Dr. James West Davidson.

Architect and engineer (Volume v.115-116 (Oct. 1933-Mar. 1934)) online

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THE

En^ilMEER







-v-'^^!^i^MS



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OCTOBER 1933



PROBLEM:

When plans were under con-
eideration for a new building for
the Cities Service Company, New
York City, known as Sixty Wall
Tower, there was one very ob-
vious drawback. The plot of
ground was small. The zoning
law limited the height of the main
part of the building to thirty
stories. A monumental tower was
desirable. If this tower was built
higher than forty-eight stories,
the number of elevators required
for efficient service would occupy
an uneconomic proportion of
floor space.








SOLIJTIOX:

Here was an ideal opportunity
for the first practical application
of a new step in elevator practice
which Otis engineers had been
developing through years of re-
search — the double -deck ele-
vator. With the installation of
double-deck elevators, it was pos-
sible to make the tower sixty
stories high. Eight of these ele-
vators now serve this building,
which reaches above all others
in lower Manhattan and is the
third tallest building in the
world. These eight tower ele-
vators provide transportation
facilities equivalent to fourteen
ordinary elevators. They con-
serve space, cut operating costs,
and, together with eighteen sin-
gle-deck elevators and ten escala-
tors, provide this building with
adequate and convenient vertical
transportation facilities. . . . Otis
Elevator Company, offices in the
principal cities of the world.




WE DO OUR PART



ROOM
CO NTROL



~^r Econ om I//

JOHNSON

Automatic Control Systems
are Economy Insurance



Eu a



ED EU
E3 E3



REGULATION of VENTILATION
AND AIR CONDITIONING



ZONE CONTROL




PERIODIC

FLUSH
SYSTEMS




Thoroughly modern, yet based on nearly half a
century of experience in design, manufacture, and in-
stallation, Johnson apparatus is available for a variety of
applications. It plays an important part in the modern-
ization of the mechanical plant in any type of building.
To control ROOM TEMPERATURES,7o/j«io« thermostats
operate simple, rugged radiator valves or mixing dam-
pers. Room thermostats may be had in the single tem-
perature pattern or with the v^ell-knowa Johnson "Dual"
arrangement, providing a reduced, economy temperature
when certain sections of the building are unoccupied. . . .
For VENTILATION AND AIR CONDITIONING plants,
there are thermostats, humidostats, and switches to con-
trol valves and dampers, start and stop motors on tem-
perature and humidity variation. Heating, cooling,
humidifying, dehumidifying — whatever the problem,
Johnson equipment is the answer . . .

JOHNSON ZONE CONTROL has been developed to a fine
point. Groups of radiators are controlled by the Johnson
"Duo-Stat" in accordance with the proper relationship
between outdoor and radiator temperatures. . . .JOHNSON
PERIODIC FLUSH SYSTEMS are simple, dependable, uti-
lizing the full force of the water supply for cleansing, and
reducing the load on supply and waste pipes by inter-
mittent flushing in various parts of the building . . .

Economy is the direct dividend paid hy Johnson instal-
lations. Comfort and convenience are the inevitable by-
products. . . . Sales engineers located at thirty branch
offices in the United States and Canada will survey and
report on your requirements, without obligation, just as
they have done in the case of countless buildings and
groups of buildings all over the continent.

JOHNSON SERVICE COMPANY

MAIN Office and Factory, Milwaukee, Wis.

BRANCH OFFICES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES



JOHNSON HEAT CONTROL



The Architect and Engineer, October, 1933



Thumb Tacks and T- Square



AND now they arc building homes
out of cotton. Stanley Nicholson, an
amateur aviator, has recently completed
a portable house on a camp site near
Milwaukee, with exterior of unbleached
cotton sheeting that is given a coating of
cellulose "dope" as applied to airplane
wings. This paint waterproofs and
shrinks the fabric tightly in place. The
interior is completely lined with the same
material and the wall-cell is filled with
a loose-pack insulating material. The
floor which is an integral part of the
rigid room unit, is of double thickness
with an intervening air-space.

