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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

PRESENTED BY

PROF. CHARLES A. KOFOID AND
MRS. PRUDENCE W. KOFOID



TIGER SLAYER BY ORDER



BY THE S4ME AUTHOR

DULALL, THE FOREST GUARD

By C. E. GOULDSBURY

LIFE IN THE INDIAN POLICE
By C. E. GOULDSBURY

TIGERLAND

REMINISCENCES OF FORTY YEARS' SPORT
AND ADVENTURE IN BENGAL

By C. E. GOULDSBURY



TIGER SLAYER BY
ORDER

(DIGBT DALIES, LATE BOMBAY POLICE)



BY



C. E. GOULDSBURY

(LATE INDIAN POLICE)

AUTHOR OF "DULALL, THE FOREST GUARD" A TALE OF SPORT AND
ADVENTURES IN BENGAL ; " LIFE IN THE INDIAN



WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS



LONDON

CHAPMAN & HALL, LTD.
1915



DEDICATED

BY SPECIAL REQUEST OF MR. DIGBY DAVIES TO
AND WITH KIND PERMISSION OF

THE RT. HON. LORD HARRIS, G.C.S.I., G.C.I.E.

LATE GOVERNOR OF BOMBAY, DURING WHOSE TENURE
OF GOVERNORSHIP MR. DIGBY DAVIES ENJOYED HIS BEST
YEARS OF SERVICE, AND THROUGH WHOSE KIND OFFICES
HE WAS ENABLED TO CARRY OUT HIS SHOOTING
EXPEDITION INTO SOMALILAND, N.-E. AFRICA

THE AUTHOR



M304Q93



AUTHOR'S NOTE



THIS work, to which I have given the title of " Tiger Slayer
by Order," as being obviously the most suitable, has been
compiled entirely from notes and stories, furnished by Mr.
Digby Davies, late a Deputy-Inspector-General of the
Indian Police, and contains his own experiences as a Police
Officer, and Bhil Agent coupled with the unique office of
Tiger Slayer to the Government of Bombay.

Mr. Digby Davies served for over thirty years in that
Presidency, and during this long period had many and
exceptional opportunities of indulging his great taste for
sport, especially when carrying out his duties as " Tiger
Slayer." I have, at his request, endeavoured, with the
aid of his notes, to construct a tale or rather, autobio-
graphical narration of his adventures and experiences,
and in order to do this have necessarily been obliged to
make use of the first person throughout.

To relate another's story is, naturally, more difficult
than to tell one's own ; but in this case Mr. Davies' accounts
of his adventures are so full, and his descriptions of the
appearance and habits of the various animals he
encountered given in such detail, that my task has been
comparatively easy, and a very pleasant one.

In my last book " Tigerland " written also in these
lines, I was, for reasons given, in the Preface to that work,
unfortunately unable to divulge the name of the individual
whose experiences I was narrating. Thus, in spite of my
explanation, I was undeservedly credited with having
experienced the adventures myself.

In the present instance, however, being under no such
restriction, I am glad to be in a position to acknowledge

b vii



AUTHOR'S NOTE

my indebtedness to Mr. Digby Davies by name, for the
excellent material which has enabled me to compile this
work, as well as for the interesting photographs from which
the illustrations have been taken. Mr. Davies' hunting
experiences were not confined to India alone, for during
one period of leave, he made an expedition to Somaliland
where he was singularly fortunate in procuring several
elephants and lions, besides specimens of nearly every
other wild animal to be found in that country. An account
of these adventures is given in this narrative and should
make interesting reading from the sportsman's point of
view.

In conclusion, I take this opportunity of acknowledging
the numerous and very favourable notices accorded by the
Press to my last book " Tigerland " and venture to
hope that the present volume may meet with a similar
reception.

AUTHOR.

MALVERN WELLS,
July, 1915.



