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ration of his kindnesse in graunting to his poore servants
such an extraordinary and miraculous deliverance. His
holy name bee blessed forever.

This day wee went cm towards Cape Anne, as y* wind 16-
would suffer, &; our foore sayles further, and came within
sight thereof y* other morning ; which Sabbath, being y*
13 wee kept on ship-board, was a marveylous pleasant
day, for a fresh gale of wind, & cleare sunshine weath^.
This day wee went directly before y® wind, and had de-
light all along y* coast as wee went, m viewing Cape
Anne, y® bay of Saugust, y* bay of Sal^m, Marvil head,
Pullin point, and other places ; and came to ancre at low
tide m y® evening at Nantascot, in a most pleasant harbor,
like to wch I had .never scene, amongst a great many
of Bands on every side. I was excercised on ship-board
both ends of y* day. Aft«r y* evenings excercise, when
it was flowing tide againe, wee set sayle, and came y^
night to ancre againe before Boston, and so re^ed y^ night
with glad & thankefoll hearts y^ (rod had put an end to
o'long journey, bemg 1000 leagues, y* is 3000 miles
English, over one of y® greatest seas in y^ world.

Now y* o' journey, by jr* goodnesse of o' God, was
very prosperous unta us ev^ manner of way. First of
all it was very safe, & healthfoU to us ; f<Nr tho: wee were
in y^ ship 100 passengers, besides 23 seamen, & 33 cowes



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32 RICHARD Mather's journal.

^"ff- and heyfers, 3 sucking calves & eight mares, yet not one
of all these dyed by y® way, neither person nor cattell,
but came all alive to land, and many of y* cattell in bet-
ter liking y" when wee first entered y* ship ; and most of
y® passengers in as good health as ever, and none better
y** myne owne family, and my weake wife & little Joseph
as well as any other. Fevers, calentures, small pockes,
& such diseases as have afflicted other passengers y® Lord
kept from among us, and put upon us no griefe in o*^
bodyes, but a little sea-sicknesse in y* beginning of y* voy-
age ; saving y* 2 or 3 seamen had y® flux, and Rich.
Becon lost his right hand in y® last storme, and one wo-
man and a little child of hers, towards y® end of y® jour-
ney, had y^ scurvy. The meanes of which infirmity in
her wee all ccmceyved to bee y* want of walkmg and
stirring of her body upon y® decke ; her manner beeing to
sit much betweene y® deckes upon her bed. And a spe-
ciall meanes of y® healthfulnesse of y® passengers by y*
blessing of God wee all concey ved to bee much walking
m y^ open ayre, and y^ comfortable variety of o' food ;
for seeing wee were not tyed to y® ships diet, but did
victuall o' selves, wee had no want of good and whole-
some beere &; bread ; and as o' land-stomaches grew weary
of ship diet, of salt fish & salt beefe and y® like, wee bad
liberty to change for other food which might sort better
with o' healthes and stomaches ; and therefore sometimes
wee used bacon & buttered pease, sometimes buttered
bag-pudding made with curraynes and raisins, and some-
times drinke pottage of beere k, oate-meale, and sometimes
water pottage well buttered.



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RICHARD Mather's journal. 33

And tho: we had two stormes by y* way, y® one upon Amt.
Munday y« 3d of August, y« other on Saturday y« 15th
of y* same, yet o' gracious God (blessed and forever bless-
ed bee his name) did save us all alive in y"* both, &
speedily assuaged y°* againe. Indeed y® latter of y"* was
very terrible and grievous, insomuch y* w" wee came to
land wee found many mighty trees rent in pieces in y®
midst of y® bole, and others turned up by y® rootes by y®
fiercenesse thereof: and a barke gomg fh)m y® bay to Mar-
vil head, with planters & seamen therein to y® number of
about 23, was caste away in y® storme, and all y® j^ople
therein perished, except one man & his wife, that were
spared to report y® newes. And y® Angel Gabriel beeing
y** at ancre at Pemmaquid, was burst in pieces and cast
away in y" storme, & most of y® cattell and other goodes,
with one seaman &; 3 or 4 passengers did also perish
therein, besides two of y* passengers y^ dyed by y® way,
y* rest havmg y' lives given y™ for a prey. But y* James
& wee y* were therein, with o' cattell & goods, were all
preserved alive. The Lords name be blessed forever.

2ly. It was very delightfiill, while wee tooke pleasure
& instruction in beholding y® workes & wonders of y*
Almighty in y® deepe ; y® sea sometimes beemg rough
with mighty mounteynes and deepe valleyes, sometimes
againe plaine and smooth like a levell meadow, and some-
times pamted with variety of yellow weedes : besides it
was a pleasant thing to behold y^ variety of fowles &
mighty fishes swimming and living in y® waters.