Each "room-unit" is of a standardized
size and shape that can be fitted for a
kitchen, dining room, bedroom or living
room. Smaller units are provided for
bathrooms. As the need for additional
space is required, other units are easily
aligned and joined to tho.se already in
place.

The first demonstration home which
has been occupied this past summer by
Mr. NichoLson, is of two units weighing
but 370 pounds and costing $220.00.
Among the attractive features of the
house are hot and cold running water
and an air-conditioning system. The
kitchen is fitted with a refrigerator, gaso-
line range and sink, and concealed fix-
tures make it possible to convert the liv-
ing room into a bedroom, combining es-
sential bathroom facilities. By the econ-
omies of mass production, it is planned
to introduce the "room-unit" house to
campers through sporting goods mer-
chandising channels at a price of less
than $100 per unit.

« K a

NOBODY has to do anything.

No industrialist has to join his trade
a.s.sociation.

There is nothing in the National In-
dustrial Recovery Act that compels any-
thing.

But, it is easier to co-opcratc and it is
much more comfortable in the eyes of
everyone if every industrialist does co-
opcratc, join his trade as.sociation and
help put the recovery programme over
in a big way. It's much easier to work
in groups than singly and the larger and
better the groups are organized the eas-
ier it is going to be.

:t :: »

EVERY tenth per.son gainfully
employed in the United States depends
upon construction for his livelihood. It
is estimated that fully as much employ-
ment is given indirectly in dependent in-



dustries as is created in actual construc-
tion works. These figures show that
under the National Recovery Act public
works programme just how important it
is that projects get under way. Every
dollar spent for construction multiplies
as it passes into circulation and becomes
a factor of tremendous importance in the
nation's economic life. The rcemploy'-
ment of the vast army of construction
workers, who will spend if they earn,
will make markets for all industries.
Hence it behooves the administration to
hurry up its public works program.
There has already been too much pro-
crastination.

LAST month we published two
letters of appreciation from our readers.
Here are two more that are none the
less appreciative and interesting:
Editor, Architect and Engineer:

I thank you very much for your kind
letter of August 17th. also copy of the
August issue of The Architect and Engi-
neer. I have gone over this issue with
much interest and have particularly
noted the prominent place you gave co
the Treasury Department regarding fur-
ther information on architects and en-
gineers. "We are indebted to you for
this.

I want to say that I am very much
interested in your particular magazine,
as it is something new to me and gives
a very attractive study of California. I
am also interested to see that you coupled
architects and engineers together. Tliis
we have jilways thought necessary on
large architectural projects.

With personal regards, I am.
Sincerely,

L. W. ROBERT, Jr.
Assistant Secretary of the Treasury.

Washington. D. C.

a a u

The following is an abstract of a
letter from Hart Wood, architect of Hon-
olulu, who will be remembered as a
former partner of Horace Simpson in
San Francisco:

"I have read all of Elmer Grey's
"Vicissitudes" with considerable enjoy-
ment and am writing to-day to tell him
so.

I want to congratulatte you on the
tone and standard of work you have been
able to maintain through the.se trying
times.

"Yours is one of the few publications
I have felt the least able to give up and
so have an unbroken file for .several
years past.

"Visitors from the mainland and re-
turning islanders tell us that we ha\e
been very fortunate in conipari.son with
the mainland throughout this struggle of
the pa.st four years. It is true that
with perhaps one exception the archi-
tects have been able to carry on, though



of course, at much reduced speed. The
exception was possibly not due alto-
gether to inability to keep going but that
for the present at least the going seemed
better in other channels.

"We have an active Chapter with a
comparatively large representation of the
registered architects and a very good at-
tendance average. Wc recently started
a schedule of semi-monthly meetings be-
cause of increased activity and interest."

