Copyright
Donald B. (Donald Budd) Armstrong.

The Penman-Artist and Business Educator (Volume 6-8) online

. (page 138 of 225)
Online LibraryDonald B. (Donald Budd) ArmstrongThe Penman-Artist and Business Educator (Volume 6-8) → online text (page 138 of 225)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Puhlishiis of "Tht eoth Cinliii-i/ Ukldliijn Hook and Leyal Forms," J72 pi,., 75c. N



<^9h6^mm>&n''GiiM ami Suitinci^^diiccikrr^^



-jOOOOOOQ^




HV JNO. W. VONESH, CHICAGO, liL.



THE




Has recently been moved into larger and b.tter quarters,
the best quarters this institution lias ever occupied.
StiKlcnts will now find tlie School located on the. .southe.ast <iorne.r
ot nJGM ANF) LONCi STREETS,

Where Me.vsrs. Zaner &- Bloser, proprietors of the institution, will be glad to welcome all
of their old friends and pupils, and as many new ones as see fit to come.

Zanerian graduates are in greater demand to dav than ever before. In fact, we can
suppl.v hut a small part of the demand.

Of course the best pi.ving and most congenial positions are secured onlv bv those who
have thoroughly prepared for them. Young persons should look ahead and "prepare for
work that promises most for the future. Surely no other lines are more interesting or
promise more for the future than those for which Zanerian students are prepared.

TheZanerian is quile generally recognized as the Penmanship and Art Mecca of this
country. It is also the best school to attend if you desire the best positions to be had as a
commercial teacher in commercial schools, or in commercial high schools. In the field of
business education, good penman are always given the preference, and Zanerian graduates
generally recognized as the most expert penmen and teachers of penmanship to



be fx

Ir



:clu.



1.1 if ;



L ilesi



in public schools; if y



I desi



Kle



uper



special I



aclii-



Zanerian Collegfe, Columbus. 0.




:i



E. C. Mills,

1 95 Grand Ave. Rochester. N.Y, ^

will send you one dozen 1

cards, your name in either i

plain or ornamental writing, /

for 25c. Address lines lOc. )

per dozen extra. <




TO ZANER-IANS

By special arrangements
with Messrs Zaner <!ir Bloser.
I am enabled to offer to Za-
nerian students only, hlatik
exact representation of the

ZANEKIAN PIN

iited and embossed in gold on the ujiper
corner of the '^ards. They are handsome.
inctly professional and exclusive.



25 card!

100 "

Address, \y



PRICES.

postpaid



n. \'ioos,

COI.li.MIHVS,



Finest Supplies for Penmen

AND ARTISTS

PENS AND HOLDERS
All goods listed below go by mail postpai(i.

Zanerian Fine Writer Pen — The beat and
finest 6ne writing pen made— ^besl for en-
grossing, card writing and all fine script
work. Gross $1. no, V4 Gross Z-jc. 1 Doz 12c.

Zanerian Ideal Pen— One of the best pens
made for general penwork— business or or
namental. One of the best pens for be-
ginners in penmanship. Gross 75c., l>i Gross
25c., 1 Doz lOc.

Zanerian Business Pen — A smooth, durable,
common sense business pen. For unshaded
business writing it has never been excelled,
if equaled. Gross 7oc., % Gross 25c., 1 Doz. .10c.
Gillott'B Principality No. 1 Pen — A fine writ-
ing pen. Gross $1.00, 1^ Gross 25c., 1 Doz 12c.

GUlott'a Double Elastic E. F. No. 604 Pen — A
medium fine writing pen. Gross 75c., ^

Gross 25c.. 1 Doz. -_ IDc.

GUlott'B Magnum Quill E. F. No. 601 Pen— A
btisiness pen. Gross 1.00, J^ Gross 25c., 1 Doz .12c.
GillotfB No. 303 E. F. Pen— Used largely for
drawing purposes. Gross $1.00, ^ Gross 25c. ,

1 Doz. - 12c.

Gillott's Lithographic Pen No. 290— One of the
finest pointed cirawing pens made. 6 pens

25c., 3 pens 15c.

