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Fratres in Collegia

Laiv
J. N. Duncan



W. B. Umstead



L. L. Sasser



Class of IQ2I
J. H. Shinn



R. S. White



Class of iq2)
T. W, Brlton W. H. Smith



E. S. Stevens
J. M. Sloan, Jr.



Class of iq24

J. D Secrest
A. B Hall



Martin Carmichael
R. C. McNairy



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Kappa Alpha

(Founded 1865)



Colors: Crimson and Gold
Fifty Alumni Chapters



Flowers: Magnolia and Red Rose

Fifty Active Chapters

Membership 10,000

ALPHA PHI CHAPTER OF KAPPA ALPHA

(Established 1901)

Fratres in Facultate

W. H. Hall



J. P. Breedlove



H. D. Carmichael
A. G. Elliot

H. A. FOUSHEE

F. S. Fuller
Jones Flller



W. B. BOLICH



H. P Cole



J. G Pennington



Jean Bolich



Fralr



Urbe



Mahler Kramer
F. A. Muse
W. H. Muse
M. E. Newsom

Fratres in Collegio

Law
John Hall, Jr.

Class of IQ21
W. T TowE

Class Oj IQ22

T. B. Crawford, Jr.

Class of iqzj
D. L. Suiter
C. E. Summers

Class of iq24
Fritz Smith



D W. Newsom



J. H. Potts
R. B. Potts
Dr. B. Robinson
J. L. Scott
T E. Wright



John Small, Jr.
J. W. Hatmcock

E. C. Brooks, Jr.
Vernon Derrickson



Two Hundred Sevenly-one




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Pi Kappa Alpha

(Founded i8b8)

Flower: Lily of the X'alley Colors: Garnet and Gold

Fifty-three Active Chapters Thirty-four Alumni Chapters

Membership 10.44b

ALPHA ALPHA CHAPTER OF PI KAPPA ALPHA

(Established 1901)

Fratres in Urbe



Dr. C. a. Adams, Jr.
W. B. Arthur



T. B. ASHBY, Jr



n. j. boddie
Julian Frazier
R. M. Gantt

Fratres in Collegia

Law

\V. E. Smith

Class of IQ2I
J. D. Lewis

Class of /Q23

Fred Folger
T. G. Neal



W. B. McGeary
W. S. Willis



H. A. Crute
George Hadlev
W. B. Hadley








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Sigma Phi Epsilon

(Founded at Richmond College, 1901)

Flowers: American Beauty Rose and X'lolet Colors: Royal Purjjle and Red
Forty-six Active Chapters Twenty Alumni Chapters

Membership: b5,ooo

NORTH CAROLINA GAMMA CHAPTER OF SIGMA PHI EPSILON

(Established 1909)



Howard Bowen



Fralres in Urbe
Nash LeGrand

Fralres in Collegia
Class of IQ2I



W. L. Pridgen



R. \V. Giles



C. VV. Hackney



Class of ic)22
T. A. Banks

Class of iqzj
N. S. Crews

Class of IQ24
J. S. Barnes. Jr.



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Sigma Chi

(Founded 1855)
Flower: White Rose Colors: Sky Blue and Gold

Seventy-four Active Chapters Forty-nine Alumni Chapters

Membership 20,25b

BETA LAMBDA CHAPTER OF SIGMA CHI
(Established 1912)



Dr. M.
Dr. O.
Dr. E.



T. Adkins
B. Darden
T. McCleeves



F rat res in Urbe
O. L. Skinner
G. M. Mayes



Yancey Milburn
G. W. Tandey

E. D. SiKES



Frater in Facidlate
James Cannon, III

Fratres in Collegia

Law

S. T. Carson B. B. Jones



J



Graduate
G. Leyburn



Class of IQ2I
W. L. Chandler



L. L. Rose



J T .-Xrmstrong
J. E. Blades



J H. Graham
J. M. Hardee
G. T. Wood, Jr



Class of IQ22



j. D. Johnson, Jr.



Class of /g2j
E. B. Brown
J. E. Lyon

Class of ic)24
W. M. Blades
Sebron Perry
W. F. Ricks

Two Hundred Sevenly-seven



w.
w.



L. Pegues
H. Lander



Julian Ross
J.-\MES O'Hare. Jr.