Vlll



CONTENTS



PAGE

AUTHOR'S NOTE . ... vii



CHAPTER I

Decide on an Indian career The lure of big-game hunting Consider-
ing ways and means of adopting it professionally Final resolution
Sail for India En route for Bombay The pains and pleasures
of a voyage to the East A game of quoits interrupted Man
overboard Attempts at rescue The shark and its victim Some
remarks about sharks Superstitions concerning them The voyage
at an end Anxiety to land explained " Privilege leave," its
object and advantages described A description of Bombay First
impressions of the East The Elephanta caves, or temples, and
their gods 'The Towers of Silence cemeteries Swarms of vultures
Gruesome reasons for their presence Parsis, their origin,
customs and religion: an enlightened and interesting race
Preparation for journey to Guzerafr Bullock- carts described
Anticipation of sport Purchase a gun in the Bazar Discomfort
and luxury of railway travelling in India Full length sleeping
accommodation Long journeys rendered comfortable , . .



CHAPTER II

A journey by bullock-cart Come across antelope A successful stalk
Skinning my first trophy Exhibiting my prize Join the 19th
Native Infantry A martinet C.O. Life at Malegown Hurdle
races and a fall A novel remedy The Station Shikari and his
wiles Paying for experience Beating for a phantom panther
Counterfeited footprints The fraud detected Flight of the
culprit Pursuit and punishment A description of the offender
Experientia docet Unreliability of native information Lying
to please Other reasons for false reports of game Tact and
temper necessary to success Rewards for true information
Money well laid out How to acquire experience A sad incident
in our station life Skylarking ends in a disaster Going to a race
meeting by rail Walking along the foot-board Approaching a
bridge Warned too late Cannoned off into the river Body
subsequently recovered 9

ix



CONTENTS



CHAPTER III

Leave Malegown for Khandesh Appointed Assistant Political Agent
and Adjutant Bhil Police Corps My chief A fine old sportsman
Air-guns dangerous at times A marvellous performance Some
reminiscences of my early youth An accommodating tutor
Questionable justice My headquarters in Khandesh A palatial
residence Description of my duties A banyan tree tribunal
Some accounts of the Bhils, their belief in witchcraft Omens and
superstitions, love of sport Legend of their origin Life in the
station Christmas camps Running amok A thrilling experience
Shooting a Havildar My first tiger A description of the beast
Rejoicings in camp An unselfish sportsman Efficiency of a
500 Rigby Express rifle The best weapon in those days for tigers
Diversity of opinion as to rifles Various weapons or projectiles
used by well-known sportsmen To be judged by results Best
rifles for soft-skinned and heavy game described in next chapter . . 16



CHAPTER IV

Some talk about rifles for big game Efficiency of small bores doubtful
Selous on this subject Knowledge of anatomy An important
factor A quotation from Sanderson An advocate for heavy
weapons Rifles recommended Sir Samuel Baker's opinion
Experiments I have made Various projectiles used with results
Some rifles I have used Apology for digression Narrative resumed
The district of Khandesh described How the Bhils were civilized
The necessity for a local and special officer His duties Experi-
ence, how gained The origin of the office of Tiger Slayer Cattle
and human beings destroyed by tigers Khandesh a stronghold of
wild beasts Special body of hunters from Bhil Corps Government
elephants Useful to shoot off or as beaters 23



CHAPTER V

A description of my Shikaris A reliable quartette The wild man of
the woods A true Aborigine My first introduction to him The
palaver Brother Shikaris Become the best of friends His
progress in life The tiger, and how to get him The best season
for tiger shooting Baiting the jungles Looking up the baits
Tracking by footprints Stops on trees The drive Monkeys and
peacocks as guides Random shooting to be avoided Following up
a wounded tiger Dangerous but necessary Precautions to be
taken The art of tracking How to be acquired Difficult at first
Hyena or panther How a tiger can be distinguished from a
tigress An adventure on the Satpuda hills A tigress and her cubs
Arranging the beat The tigress viewed A beater charged
Seeks refuge in a tree Seized by the leg I go to the rescue The
wounded man sent into camp Tigress takes cover Refuses to
come out We attack her in her stronghold A furious charge and
subsequent retreat Darkness sets in We leave her for the night . 30