31y. It was comfortable to us, by meanes of y* fellow-
4#



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34 micHAKD buther's journal.

^^' rfiip of divers godly Christians in y* ship, & by meanes
of o' constant serving God morning & evening every day,
y® dayly dutyes beeing performed one day by Mr. Maud,
another by myselfe, and y® Sabbath excercises divided
(for y® most part) equally betwixt us two.

True it is o' journey was somewhat long ; for tho: from
Munday y® 22d of June, w° wee lost sight of our ould
Englidi coast, untill Saturday y® 8th of August w** wee
made land againe at Menhiggin, it was but six weekes
& 5 dayes, yet from o' first entering y^ship in Kmg roade,
on Saturday y® 23 of May, till o' landmg at BosUm in
N. E. on Munday y® 17th of August, it was 12 weekes
& 2 dayes. For wee lay at ancre in King roade 11 dayes
befiDve wee ever set sayle, & 3 dayes at Lundy & 12
dayes at Milford, and spent 3 dayes in tacking betweene
King roade & Lundy, one day between Lundy & Milford,
tn 8 dayes betweene Menhiggin & Boston. Neverthe-
lesse o' God preserved us dl\ y® while, and wee had op-
portunity by these often delayes to take in more haye,
oates &; frech water, and arrived in a good condition.
Agayne let our gracbus God be blessed forever. Amen.



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THE

LIFE «°d DEATH

OF

That Reverend Man of G O D,

Mt. RICHARD MATHER,

TEACHER of the CHURCH
IN

Dorchester

IN

JVEW'EJ^rGLAJVD.



Psal. 112. 6. The Righteous shall be had in everlasting

remembrance,
Heb. 13. 7. Remember them loho have spoken to you the

Word of God.
Rev. 14. 13. Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord :

they rest from their labourSf and their toorks follow

them.



Ministri vita censura & cynostura.

CA MBRID GE :
Printed by S. G. and M. J. 16 7 0.

[Boston : Rei»riiiied by Datid Clapt. 1890.]



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TO THE

CHURCH

AND

INHABITANTS

OF

DORCHESTER in N. E.

Grace unto you from God by Jesus Christ.
Beloved in the Lord Jesus,

Y On have here presented to your view, and for
your Imitation in the Lord, the Life of him
that was to rnany of you a SpiritucJ {a^to
me a Natural) Father: inasmuch as the
greatest part of his time in the Ministry he was a
Labourer in the Lords Harvest amongst you ; Also with
you did he finish his course. There is therefore special
reason why what is here done should be directed to your



The Composer of this ensuing Relation is not willing
that his Name shotUd be published. But it is done by
one who hath had the viewing of my Father* s Manu-
scripts ; from whence, as well as from personal and
intimate Acquaintance of many years continuance , and
other wayes, he hath been truly furnished with the

knowledge



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(40)

knowledge of what is here reported. And indeed the
greatest part of the Story is known unto sundry
amongst your selves.

What remaineth then. Brethren and Beloved in the
Lord , but that we should be mindfull of what is by the
Lord required^ when the Scripture saith^ Eemember
them that have tau^t {and not onely them that do
teach) the Word of God, whose faith follow, consider-
ing the end of their conversation. What that Doctrine
of Faith is which your blessed Teacher did from the
Lord instruct you in, I need not say ; ondy Remember
it. Remember his Farewell Exhortation, which is now
in many of your Houses^ and Oh tiuU it were in all your
Hearts. And as for his Conversation, your selves know
that God made him Exemplarily Faithfully Zealous^
Patient^ Humble^ Holy : Follow him as he followed
Christ. So likewise pray that he may do who is

Boston Septem^G^ Yours in the Lord alwayes,

N.E. 1670. ^ '

, Increase Mather.



THE



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(41 )




THE

LIFE & DEATH

OF

Mr. Richard Mather.

THe Writing and Reading of the Lives of
Worthy Ones , hath been by some accounted
amongst the most profitable works of men
under the Sun. The Labours of some Learned
amongst the Gentiles this way have not been alto-
gether without benefit, witness what is done by Plu-
tarchj LaertiiiSj Philostrattis, Eunapitcsj Pliny, &c.
albeit they are to be read with judgement. But espe-
cially the faithful Desoripti(m of the Lives of those
who have been Eminent Teachers in the Church, hath
been to the great advantage of after- Ages. Many have
reaped benefit by reading Dorothem his Collecti(m of
the Lives of the Prophets, Apostles, and Seventy Disci-
ples of Christ : And ( not to speak of the Labours of
Gennadius, Epiphanius, Isidore, and Prochorus of old)
among later Writers, Shopfius his Academia Ckristt^
and TossaniAs concerning (he lives of the Fathers^
and Mekhior Admn concerning the Lives of aU our
Modem Divines, as farre as he could by any means
come to the knowledge thereof. The pains which
5 Mr.



