Copyright
D.M. Bishop & Co.

Bishop's Oakland directory for .. (Volume 1875) online

. (page 1 of 53)
Online LibraryD.M. Bishop & CoBishop's Oakland directory for .. (Volume 1875) → online text (page 1 of 53)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


REFERENCE DEPARTMENT




Book no,



Accession



~3

917.94 0121-



563922



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY



FORM 3427-5000-8-46



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY



3 1223 04590 0934






MAY 2 2 1947



K Laird, -fap




San Francisco.




FIREMAN'S FUND

Insurance Company.

ASSETS, JANUARY 1st, 1875, - - $675,000.00

FIRE AND MARINE RISKSTAKEN.

Office, S. W. Cor. California and Sansom Sts., San Francisco, Cal.

D. J. Staples, President. Alpheus Bull, Vice-President. George D. Dornin, Secretary.

FRED. O. FULLER, Agent, Oakland.

GEO. C. SHREVE & GO.

DEALERS IIST

JEWELRY AND SILVERWARE,
110 Montgomery Siroet,

SAW FRANCISCO,

RELIABLE, CONSERVATIVE, PROMPT
ALAMEDA CO. BRANCH

INSURANCE CO. OF CALIFORNIA. *

COR. NINTH AND BROADWAY, OAKLAND.

CAPITAL, - - $300,000.00

CASH ASSETS, 571,229 04

INCOME, 1874, 412,182.07

8®-DEVOTED TO FIRE INSURANCE EXCLUSIVELY."®"



PREMIUMS DEPOSITED AND INVESTED IN ALAMEDA COUNTY.

<-£=* TIE^TTSTEES. ^=3>->

J.A.LEDDEN, A.C.HENRY, JOS. BECHT, R. S. FARRELLY, WM. B. HARDY,
CHAUNCY TAYLOR, JOS. B. MARLIN.

H. A. CRAIG, Secretary. R. H. MAGILL, Manager.

S. O. HOLLAND, City Agent. . IV. W. HASKELL, Traveling Agent.



MAC nJJV j Cas Fixtures, Mantel Clocks | 122 & 124 SUTTER ST.



OAKLAND DIRECTORY.



mlu ii mm ww %Mm*MF&



fi\oio^hjpi\i6 fki






UNEXCELLED FOE AETISTIC EXEOUTIO



No. 12 MONTGOMERY SI

OPPOSITE LICK HOUSE.

GEO. C. SHEEVE & I

IMPORTERS OF

WATCHES, DIAMO

Jewelry and Silverw

No. 110 MOSTTCOMEEY SI



SAN FRANCISCO.

3 1223 04590 0934



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS.



ACADEMIES.

PAGE

Golden Gate (Oakland) 81

Pacific Theological Seminary
(Oakland) vi



AGRICULTURAL IMPLE-
MENTS.

Scoville Ives & Co. (Oakland) 340

APOTHECARIES.

Bowman Henry (Oakland) . . 226
Steele J. G. & Co. (S. F.)...396

ARCHITECTS.

Bugbee& Son (S. F.)

Newsom Bros. (S. F.) xlii

Stokes William (Oakland). .356

BANKS— SAVINGS.

Bank of Savings (Oakland).. 328
German Savings and Loan

Society (S. F.) ix

Hibernia Savings and Loan

Society (S. F). ix

Masonic Savings and Loan

(S. F.) vi

Savings Union (S. F.) viii

Union National Gold Bank

(Oakland) 374

Union Savings (Oakland). . . 374

BASKET MAKER.

Schneider A. James (Oak-
land) 322

BILLIARD SALOON.
Fennessy J. (Oakland) 168

BLACKSMITHS.

King & Williams (Oakland).. 306
Scoville I ves& Co. (Oakland) 340

Sohst Bros. (Oakland) 340

Weeks Henry (Oakland) 362

BOOK BINDERS.

Hicks D. & Co. (S. F.) x

Strickland & Co. (Oakland) . line
register of names 9^179

BOOKSELLERS.

Auld & Barf red (Oakland). . 84

Hardy W. B. (Oakland) 200

Keller H. & Co. (Oakland) . . x



PAGE

Moore A. P. (Oakland) 274

Moore H. H. & Co. (S. F.). . vii

Strickland & Co. (Oakland)

line register of names 9-479

BOOTS AND SHOES.

