Dwight H. (Dwight Hall) Bruce.

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Hand, Mander 99

How, Stephen 99

Isham, Zebaher . 68

Johnson, Samuel 56,68



Acres.


Quality.


64i
50


2
2
2


100


3


50


3


33


3


8


3


10




13


3


52


3


83


3


6H
43


3
3


50


3


53


3


40


3


70


3


10


3, 3


30


3


6


3


136


2


2


3


1


1


100


3


35


3


1


3


187


1
1, 3


1


1


37


2


156


2, 3


1


3


311*
13


3

1. 2

3


54


2, 3


3




75


3


100


2


133


3


150


2


85


3


34


3


300


3


80


3


100


3


237


2


1


2


64


3


35


3


55


3


4


1


135


1
3


86


3


100


3


4


2


21J


8



Real. Personal. Tax.

S 150 $ .63

548 2.45

900 3.75

500 2.23

300 1.24

130 .53

40 .15

100 .42

130 .53

400 1.66

330 1.38

1,305 5.47

836 .1.40

250 1.03

300 1.36

300 .81

430' 1.76

830 3.47

180 • .74

100 .43

1,134 4.74

300 .81

40 .15

900 3.75

225 .93

150 .63

300 1.35

1,835 7.96

100 .43

375 1.57

1,113 4.63

175 .74

75 .32

5,890 §500 26.75

70 .30

477 3.00

30 .09

535 3.35

700 3.92

1,107 4.62

1,400 5.86

500 3.23

272 1.13

2,300 9.18

560 3.49

900 3.75

3,180 .... , 9.13

100 .43

384 1.62

150 .63

330 1.38

1,000 1,000 8.36

350 ...... 1.01

635 3.63

364 1.54

800 3.34

100 .43

330 .90



THE TOWN OF CAMILLUS.



675



Residents. Lot No. Acres. Quality.

Johnson, Charles M 56 30 3

Keeler, Isaac & John 63 100 3

Ketcham, Timothy 51 33 3

Kimberly, George & Co 68 i 3

Kynon, Asa 77,88 300 3

Ketcham, Jeremiah 78 60 3

Kimberly, Elisha, by G. Law-
rence -.80 2 3

King, Thomas ...80 i 3

Kimberly, Israel, jr., •. 80 ^J 1

Kilby, John B .56 1 3

Karson, Archibald 98 49 3

Kimberly & Brockway 80

Like, David 87 1 1

Lusk, Samuel 51 35 2

Lusk, Richard 53,90 110 1,3

Eadd, Russell 44 35 3

Lyon, Abel 65 75 3

Lamberson, Lawrence 66 150 3

Lawrence, James R 66, 80, 90 134 2, 3

Labolt & Miller, Peter 66 52 3

Lamberson, Con radt 66 9 3

Labolt, Absalom 80 i 3

Lawrence, Grove 80 3 3-

Land, Charles 80 J 1

Liddle, Thomas 89 96 3

Munro, David

68, .69, 33, 80, 34, 65, 90, 60 1,379 3, 3

Munro, Squire.... 53, 60, 70, 81, 83 819 1, 3, 3

McDowell, Henry, jr .51 39 2

Morey, John 51 3 2

Marshall.Simon&HarlowlS, 51, 63 300 1

Marvin, Adonij ah 63 .J 3

McDowell, Henry 53 66 1

McDowell, Alexander 53 30 3

Milliard, Edward & Edward, jr. 87 55 3

McCall, Alexander 64 100 3

Mason, Daniel 44 10 2

Mann, David ' 53 130 2

Mathew, Ashel 68 i 3

Millard, Edmond 77 107 3

MiUin, Ephraim 80 J 1

McGoon, Isaac .80,100 53 3

Maynard, Joseph W. 80 f 1

Maynard, John. 80 3 3

Maynard, Abner... .98 11 3

Owen, Thomas 68 1 1

Paddock, Thomas 51 109 1

Paddock, Jonathan 51 125 3

Paddock, William W 51 33 3

Paddock, Solomon... 53 100 3

Paddock, Jonathan, 3d 87 86 1

Putnam, Levi 97 1 2

Pulver, William M 97 18 3

Phillip, Jacob 44,56 40^ 3

Palmer,John 44 32 3

Palmer, Benjamin 44 28 3

Perry, Eli 44 5 2



Real. Personal. Tax.