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42 The Life and Death of

Mr. Clark hath taken in publishing the Lives of many
of our English Worthies, hath been profitable to not
a few : And great pity it is that more should not be
done that way. If the Lives of Brightman^ Parker ^
Ames, Bwrroughsy Hooker, &c. were published to the
World, it might be of general advantage. Nor is it
to be doubted but that there have been many famous
in their Generations, whose Memories are buried in
the dust, for want of some one to undertake this office,
whereby their Names might have been perpetuated to
Posterity.

Vixere fortes ante Agamemruma
Multi : Sed ilktchrt/mabiles
Urgentur ignotiq, longd
Nocte; Carent quia vote Sacro.

But it must needs be in it self a thing pleasing to
God, that his grace towards and in his Servants, and
the wonders of his Providence about them, should be
kept in reme^lbrance. Therefore some have written
their own Lives. So did (not to mention Josephus,
BeUarmine, Cardan) Gimongst our Worthies, Junitis,
CoUinus, Buchanan ; and of our own Nation, Bale,
Burton, Hall, Bodly, &c. And the like did this Rev-
feirend Man who is to be the Subject of the ensuing
Discourse essa/y to do ; and proceeded therein to the
39^ year of his Age, but finished not what he had
purposed. It remaineth therefore that some other

should



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Mr. Bidiard Mather. 48

should do it, which we shall in the following words
of truth and plainness endeavour to do.

rilHere is in the Parish of Winurick in the County of
-■- Lancaster f a small Country Town or Village cdl-
ed LpwUm : In which Vilkge Richard Mather was
^born Atmo 1596. His Parento llumuu and Marga^
rite Mather were of Ancient Famihes in LowUm afore-
said, but by reason of some unhappy Mortgages they
were reduced unto a low condition as to the Woridr
Nevertheless, God so disposed their hearts, that they
were willing to Educate this their Son in good Learn-
ing : Concerning which he (after that the Lord was
pleased to bestow not cmely Learning but Grace upon
him) hath sometimes expressed himself, saying. By
what principles and motives my Parents were chiefly
induced to keep me at School^ I have not to say^ nor do
I certainly know : But this I must "needs say, that this
was the singular good Providence of CM towards me,
{who hath the hearts of all men in his hand) thus to
incHne the hearts of my Parents; for in this thing the
Lord of Heaven shewed me sudi favour , as had noi
been shewed to many my Predecessors and ConUmpora-
ries in that place.

Now his Parents being strongly bent in spirit to
have their Son a Scholar, they sent him to Wmwick
School, which was about four miks distant from his
Fathers house. In the Winter season they boarded
him at Winwick; but such was his desire after know-^

ledge,



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44 The lAfe and Death of

ledge^ that in the sammer he travelled erery day
thither. Whil'st he wa» thus at School he met with
no small discouragement, for that the Schoolmaster
Undear whom be was, although he had an excellent
faculty for teaching in GrammaT-Learning, and many
were trained up by him, so as to be sent ttoto Oafvrd
And Cambridge, for Instruction in higher Studies ; yet
was he very severe and partial in his discipline. Junius
was almoBt quite diseonraged from his Studies, when
bdaig a School boy his Master would beat him eight
timies in a day whether in fault or in no fault : The like
Magisterial harshness caused him of whotn we write,
earnestly desire that his Father would take him {torn
Sd^ool^ and dispose of him to some other Calling.
Himself afterwards, When he had waded through these
difficulties, wcmld say, ChdirUended better for me^ then
I would have cho$enfor my seif; and (herefofe my Fa-
iti^, though in other ihingi indulgent enough^ yet in
thie 1/bofM never^ condescend to my request, but by put"
ting me im hope that by his speaking to the Master^
thingstcould be amended, would still overrule me to go
aninm^ Studies; and good it was for me to be over*
ruled by him, and his discretion, rather then to be left
to my own affection anddesire. But Oh that M School-
masters would learn Wisdome, Moderation and Equity
ttntfords their Scholars, and seek rather tourtn the hearts
of Children by righteous^ loving, and courteous usage,
then to alienate Iheir minds by partiality and undue
severi^, which had bden my tdter undoing, had not the

good



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Mr. Richard Mather. 45

good Providence of God, and the Whdome and Au-
thority of my Father prevented. But thus was that of
the Poet made good :

MuUa tulitfecitq, Puer sudavit 8f alsit,
Qui capit optatdm cursu contingere metam.

