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Anode, 394.

Arago's electro-magnetic researches, 351.

Armatures, 185.

Armstrong's hydro-electrical machine, 210.

Astatic needle, 187.

Athermanous media, 123.

Atmosphere, low temperature of, superior
strata of, 54.; non-conductor of electricity,
198.

Attraction, magnetic, 152. ; electric, 189.

Aurora borealis, Influence of on magnetic

needle, 179.
Austral fluid, 155.
Axis, magnetic, 153. ; of circulating galvanic

current, 321.
Azimuth compass, 165.

Babbage's electro-magnetic researches, 351.
Bagration's galvanic system, 283.
Bain's electro-chemical telegraph, 436.
Balance-wheels, compensation of, 30.
Bar, magnetic, 161.

Battery, electric, 231 . ; voltaic, 280. 440.
Becquerel's galvanic system, 283. ; electro-
chemical researches, 405.
Bells, electric, 246.
Birds, plumage of, its uses, 110.
Blood, temperature of in human species,

Boiling point, 10. 99.

Boreal fluid, 155.

Buildings, metallic, 27.; warming, 38. 46.

106.; ventilation of, 38.
Bulb,thermometric, 7. ; liable to permanent

charge of capacity, 15.
Buusen's galvanic battery, 280.

Calcium, 418.

Caloric, 5.

Calorimeter, 48.

Calorimetry, 47. ; method of solving calori-

metric problems, 48.
Cavendish's electric barometer, 259.
Centigrade scale, 11.



Chemical effects of electricity, 264.

Chemistry, electro-, 393.

Children's great galvanic plate pile, 293.

Circuit, voltaic, 298. See Electricity.

Clothing, its properties, 111.

Cold, greatest natural, 81.

Combustibles, 3. 134.; illuminating power

of, 135.; constituents of, 135.; quantity of

heat developed by, 136.
Combustion, 3. 132. ; agency of oxygen in,

133.; combustibles, 134.; explained, 134.

temperature necessary to produce, 134.;

illuminating power of combustibles, 135.;

constituents of combustibles, 135.
Compass, azimuth, 165.; mariner's, 166.
Compensators, 27.
Compression of vapour, 96.
Coercive force, 156.
Coin, why stamped, not cast, 76.
Condensation, 2. 86.; of vapour, 105.
Condenser, electric, 214. ; principle of, 216. ;

forms of Culhbertson's, 218.
Conduction, heat, 107.; electricity, 196.;

magnetic, 3. 107.; electric, 196.
Conductibility, 3.
Conductors, heat, 4.; good and bad, 107.;

electric, 196. 237. ; connecting galvanic

elements, 292.
Congelation, 2. 67. ; latent heat rendered

sensible by, 65.; points of, 74.; of alcohol,

Contraction, 1.29 ; of solids, 26.; of mercury
in cooling, 76.

Coulomb's electroscope, 222.

Couronne des lasses, 289.

Crosse's electro-chemical researches, 406.

Cruikshank's galvanic arrangement, 290.

Currents, atmospheric, cause of, 41.; voltaic,
296. See Electricity ; rectilinear, 300. ;
indefinite, 300. ; closed, 300. ; circular or
spiral, 300. ; circulating, 320. ; spiral and
heliacal, 322. ; thermo-electric , 385.

Cuthbertson's electric condenser, 2. 218.

Dance, electric, 247.

Daniel's constant galvanic battery, 281. 294.

Davy, galvanic pile, 293. ; experiments in
electro-chemistry, 409. ; method of pre-
serving copper sheathing, 421. See Elec-
tricity.

Declination, 168. ; in different longitudes,
172. ; observed at Paris, 175.

Dena<*rator, galvanic, 293. 439.

Delarive's floating electro-magnetic appa-
ratus, 323.

Deluc's galvanic pile, 295.

Density, effect of relation of different strata
of same liquid, 44. ; relation of specific
heat to, 53.

Dew, principles of, 131.



453



Diathermanous media, 4. 123.

Dilatation. 1. 29.; of mercury, rate of, 13. ;
of solids, 22. ; of gases, 31 ; of gases differs
with change of pressure and temperature,
34.; of liquids, 42. ; rates of, of liquids, 43.

Dip, lines of equal, 171.; local, 173.; ob-
served at Paris, 175.

Dipping-needle. 167.

Discharging-rod, 213.

Distributor, electro-magnetic, 340.

Dutch tears, 85.