$ 310 .^ .86

1,000 4.17

190 .79

400 1.66

2,200 9.18

500 2.23

135 .53

150 .63

800 3.34

30 .09

350 ■ 1.47

$1,000 4.17

100 .43

300 .81

1,870 300 4.91

210 .87

462 1.93

1,350 5.64

1,515 6.53

275 1.15

54 .33

30 .13

400 1.66

200 .81

900 3.75

10,930 45.74

11,300 4,000 64.06

270 1.10

50 .21

2,000 .. 8.36

50 .31

550 2.44

350 ■ 1.03

700 3.93

1,000 4.17

80 .34

1,170 4.89

300 .81

530 2.36

300 .81

1,100 4.59

800 3.34

400 1.66

60 .36

300 1.35

1,300 5.01

1,000 400 5.85

350 1.03

700 3.93

900 3.75

50 ■ .31

100 .42

350 1.47

356 1.04

168 , .70

40 .17



676



OiTONDAGA'S CENTENNIAL



Residents. Lot No.

Palmer, Jonathan 44

Peak, Jolin 44

Palmer, Daniel 44

Peck, Enos, jr 54

Pulver, Henry M _ 98

Potter, Henry _ 98

Paine, Seth 56

Redman, Wm., heirs of_. 75, 86, 87

Rose, Gilbert 97

Rose, Nathan 97

Reynolds, Urbane... 97

Ross, Robert 53

Redman, Elizabeth 76

Richmond, Loren 76

Rockwell, Joseph B. ._ 76

Richmond, Sylvester 50, 51

Rhoads, Solomon 18, 51, 52

Remington, Ransom 44

Robinson, Simeon 44

Robinson, Chauncey 55

Robinson, Erastus 55

Reed, William 56,68

Rust, Dennis 68

Robbins, Samuel :. 89

Rood, Joseph _ 99

Roach, Richard 109

Stevens, John 88, 92, 93

Sprague, Daniel 87

Sprague, Stephen 64

Stephens, George 88, 89

Squires, Linus 39, 40, 44

Skinner, Otis _ 63

Spalding, Abel 51

Skinner, Jonathan 40, 53

Sears, John 41, 54

Sherwood, Lyman 53

Sears, Charles 54

Seymour, Miles 54

Shearer, Alexander 65

Shannon,' Hannah 66

Sherman, Martha _ 66

Stephen.s, Alfred 66, 79

Sears, Eleazer 78

Stone, Pomeroy 80

Shead, H. & Ephraim 80

Shead, Horatio 80

Seymour, Abraham _. 89

Saunders, John E 98

Turner, John 51

Totten, Daniel 87

Taylor, William 87

Tomlinson, Anny _. 64, 80

Tompkins, Nathaniel 15, 68

Tillotson, David 40, 53

Ten Brook, Jacob 44

Tompkins, John 56, 68

Tuttle, James 68

Tuttle, Abner 68



Acres.


Quality.


Real. Personal. Tax.


35


2


$ 300


$ .81


25


2


125


.52


31


3


157


.65


140


2


1,120


468


56


3


336


1.40


43


3


255


1.04


78


3


624


2.02


28


1


380


1.59


37


1


300


1.25


18


2


300


1.35


10


3


40


.17


50


3


800


1.25


125


2


1,350


5.64


105


1


1,070


447


17


2


300


.81


40


3


325


1.37


72


2


440


1.83


11


3


77


.33


2?


2


125


.53


50


2


350


1.47


50


2


350


1.47


220


2


3,000


13.54


1


3


75


.31


172


3


1,304


5.01


52


3


300


1.25


32




133


.54


150


1, 2, 3


2,800


11.73


1


1


190


.79


50


3


300


1.35


100


2


700


3.93


146


1, 3, 3


1,530


6.41


99


1


1,800


7.55


50


1


400


1.66


101


3


830


3.47


109


2


1,059


4.43


77


3


703


3.94


6


3


50


.21


67


3


536


3.41


95


3


760 § 0.25 3.32


6


3


30


.13


3


3


20


.09


834-


3, 3


766


3.33


5H


3


339


1.41


3


1


800


200 417


i


1


300


800 459


4


1


400


1.66


50


3


500


2.33


H


3


100


.43


66


3


670


3.81


12


3


300


1.35


65


1


710


50 3.20


76J


3


700


2.93


26i


2, 8


575


2.58


38


3, 3


477 . .