Senram F. & Co. (Oakland)

back cover
Stuart D. (Oakland) 356

BRICK MAKERS.
Remillard & Bros. (Oakland) xi

CARPET BEATER.
Robinson A. (Oakland) 322

CARPETS.
Taylor Chas L. (Oakland). ..362

CARRIAGE MAKERS.

Allen M. W. (Oakland) 84

King & Williams (Oakland).. 306
Smith J. N. O. (Oakland). . .xiii

Sohst Bros. (Oakland) 340

Weeks Henry (Oakland) 362

CEMENT PIPE.
Padey Martin (S. F.) xvi

CHIMNEY STACKS.
BrowellJ. (S. F.) 481

CLOAKS AND FURS.
Slate W. (Oakland) 362

CLOTHING.

Sherman Wm. & Co. (S. F.)
register of names 344 and 345

COFFEE AND SPICES.

Ghirardelli & Petar (Oak-
land) 256

COLLEGES.

Heald's Business (S. F.)

register of names 209

CONTRACTORS.
Remillard & Bros. (Oakland) xi

CORDAGE.

Pacific Cordage Co. (S. F.).. v



DIAMOND SETTERS.

PAGE

Braverman & Levy (S. F.). .

front cover

Laird D. W. (S. F.). .front cover

ShreveG. C. & Co. (S. F.).. ii

front and back covers

DOORS, SASH, ETC.

Barnes & Taylor (Oakland).. 84
Blethen & Terry (Oakland).. 236
Burnham, Standeford & Co.
(Oakland) back cover

DRAIN PIPE.

Brannan Daniel (Oakland)., xii
Padey Martin (S. F.) xvi

DRUGGISTS.

Bowman Henry (Oakland). .226
Steele J. G. & Co. (S. F.).. . .396

DYER.
Patzer L. (Oakland) 256

EXPRESSES.

People's (Oakland and S. F.).483
Wells, Fargo & Co. (S. F.). . iv

FLOUR DEALERS.

Babcock & Gould (Oakland) 84
Hunt & Wharton (Oakland) 236
Landon & Co. (Oakland). line
reg. of names, pages 9-479

Samm Jacob (Oakland) 334

Sarpy & Barstow (Oakland). -322

FURNITURE DEALERS.

Sternitzky & Neumann (Oak-
land) 356

GAS COMPANY.

Oakland Gas Light Co. (Oak-
land) 274

GAS FIXTURES.

Dalziel Robert (Oakland). . .246
Day T. (S. F.) front cover

GLOVE MANUFACTORY.

Spaulding & Robbins (Oak-
land) xi

GROCERIES.
Raffo Bros. (Oakland) 316



OAKLAND DIRECTORY.



HAIR JEWELRY.

PAGE

Buehren Augustus H. (Oak-
land) 116

HARNESS AND SADDLERY.
Lentell James (Oakland) — 306

HARDWARE.
Brown G. S. & Co. (Oakland) 266

HATS AND CAPS.
Brink M. (Oakland) 116

HAY AND GRAIN.

Hunt & Wharton (Oakland) 236

Landon & Co. (Oakland)

line register of names 9-479
Sarpy & Barstow (Oakland) 322

HOTELS.

Eureka Hotel (Oakland). . . .168

Grand Central Hotel (Oak-
land) iii

Piedmont White Sulphur
Springs (Oakland) 256

Tubbs' Hotel (Oakland)

line register of names 9-479

ICE CREAM MANUFACT-
URER.

Gordon J. S. G. (Oakland). .
line register of names 10-480

ICE DEALER.

Gordon J. S. G. (Oakland). .
line register of names 10-480

INSURANCE AGENTS.

Magill R. H. (S. F.).. front cover
Woodward E. W. (Oakland)
line register of names 10-480

INSURANCE COMPANIES.

Fireman's Fund Ins. Co.

(S. F.) front cover

Hamburg Bremen Fire Ins.

Co. (S. F.)

Home Ins. Co. (S. F.)

front cover
Swiss Lloyd Marine Ins. Co.

(S. F.) SO

JEWELERS.

Braverman & Levy (S. F.). .

front cover
Laird D. W. (S. F.). .front cover
Shreve George C. & Co.