CONTENTS
CHAPTER VI

PAGE

Resume the attack A bait taken The tigress charges A difficult shot
Hit Wounded mortally, yet attacks a beater I go to the rescue
A fortunate escape Tigers not incapable of climbing trees The
wounded man recovers Wounds from tiger's teeth and claws The
character of tigers described Man-eaters Causes that produce
them Fallacies regarding man-eaters News of another tiger
Posted on foot Killed with a single buUet Tenacity of life
Fortunately rare A dangerous sport A tigress with cubs One
bagged An unexpected attack Fire both barrels into her face
The tigress gets home I am knocked over A period of un-
consciousness Badly clawed and bitten Saved by Bapu's pluck
Bandaging the wound Carried into camp Treatment and
eventual recovery The dangers of a light rifle Heavy casualty list
in Khandesh Another instance of light rifle inefficiency Monkeys
give the alarm Sudden appearance of the tiger An unfortunate
slip Reserving my fire A terrified dog-boy Tiger sits up dog-
fashion A perilous situation The tiger fortunately retires Send
for heavy rifle Tracking up the tiger Success at last A fine
trophy 37



CHAPTER VII

A rare chance A bull bison and a tiger Hopes of a record " Right
and left " Beating on spec The bull bison viewed Changing my
rifle About to pull the trigger The tiger appears on the scene
An unparalleled situation A chance of making history Another
change of rifles Fatal hesitation The tiger alarmed Making off
at a gallop A difficult shot The record unachieved The tigress
shot The light rifle scores for once Another tiger killed
Evidence in favour of the heavier weapon Experience gained as
Tiger Slayer Some remarks on tigers Varieties of the species
Hot and cold weather coats Colour a sign of age Muscular
development " Lucky bones " Cattle-killing and hill tigers Dif-
ference in weight and size Length of tigers Methods of measure-
ment Age difficult to determine How a tiger kills its prey
Manner of eating Not necessarily nocturnal in its habits An
example The tiger's attack Wounds generally fatal Time of
breeding Number of cubs produced Devouring their young
Feeding the cubs Cubs as pets Tiger fat and rheumatism Milk
of tigress as medicine Adventures of a sample Legends and
superstitions A curiosity in tigers Declared a new species The
mystery solved Disillusion 44



CHAPTER VIII

i

Tiger Slayer and Policeman A useful combination Tracking a dacoit
leader A troublesome gang Eluding the police In pursuit My
early morning visitor A nude, wild figure An unexpected meeting
A conditional surrender suggested Offer of a drink Sampling
the brandy Arrested in the act Camp life in India Tents

xi



CONTENTS

PAGE

Council round the camp fire Useful information thus acquired
A day in camp described Fascination of the life Camping near
jungles Noises in the night As music to the sportsman
Possibilities of adventure, an example A dinner interrupted
Pace to face with a leopard Dangerous curiosity Another
camp adventure A shooting camp disturbed Besieged by a
wild elephant Its threatening attitude A thrilling moment
Suspense relieved A well-considered shot Comical conclusion
A Christmas camp Some bears marked down The beat begun A
frock-coated sportsman Charged by a bear His headlong flight
Coat-tails flying Caught in a creeper A Scotch doctor to the
rescue A lucky fluke " Get up, mon, I've shot the bar " Proud
of his success His boast ... ... 53