THE CHICAGO fair closes
November 1. From an architectural
view-point it may not have been as suc-
cessful as the White Fair 40 years ago.
While the present Exposition may re-
flect the "modern trend " to some ex-
tent critics say it is not a true picture of
40 years of artistic gain inspired by
Chicago's previous Fair.

We recall the words of Frank Adams
Cram early in the year, who found
little to enthuse about in the new de-
signs, except that they formed a "close
kinship with the painted flats of the
theater, carelessly stacked,' a "Tin Lizzie
style. '

If those who developed the new
buidings were making any claims for
them as significant achievements of archi-
tecture, there would be more room for
argument, says a writer in the Spring-
field Republican. "But," this writer con-
tinues, 'that is not the case. The build-
ings were conceived entirely in a spirit
of utility, which was judged to be neces-
sary on account of the financial risk in-
volved in the exposition. It has been
officially explained that as the buildings
must be removed after the fair, mater-
ials economical in original cost, having
some salvage value and permitting of
dissembly at low cost, were selected.
Paul P. Cret. Philadelphia architect, who
designed the Hall of Science, wrote a
few months ago that the buildings hoped
to get from bright paint, from ingenious
planting and from occasional scuptured
decorations, some of the charm which
they obviously lacked. "Buildings of
this "type," said Mr. Cret, "are, at
best, "only a successful background for
crowds.'

Those who have returned from a visit
to the Fair are neither enthused nor dis-
appointed in what they have seen. They
are of the opinion that while certain
types of construction may be all right for
Exposition buildings, they are hardly
suitable for our domestic and commer-
cial uses. We have not yet reached the
stage where we deem it necessary to sub-
stitute paint in gay colors or ingenious
electrical effects for architectural detail
on exterior walls, such as predominate at
the Chicago Exposition.

The Architect and Engineer. October, 1935



VOLUME 115
NUMBER 1



THE

ARCHITECT

AND ENGINEER



OCTOBER
1933



Wl^




(^his ^ssue


Co'iier Picture


GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE FROM A BELVEDERE GARDEN


^(^^^r




Cliesley Bonestell


W^


Frontispiece


PROPOSED CHAPEL NEAR MEXICO CITY
Robt. B. Stacy-Judd, Architect


MMSWIMM




TEXT




U . . .


WANTED— AN ALL-AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE
Robl. B. Stacy-Judd, A. I. A.


FREDERICK W. JONES, Editor


21 . . .


TOWARD A NUDIST ARCHITECTURE
Leicester B. Holland


EDGAR N. KIERULFF,


25 . . .


MODERN LINES ARE REFLECTED IN NEW LOS ANGELES VIADUCT


Advertishtg Manager




Louis L. Huot. .Architect




31 . . .


AMERICAN TR.'VDE AND INDUSTRY UNITE FOR BUSINESS


Contributing Editors




RECOVERY


CLARENCE R. WARD, San Francisco




General Hugh S. Johnson




35 . . .


LONG BEACH MASONRY— A PLEA FOR BETTER DESIGN AND


CARLETON MONROE WINSLOW,




SUPERVISION


Los Angeles




Ralph McCoy, with Department of Building Inspection. Oakland. Calijornia


HAROLD W. DOTY, Portland, Ore.


45 . . .


CONSTRUCTION STARTED ON MARIN TOWER, GOLDEN GATE
BRIDGE


CHAS. H. ALDEN, Seattle, Wash.


50 . . .


WITH THE ARCHITECTS


Consulting and .Advisory Editors




PLATES AND ILLUSTRATIONS


J. HARRY BLOHME


12-14 . .


PHOTOS OF MAYAN RUINS


LEWIS P. HOBART


15 . . .


PROPOSED STORE AND OFFICE. BUILDING, LOS ANGELES
Robt. B. Stacy-Judd, .Architect


TIMOTHY L. PFLUEGER


16 . . .