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Pi Kappa Phi

(Founded 1904)



Flower: Red Rose
Fourteen Active Chapters



Colors: Old Gold and White
Six Alumni Chapters



J. C. Angier
H. S. Pollard



B. S. Borland



Membership 1,200

Fratres in Urhe

G, E. Powell

L. C. Richardson, Jr.

Fratres in Collegio

Law

K. M. Brim

Class of ig2i

C. C. CORNWELL

Class of iqiz

W. J. BUNDY

T. R. Waggoner



B. O. Rigsbee
F. M. Sasser



R. C. Leach



Class of 7Q2J

D. S. Harper W. T. Huckabee

Class of iq24
R. W. Spencer

'Two Hundred Seventy-nine




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Delta Sigma Phi

(Founded 1899)

Flower: White Carnation Colors: Nile Green and White

Thirty-three Active Chapters Seven Alumni Chapters

Membership 4,000






ALPHA EPSILON CHAPTER OF DELTA SIGMA PHI
(Established 1920)

Fralres in Collegia



L. B Hathaway



LeRoY RlDDICK



G. V. Allen



Class of iqii
O L. Richardson

Class of iqz2
F. C. Sherrill

Class of IQ2 3

C. K. Sherrill
H. L. Jones



A. B. WiLKINS



R. E. Thicpen



Class of 1Q24
E. B Dralchon H. a. McNeely



Two Hundred Eighty-one



^i!:2SS2!SSISS




H B. Willis







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Alpha Zeta Phi



(Founded at Trinity College 1915)
Flower: Hyacinlh Colors: Gold and Maroon



B. W. Barnard



Fratres in Facultate
Dr. W. H. Glasson



H. E. Spence



W. \V. Clements



Fratres in Urbe
1 H Jerome



H. C. West






I-



A. H. Gw'iN



Fratres in Collegia
Law



C. H. Moser
L. B. Durham
J. L. Peterson



T. C. KiRKMAN



Class of iqii

R. J Tysor

R. A. Parham



E. M. Spivey



F. N. McGrannhan
H. E. Fisher

G. S. MUMFORD



Class of 1Q2 2

i\l. T. Shelton
H. J. Herring



W. Young



&



J. L. Jackson

F. J. BOLING



Class of IQ2J
W. W. Turrentine



Class of 1Q24
\V. H. Carstarphen C. H King



E. T. Sherrill
J. E. Bridgers



C. G. Wilson



Two Hundred Eifihly-three



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Kappa Delta



(Founded at Virginia State Normal, Farm\ille, Virginia, 1897)

Flower: \V7i;(f Rose Colors: Olive Green and \('hite

Membership: 1700 Twent\-eight Acti\-e Chapters

SIGM.A DELTA C-H.-XPTER OF KAPPA DELTA
(Established 191 2)

Sorores in Urbe



Mrs. Watts Carr Mrs. J. L. Morehead

Mary White Crawford Gertrude Fallon



Mary Cobb

Mary Erwtn



May Waller



Blanche Barringer



Elizabeth Finch




Mrs. W. p. Few
Estelle Flowers

Sorores in Collegia
Class of IQ2I
Marguerite Russell

Class of IQ22

Annie Higgs

Class of ig24
Elizabeth Newcomb



Mrs. K. p. Lewis
Mary Louise Manning
Mrs. Joseph Speed
Mrs. Frank Webb



Lily Nelson Mason



Fannie Stevens



Inez Newsom



Patronesses



Mrs. F. C. Brown
Mrs. W. I. Cranford



Mrs C. W. Edwards
Mrs. W. T, Lapr.^de



Mrs. L. S. Booker

Two Hundred Eighty-seven

120 l^ 1 c





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Zeta Tau Alpha



(Founded at Virginia State Normal, Farmvilie, Virginia, 1898)



Flower: White \'iolet
Membership: 2,253



Colors: Turquoise Blue and Steel Grey
Twenty-six Acti\e Chapters



PHI CHAPTER OF ZETA TAU ALPHA
(Established 191 5)



Inez Allen
Laura Tillette



Sorores in L



Mrs. Plato Monk
MozELLE Newton



Sorores in Collegia
Class of ig2i
Emma Elizabeth Davis

Class of IQ2 2

Lota Leigh Draughan
Thelma Howell

Class of igij
Flora Marie Meredith



Tina Fussell

Lucille Merritt
Lillian Ramsaur

Dorothy Dotger



Class of 1Q24

Montrose Ballard Mary Lee Norment

Esther Evans Carolyn Shooter

Norma Dutton

Patrons and Patronesses

Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Angier Mrs. James j Wolfe

Prof, and Mrs. Albert M. Webb






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L'Envoi

Dear little girl, you are still in my dreams,
I'll never forget the quarrel it seems

And the day that the pin was returned.
But I light up my pipe, drawing pictures in smoke,
And I wonder just who got the best of the joke.