Earth, temperature of globe of, 114 ; analogy
of, to magnet, 164. 170. ; direction of mag-
netic attraction of, 353. ; magnetism, 379.

Ebullition, 99.

Electrical attractions and repulsions, 189.

Electrical machines, 207. See Machines.

Electric lamps, 445.

Electric light, 443.

Electricity, 189. ; attraction and repulsion,
189. ; origin of name, 189. ; fluid, 190. ;

. positive and negative, 191. ; single electric
fluid, 191.; two fluids, 192.; vitreous and
resinous and positive and negative fluids,
192. ; developed by various bodies, 193. ;
positive and negative substances, 194.;
method of producing by glass and silk,
195.; conduction, 196.; conductors and
non-conductors, 196.; insulators, 197.;
insulating stools, 197. ; induction, 202.;
electrical machines, 207. ; condenser and
electrophorous, 214.; dissimulated or la-
tent, 217. ; free, 217. ; electroscopes, 220. ;
Leyden jar, 224. ; charging a series of jars
by cascade, 231.; electric battery, 231.;
laws of electrical forces, 234. ; proof plane,
235. ; electrical orrery, 240. ; mechanical
effects of. 241. ; attractions and repulsions
of electrified bodies, 241. ; electrical bells,
246. ; electric dance, 247. ; electrical see-
saw, 249. ; thermal effects of, 249. ; igni-
tion of metals, 250. ; electric pistol, 251. ;
gunpowder exploded, 252. ; Kinnersley's
electrometer, 252. ; luminous effects of,
253.; electric spark, 254.; imitation of
auroral light, 257. ; Leichtenberg's figures,
257. ; experiments, indicating difference
between the two fluids, 258. ; Cavendish's
electric barometer, 259. ; thermal hypo-
thesis, 259. ; physiological effects of, 261. ;
chemical and magnetic effects of, 264.;
Voltaic, 67. ; discovery of galvanism, 67. ;
contact hypothesis of Volta, 269 ; electro-
motive force, 269. ; classification of bodies
as to electro-motive property, 270. ; elec-
tro-motive action of gases and liquids,
272. ; polar arrangement of fluids in elec-
tro-motive combinations, 274. ; positive
and negative poles, 274. ; Volta 's first
combination, 278.; Wollaston's combina-
tion, 278. ; Hare's spiral arrangement,
278. ; cylindrical combination with one
fluid, 279. ; with two fluids, 280. ; Grove's
battery, 280. ; Bunsen's battery, 280. ;
Daniel's constant battery, 281. ; Pouillet's
modification, 281. ; Smee's battery, 282. ;
Wheatstone's system, 283. ; Bagration's
system, 283. ; Becquerel's system, 283. ;
Schonbein's modification of Bunsen's bat-
tery, 284. ; Grove's gas electro-motive
apparatus, 284. ; Volta's invention of the
pile, 2S5.; Couronnedestasses,289.; Cruik-
shank's arrangement, 290. ; Wollaston's
arrangement, 290. ; heliacal pile of Faculty



of Sciences at Paris, 291 . ; conductors con-
necting the elements, 292. ; memorable
piles, 293. ; Davy's pile, 293. ; Napoleon's
pile, 293. ; Children's great plate batterr
293. ; Hare's deflagrator, 293. ; Stratingh's
deflagrator, 293. ; Pepys's pile, 294. ; bat-
teries on Daniel and Grove's principles
294.; dry piles, 294.; Deluc's pile 295. ^
/amboni's pile, 295. ; piles of a single
metal, 295. ; Hitter's secondary piles, 296. ;
Voltaic currents, 296. ; direction of curl
rent, 297.; poles of pile, 298.- voltaic
circuit, 298. ; method of coating conduct-
ing wires, 301 .; supports of wires, 301-304.;
Ampdre's method to reverse current, 301.
Pohl's reotrope, 303.; electrodes, 303.;
Ampere's apparatus for supporting move-
able currents, 304. ; reciprocal influence
of rectilinear currents and magnets, 305.
electro-magnetism, 305. ; effect of shock
on bodies recently deprived of life, 447
on a leech, 447. ; excitation of nerves of
taste, 448. ; of nerves of sight, 448. ; of
nerves of hearing, 448. ; supposed sources
of electricity in animal organization, 448.;
electrical fishes, 449. ; properties of the
torpedo, 449. ; the electric organ, 450.