PROPOSED DEPARTMENT STORE, ETC., LOS ANGELES


ELMER GREY




Robt. B. Stacy-Judd. .Architect




17 . . .


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, VENTURA


CLARENCE A. TANTAU




Robt. B. Stacy-Judd. .Architect


WM. L. WOOLLETT


18 . . .


INTERIOR OF FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH. VENTURA
Robt. B. Stacy-Judd. .Architect


JOHN J. DONOVAN


25-30 . .


SIXTH STREET VIADUCT, LOS ANGELES


JOHNBAKEWELL.JR.




Merrill Butler, Chief Engineer; L. L. Huot, Architect


EDWIN L. SNYDER


39-43 . .


PRELIMINARY STUDIES AND SKETCHES, UNIVERSITY OF
CALIFORNIA


THOMAS J. KENT




Hoiiard and Cauldwell. Architects


44-48 . .


NIGHT VIEW OF GOLDEN G.^TE BRIDGE BY CHESLEY


ALBERT F. ROLLER




BONESTELL; ALSO PROGRESS PICTURES OF BRIDGE


J. STEWART FAIRWEATHER






JOHN W. GREGG
RALPH D, CORNELL




(^ext ^sMonth


CHAS. H. CHENEY




Recent work of Bliss and Fairweather. architects of San Francisco, including


W. ADRIAN




an airplane view of the proposed plant of the Standard Brands of California,
Federal building. Stockton, and residence for Mrs. 0. A. Hale, Saratoga.


JULIAN C. MESIC




Second installment of Robt. B. Stacy-Judd's interesting article on Mayan
Architecture.


H. J. BRUNNIER


"i.


Progress work on the San Francisco Bay Bridge with late photographs of
various units under construction.


L. H. NISHKIAN




Portfolio of intimate sketches of local scenes by Arne Koitwold.



Published monthly by THE ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER. INC.
621 Foxcroft Building. San Francisco. California

W. J. L. KIERULFF, President and Manager FRED'K. W. JONES, Vice-President L. B. PENHORWOOD, Secretary

Xe-d! York Representative— The Spencer Y'oung Company, 299 Madison Ave., New Y'ork City

5ais<:n>/io«5— United States and Pan-American, $4.00 a year; single copy, $ .60. Canada and foreign countries, $6.00 a year.




PROPOSED CHAPEL, NEAR MEXICO CITY (All Mayan motifs)
ROBT. B. STACY-JUDD, ARCHITECT



THE

ARCHITECT

AND ENGINEER



Q 111

379329



OCTOBER 1933
VOLUME 115
NUMBER ONE



WANTED- AN ALL-AMERICAN
ARCHITECTURE

With Ancient Mayan Motifs as a Background — Part 1

by



(In the following poem by Mr. Stacy-Judd. is
told the triumph in tragedy of the Mayan Civiliza-
tion, believed to be the greatest of all civilizations
of which we hare any tangible evidence. The poem
was published in "Pencil Points" through whose
courtesy we herewith reprint it. — EditorJ

THE MAYA RACE

Tradegy, and the Mind of Time combined

To usher, from apparent realms of space,
A people, wise in lore, tradition intertwined

With skill in Arts and Peace — The Maya Race.

No scribe has blazoned scrolls that we may learn

From whence they came, or source of power which w-illed.

Or what stupendous grief that made them turn
To Yucatan, an Empire to re-build.

What cataclysm drenched their eyes with tears!

What losses must have been their wages of toil!
What shattered hopes and dreams encouraged fears

When they were cast adrift to seek new soil!

And yet. forlorn, without a dreg or hope.

Driven, desperate, dreams all turned to dust.

Starving, suffering, powerless to cope.

They gave the Supreme Being simple trust.

And by his faith, well tried throughout past years
They gathered of their remnant shattered band.

And, probably, o'er waters fraught with fears.
Conquered, in their quest for safer land.