(S. F. ) ii and front and

back covers
LAND COMPANY.
Central Land Co. (Oakland). 218

LIVERY STABLES.
Carter & Olin (Oakland) 312

LUMBER DEALERS.

Oakland Point Planing Mills

(Oakland)

Taylor & Co. (Oakland) 340



MACHINISTS.

PAGE

Scoville Ives & Co. (Oak-
land) 340

NEWSPAPERS.

Alameda Encinal (Alameda) 456

News (Oakland) 88

Transcript (Oakland) 106

NOTARY PUBLIC.
Smith G. E. (Oakland) 266

OPTICIANS.

Houseworth Thomas & Co.

(S. F.) ii and back cover

Wilson W. (Oakland) back cover

PAINTER.
How J. E. (Oakland) 236

PATENT SOLICITOR.
Redstone J. H. (Oakland)... 322

PHOTOGRAPHERS.

Houseworth Thomas & Co.

(S. F.) ii and back cover

Ingersoll W. B. (Oakland). .278

PIANOS, ETC.

Strickland & Co. (Oakland)
line register of names, 9-479

PICTURE FRAMES.
Lutz & Berg (Oakland) xiii

PLANING MILLS.

Blethen & Terry (Oakland).. 236
Burnham, Standeford & Co.

(Oakland) back cover

Oakland Point Planing Mills

(Oakland) xii

PLUMBERS AND GASFIT
TERS.

Day T. (S. F.) front cover

Kirk O. C. (Oakland) 306

McGi vney James (Oakland) . 274

POTTERY.
Brannan Daniel (Oakland)., xii
Browell J. (S. F.) 4

PRINTERS.
Francis & Valentine (S. F.)..482

REAL ESTATE AGENTS.

Dam & Myers (Oakland) 312

Kelly & Co. (Oakland), .line

register of names 10-480

Milbury S. (Oakland) 290

Rowell William K. (Oak-
land) 290

Smith G. E. (Oakland) 266

Woodward E. W. &Co. (Oak-
land) line register of

names, 10-480

ROOF PAINT.
Posey T. R. &Co. (Oakland) 312



ROPE MANUFACTORY.

PAGE

Pacific Cordage Co. (S. F.)... v

SODA MANUFACTURER.
Gordon J. S. G. , Agent (Oak-
land) line register of

names 10-480

SQUIRREL POISON.

Steele J. G. &Co.(S. F.) xi

and back cover
STAIR BUILDER.
Blair G. M. (Oakland) 226

STATIONERS.
Auld & Barfred (Oakland). . 84
Hardy W. B. (Oakland). . . .200
Mathews H. E. & Co. (S. F.). . 80

Moore A. P. (Oakland) 274

Strickland &C'o. (Oakland).,
line register of names 9-479

STENCIL CUTTER.
Trueworthy F. M. (S. F.). . .334

STOVES, ETC.

Dalziel James (Oakland) 246

De La Montanya M. (Oak-
land) vi

TAILORS.

Francis Samuel (Oakland). .278
Healy M. J. (Oakland) 200

UNDERTAKERS.
Beaudry & McAvoy (Oakl'd) . 100

WATCHMAKERS AND JEW-
ELERS.
Braverman & Levy (S. F.). .

front cover
Buehren Augustus H. (Oak-
land) 116

Laird D. W. (S. F.). .front cover
Shreve Geo C. & Co. (S. F.).. ii
front and back covers
Wilson W. (Oakland) back cover

WATER PIPE.
Brannan Daniel (Oakland)., xii

Browell J. (S. F.) 481

North Beach Drain andWater
Pipe Co. (S.F.).reg.names,xvi

WIND MILLS.
Southwick A. H. (Oakland).. 298
and 350
Tustin W. I. (S. F.) . . xt- and xv

WINES AND LIQUORS.
Bocqueraz P. (Oakland). ...226

Fennessy J. (Oakland) 168

Gaudin J. (Oakland) 168

Ghirardelli & Petar (Oak-
land) 256

Kihlmeyer Louis (Oakland). 306
Raffo Bros. (Oakland) 316

WOOD AND COAL.
Chappellet & Miner (Oak-
land) 218

Duffy & O'Neil (Oakland). . . 100
Purrington & Ough (Oak-
land) 316



0. P. S— Hominy and cracked wheat, 116 Ninth St. nr Bdwy— 0. F. S.



GENERAL REVIEW



SEPTEMBER, i875,




PROGRESS OF THE CITY.