Gillott's Crow Quill Pen No. 659— Very fine

points. 6 pens 25c. 3 pens _ _ . 15c.

Soennecken Lettering Pens — For making
German Text, Old English, and all broad
pen letters, ^et of 12— numbers 1, 1%, 2. 2%,
3, 3H, 4, 5 and 6 single pointed and 10, 20

and 30 double pointed - 26c.

Double Holder for Soennecken Pens— Holds

2 pens at one time -. 10c.

Zanerian Oblique Penholder — Hand-made,
rosewood. 12 inches long, a beautiful and

perfect holder. 1 holder 50c.

Fine Art Oblique Holder — Inlaid and fancy,
hand-made, rosewood, and by fur the most
beautiful holder made. 1 holder sent in a

small wooden box $i.ou

Excelsior Oblique Holder — The best low priced
oblique holder made. Many hundreds of gross
have been sold.

1 Holder lOc.

1 Dozen , 50c.

K Gross - - .- $1,10

Vj Gross 2.15

1 Gross - . . . 4.25

Straight Penholder — Tork tipped and best
for business writing, flourishing, etc. 1

holder. 10c; 6 holders. 40c : 12 holders 65c.

When you need anything in our line write us
for prices, as we can furnish almost anything
and save you money.

Cash must accompany all orders. Prices are
too low to keep accounts. Remit by money or-
der, or stamps for small amottnts.

Address, Zaner & Bloser, Columbus, O.



M




emington

Typewriters



HAVE



/« The most compact keyiBoard*

2* The slightest key depression*

3, The lightest and mo^t even
touch,

Tliese are three reasons <why REMINGTONS
are preferred by all operators




For Touch Writing



WYCKOFF, SEAMANS & BENEDICT, 327 Broadway, New York.



GILLOTT'S PENS,

THK HOST rEXrSCT OF rBKI,

HAVE GAINED THK

GRAND PRIZE,

Paris Exposition, 1900.

IMi la th» ElKhf St PrU< ffi Awudcd M P<a«.




PLUMMEU

iDej'igneru

Providence. R. I.



COMMERCIAL TEACHERSIWAMTED

We want first-class teachers of Penmanship,
Bookkeeping and St^no^aphy. We had last
year more calls than we could supply. If you
desire a better position, write us frankly con-
cerning your qualifications, and we will
frankly t«ll you what we can do for you.
Reference book ft'ee.



^B


Has


written thousands


of cards


Bold


Daahy,






beautiful.


3ne Dozen.


2')C.






A.


H.BURKE


Dexter


Iowa. 1


Teacher


of Penmanship


. Dexter Normal


School 1











RejolutionxMemoriau

and Tejtimonialj engrossed.
aArtijUc BookPfatej-
e'HereJdic Dexi^nina

AlXKlNDS OF COHMERdTAL D6aW
WS-MT REASONABLE. PRICES 2



'Spp'^tAL-CARe-' ANO.'ATtE.NT,(bN Giv£\' TO RtPROO



j ADD A LITTLE TO THE COST. I



xii
\i/
vir
xit
Hf
xHt
\b
xii
\ii
\ii

\ii
\ii

\ii
iit

\li
xHt

Xif

Hi
xif
xii

xit

Xif

xit

li/

xHt
Hi
xii
xb

Xii



Tliis is economy to the commercial teacher, it it is necessary, in order to get first-
class results from his students. The educational excellence ol' the Sadler-Rowe publications
is well known, but it is worth while to consid^^r the quality of the materials out of which
tiiese books are made. Notwithstanding high grade papers have greatly increased in price
within the last four years, our blank book-s and stationery have been reduced in price and
the grade of stock has never been lowered one iota. We make no attempt to compete with
SDnie of the cheap blank liooks on the market.



Customers



will note that we have lately
adopted a UDiform style and
i:rade of book paper in the manufacture of all our
hooks. We now employ the very best book binders
obtainable, and our books represent the very highest
attainments in the book makers' art <«. ^ ^



This is the time of year



when tei^<•ller^ are considering readinstim-rits
of their courses ol .study for the coaming
school year. We find there are many schools that would like to make a change, but they
don't want to do so until they have first made a test of the publication they are consider-
ing. To meet this well defined want, we have arranged a very attractive offer for those who
wish to test any of our publications, huleed, it is so advantageous that every teacher thinking
ui" mailing a change slimikl write t(i u,-. We will be glad to supply full particulars.