2.01


53


3


318


1.34


157


3


2,416


10,14


49


3


539


2.43


i


2


100


.43



THE TOWN OP CAMlLLtrS.



677



Residents. Lot No.

Tompson, Adonijah , 80

Truesdale, John 100

Van Alstine, Jacob _ 52, 65

Van Alstme, Abraham 65

Van Derwerker, Martin 44

Vossler, Jacob 44



Acres.

8i
175
105

42

18

57

42

68

61

40

75

50
150

70

60

195

126

1

67
122
139

10
126

56
320

19
170

99
1

56

H

8
18

"s

i



Quality.
2
2
1, 3

3
2
2
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3

1, 2
1
1
2

2, 3
2
2
S
3
2



B 100



2,



Van Alstine, John J. _ 65

Veeder, Simon & John 66

Van Alstine, Jane 66

Veeder, Simon 2d 66

Van Dorn, Jesse 69

Veeder, Ryer_ _ _ 79

Van Alstine, Bartholomew 79

Vandenburgh, Andrew 79

Vosburgh, James 66

White, Elijah _ 18, 56, 68

Wever, Benjamin 18, 50, 51

Wells & Bates 63

Wood, Samuel 76

Wood, Abraham 87, 97

Warner, Heman _ 40, 53

Wilkinson, Lysander B 56

Wood, Enoch 77,88

Wiriam, Wheadon _ 78

Wheadon, Augustus 79, 80

Winten, Squire 80

Wheeler, William 80, 90

Wood, Nathan 88

Wood, Alvin . . _ _ 88

Warren, Peter. _ 89

Wells, Henry 89

Wells, Henry & John 90

Whittman, Samuel 44

Walter, John 44

Webber&Hoar 80

Whiting, Melzor _ . . 79

Yerington, 80

The Methodist Episcopal church of Camillus, mentioned on a fore-
going page, was reorganized in 1837, and three years later the society
erected a house of worship, the second in town. In 1830 the circuit
preachers were Revs. Isaac Puffer and G. W. Dinsmore. In 1836 Ca-
millus was made a station with Rev. Ross Clark pastor. This edifice
has since been remodeled, and is still standing.

By 1830 immigration had reached its full tide, and the town every-
where gave evidences of general prosperity. The western part of
Camillus had developed into a thrifty section, giving existence to the
hamlets locally known as Wellington and Oswego Bitter. The former
on the Genesee turnpike, very soon became quite a busy place, and for
a time enjoyed the privileges of a post-office, besides a store, two tav-
erns, shops, etc. All these, however, were long ago discontinued.



Real.
S 64

2,250
456
356
144
400
250
408
360
380
525
250

1,050
490
360

1,369

1,210
300
650

1,300

1,647
70

1,580
393

3,160
600

1,600

1,100
150
150
350

1 000
56
90

"56
200



Personal.



1,000



Tax.
8 .26
9.41
403
1-50
.62
1.66
1.03
1.71
1.52
1.60
2.37
1.03
440
2.23
1.52
6.15
5.06
1.23
2.74
5.45
6.91
.30
6.78
1.65
9.06
2.49
6.73
461
.63
.63
1.47
4.17
.26
.38
4.17
.31
.81



678 ONONDAGA'S CENTENNIAL

Oswego Bitter, about one and a half miles north, also near the Elbridge
line, was originally called " Swago Bitter."

The first town records in existence begin March 36, 1829, at which
date the towns of Elbridge and Van Buren were set off by acts of the
Legislature. Clark's ' ' Onondaga " states that all the early records were
burned, but this should be construed as relating to the proceedings of
the board of town officers; records of roads are preserved back to 1813
and of schools to 1812. From these we learn that Linus Squire was
town clerk in 1814-17; Charles H. Toll, 1818-20; Gideon Frothinghani,
1821; C. H. Toll, 1822-24; Linus Squire, 1825; David C. Lytle, 1826-
27; Abel Lyon, 1828. Clark also says that the first town meeting (in
1799) was held at the house of Medad Curtis, who was elected super-
visor; Daniel Vail was chosen town clerk. The first meeting after
Camillus was reduced to a little less than its present size (a part of On-
ondaga being annexed in 1834) was convened at the house of William
Stevenson on April 28, 1829, when the following officers were elected:

Miles W. Bennett, supervisor; Chauncey White, town clerk; Robert Hopkins,
Henry Wells, and Ethan 'Campbell, assessors ; David Seymour and Elijah White,
overseers of the poor ; Nelson Buck, collector; Darius Glsason, sealer; Daniel Ben-
nett, Perigo Austin, and Alanson Ellis, commissioners of highways; Daniel T. Jones,
Grove Lawrence, and Ethan Campbell, trustees of public lot; Grove Lawrence,
D. T. Jones, and Isaac Magoon, commissioners of common schools ; George W. Rich-
ards, Harold White, and James O. Bennett, inspectors of common schools ; David B.
Winton, Darius Gleason, Joseph S. Furgason, and NelsOn Buck, constables; and
twenty-five overseers of highways.