The City of Oakland was incor-
porated by an Act of the Legisla-
ture, passed March 25, 1854. For
two years previous to that date the
place had been under a town gov-
ernment, Avhich had conveyed to
an old resident the entire water
front, in consideration of the
building of a wharf and a school
house. The extensive flats making
out from the western side of the
city prevented the building of a
city here in 1849, for it was better
to locate where deep water came
close to the shore. There was no
time to build long piers or to re-
move obstacles to navigation. It is
true that the labor of cutting down
sand hills and of reclaiming swamps on the western shore of the bay has
been much greater than would have been the work of connecting the
Oakland shore with deep water, but in the hurry and confusion incident
to the settlement of California, it was necessary to chose the locality that
was most immediately available ; the slower labor of development was
left to another generation.

Twenty years ago Oakland was a most beautiful place, its carpeting of
wild flowers, and its quiet, majestic groves, rivaling the attractions that
have siibsequently been created by the hand of man.

The establishment of the College School in 1853, by the late President
Durantj may have seemed unimportant at that time, but its subsequent
history has been interwoven with the history of the city, and has been a
power in promoting its progress. The presence and success of that insti-
tution, the establishment of the College of California as one of the re-
sults, indirectly caused the building up of other private educational insti-
tutions, and Oakland became the recognized educational center of the
Pacific Coast long before coming into prominence from other causes.
These schools attracted visitors, and Oakland had a permanent population
of more than four thousand persons many years prior to those speculative
movements in real estate consequent upon the close of the war and the
immense immigration to this State. The College of California has a new



STRICZLA1TD & CO. keep the best Gold Pens in the World.



Buy your Homesteads from E. W. WOODWARD & CO., 958 Bdwy.



10 OAKLAND DIRECTORY.



and higher life as the University of California, the peer of any university
on the American Continent. The fame of our earlier private educational
institution has been eclipsed by a system of public schools, in which
can be taught the four thousand six hundred and fifty-nine children who
are entitled to admission. Now, as it was twenty years ago, population
is setting towards Oakland, because of the faculties for the education of
the young.

Some twelve years ago communication with San Francisco by the Creek
route had become so luicertain that a corporation was formed for build-
ing a pier into the bay, from the western part of the city, to be connected
with the central portion by rail. This work having been done, the growth
of the city was vastly accelerated, and people whose business was in San
Francisco began to take up residences in Oakland on account of its many
attractions, and its accessibility. The city soon seemed to have been im-
bued with a new life. Streets were opened and improved, an effective
fire department organized, a City Hall erected at a cost of $100,000, and
public school houses built, which were as ornamental to the city as they
were useful for their intended purposes.

In 1867 there was a general discussion throughout the State about the
location of the terminus of the Central Pacific. The representative men of
Oakland were wide awake and vigilant. The water front surrounding the
city wa3 held by H. W. Carpentier, under the grant made by the town au-
thorities in 1852, and though there had been so many years of litigation to
regain it, there was no prospect of a termination. The Hon. John B. Felton
was retained by the city and a compromise was finally agreed upon, the
impelling motive being the necessity of offering some of the property to the
Western Pacific Railroad Company as an inducement to locate its terminus
in Oakland. The reservations to the city were the portion of the property
now occupied by the City Wharf, and the water park, known as Lake Mer-
ritt. There were small reservations to Mr. Adams and Mr. Carpentier, and
the remainder of this vast property was conveyed to the Oakland Water
Front Company, composed of Adams, Carpentier, Stanford, and other direc-
tors of the Western Pacific. The water front property, now held by the
Central Pacific is under title derived from the Water Front Company, and
those donations were the inducement for locating the terminus of the
overland railroad in the City of Oakland. The water front comprises the
overflowed land between ordinary high water mark and ships' channel ;
but the marsh lands on each side of the San Antonio Creek were claimed
as pari of this property, and the question of title was pending in the
Supreme Court of the United States, a year and a half ago, but there
has been a compromise between the parties interested. A strip of the
marsh land bordering on the creek and three hundred feet in width, was
relinquished to the Water Front Company, and the title to the remainder
was confirmed to private individuals. It is claimed that if the water front
had not been retained until 1868 by one person, the city could not have
been in a position to offer a sufficient inducement to secure the location of
the terminus. It has not been the policy of the new owners of the property
to dispose of it in sub-divisions for the general purposes of trade and
commerce, and it may be that this will be equally advantageous in the
future. Railroad improvements, far beyond what were required by the
stipulation, have been made, and ever since November 8th, 1869, the ter-
minus of the trans-continental railroad has been in Oakland. The ferry
service has since been under the control of the Central Pacific, and has
expanded so as to meet the wants of the thousands who daily travel be-
tween this city and San Francisco. Three trains of cars and two elegant
steamers make forty-eight trips per day, carrying an average number of
nine thousand six hunched passengers, or three million five hundred and
four thousand per annum. At this time preparations are in progress to



