINAL ACTION OF THE TOWN.

At a Meeting of the inhabitants of the town of Dedham
held at Memorial Hall, April 4, 1887,—

Under Article 30, it was " Voted to raise and appropriate
the sum of $1090.29 to cover expenditures made under
the direction of the Committee in celebrating the Two
Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary."

Under Article 34, it was ** Voted that a committee,
consisting of John R. Bullard, Henry O. Hildreth,
Julius H. Tuttle, Erastus Worthington, Winslow
Warren, and Don Gleason Hill be appointed to take
charge of the printing of the proceedings of the Two
Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary, with instructions to
print an edition of one thousand copies to be sold at cost,
and that the sum of $750.00 be raised and appropriated
therefor."

At a meeting of the Committee appointed under the
foregoing vote of the town, held on Friday, June 3, 1887,
Henry O. Hildreth and Winslow Warren were
chosen a sub-committee to prepare and print a suitable
volume of the Proceedings at the Two Hundred and
Fiftieth Anniversary of the Incorporation of Dedham.



^y



APPENDIX.



I. — ODE AND VERSES.



Frederic J. Stimson.

ORGAN.



Music by ARTHUR W. Thayer.




VOICES AND ORGAN.




:1ti4



i£E^



i^Efej^3^ife3^:



:*:



*



r



A - thwart the way our fathers laid, The sum - mer sun - light falls ;
The har - vest falls from broader fields, The wan - ing woods are few ;



The
Food



f—t—t-, •£•• T - T-



t



^ — ^-



±:



-P^



^^ ^rEj^t^^-bJ— ^:^^^^Efe^SE^



^^^



:St



m



elms our fathers set still shade The road, 'twixt church and pas - ture made ; The
for a world their homestead yields, All earth's op - pressed their shel-ter shields, A

fr. r f f.r f- 1-



m



*=|c



-t b



:fc=£



£



^



— ^^S



:U:



^=bzd=M=



^^r



// stones their plough-shares first up - laid Still lie in mos - sy walls.
J^ na - tion's ner - ved arm now wields The truth that first they knew.



m



^



m



U-



*



m.



r




i



-(S2_



Con -
Un -



r rjr r T'^Tii



Down from the western hills our own Still roam - ing riv - er runs.
Be not a - lone a har - vest won Of gold, from la - bored hours ;



g^



■J^-:^



£-•



J-c^J^



tic



J :^A AA^_



f-F



tent in Ded - ham's arms a - lone To lie and mir - ror spire and stone — The
do not what their hands have done, Nor bind with wealth they sought to shun ; Still



5=b-



S



i^t



=t=-E:



-t===-\



>— ^-:



P I



^




^



rob - in, to our fa - thers known, Still
ring the bells at set of sun, Our

I. ^ J J -i- J' J J-
-•-^ — • — ^ — s J ^ » — i — ~



sings for us, their sons,

fa - thers' God, and ours.



A



m



r




VOICES. Allegro moderato.



Unisons, f p^"^!/ I



P^



For the ful - ness
From sins of



of
the



earth,
few.



Unisons.



m^^



M



^=



t



j-



=K



5r^-



For the
From



ORGAN. Allegro moderato.





'^^



light of the

crimes of the



sky,
man



^-r



S



P^



For their death, for our

From pro - phets un



:t:









m



s=J^






-^ - -



' ^"""^'^ ^ V 3

3

Born of the word of light,

Crime that ig-n'rance frees;



^



"^



X



-J-



Won
Lust,



by the deed of
that is born of



4— V. -^ — a 1 w



s



V—\0t—\/-







^



-I*:



^



- {y- — g-i^



e



r




^ N ^



^.^ ^



/■/« mossfl.



til:



g



might,
ease;



:^



Saved by the sow-ing of sight -
Hate that is born of these ■

3



U^^



»-:—0-

For the
From the



# • • — I-



^:t:t=p=g



P



^r^'











light in the eyes and the love in the hearts of men That
curse of false lights and wor - ship of earth, and then



^



S



:tji:



-I F p-



H



fe^



S



^^



S






brings men to be brave in war, And true in the love of all

Doubt and for - - get - - ting of God, and death of the



,-^i^n,n






A h 1






JLJ2U ^


na


^


ISI


^b .








eJ


^^^ - =-


EK


■"


^






^ tempo.