As your likeness in embers is burned.
For I think of your smiles and your frocks and your frills
And your hard-working husband, footing the bills.

— The Chanticleer, 1912.





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^^, TMiltlO NOTES



.OMETHlNt YO" /l\-AHI-RAHi-RMll
SELDOM SEt" RAHiRftHi.WKi



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Tnio Hundred Ninely-one






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1



Come Greet the Dawn!

By John Small

Come greet the dawn ! Come greet the daun !
Come greet the dormant princess, Morn,
Whom soon a jealous, wakeful day
Will rouse and quickly speed away.

Come greet the joyous dawn alone
With me from the aerial throne
Of clouds which breaking mists have spun
To crow n the Morn w hen night is won.



Come speed your flight for dawn is near
Her silent couriers arc here.
And earth no moment w ill arrest
Her hand for the delinquent guest.

Ihc dawn is come; we are much spent
And yet have gained our high intent :
The cleansing beauty of the Morn
Gives joy to life w hen joy is gone.








a ie n dar



SEPTEMBER











OCTOBER


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NOV EM BE 8








DECEMBER









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Calendar

Assembled by the Editor

Sept. 14 — 4:00 A.M. ; Freshmen begin to arrive for College.
b:2o P.M. ; All Freshmen on the campus.
7 :oo P.M. ; All Freshmen in bed.

-First Chapel clay. Freshmen matriculate.

-First Class day. Martin Carmichael and George Hadley
cut their first class.

-Football practice starts.

-Presidents opening address.

-Upper classmen start strolling in, most of them thinking
that College opened on the first or they would not
ha\'e come in so early.

Sept. 21 — Anni\-ersary of the da\- when Tub Taylor was tubbed.
Upperclassmen start nightly entertainments for Fresh-
men.



Sept.


15


Sept.


16


Sept.


17


Sept.


18


Sept.


'9



'4



Tivci Hundred .\'inet\-fwe







_i»^»-J^-JL-/L - ^0->-i-'^-_-'pT7T7-



^hrC.HKNTJGLhEr'feRx^i



Officers McSweeny Club



(The Mess Hall Cooks)



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(Affiliated with the Anti-Work League and the Loafers' L'nion Founded in the Procrastination
Period by Ima Bum, B V D , SOL . I O LI , I AV W , Author of
"Why don't the man that started work finish the job."
Motto "Work is for horses and mules, and they turn their backs to it")



Results Good
Favorite Theme




Sons of Rest



Purpose: To kill time SLuan "Let Father do it"

Rest Official Flower: Jimpson Weed Favorite Objection Work

Meeting Places The Orpheum and the Dope Shop

OFFICERS
W. H. Smith, President of the Brotherhood of time killers.
John S, Barnes, Jr , Chief of loafing squad.
P Rascoe, Grand Imitator of Rest
P. Gibson, Head of labor dodgers.
Requirements for Admission
Candidate must possess at least thirty-five cents.
Candidate must have a Y M C A recommendation
Dues: Mountain dues.
By-Laws
No profanity allowed (swearing permissible).

he club is not responsible for hats, coats, or cuff-buttons ol members.
No crooks allowed — except members.

MEMBERS
J M Sloan N A Ruphbrford ) B Harris W. L. Taylor M. 1. Wilson

J. M Barrktt C E. Jordan M L Wilson Nat Crews G. W Roebuck

N B. — For complete list of the honors of the members of the club see register at police headquarters.

Three Hundred Twelve






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/ nree nunarea i weive J ^^~\.

E£a!scg:2S5aissz2G35::M^





Babe Ruth






Baby Ruth. Bahy Ruth,

With your simple stick

^'ou hold the eyes of age and youth

With your sa\'age lick.

Bahy Ruth. Baby Ruth

With your cool haw k-eye.

Some day I hope you'll send, by gooth,

A meteor to the sky.

I know you lo\e that triendly stick
Tnat greets whatever's twirled:
It helped you play the diamond trick
That send you round the world.
Here's to your health, your fame, your al
Swat em whene'er you can;

wonder w ho can find the ball
\\ hen you become a man !

Dallas Walton Newsotn.