Electricfty, thermo-, 384.; thermo-electric
current, 385.; Pouillet's thermo-electric
apparatus, 386.; conducting powers of me-
tals, 389.; thermo-electric piles, 391.-
electro-chemistry, 393.; electrolytes and
electrolysis, 393. ; Faraday's electro-che-
mical nomenclature, 393. ; positive and
negative element, 394. ; electrolysis of
water, 395.; Mitscherlich's apparatus, 397.-
compoundssusceptibleofelectrolysis,4()2.;
electro-negative bodies, 403. ; electro-posi-
tive bodies, 403. ; researches of Becquerel
and Crosse, 405. ; Faraday's voltameter
407. ; Faraday's law, 407. ; Sir H. Davy's
experiments, 409. ; Faraday's doctrine,
412. ; Pouillet's observations, 414. ; Davy's
experiments confirmed by Becquerel,414.
liquid electrodes, 416. ; electrolysis of the
alkalis and earths, 418. ; the series of new
metals, 418. ; Schoubein's experiments on
the passivity of iron, 419. ; tree of Saturn,
420. ; Davy's method of preserving copper
sheathing, 421.; calorific, luminous, and
physiological effects of voltaic current
438. ; Hare and Children's deflagrators,
439. ; Wollaston's thimble battery, 440. ;
Jacobi's fexperiments on conduction by
water, 441.; combustion of the metals,
442. ; electric light, 443. ; electric lamps,
445.

Electrodes, 303. 394.

Electro-chemistry, 393.

Electrolysis, 393. ; compounds, susceptible
of, 402.

Electrolytic classification of the simple
bodies, 403.

Electrolytes, 393.

Electro-magnets, 335.

Electro-magnetism : apparatus to exhibit
direction of force impressed by a rectili-
near current on a magnetic pole, 309.
apparatus to measure intensity of such
force, 310. ; apparatus to illustrate electro-
magnetic rotation, 315.; Ampere's method,
318. ; reciprocal influence of circulating
currents and magnets. 320. ; circulating
current, 320. ; axis of current, 321 . ; spiral
and heliacal currents, 322.; Ampere's and



454



Delarive's apparatus, 323. ; instable equi-
librium of current, 325. ; right-handed
and left-handed helices,326. ; electro-mag-
netic induction, 331. ; Savary's experi-
ments, 333.; electro-magnets, 335.; electro-
magnetic power employed as a mechanical
agent, 336. ; electro-motive power applied
by M. Froment, 337. ; electro-motive ma-
chines constructed by him, 339. ; distribu-
tor, 340. ; regulator, 343. ; use of a contact
breaker, 34S. ; magneto-electric machines,
348. ; effects of momentary inductive cur-
rents produced upon revolving metallic
disks, 351 .; researches of Arago, Herschel,
Babbage, and Faraday, 351. ; influence of
terrestrial magnetism on voltaic currents,
353. ; direction of earth's magnetic attrac-
tion, 353.; Pouillet's apparatus to exhibit
effects of (earth's magnetism, 3*7. ; Am-
pere's rectangle, 362. ; reciprocal influence
of voltaic currents, 363. ; voltaic theory of
magnetism, 378. ; reoscopes and reome-
ters, 3-*0. ; differential reometer, 384.

Electro-magnetic induction, 331.

Electro-metallurgy, 425. ; production of
metallic moulds, 428. ; production of ob-
jects in solid metal, 428. ; reproduction of
stereotypes and engraved plates, 429. ;
metallizing textile fabrics, 429. ; glypho-
graphy, 430. ; reproduction of Daguerre-
otype, 430.

Electro-motive force, 269.

Electro-negative bodies, 403.

Electro-positive bodies, 403.

Electrophorous, 214 219.

Electroscopes, 220. ; pith-ball, 221 . ; needle,
221.; Coulomb's, 222.; quadrant, 222. ;
gold leaf, 222. ; condensing, 223.

Electro-telegraphy, 431.; conducting wires,
432. ; earth best conductor, 432.; telegra-
phic signs, 433.; Morse's system, 436.;
electro-chemical telegraphy, 436. ; Bain's
telegraph, 436.

Element, positive, 394. ; negative, 394.

Equator, magnetic, 149. 170.

Evaporation, 86. ; mechancal force de-
veloped in, 92. ; heat absorbed In, 103.