The last half of MacFarlane's Commercial and Industrial Geography

will be ready for distribution shortly. This will be good news to a great many teachers.
The issue of this half has been delayed over eight motiths waiting for 1900 census figures
for Internal Commerce and Manufactmvs, which have ja-«t been received from the census
bureau. We could have issued the book with 1890 figures, but then we do not do business
that way. We were bound to issue a 20th century book even if it cost us heavily to do
so, but that is a secret of our success in book making. We will not issue any book if it
is not the best of its kind to be found.

Our booklets, price lists, and other information will be sent to all teachers and
school officers on application, free of charge.

5ADLER=R0WE CO.,

Baltimore, Md.



Hx



i^x

fix



'^v^'-S ^^'-^ ^^'-^ ^^'-^ ^^:^ :-S'-^ ^^'-^ ^^'-^ ^^"^ft '-^S*-^ • S'lS^' S" ■&''iir^'^



Incre^Lse Your Skill

in usin^lhe pen 4Thd.l often meocns a. rMSe
in SQile^ry 4 You ce^n do this by practicing
from MILLS'S LESSONS BY MAIL ift 4 4



Spe^re time only required 4 If jou a^re looK:
ind" for The Best in instruction and exneri-



enced criticism matrkin^s you should write
qJ. once 4 Full informoLtion for ^ sts^mp 4 4
L. C.Mills. 195 GraLnd Ave. Rochester. N Y^



9000-00000000000000000000000

I Colored Cards. I

^ The Kind That Bring: the Dimes. {

X Something uew and they catch the eye, X

X tickle the fancy and loosen the purse X

X string s of your customers. Come in six X

X colors. Great for advertising purposes. X

5 Schools use them. Penmen use them. X

Everybody wants them. You write a dozen q

and each person who gets one out of the a

dozen will want a dozen. They are just the ^

thing you have been looking for. a

Doubt it? Write for free samples and ?
price list. X

H. O. KEESLINqJ

A With Rider Biii,iiieK» rallese, J

5 TRENTON, N.J. 6
ooo-ooooooooo-ooooooooo-oooooo



^ 1 hj



$5.00 Worth forl0c.-Alt<

1 have found the secret of ;

L. multiplication, fractio



• lOyenrsuf hard a
ipiU addition, suhl
« and square root



Lightning Talculator. l)ept. IJ.Ev



iioMmjaM




jJCE:ND_CQe^



jc-^rHinyfAii






modern Penmanship Publtca=

tton$ for Penmen and

Ceacbers

Our publications are universally recognized as
the finest alonf,' their lines. Tlie prices are very
low consideriuf; the quality and character of the
work. All books mentioned bL-low are sent by
mail postpaid.

Zanerinn Theory of Penmanship— A thought-
provoking work that deals with the numer-
ous problems pertaining to penmanship.
Some have termed it the Shakespeare of
penmanship literature. All who intend
to leach writing should read it. A book of
176 pages, cloth binding __ _ .. . $1.(0

Lessoi's in Ornamenliil Penmanship— A work
in sJip form embodying the $10 mail course
formerly given by us. with some extra
plHtes. .\ thorough and complete work for

Compendium of Simplified Vertical I'enman-
ship — In book form, and by far the most
thorough and complete instructor in ver-
tical writing yet published 50c.

Manual of Simplified Script — A work con-
taining a thorough, graded course of photo-
engraved copies from the pen of that master
penman and artist, C. P. Zaner, all in the
simplified style. For ra^id business pur-
poses many persons believe this style of
writing unequalled _._ 50c.

Zaner's Gems of Flourishing - A book devoted
exclusively to the fascinating art of flour-
ishing. It begins at the beginning, show-
ing tbe student how to make the simplest
strokes and exercises and finishes with a
great variety of designs, showing the high-
est degree of skill yet attained in this art.
Two editions of this popular work have
already been sold. It is unquestionably the
best work on flourishing ever published. - 50c.