Intelligence supreme was theirs, long ere

The dread events which sealed their country's doom.
Of this we are assured by what is there

In Yucatan, from Copan to Tuluum.



ROBERT B.STACyJUDD,A,I.A.

Time soothed their grief and urged great minds to build
Pyramids, and temples, and palaces to store

Replicas of their arts, which now but filled

Their memories, and fostered dreams of yore.

So. glorious, as the sun from out the night.

Rose monuments, by architects unknown.
But brilliant in triumph of their right

To create history — in living stone.

Though ruins now. we prove their works compare
With all the Classic Orders, and longevity

In Fame shall crown the loving care

Which joyous labor freely ga\e posterity.

America! World's most dominant factor,
cynosure of lesser powers, leader in many
branches of science, mechanics and "mod-
ernism. " The foremost nation in claim-
ing originality, yet the world's greatest im-
itator when it comes to architecture and its
allied arts.

A host of styles have found a warm wel-
come in this generous-hearted land, and
legions of eager designers have sprung
with avidity on the old world' introduc-
tions and polished them up so that they
look like new^.

The lordly Greek and Roman classics,
with their columned porticos and pedi-
mented facades, arrived in the so-called
'new world' with their erstwhile dignity,
and courted a renaissance.

Stately Gothic came and marched with
ecclesiastic grace down the aisles of men.



^ 11 ►




EL CASTILLO. Chichi-n-llza. Vucatail. This maKnilicent pyramid,
like so many Maya structures, is enrapted with esoteric lore. There arc
4 staircases, representing the four seasons; 91 treads to each stairway
and a one step platform on top. 4 times 91 equals 364, add the plat-
form step and the total is 365. or days in the year. Nine great terraces
form the pyranlitl proper. The Maya year was divided into two periods
of nine months each, each month consisting of 20 days and five odd
days. There are 52 panels on the four facades. These represent the
fifty-two year period into which the Mayas divided their historical
chronicles. .■\t the end of each fifty-two periixi the ceremony of re
lightinK the fires, (of life) took place at dawn on a pyramid top.



no whit discouraged by the craftless hand.

The charming English mansion strode
with jovial countenance throughout the
hospitable States and remained for years
a privileged guest. The architecture of
other countries in turn found favor, more
or less, and, finally the freedom of the na-
tion was extended to the arts of Spain and
her seductive companions. But none ac-
cepted conversion.

The foregoing is not intended as uncon-
structive criticism. It is admitted that



/\fler a trying journey through the den>e.
city site of the Mayas known as Zayi is
shadows where the great Cordilleros range
the jungle buried buildings little is kno
herewith. It is a masterpiece in design



unfriendly jungle the ancien
■ached. It nestles in the sof
light be sflid to be born. O
n except the Palace showr
workmanship and contain



jnd



litcs of apartmenLs. The author slept in this structure. It
filled with large serpents, vampires (of the blotxj sucking variety)
iguanas and hornets, not to mention scorpions, tarantulas and giant
spiders. And the hcati



American architects have developed the
skyscraper and, in one sense, a style in that
class. But whatever the result, no matter
how distinctive, it is a type of, and con-
fined to the skyscraper and is utterly un-
suited to any other class of building.

Architecture a Language

A style' in architecture is a language
spoken in lasting substances by a people
who have attained a cultural level permit-
ting intelligent conversation through not
only the present but succeeding ages. It is
a tongue spoken and written, having an
alphabet and grammar. Its letters, words
and sentences are formed by the arrange-
ment of cornices and their details, carvings
or lack of same, moldings, their width and
height, openings, bulk and massing, or
general planning. The change in any one
of these details, or the method in which
they are grouped designates the milestones
in its life history. The artistry of properly
grouping the grammared sentences in a
structure, as a whole, constitutes the prose
or poem in stone. Such is the language of
Architecture. Through this intriguing sci-
ence the beliefs, religion, government, sci-
ences, hopes and fears of a nation may be
learned. It is further quite possible, due
entirely to individualism being expressed
in a given style, to learn even the name of
the architect.