Faraday's electro-magnetic researches, 351 . ;
electro-chemical nomenclature, 393. ; vol-
tameter, 407. ; electro-chemical law, 407.
See Electricity.

Fire-eaters, feats of, explained, 147.

Fireplaces, 39.

Fishes, electric, 449.

Flame, 133.

Fluid, magnetic, 155. ; electric, 190.; posi-
tive, 192. ; negative, 192. ; vitreous, 192. ;
resinous, 192. ; experiments indicating
specific difference between two electric,
258.

Fluxes, 81. j principle of, 81.; application,

Forces (electrical), laws of, 234.

Freezing mixtures, 77. 80. ; apparatus, 79.

French metrical system, 44.

Froment's electro-magnetic machines, 337.

Froast (hoar), principles of, 131.

Fusion 2. ; latent heat of, 70. ; points of, 70 ;
substances which soften before, 77. ; in-
fusible bodies, 82.

Galvanism, 269.

Galvanometer, 382.

Gases, dilatation of, 31 . ; liquefaction of, 55.



97. ; permanent, 97.'; solidification of, 97. ;
under extreme pressures, 99.; non-con-
ductors of heat, 109.

Graduation of thermometers, 9. ; of pyro-
meters, 18.

Gravity, specific, of liquid, 43.

Grove's galvanic battery, 280. 294.; gas
electro-motive apparatus, 284.

Hare's deflagrator, 293.

Hare's spiral galvanic arrangement, 278.

Harrison's pendulum, 28.

Heat, 1. 5. ; sensible, 1.; insensible, 1.,
latent, 1. 65. 101.; heating liquid, 45.;
does not descend in liquid, 45. ; propagation
of, through liquid by currents, 45. ; quan-
titative analysis of, 47. ; specific, 47. 58. ;
uniform and variable, 48. ; development
and absorption of by chemical combina-
tion, 56. 132.; specific of simple gases
equal under same pressure, 57. ; relation
between specific and atomic weight, 57. ;
rendered latent in liquefaction, 65. ; latent
rendered sensible by congelation, 65.; la-
tent, of fusion, 70. ; absorbed in evapora-
tion at different temperatures, 103. ; ra-
diation of, 115.; reflection of, 119. 12^.;
absorption of, 121.; transmission of, 123.;
decomposition of by absorption, 125.; re-
fraction of, 128.; polarization of, 128.;
Quantity of developed by combustibles,
36. ; animal, 138.; experiments to ascer-
tain rate of development of animal, 142. ;
total quantity of animal explained by
chemical laws, 143.; sensation of, 144.;
touch, fallacious measure of, 145.

Heliacal galvanic pile of Paris, 291.

Helices. See Electricity.

Herschel's electro-magnetic researches, 351 .

Hydraulic press, Britannia bridge, casting
of, 113.

Ice, method of preserving, 112.; production

of artificial, 79. 132.
Incandescence, 2.
Induction, magnetic, 156.; electric, 202.;

effects of, 179.; electro-magnetic, 331.
Influence of voltaic currents and magnets,

306. 363.
Influence of terrestrial magnetism on voltaic

currents, 353.
Infusible bodies, 82.
Inlaying, metallic, 27.
Insulating stools, 197. 212.
Insulators, 197.
Isogonic lines, 173.

Jacobi's experiments on electric conduction
by water, 441 .

Kathion, 394.
Kathode, 394.
Keepers, 185.
Kinnersley's electrometer, 252.

Lamp, Argand, 40. ; electric, 445.

Laplace's calorimeter, 48.

Lavoisier's calorimeter, 48.

Leyden jar, 22-1. ; improved form of, 230.

Light, solar, thermal analysis of, 115.; phy-
sical analysis of, 116.; electric, 443.

Lines of equal dip, 171.; agonic, 172.; iso-
gonic, 173. ; isodynamic, 176.

Liquefaction, 2. 67. ; of gases, 55. 97. ; ther-
mal phenomena attending, 63. ; facility of



455



proportional



to latent heat, 72. ; of alloys



Liquids, dilatation of, 42.; effects of tempe-
ratures of different climates on, 106. ; non-
conductors of heat, 109.; materials fitted
for vessels to keep warm, 129.

Loadstone, 149.

Luminous effects of electricity, 253.

Machines, electrical, 207.; parts of, 207.;
common cylindrical, 207. ; Nairne's cylin-
der, 209. ; common plate, 209. ; Arm-
strong's hydro-electrical, 210. ; appen-
dages to, 212.