After that he had spent sundry years m this School,
some Popish Merchants coming out of Wales to War-
ringioUy which is two miles from Winunckj were in-
quisitive whether there were not any pregnant Wits
in that School whom they might procure for Appren-
tices. Presently Richard Mather was mentioned to
them as a pregncmt Youth : Whereupon application
was made accordingly to his Father, who W€U3 inclitie-
able to accept of this Motion, because now his Estate
was so decayed, that he almost despaired of bringing
up this his Son as he had intended. But here the
Finger of Divine Providence was observable ; for
when his Father was ready thus to part with his Son,
and his Child to go, the Lord raised up the heart of
his Master, to be importunate with his Father still to
keep him at School, professing that it was great pity
that a Wit so prone to Learning should be taken from
it, (as indeed it was) or that he should be undone by
Popish Education. The Perswasions of the Master
so farre prevailed, as that his Scholar was continued
under him, until the fifteenth year of his Age.

It was a mercy to him, that whil'st he was yet in

his Minority, he enjoyed the publick Ministry of one

5* Mr.



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46 The Life and Death of

Mr. Palifif then Preacher at Leagh; of whom he
would say, that the remembrance of that man was
Comfortable and Honourable in bis thoughts, even in
his old Age, though his knowledge of him was in
his Childhood : He then observed such a plain, power-
full, and piercing efficacy in Mr. Palins Ministry, as
was not to be seen in the common sort of Preachers
i^ those dayed, by means whereof some Illumination,
though not a thorough Conversion, was wrought in
him.

Having been thus long kept at School, he was
called to leave his Fathers Family. The occasion
whereof was this. At a place called Toxteih Park
near lAverpoolf there dwelt a wise and Religious Peo-
pki who being desirous of the good of themselves and
their Posterity, intended to erect a School amongst
them, for the Education of their Children. It came
into their mindes to send unto the Schoolmaster of
Wbfiwichi to enquire whether he had any of his Schol-
ars whom he would recommend unto them for such
a service : who having received their desires, forth-
with communicated the same to thk his Scholar, and
to his Father, to see if the Motion would stand with
their acceptance. He was desirous rather to have
gooe to the University, but his Father closed with the
Offer ; whence it was in fine mutually embraced, so
that he removed from his Fathers house to Toxteth
(ilnno 1611.) there to teach SchooL Nor is it any
disparagement to his Worth that he was once a

Schoolmaster ;



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Mr. Richoid Mather. 47

Schoolmaster ; for very eminent Divines have been so,
as of om-'^own Nation, Mr. Hieron^ Mr. WhiUdcer^
Mr. Vines^ not to mention others, but rather an Emi-
nency ; the like seldome known, that one should be
found fit to be a Schoolmaster at fifteen years of Age :
Yet the Lord helped him in those his young years to
carry it with such Wisdome and Love and Gravity
amongst his Scholars as was to admiration, so as that
he was by them both loved and feared, beyond what
is usual, even where there are aged Masters.

His being thus employed was more wayes than one
advantageous to him : for by this means he became
a more accurate Oranmiarian than Divines usually
are. Being also diligent in his Studies whil'st he con-
tinued in this way of Imployment, he became a Pro-
ficient in other Arts, as in Logick, Khetoricky yea and
in Theology. Moreover, it afterwards appeared to
be of God, that he was Called to such a Work in
such a place, for there the effectual Conversion of his
Soul unto the Lord, was wrought in his tender years,
even afore his going to Oxford ; whence he was pre-
served from those Corruptions which undid many of
his Contemporaries, through the Temptation which in
the University they met with. The mecms of his
Conversion was partly by seeing a strange difference
between himself and sundry in that godly Family,
where Divine Providence had cast his Lot in Toxtelh^
viz. the Family of Mr. Edward AspintocUlj who was
a Learned and Religious Gentleman. Now he ob-
served



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48 The Life and Death of

served that the way and walking of that holy man, was
such as himself had not as yet been accustomed unto,
which caused sad fears to arise in his Soul, lest haply
he might not be in the way which leadeth unto Eter-
nal Salvation. Also Mr. Harrison^ then a famous
Minister at Hyion^ Preaching upon JoA. 3. 3. concern-
ing the necessity of Regeneration, and at the same
time reading a Book of Mr. Perkins his, shewing how
farre a Reprobate may go, God blessed these thre^
things not onely to CofwuHanj but to Conversion.
This was Anno 1614. The pangs of the New Birth
were exceedingly terrible to him, inasmuch as many
times when they were at Meals in the Family where
he sojourned, he would absent himself to retire under
hedges and other secret places, there to lament his
misery before God. But after some lime, the Lord
revived his broken heart, by sending the holy Spirit
in the Ministry of the Word to apply the Precious
Promises of the Goj^I to his Soul.