CHAPTER IX

A bear adventure Following up the tracks A black object seen An
erroneous conclusion Firing too hastily An old woman shot dead
Howls from the Press Bloodthirsty suggestions Another bear
adventure A short-sighted sportsman " Thinking it was a bear "
" What, not dead yet?" The second barrel A revelation and
explanation Disturbing the bees Pandemonium Horses stung
to death Floods in Khandesh A perilous adventure Saving a
woman's life Native gratitude A thankless task A change of
headquarters My mosque bungalow Said to be haunted The
ghost appears Life at Nundobar Coursing jackals, etc. Cholera
epidemic A village devastated Lose my cook Death of the
apothecary I turn doctor A successful prescription Administer-
ing the mixture My patient recovers A claim for damages A
police mutiny averted Drastic measures My orders upheld My
first attempt at spearing a panther on horseback An exciting chase
The panther crouching Avoids the thrust Seeks refuge amongst
the rocks A lucky escape Panther spearing A dangerous but
most attractive form of sport Railways and their influence on
game Revisiting old hunting grounds Ravages caused by axe and
plough The march of civilization Jungle now devoid of game
Sic transit gloria mundi 62



CHAPTER X

My duties as tiger slayer Panthers included Some description of
them Variety of the species Size, weight, and markings What
they prey on Climbing powers Their courage and ferocity in
attack How they feed on their kills Man-eating leopards The
black panther rare The cheetah Panthers difficult to locate
Returning to their kills Dangerous to follow up An experiment
with buck shot S.S.G. best for close quarters Panther un-
expectedly encountered My Shikari attacked and mauled A huge
beast Another panther hunt Attacks and mauls beater Its final
charge Finished with S.S.G. The uncertainty of sport Killed
with a single shot Handsomely marked skins An unusual sight
Tiger and panther seen together Abject terror of the latter
Slinking off into the jungle A tiger's sovereignty of the jungles

xii



CONTENTS

PAGE

The wild boar excepted Uncertainty The fascination of Indian
sport An unexpected meeting with a bear Bagged Capture the
cu b Becomes quite tame in time Walking out with the dogs A
leopard adventure in Bengal Shooting for the pot A partridge
shot Retrieving the bird Sudden appearance of a leopard
Changing cartridges Leopard dropped but still alive Attempts
to charge No more ball cartridge On the horns of a dilemma
My orderly's ingenuity An extemporized projectile Complete
success 7 1

CHAPTER XI

Take three months' leave A shooting trip to Central Provinces A fine
shooting country Local Shikaris A monster tiger bagged Hear
of many bears Sitting up at night A great fusillade Surprising
result My feat with a -360 Hitting the right spot A fine bison
brought to bag Stalking a herd Within ten yards of a bull A
tempting shot -Taking a risk The "360 scores again Astonishing
my friend A remarkable performance Small bores not suitable for
big game Exceptional cases The Indian bison -Where to be
found Average size of General appearance Description of the
horns Difference between bulls and cows Difficult to approach
Solitary bulls Savage and morose Stalking two bulls Risking a
shot " Missed " A long chase Come upon them at last Off
again Another long chase Pound once more A right and left
Doubt as to result Following up A pleasing surprise Both found
dead Camping out for the night A favourite resort for bison
Encounter with a solitary bull The first shot Following up
tracks A determined charge Effects of an 8-bore Why solitary
bulls are savage Dangerous not only to sportsmen Expelled from
herds Solitary wild elephants and buffalo 80



CHAPTER XII

The Indian wild buffalo Its size, appearance and habitat Dangers
in tracking them up An encounter with a solitary bull A shot
with 10-bore rifle Hit but not disabled At bay Effects of a
second shot Threatening to charge A timely shot Floored A
herd encountered Selecting the bull Badly hit but makes off
Found lying up Dead or alive? The question unexpectedly
solved The advantage of being prepared A shot in the chest
The last gallop Buffalo shooting a dangerous pastime Poor
trophies as a rule The Indian bear A terror to the native Attack
without provocation Many victims Bears uncertain in temper
Effects of feeding on intoxicating berries -Dangerous to tackle
Very tenacious of life Size and general appearance Where found
The best plan for bear shooting They afford good sport Two
narrow escapes An exciting adventure No room for two to pass
A lucky shot The non-dangerous big game of India First in size
and importance The sambar Some description of this animal A
good head A fine trophy The bara-sing or swamp deer Its
resemblance to the red deer The chetul or spotted deer The
handsomest of the deer tribe The barking deer The mouse and
hog deer described 87