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His Highest Ambition

Gilbert E. Powell

A Bull Feast was in session. The place of the meeting was up in
Cats Head, that famous and notorious scene of Bull Artists'
Conventions since way back yonder before Woman Suffrage,
the influx of the feminines, and the formation of Sachet-brigades had
converted our many institutions into a garden of love sighs, a con-
glomeration of lace, frills, pink tea parties, social satellites, chiclet
chewers and dope fiends. Now this was not an ordinary, every-day-
and-night sorta Bull Feast, for the boys were not telling jokes, boning
for an exam, or raking the Dean over the burning coals of a student's
wrathful contempt. It was an unusual session. There was no dis-
order or confusion — no simultaneous wiggling of boisterously dis-
cordant tongues. Instead, there was an ordinary discussion in pro-
gress. Only four men were present — two upperclassmen, one fresh-
man, and one first year law student. And the question was: "What
is my highest ambition?"

The Freshman's turn came first. "Gentlemen," said he, "as
doubtless all of you know, I have musical tendencies. My fathers
had them before me. One of my ancestors, coming over on the May-
flower, could play the Jew's harp so well that favorable winds at-
tended the ship just to catch the rhythmic strains which emanated
from that simple mouthpiece. And when the Pilgrims landed, the
Indians who came to massacre were forced to dance themselves to
death under the spell of my ancestor's masterful touch. A great
uncle of mine, who was one of three, came into the world singing
'We Are Three Jolly Good Fellows". One of my aunts cut her teeth
on an ocarina; my grandfather was always fond of drumsticks; and
my cousin died from the effects of a song — he was a bachelor, rather
nervous and inflammable, and had a room next to an old maid who
was taking voice. So you see gentlemen, it's a plain case of inherited
ability, and I earnestly trust that 1 shall not incur the indignation of
this assembled body when I state that the greatest desire of my life

Three Hundred l'ourU'er\



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C/"-^5^ Three Hundred l'ourU'er\ ^„^'







is to be a wonderful singer. I don't mean a measly, mediocre, two-
by-four squabber; I mean a songster of some force and power — one
who can outmock the mockingbird, outcjuestion the owl, and out-
night the nightingale. I want my vocal organs to be so euphoniously
tuned that when I speak there will be a melodious rhythm to n^\
every utterance — an entrancing .harmony in my very breathing, and
when I open my mouth and actually let loose, the birds in heaven
will cease to chirp in order to listen, the barnyard duck desist from
its discordant quack, and the victrola playing a Caruso record will
automatically stop and hang its crank in shame. In other words,
gentlemen, 1 want to be a singer of such unexcelled excellency that
I can play on the feelings of my hearers like David played on the
harp of a thousand strings, can draw rosin out of an oak plank, and
even touch the cold, stern heart of a college professor! Then, may-
haps, 1 can talk to the spirits in Paradise, for Carlyle says that music
is the speech of the angels."



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The first upperclassman's turn came next. "My friends,"
said he, "if you will pardon the material viewpoint from which I
have regarded this question, the height of my ambition is to be a
shirt manufacturer — that is, the manufacturer of a shirt after my
own liking. Now ever since the first few days of my tender infancy
up to my present state of mental confusion and co-ed inclinations
I've been shirted in some form or other — night — , under — or top-
shirted — and in all that lengthy period of garbed existence 1 have
never owned or seen a shirt which possessed all the qualities that 1
thought a real shirt ought to have. They were all too gaudy or too
plain — too big or too little — the collar-band too large or too tight —
the sleeves too long or too short and puckered where they joined the
body — the cuffs wore out too easily — the buttonholes always too
large — the buttons never would stay on — and besides all that, the
tail was forever coming out. Now my idea is to manufacture a shirt
which rectifies all these wrongs and strengthens all these weaknesses.
I'll have the colors blending so harmoniously they will be a joy to
the eyesight, an elastic collar-band that will fit any neck, the sleeves
just right, the cuffs made of a durable substance which will ne\cr
wear out, the buttons fastened so securely that a tug-ol-war could

Three Hundred Sixteen



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^■*^^^ Three Hundred Sixteen /■"'''-






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not pull them loose, and the tail fashioned so skillfully to fit that
portion of the anatomy which it covers that it will never come out
unless such be the willful intent of the wearer and a definite motion
made by him to bring out such ends. To be the maker and manu-
facturer of a shirt like this, gentlemen, is my greatest ambition
on earth!"

The second upper-classman came third. "Gentlemen," said he,


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