Without an individual style in architec-
ture no nation is truly great.

With it comes the spirit of power and
grace of the mighty. It is the emblem of
a classic civilization and typifies an in-
spired race of people.

A national architectural style therefore
must have its own alphabet, grammar and
constructive sentences, in other words, a
language. To establish such a style it is
obvious that the motifs should be adapta-
ble to all classes of structures in all parts
of the country. The same conditions apply
to the skyscraper, commercial, ecclesiastic,
domestic or public buildings.

By this I do not mean that a church
should bear the same form and decoration
as the residence, each type enforces its
own conditions. I mean the fundamental



THE ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER



^ 12 ►



OCTOBER. NINETEEN THIRTY-THREE



motifs should be used in all types, if a
national style is sought. In other words,
a definite language, differentiated just as
is ecclesiastic and domestic Gothic. Fur-
ther it is not intended to insist dogmatically
that each and every structure shall be
thus and so, but that a style be created
for all types of buildings recognisable as
National.

An American Tradegy

As much as we dislike admitting it. we
are a tragic figure in this, the World
School of Architectural Classics. A host
of geniuses lie buried beneath a pile of
gross materialism, iron-bound custom and
its attendant inhibitions. Nevertheless,
they are but awaiting the time when
America is ready to foster the necessary
prolonged cultivation.

From time to time great minds have con-
ceived possible solutions which have lain
unnoticed in the lap of an unappreciative
American populous. Style reception was
cold. Psychological reasoning might attri-
bute the unresponsive attitude of the public
mind of entirely too natural conditions.
The two-gun, two-fisted he-man, strictly
materialistic formative period of nation
building dispensed with all consideration
of the finer arts in its curriculum. In fact
such tendencies were deemed indicative of
effeminancy.

It is only in comparatively recent years
that conditions are changing. While men
worked, seeking riches, women took ad-
vantage of their spare time. Women's so-
cial clubs sprang up over night, like mush-
rooms. Every city, town and hamlet in
these United States possesses its feminine
clubs, post-graduate emporiums dissemi-
nating culture and advanced knowledge.
Hence the fact that American women are,
as a body, far more intellectual than the
men.

The men, realizing the challenge to su-
premacy of their already inflated ego, de-
terminedly follow suit. The movement is
inspiring, it indicates the period of intel-
lecutal awakening is at hand. The thirst
for knowledge carries the possibility of
world leadership. The library, motion pic-




THE .AXXEX. C.AS.A DE LAS MOXJ.AS. Chichen Itza. Yucatan. An
elaborately carved building, full* of esoteric symbols and rich in motifs.



ture and radio are rapidly consumating the
change. Appreciation of the arts is but one
step further. Already the demand is for
American composers, American authors,
American artists, American poets and
American craftsmen.

Believing that the time aspects are pro-
pitious, I now place a new offering in the
erstwhile perverse lap of America. My
plea is for an All-American Architecture
and its Allied Arts.

In all branches of art it has always been
man's prerogative to turn to masters of the
past for inspiration. We realize the new
is ever founded on the old, because no man
is truly original. With one possible excep-
tion the world of art has been ransacked
by art creators seeking new motifs. It is




THE GOVERNORS PALACE. UXMAL
counted over 20.000 carved stones in the i
325 feet long. ,19 feet nide. 25 feet high,
platform, built of small stones set
seven acres in extent and 55 feet h
the Queen City of the Mayas.



Yl'CATAX. The • attthnr

r facades. The buildi5i§, is

gh. It stands on a solid sfone

cement, covering approximately

The author designated I'xmal



Online LibraryDr. James West DavidsonArchitect and engineer (Volume v.115-116 (Oct. 1933-Mar. 1934)) → online text (page 1 of 49)