xiii



CONTENTS



CHAPTER XIII

PAGE

Indian antelope 'Black-buck the best known Where found Descrip-
tion, habits, etc. Rifle recommended The Indian gazelle The
gazelle or chinkara Its peculiar call The four-horned antelope
Flesh uneatable The Nil Ghi Meaning of the name Ibex or
wild goat of Asia Minor A stalk described Rolling down a
precipice Ibex driving in Afghanistan Posted to Sholapur No
big game Pig-sticking The sport described A comparison A
boar described Its formidable weapon How used Riding for
first spear Keen competition The pig-sticking spear Spears
used in Bombay and Madras The short spear of Bengal Blades
Varieties in shape of Horses best suited for the sport Cunning of
the boar Its courage and determination A formidable foe Some
runs described The secret of success Full speed a necessity A
sport sui generis I lose a favourite terrier from hydrophobia
Two servants bitten Apparently none the worse A tragic sequel
Both men die of hydrophobia No clue as to how the dog was
bitten The danger of owning pugnacious terriers Village curs
dangerous to fight with 95



CHAPTER XIV

A lack of amusement Fishing on the lake Good sport Snake charm-
ing A performance described " Music hath charms " Discordant
but fascinating Lured out of a well A marvellous performance
Removing poisonous fangs The hamadryad Its rapidity of move-
ment A friend's experience Hatching the eggs A male mother
The nest found A rare specimen The insatiable collector The
biter bit The snake stone Method of using it The cure effected
An heirloom Purging the stone A narrow escape Rough on
the fishing-rod A snake in the hall Prompt measures Taking
the bull by the horns A strange protest Posted to Shikapur
Its evil reputation The hottest place in India How we keep cool
at night Sand-flies and mosquitoes Sand storms No regular
rainfall A change to Sukkur Cold weather Short and severe
Wild-fowl in plenty Pleasant days at Khairpur An old-time
chieftain A sportsman over seventy Wild shooting Ali Murad
and his falcons A day's hawking Well-trained birds An old
reprobate Curious way of fishing 103



CHAPTER XV

After furlough Posted to Bijapur A city of the dead Tomb as
official residence Mosque with whispering gallery A dome larger
than St. Paul's My tomb-house Its advantage and drawbacks
Plague and famine My next station The sacred city of Nasik
On plague duty High-handedness and extortion Discontent
Riot and murder Victims of the plague Dacoities and sedition
Police measures A robber chief His formidable gang Baffles
the police A police post attacked Pursuit A havildar and his

xiv



CONTENTS



PAGE

men killed Vengeance on a spy Organize a flying column The
robber stronghold stormed Desperate resistance Heavy casualties
on both sides Capture of ring-leader and ihis gang Treasure
recovered A fine body of men A wounded robber chief in hospital
Some startling revelations A sporting ruffian Sedition in
Nasik Mistaken sympathy from the Press Trial and conviction
of the ring-leaders Inadequate sentences Agitation renewed
Manufacture of bombs Art acquired in Europe by so-called
students Murder of officials A judge shot in native theatre . . 110



CHAPTER XVI

Wild animals as pets I start a menagerie Experiments with tiger and
panther cubs Hunting by scent or sight and hearing ? A much-
vexed question practically decided Conclusive evidence " Billy,"
my tiger cub Pillow fights with tiger cubs The dog-boy and his
charges A troublesome pair Gymkhana for the police Bicycles
supersede horses Re-visit Khandesh A hunting box Old friends
Shooting under difficulties Blank days A tiger at last reported
The beat -A tiger and tigress put up Charging the beaters
Situation becomes dangerous Bescuing the stops The beat aban-
doned for the night Disappointment Nasik antiquities Traffic
in curios Made in Birmingham Transferred to Dharwar
Shooting off ladders An accident near ending in a tragedy Fit
only for a madhouse An interesting temple The god Khundobar
Said to have been a sportsman Hunting with his hounds
Worshippers assume attitude and character of dogs Feeding the
dog-devotees On all fours Biting and barking A repulsive and
degrading exhibition Backsheesh the main object .... 118