Cash should accompany all orders. Remit by
money order, draft, or stamps for small amounts.
Do not send personal checks. Address.

ZANER a BL05ER. Columbufl, Ohio.



LEARN TO WRITE YOUR NAME— Send nit
Toiii name and 12.^ cents and receive one dozen n
iiioie ways with instriictinns. Add^e^•s.

A E. PARSONS, Creston, Iowa.



1 WHY DOES A HEN LAY AN EGG ?

* «

* This was once the famous subject of a rib tickling, post-prandial discharge of verbal artillery by a man-of- J

* Warr. It did — as it ought — a great deal of execution. Why? For the .same reason that the hen, during the next ^
ik step in the process of evolution, brought forth a chick from that egg — the suliject had been hrooded over. «r»
jj< An aspiring young woman once wrote to Henry W. Longfellow asking where he found all his vivid illustra- J[
^ tions, his apt comparisons, his beautiful figures. She was sure that she, too, could write moving verse if she could |JJ
yi control such a wealth of ideas and illustrations. Certainly. So might we all. We are "shovpd" off the nest too m

* frequently. Our thought-eggs get cold. We do not hrjad enough. No psychologist can tell why certain coucep- JJ]
J tions form themselves in the mind— hatch aut, so to speak— as a re-ult of meditation and reflection, but we all know I|,
^ that fledgelings of thought do thus flutter into existence. <?<

I TO INDUCE YOUNG PEOPLE TO HATCH CHICKS |

* of the mental variety is the proper object of schools and school machinery. Are the kindergarten and kindred ^
<li methods and influences to be blamed for the present-day tendency to entertain pupils in our schools? Whatever (»>

* may be the cause, there is today all too little of the brain-sweating, that, for their and their country's lasting good, J
jj our grand-parents had to undergo in the schoolroom. ' if
A Our students do too little downright thinking of the kind, that develops self-reliant judgment, pioliably the most m

* valuable of the proper results of school training. We meet this need, in our text-books, by so presenting the cxerci.ses ]Jj
[U for schoolroom work that the student is not dawdled along like an infant, unable to walk, but is, with assistance in ,p
lii the beginning, required to do his own walking— his own thinking. One oC the best illustrations of this policy is our if>
j* Bookkeeping and Twentieth Centurj- Business Practice. A complete and logical method of presenting modern JjJ
^ accounting and business forms and usages, it is attractively arranged to excite the student's interest, yet it makes ^p
It him think. It develops concentration, accuracy, judgment. 1*

* To each teacher who names his school and mentions this paper, we offer to send one set of our complete Book- jjj
jj keeping and Twentieth Century Business Practice, expressage prepaid, for $1.0.5 (retail price, §4.20). This is simply ift
\t) another bargain-counter offer, used as a means of testing the value of this paper as an advertising medium. The offer ft

* will be open until July 15th. ^

5 SEND FOR OUR NEW CATOLOGUE OF TEXT-BOOKS FOR COMMERCIAL SCHOOLS. IT IS FREE. ADDRESS, !|!

I THE PRACTICAL TEXT BOOK COMPANY, |

I 4?5 EUCLID AVENUE, CLEVELAND, OHIO. i



-TTTT



jj L








^^^^^n — kry>



|- / ' I



: "v



Js^



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE COMING YEAR.



As heretofore, the policy of this journal will be to say little, and do
excellent features we have booked for publication.

The Policy of giving all sides a hearing ; of alloyving each con-
tributitr full sway to his opinions ; of presenting the latest and
best possible, will be continued as heretofore. A broad-gauge,
progressive journal is still our purpose.