Magnetic effects of electricity, 264.

Magnetism, 149. ; equator, 149. 170. ; poles,
149.; pendulum, 151.; attraction and re-
pulsion, 152. ; axis, 153.; boreal and aus-
tral fluids, 155. ; coercive force, 156. ; sub-
stances, 156. ; induction, 156. ; decompo-
sition of fluid, 159. ; effects of heat on,
162.; terrestrial, 164.; meridian, 168.
171.; declination or variation, 168.; va-
riation of dip, 170. ; lines of equal dip,
171.; agonic lines, 172.; isogonic lines,
173. ; local dip, 173. ; position of mag-
netic poles, 173. ; intensity of terrestrial,
175.; isodynamic lines, 176.; diurnal va-
riation of needle, 177. ; influence of au-
rora borealis, 179.; voltaic theory of, 378.
See Electricity.

Magnetization, 179.; effects of induction,
179.; method of single touch, 181.; of
double touch, 182.; magnetic saturation,
183.; limit of magnetic force, 183. ; effects
of terrestrial magnetism on bars, 184.;
armatures or keepers, 185. ; compound
magnets, 186.; influence of heat on mag-
netic bars, 186. ; astatic needle, 187.

Magnets, electric machines, 348. See Elec.
tricity.

Magnets, natural, 149.; artificial, 149. 180. ;
compound, 161. 186.; with consequent
points, 163. ; best material, form, and
method of producing artificial, 180. ; elec-
tro-magnet, 335. See Electricity.

Marble, fusible, 83.

Mariner's compass, 166.

Matting on exotics, its use, 112.

Mechanical effects of electricity, 241.

Melloni's thermoscopic apparatus, 123.;
thermo-electric pile, 392.

Mercury, preparation of, for thermometer,
7. ; introduction in tube, 8. ; rate of dila-
tation of, 13. ; qualities which render it a
convenient thermoscopic fluid, 15.

Meridian, magnetic, 168. 171.; true, 168.;
terrestrial, 168.

Metals, weldable, 77. ; ignition of, hy elec-
tricity, 250. ; electric conducting power of,
389. ; new, 418.

Mitscherlich's electro-chemical apparatus,

Moisture, deposit of on windows, 129.
Moulds for casting metal, 26. ; electro-me-

tallurgic, 428.

Morse's electric telegraph, 436.
Multiplier, electro-magnetic, 382.

Nairne's cylinder electrical machine, 209.

Napoleon, galvanic pile, 293.

Needle, magnetic, 161.; dipping, 167.; di-
urnal variation of, 179. ; influence of
aurora borealis on, 179. ; astatic, 187.



Nobili's reometer, 383.; Thermo-electric

pile, 392.
Non-conductors, electric, 196.

Oils, congelation of, 76.

Orrery, electric, 240.

Oxygen, its agency in combustion, 133.

Pendulum, compensating, 27. ; Harrison's
gridiron, 28.; magnetic, 151.

Pepys' galvanic pile, 294.

Physiological effects of electricity, 261.

Phosphorus, congelation of, 76.

Piles, galvanic. See Electricity Thermo-
electric, 391.

Pistol, electric, 251.

Platinum rendered incandescent, 135.

Pohl's reotrope, 303.

Point, standard, in thermometer, 9. ; freez-
ing, 10. ; boiling, 10. 99. ; of fusion, 70. ;
of congelation, 74.; consequent, 163.;
electric conductors with, 237. ; consequent,
electro-magnetic, 332.

Polarization, heat, 128.

Poles, magnetic, 149. 168. ; position of mag-
netic, 173. ; electric, positive and negative,
274. ; of galvanic pile, 298.

Potassium, 418.

Pouillet's modification of Daniel's battery,
281 .; apparatus to exhibit effects of earth's
magnetism, 357. ; thermo-electric appa-
ratus, 386.

Pressure, 31."

Proof-plane, 235.

Pyrometer, 3. 18. ; graduation of, 18.

Radiation, 4. 115. ; rate of heat, 120.; inten-
sity of, 120. ; influence of surface on, 120. ;
radiating powers, 121.

Reaumur's scale, 12.

Red-hot, 2.

Regnault's tables of specific heat, 58.

Regulator, electro-magnetic, 343.

Reflection, heat, 4. 119. 128.; reflecting
powers, 121.

Refraction, heat, 5. 128. ; light, 116.

Refractory bodies, 73.