P



i?^



things — Glo

soul in men ; Wealth



^t-^^



ry of deed that is past,
that is ea - sy won,

N K N '^^ ^ N

y N r -9- -0-



=^t^



^-






-t:^







-0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- M§- -^ ■§- -^ -# - #- -^ -^ -^- -^- T^




Safe
Free



- ty of State that is fast,
dom, too soon un - done,



^



~.l



V-t^-



*EE



Hope that is now and shall

Mai - - ice that masks the






ii



«^






^^



1



5=^=^:



^



r



r-



f=






k^



Maestoso.



r^r



-s^-



::|v



^



1



last-
sun ;



For the flow'r
From con



and the fruit,
fiict of class,



For the
From



P



H-^tfe-tf



I



^



^



I



j^— -



/y L.



Maestoso.



g-ts' #-<-#-*— F-|— I — i^^j — ! — ^1 — Lg.^ — 0—0 — — — — 9 — — ^_u




m~^



-^



^M



rr^




Perdendosi.




UJ^j



Maestoso.




25OTH ANNIVERSARY. 205

II.

ANNIVERSARY POEM.

Among other contributions which the unexpected
length of the programme prevented utihzing on the
occasion, was the following poem, written, at the request
of the Committee of Arrangements, by Charles A. Mackin-
tosh, a member and Secretary of the Committee until a
few weeks before the celebration, when sickness enforced
his resignation and absence from the proceedings.

Mother of towns ! Thy children bow

In filial reverence here to-day.
The years lie lightly on thy brow,

Thy locks but show the trace of gray ;
And never sweeter were than now

The smiles that o'er thy features play.

To us of later, busier days

A thought old-fashioned seems thy dress ;
Thy mien sedate, thy cautious ways,

Thy standard of fastidiousness,
Thy calm content if matters each

Glide softly in the accustomed groove.
Little accord with those who preach :

" No matter where you move — but move ! "

And yet, as when we turn our eyes

From chromo-lithographic art
To where, in fading lines, there lies

Some work where truth alone had part ;
Or when upon the wearied ear,

Tortured with songs made to be sold,
Deafened by cacophonic seer,

Falls some grand harmony of old, —



206 THE TOWN OF DEDHAM.

We learn the lesson, needed sore

In this our feverish modern time, —
Leave not the foothold gained before

Till surely, higher, may we climb !
So, Mother Town, thine honored age

The more endears thee to each heart ;
We would not blot a single page.

We love thee better as thou art.



I love not the historian's trade,

In antiquarian dry-as-dust.
Each spade need not be proved a spade,

Some things we safely take on trust.
The distant star, the sunset skies,

The turbulent sea's sublime unrest,
Have charms one may not analyze

By any microscopic test.



What triumph for historic truth

To make the ennobling facts appear, —
This sage was flighty in his youth ;

That hero partial to his beer;
This orator took snuff, and that

Wofully shabby was in dress ;
While yon, the great divine, waxed fat

And fancied onions to excess ?



We gaze upon the far-off height,

Robed in its own ethereal blue ;
How vastly more sublime the sight.

If at the time we only knew
The northeast half was owned by Shaw,

The other moiety was Sense's,
And Shaw was threatening Bense with law

Because he would n't mend his fences !



25OTH ANNIVERSARY. 2O7


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12

Online LibraryDedham (Mass.)Proceedings at the celebration of the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the incorporation of the town of Dedham, Massachusetts, September 21, 1886 → online text (page 12 of 13)