The Penmanship Department, as in tlie past, will be high-grade,
progressive, and lil^eral. Mr. A. R. Burnett's lessons in practical
business penmanship will be continued indefinitely. Mr. K. C.
Mills will continue to favor our readers monthly with work from
his masterful pen. He will contribute a series of business forms,
such as notes, drafts, checks, etc. This work will represent his
very best efforts, and will be just what students of penmanship
need, especially those takiug a business course. - Mr. S. M. Blue
will delight lovers of dash with specimens of his ornate hand.
Mr. H. O. Keesling will present one of the most practical and best
graded series of business writing ever printed. See for yourself.
His work will be a surprise. We have already seen the greater
part of the course and we feel that we cannot commend it too
highly. It contains much valuable material for students. Mr.
C. C. Lister, of Sadler's Business College, Baltimore, Md., is
working on a series of lessons in business writing which he is
endeavoring to make the finest of his life. He says : " I want to
make this the effort of my life." Those who are aware of Mr. Lis-
ter's skill and ability know what this means. He is the author
of "Writing Lessons that Teach," published and sold by the
Sadler-Rowe Co., of Baltimore. His work as an author, his wide
experience as a teacher, and the high order of skill he possesses,
admirably fit him for preparing something unusually valuable
and interesting for our readers. Mr. A. I). Skeels, Temple Col-
lege. Philadelpliia, will present some work which is sure to win
him many new admirers. Mr. T. Courtney, tlie accurate, forceful
penman of Providence. R. I., has on hand a supply of his work.
Mr. F. B. Courtne.v. the all-round pen wizard, has work prepared
in advance to delight, amaze, and instruct our readers for a year
or more to come. Mr. \V. E. Dennis, of Brooklyn, N. Y,, the inim-
itable genius of grace, will present a series of lessons in flourish-
ing. Mr. Dennis states that he shall endeavor to excel all pre-
vious efforts in this line of work. This means that he will
present by far the greatest course of lessons in flourishing ever
attempted in a penmanship journal. He h?" long been known
as the prince of ffourishers. Sharpen your quills and get ready
for these lessons. Mr. C. E. Doner, the young man who has won
the reputation of being a model penman and gentleman, has
promised our readers something from his pen from time to time.

Is this not a dollar's worth ? We have given a mere outline,
however, which is not at all complete.



much. Nevertheless, it is well to simply



a few of the many



The Business Department,under the able editorial management of
Mr. Gaylord, promises even more in the future than it has realized
in the past. The work given in this department has been beyond
anj-thing ever attempted along practical, business education,
and it has but fairly begun. Keep an eye on that department.

The Art Department will continue to present, high-grade, help-
ful, and timely examples of script, lettering, engrossing, designs,
illustrations, portraits, etc.. etc. The best is none too good for
our readers.

The Editorials promise to be as timely, terse, conscientious,
anil forceful as in the past. The news items, etc., will be as inter-
esting and up-to-date as heretofore.

The Covers will be. no doubt, as cheerful, artistic, seasonable,
and varied as they have been since their inauguration by this
journal. They cost a good deal, but they are widely admired
and are a step in the right direction.

Keep Us in Mind Jor Clubs, and single subscriptions. Our
friends on all sides tell us that we are giving too much for the
money. That rnaj' be true, but in the future we shall endeavor
to give more rather than less. We are aware that our journal has
already set a high standard. So many experts have never before
lieen engaged to give lessons and contribute articles to the same
journal at the same time. Heretofore such enterprise has been
something entirely unheard of in the realm of this class of jour-
nalism, but we are determined that the standard shall go still
higher rather than lower.

So we wish to ask our friends, one and all, to keep us in mind
for subscriptions. Those who can send clubs should write for
club rates.

While we have every reason to be thankful for the support in
the past, a still larger patronage will enable us to make further
improvements, to more nearly reach our ideal journal.

Remember that we publish but one edition, and that persons
taking our journal get the best of it and the whole of it— no cheap
or partial numbers. The editors believe that students especially
should be encouraged to read the highly instructive articles by
the leading business educators of our country, and that they
should therefore receive the whole journal. You should support
our journal because it is worth the money, and because it is to
your interest to carefully read everj^ number, and see that
students get the benefit of it.



BUSINESS CAPITALS AND FIGURES BY L. S. STACY. KINGSTON, N. Y.




QlpdFU^viTvan-^CiUi^ and ^uUrwi^^duccilcrr^^



57" — -^7-^— (J-^^Z-^::-^:^-*^^-^ - ^:^-^'^::^








t^Z-^-^-^^-Z,.,^.^



Wessons


in Kapib Business


EDriting


195 GRAND AVENl'E,


number Cen


ROCHESTER, N. Y.