Being thus become a New Creature, he was the
more eminently a Bles^ng in the Family, and in the
Calling which the Lord had disposed of him in : And
such notice was taken of him, as that even from
places remote Children were sent unto him for Instruc-
tion and Education ; and many were, by the Lords
blessing upon his Endeavours, fitted for, and sent
unto the University. Some years having been past
over in this way of Employ, he resolved ( <rd>' &€<s ) to
i^nd some time in one of the Universities, as appre-

bending



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Mr. Richard Mather. 49

bending that there, by converse wilb Learned men,
and otber Advantages not ebewbere to be had, he
might gain more then by his private Studies in the
Country. Accordingly he went to Oxford^ and con-
tinued for s<»ne time there in Brazen-Nose Colled^.
Being there, he was variously affected : for it was a
joy to him to finde many there who had been his quon^
dam Scholars. It was also a joy to him that he had
such leisure to follow his Studies, and by Disputations,
Lectures, Books, Conferences with Learned men, 8f€.
marvellous Advantages to obtain a Treasure of
Knowledge. But his heart being afore this touched
with the fear of God, the great Superstition and Pro-
phaness which he was forced there to behold, was no
small grief unto him.

Soon after his coming to Oxford^ he came into Ac-
quaintance with the Learned Doctor WoreUlj who
was helpful to him in directing him as to the course
of his private Studies. Amongst other things, he
advised to reade the Works of Peter Ramus ; which
counsel he followed, and saw no cause to repent of
his so doing. But before he had spent so much time
in Oxford as he could have wished that he might,
have done ; the People in Toxleth, whose Children
had been taught by him, sent to him, desiring that he
would return unto them to jpstruct not so much their
Children as themselves, and that not in meer Humane
Literature, but in the things of God. This Call, after
due Consideration, for weighty Reasons he accepted

of.



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60 The Idfe and Death of

of. Being then returned to Ihxteth, he Preached his
first Sermon November 30. 1618. There was a very
great Concourse of people to hear him, and his La-
bours were highly accepted of by the judicious : Such
was the vastness of his Memory, as that the things
which he had prepared and intended to deliver at
once, contained no less than six long Sermons. The
people having had scmie taste of his Gifts, were the
more importunate in their desires that he might con-
tinue amongst them. And because that could not be
without Episcopal Ordinationy they urged him to ac-
cept thereof: Not having at that time so throughly
locked into that part of Ceremonkms Conformity
as afterwards, he yielded unto the Motion; and
accordingly was Ordained (with many others on the
same day) by Doctor Morton then Bishop of Chester ^
after the Mode of those Times. The Ordination be-
ing over, the Bishop singled out Mr. Mather from
amongst the rest, saying, I have something to say to
you betunxt you and me alone, Mr. Mather was then
afraid lest some Informations might have been given
in to the Bishop agamst hhn because of his Puritan^
ism, thereby to prejudice him ; but it hapne4 to be
otherwise : for when the Bishop had him alone, I have
(saith he) an earned Request unto you, and you must
not deny me; It is that you would pray for me : for I
know (said he) the Prayers of men tiiut fear God unll
avail much, and you I brieve are such an one. Never-
theless, after that the Lord gave him to see the evil

of



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Mr. Richard Mather. 51

of the sin of Conformity in the whole latitude of it,
(for as to the substance of Conformity, even from his
first entrance upon the Ministry he saw the evil there-
of, and was by Divine Grace kept from being stained
therewith) his Conforming (although it was at the
desires of his people) to accept of this Ordination
from the PrelatCj woa no small grief of heart to him.
Many years after, one of his Sons taking notice of a
torn Parchment in his Fathers Study, enquired what
it is ; unto whom his Father replied. That he received
that when he was Ordained by the Bishop : And (said
he) I tore it, became I took no pleasure in keeping a
monument of my sin and foUy in submitting to that
Superstition, the very remembrance whereof is grievom
tome.

Being as hath been related, settled in the Ministry
at Toxtethy he resolved to change his single condition :
And accordingly he became a Suitor to Mrs. Katha-
rine Hoult, Daughter to Edmund Hovlt, Esq ; of Bury
in Lancashire. She had (and that deservedly) the
repute of a very godly and prudent Maid. The
Motion for several years met with Obstructions, by
reason of her Fathers not being affected towards Non-


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