GORDON'S ice cream is the best and cheapest. 469 Ninth St.



0. P. S .— Middlings, shorts, and bran, 416 Ninth St. nr Bdwy— 0. P. S.



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 11

still further improve the service and to give greater facilities for the ship-
ment of freight by way of the creek. The steamer Capital, for many
years on the Sacramento River route, is undergoing a remodeling, and
will be placed on the creek for freight and for passengers.

A few leading facts will demonstrate the rapidity with which the city
is advancing. House building is going on at the rate of one thousand
per annum, for which are expended the sum of two and a half million dol-
lars. In 1855 the number of children was one thousand two hundred and
fifty-eight, now it is seven thousand two hundred and thirty-one. The
territorial expansion of the city has helped to increase the figures, but
the present total is what claims attention. Its religious societies have
found it necessary to provide increased accommodations for their members,
and some are budding new and costly edifices, while others are contem-
plating like improvements. Property that but a few years ago was use-
ful only for farm purposes, is now thickly covered with buildings, and
the city is increasing in size as rapidly as it can with the aid of a thou-
sand skilled mechanics and a still greater number of laborers.

By an Act of the last Legislature, the county buildings were located on
one of the plazas fronting on Broadway, between Fourth and Fifth streets.
The Supervisors selected the square on the west side of the street, and
have erected a Court House and County Jail, which have been occupied
about three months. The county was authorized to issue bonds to the
amount of $200,000 for building purposes. The cost of the improve-
ments has been in excess of that sum ; this difference coming from the
general funds at the disposal of the Supervisors. The Court House is
two stories in hight, and has a roomy basement. The extreme dimen-
sions of the main edifice are one hundred and thirty by one hundred and
forty-five feet, and in the rear there is a two story wing, forty by eighty
feet ; the lower story being the Hall of Records, and the upper story the
room for the meetings of the Supervisors. The hight of the ceiling in
the first story is sixteen feet. The hall is twenty-eight feet wide ; on the
north side is the office of the County Clerk, thirty by forty-four feet, and
on the south side is the office of* the Treasurer, of the same dimensions.
On the west side are the offices of the Sheriff, Auditor, Superintendent of
Schools, County Surveyor, and Assessor. On the second floor are two
court rooms, one for the County Court and the other for the District
Court. They are similar in all respects, each being fifty-two by sixty feet
in size. The ceilings are twenty-four feet high. In the rear are suitable
apartments for the judges and the jurors. In the finishing and furnish-
ing of the building the Supervisors have shown good taste and great liber-
ality. The desks, counters, and book-cases are of black walnut and Span-
ish cedar ; the upholstering is of the finest style, and nothing has been
omitted which would tend to make the building worthy of the second
county in the State. The building is heated by twenty-five steam regis-
ters, supplied by a boiler in the basement. There are four fire-proof
vaults and a burglar-proof vault for the use of the Treasurer. There is
an abundance of water in every part of the building. The structure is
surmounted by a dome, the top of which is one hundred and eighty-five
feet from the ground. The view to be obtained from that point is com-
prehensive and grand. J. J. Newsom was the architect, and G. W. Bab-
cock the builder. The total cost of the Court House is $195,380.86, the
builder's contract having been for $148,550, and the remainder for fix-
tures and incidentals.