3 i / — J 6 If



C^' liZ-'tT-r^-zf^












/-^^>^?-^>i.'^ - <-<i^;;:^-^-'£-(^^:;-2^S>^



<£Z-^ - td-<,









Instruettonsy Plate 46.



You will derive but little benefit from this practice unless you g
to scribble for one minute, but follow the copy exactly as it is given,
retiuires your most thoughtful practice.



ve the closest attention to every particular. Do not allow yourself
Remember that this miscellaneous page writing is difficult and



Tnstructions, Plate 47*



Copy this form of receipt and try to arrange your work exactly like the (
every detail of a copj-; not only the forms of the letters, but the general an
carefully j'ou can blame no one but yourself if you do not make satisfactory ii



ripy. It is splendid tr
lugement as well. If
iprovement.



ining to cultivate the eye to take in
you do not follow the instructions



Instructions, Plate 48.

See that you have no shades on any of the letters in these copies. We want to strive for a perfectly light, uniform line. The
practice of light lines in your writing will encourage lightness of touch, which is a very important thing for the beginner to learn.
While writing the difficult copies, do not forget that a good position should never be neglected. We want to think about this matter of
position so often during the writing hour that a healthful position of the body may become habitual.







/, / a^



f




'^.



'./d^.




.^"^^^





■J~(? ^ C


/ C^C'





/ (7 £>


A^p^-^


' —


^7-^'



f^/et-T^e ^t^ - — - ^ f'^ ^ec —-




Instructions, Plate 49.

In practicing writing suitable for entries in bookkeeping we sliould keep several important things in mind. Some of them are:
Legibility, size of writing, arrangement, good figures, etc. To copy this, either take regular journal paper or rule the lines on foolscap
paper. The heading, January 1, 190— should be the most legible. Write this reasonably large and keep in the center of the page, that is,
leave as much margin on one side as on the other. The journal entries, i, e.. Cash, E. C. Mills, etc. should be written in a little larger
hand than in the day-book explanation column.

After finishing a page of this work, hold it out at arms length and see if the general eft'ect is good. Keep working away on this copy
until you can see a decided improvement over your first copj' of it.

Instructions, Plate 50.

As this is our last lesson in this series the author would be glad to receive a copy of this letter written in your very best style. We
will not be able to answer these letters or criticise them, but it would be a great satisfaction to hear from all who have faithfully followed
this course of lessons.

I wish to thank my many friends for their kind expressions of approval regarding these copies and instructions. Your friend,

E. C. Mills,

Concernina mr. mills' Cessons

We said some nice things regarding Mr. Mills' course of lessons before we ran them, but we now desire to say that in our. opin-
ion, in the line of graceful, accurate, professional penmanship, thej' have never been equaled. Our dealings with Mr. Mills but
conforms our opiniim of him as a true gentleman, and one of the most skillful penmen the world has ever produced.

Z.\.NER A BLOSER.



Cessons in

Business Penmanship

BY A. R. BURNKTTK, ASHI.AXn. II.I..

number Chree



Cesson no. 7.

This lesson consists of word practice, l^se
both narrow and wide spacing. Fill several
pages of each word. Try to use a free and
easy movement in writing these words.
Much depends upon the wa>' you practice if
you succeed,

Cesson no. 8.

We will Ijegin this lesson by filling several
lines of the small compact indirect oval ex-
ercise. Begin small .s with right curve.
Retrace top part of up stroke slightly. No-
tice how down stroke is curved. Get letter
quite wide through the center, and closed
at the base line. I-ine Xo. 4S, we have the
■ small /-beginning bke .s. The up and down
^*' of this letter is separated by a very
•mpound curve. Practice the letter



3K y^^n-'i^^yz-^y

3^.



aA3.



^'7'?-Z-'t7 - t,^...^L£y



m
^^ .^A^ .Ay ^AyiyLA^^^A^iAAiy



Online LibraryDonald B. (Donald Budd) ArmstrongThe Penman-Artist and Business Educator (Volume 6-8) → online text (page 138 of 225)