Reometer, 380. ; differential, 384.

Reoscope, 380.

Reotrope, Pohl's, 303.

Repulsion, magnetic, 152. ; electric, 189.
241.

Ritter, secondary galvanic piles, 296.

Rod (discharging), 213.

Roofs, metallic, 27.

Scale: thermometric, 9.; centigrade.il.;
Reaumur, 12.

Schb'nbein's modification of Bunsen's bat-
tery, 284. ; experiments on the passivity
of iron, 419.

Sensation of heat, 144.

See-saw (electric), 249.

Simple voltaic combination, 267-

Smee's galvanic battery, 282.

Snow, perpetual, line of, 55. ; effect of on
soil, 111.

Sodium, 418.

Solar light, 115.

Solids, dilatation of, 22. ; contraction of, 26.

Solidification, 2. 63. ; of gases, 97.

Sonometer, application of electro-magnetic
machine as, 343.

Specific heat, 47. ; relation of to density, 53.



456



Standard points (thermometer), 9.

Steam, high pressure, expansion of, 54.

Steel, tempering, 86.

Stools, insulating, 197. 212.

Stoves, 39. ; unpolished, advantage of, 129.

Stratingh's galvanic deflagrator, 293.

Structures, metallic, 27.

Substances, magnetic, 156.

Sulphur, fusion of, 74.

Syringe, fire, 53.

Temperature, 5. 31.; methods of computing
according to different scales, 12. ; of great-
est density, 44. ; method of equalization of,
51. ; in liquids and gases, 109. ; of globe of
earth, 114. ; necessary to produce combus-
tion, 134. ; of blood in human species,
138. ; of blood in animals, 140. See Heat.

Terrestrial magnetism, 164. ; influence of on
voltaic currents, 353.

Thermal unit, 47.

Thermo-electricity, 384. See Electricity.

Thermometer, 3. ; mercurial, 6. ; tube, 7. ;
bulb, 7.; self-registering, 16.; spirit of
wine, 16. ; air, 16. ; differential, 17.

Thermometry, 5, 47.

Thermoscopic bodies, 3. 6. ; apparatus, 123.

Torpedo, electrical properties of, 449.

Tree of Saturn, 420.

Tube (thermometric), 7.

Unit (thermometric), 11. ; thermal, 47.

Vaporization, 2. 86.

Vapor, 86. ; apparatus for observing proper,
ties of, 86. ; elastic, transparent, and invi-
sible, 88. ; how pressure of indicated and
measured, 88. ; relation between its pres-



sure, temperature, and density, 91.; me-
chanical force of, 92. ; dilatable by heat,
95. ; properties of super-heated, 95. ;
cannot be reduced to liquid by mere com-
pression, 96. ; compression of, 96. ; latent
heat of, 101.

Variation, 16S. ; diurnal of needle, 177.

Ventilation of buildings, 38.

Vernier, 21.

Voltaic batteries, 285. See Electricity.

Voltaic currents, 296. 363.

Voltaic electricity, 67. See Electricity.

Volta's first galvanic combination, 278. ; in-
vention of the pile, 285.

Voltaic piles, 285.

Voltaic theory of magnetism, 378.

Voltameter (Faraday's), 407.

Warming buildings, 38. 46. 106.

Water, solidification of, 63. ; liquid below
32, 68. ; pressure, temperature, and den-
sity of the vapour of water, 91.; vapour
produced from at all temperatures, 91. ;
mechanical force of vapor of, 93.; tempe-
rature, volume, and density of vapor of,
corresponding to atmospheric pressures,
95.; latent heat of vapor of, 103,104. ; a
conductor of electricity, 199. ; composition
of, 394. ; electrolysis of, 395.

Weight, atonic, 57.

Wheatstone's galvanic system, 283.

Wine coolers, 112.

Wires (electric), 301. 304.

Wollaston's galvanic combination, 278290.;
thimble battery, 440.

Zamboni's galvanic pile, 295.
Zero of thermometric scale, 10.



THE END OF THE SECOND COURSE.



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New-street-Square.



NATURAL PHILOSOPHY, CHEMISTRY, &c.



A HANDBOOK OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY AND

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TRANSPORT. Its Management, Prospects, and Relations, Com-
mercial, Financial, and Social ; with an Exposition of the Practical



Online LibraryDionysius LardnerHand-book of natural philosophy and astronomy (Volume 2) → online text (page 44 of 45)