CHAPTER XVII

The Western Ghats Castle Eock and Morumgoa Fine scenery
Spend a hot season at Castle Eock A kill in a ravine The guns
posted A tiger viewed A doubtful hit Bapu the optimist A
tell-tale leaf An advance in close order The enemy prepares to
charge Careful shooting necessary Success Following up a
wounded bear A curious story Second sight An apparition in
the night Convincing evidence An apology to my readers
Another tiger marked down Caught napping An unexpected en-
counter My perilous position Face to face A desperate proceed-
ing Seeking refuge in a bush A precarious shelter Suspense
relieved A lucky shot Curious evidence of a recent victim A
man-eating panther Carries off a child The body found Watch-
ing over the remains An eerie vigil A jackal greedy but suspicious
The panther at last Creeping up to the " kill " Only five yards
off A steady shot at his chest Hit, but not dead Too dangerous
to follow up by night The hunt resumed Tracking by blood and
footprints Found dead A well-nourished beast The fallacy of
theories regarding man-eaters 126

XV



CONTENTS
CHAPTER XVIII

PAGE

A bait taken Living animals as bait A seemingly cruel practice
Reasons for adopting it A tigress put up Missed Charging
through the beaters Cubs discovered An all-night vigil The tigress
returns Finding her cubs Process described An opportunity
lost The cubs disappear Tigress or ghost How the cubs iwere
removed Morning at last Tracking upDeath of the tigress
The cubs found Dharwar again A shooting camp News of game
Daily disappointments Two tigers reported at last The beat
Turned by a stop A roar and a rush A hurried shot Instan-
taneous effects The tiger's mate Beaters charged again Marked
down Drawing lots for places A tempting offer Why I rejected
it Premature congratulation The tigress let off again Questions
and answers Extraordinary performance Subsequent explana-
tions What might have been accomplished The shikaris' disgust
A panther in my tent My dogs wake me up A desperate struggle
in the dark Firing haphazard A sudden crash Ominous silence
The servants aroused They arrive with a lantern What the light
revealed One dog missing Carried off by a panther A fruitless
pursuit in the dark Resumed at daybreak Remains of Rover
found An unsuccessful vigil The spot revisited months later A
panther shot Was it the same ? 134



CHAPTER XIX

The destruction of panthers Trapping often necessary A trap described
A trapping incident Screams in the dead of night Turning out
the guard Rush to the rescue What was found in the trap The
biter bit " A fine bait for the panther " Drugged and disorderly
Bhil police and prisoners How the position was reversed A par-
tridge shooting record The Dangchia Bhils An extraordinary .race
Monkeys and rats as food Belief in witchcraft Veneration for
tigers Habits and customs Another quaint people Professional
bird-snarers Their snares described A terror to legitimate sports-
men Why panthers are so destructive Less dangerous to human
life than tigers An example Sportsman charged by a wounded
tiger Attempt to escape A fatal slip Severely mauled Succumbs
to injuries Another fatal accident Wounded tiger in high grass
jungle A sudden charge Savage attack Shaken like a ratEx-
traordinary courage shown by a Goanese butler Grappling with a
tiger unarmed A double tragedy Twelve-foot tigers A myth
How to cure and preserve skin and heads Hot-blooded animals
should be skinned promptly Instructions for skinning Pegging
down How to retain proportions Burnt alum or wood ashes
Trophies to be looked after A curious result of neglect . . . 142



CHAPTER XX

An apology and explanation Big-game shooting and the camera Some
advice on the subject How a fine picture was saved Morumgoa
and Goa Poisonous water snakes and jelly fish Phenomenal


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