The County Jail is on the same square, and fronts on Washington Street;
it cost $43,800.78. Most of the material was from the jail that had been
erected in East Oakland, prior to the change of location, at a cost of some
$40,000. It is a commodious structure, having all the appliances usual
in the best appointed prisons. While it is thoroughly secure, close atten-



I C U R going to buy Stationery— try STRICKLAND & CO.'S,



E. W. WOODWARD & CO., 953 Broadway, farms and ranches for sale.




tion has been paid to light and ventilation ; and the building is large
enough to answer the desired purposes for many years to come, assuming
that the growth of the county is to remain undiminished. The design
is such that additions can be made without injury to the appearance and
projwrtions of the building.

The wharf, built and owned by the city, on the lines of Webster and
Franklin streets, was completed three years ago. During its first year
the receipts were $3,277.31 ; during its second, $4,008.02, and during its
third, $6,507.43; a fair return on an investment of $20,000, even if we
leave out of view the public policy of affording wharf facilities for local
commerce. The increase in the amount of revenue seems to accord with
the general growth of the city.

All statistics that are gathered, all facts that are brought to notice, show
that for the last two years the advancement of the city has been uniform
but very rapid. It is also observed that the number of business places
does not increase in the same ratio. The vast majority of all who be-
come residents of Oakland, do so with the desire to make it their home,
looking elsewhere for business. But the merchants who are in business
in Oakland are prosperous and thrifty. There may not be room for com-
petition with them, but there are apparently new fields of enterprise wait-
ing to be filled. The prospects for the future are nattering in the extreme.
All the information we have collected shows that in the past the city has
been advancing as rapidly as would be normal and healthy, and that it
can be retarded only by some calamity that would equally affect the whole
State. There are soon to be considered new elements which will change
the character of the city from a vast aggregation of homes, to a self-sustain-
ing commercial port.

The improvement of the San Antonio Creek, so that large ships can be
brought within a convenient distance of the mainland, has been advocated
by those who were fully conscious of the great advantages Oakland has on
account of her location on the eastern shore of the bay, being naturally
the center of the railroad system of the pacific Coast. The forty-second
Congress directed an examination of the San Antonio Creek, with a view
to its improvement. The Board of Pacific Coast Engineers, consisting of
Major G. H. Mendell, Col. C. S. Stewart, and Col. Alexander, submitted
their report in March, 1874. They made a thorough examination, and
reported favorably. They ascertained that the tide rises a little higher
and falls a little lower in San Leandro Bay than it does in San Antonio
Estuary, the difference in range being four tenths of a foot. The times
of high and low water are also earlier in San Leandro Bay, by about one
hour. The San Antonio Estuary is supposed to be filling up on account
of the smallness of the tidal basins which supply water for the stream in
the channel. But with the present tidal area, the channel is twenty-two
feet deep at Hibbard's, or the old Alameda Wharf, and that the depth
elsewhere ranges from fourteen to eighteen feet, at low water. At the
mouth of the Estuary, where the water is distributed over a large area,
a bar exists, on which there are about two feet of water. Hence the con-
clusion that if this channel were sufficiently contracted its depth would
become greater, on account of the power exerted by the ebb tides. In
this case the great scouring effect of the ebb tides is specially due to the
tidal peculiarities of the bay. The first practical step is to contract the
water way over the bay, to be done by two parallel training walls of stone,
to extend from the mainland to the deep water of the bay. To afford the
necessary room for navigation they are to be one thousand feet apart. It
is the opinion of the engineers that in one or two years these walls would
of themselves wash out a channel between them some twelve or fourteen
feet deep at low water. The natural tidal basin at the head of the estu-
ary is to be deepened, so that there will be two feet of water at low tide,



J". S. G. GORDON is the pioneer ice man. Office, 469 Ninth Street.



0. P. S— Every bale of hay sold by weight, 416 Ninth Street— 0. P. S.



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 13

and it can be still further improved so as to accommodate shipping. But
this basin is not large enough to open and maintain a wide and deep chan-
nel between the training walls. Rather than incur this annual cost of
dredging that would be necessary, a plan, almost provided by nature, has
been adopted. It is proposed to double the amount of water flowing
through the creek by connecting it by a canal with San Leandro Bay. A
dam across the mouth of the bay will be necessary. The current will
then be doubled in velocity, and it is estimated that the depth of water in



Online LibraryD.M. Bishop & CoBishop's Oakland directory for .. (Volume 1875) → online text (page 1 of 53)