The supervisors have been as follows:

Miles W. Bennett, 1829-31 ; David Munro, 1832 ; Grove Lawrence, 1833-34; Charles
Land, 1835-36; Daniel T. Jones, 1837-39; Isaac Hall, 1840; Luther Hopkins, 1841;
Albion J. Larkin, 1843; Sidney H. Cook, sr., 1843-45; Harry Weed, 1846; Harry
Tuttle, 1847 ; Henry C. Kimberly, 1848 ; Gaylord N. Sherwood, 1849 ; -John C. Munro,
1850; Erastus Sheldon, 1851; David A. Munro, 1852; Sidney H. Cook, sr., 1853-54;
William R. George, 1855; Luther Hay, 1856; David A. Munro, 1857-58; Samuel L.
Hopkins, 1859-60; Edwin R. Harmon, 1861; John C. Munro, 1862-63; Edwin R.
Harmon, 1864-68; Jonathan B. White, 1869-72; George D. Reynolds, 1873; John C.
Munro, 1874-76; E. Duane Sherwood, 1877; Sidney H. Cook, jr., 1878; E. Duane
Sherwood, 1879; John C. Munro, jr., 1880-85; Samuel L. Hopkins, 1886-90; William
B. Gorham, 1891-92 ; Samuel L. Hopkins (resigned, and W. B. Gorham appointed)
1893; William B. Gorham, 1894-95.

The first justices of the peace, elected April 27, 1830, were Grove
Lawrence, Ethan Campbell, and Alfred Stephens. George Geddes
was elected to the office in 1835. Sidney H. Cook, sr., served as mag-
istrate about thirty-five years. Many of the early town meetings were



THE TOWN OF CAMILLUS. 679

held in Camillus at the tavern of Samuel B. Rowe, which stood on the
vacant lot opposite the store of S. H. Cook. The village is sometimes
designated in the records as " Nine Mile Creek." Mr. Rowe continued
as an innkeeper until about 1858. He built the present hotel and was
succeeded by Chauncey B. Delano, Samuel B. Rowe, jr., Philo Brom-
ley, and others.

In 1830 a post-office was established at Belle Isle with George Kim-
berly as postmaster. Thomas Machan held the office many years after
1860, and was also a long time justice, being first elected in 1868. In
1836, or earlier, the place had a store, tavern, and twelve or fifteen
dwellings. One of the former merchants was M. L. Hay. In 1830
several members were dismissed from the old Baptist church at Hewlett
Hill to organize -a- society here, but it subsequently went out of exist-
ence. In later years quite an extensive boat business was carried on,
canal boats were built, and large numbers repaired prior to 1870.

As this point the names of other prominent settlers and later residents
of the town may be appropriately mentioned, viz:

William R. George, Edwin C. Parsons, Cyrus Sweet (at one time surrogate), Ed-
win R. Harmon (farmer and grain dealer), Frederick Loomis, E. D. Larkin (justice
of the peace), E. E. Veeder (barrel and brick manufacturer), Thomas H. Munro,
Gaylord Noble Sherwood, Henry Jerome (at one time postmaster at Fairmount),
Martin M. Ford (side justice), Calvin D. Bingham, A. E. Daniels, John Dow, I. Jesse
Ecker, Col. John Dill (a Revolutionary soldier, came here in 1828, and died in 1846),
Judge Samuel Dill (brother of Col. John), William Ecker, James M. Gere, Luther
Hay, Alfred L. Hinsdale, J. H. Hitchcock, Samuel Parsons (publisher), I. M. Peck,
G. D. Reynolds, Dr. John O. Slocum (surgeon in the army, and brother of the late
Maj.-Gen. Henry W. Slocum), Reuben Steves, Dr. Lewis C. Skinner (who settled in
Amboy in 1840), Dr. E. C. Skinner (son of Dr. L. C), William C. Thorpe, F. A. and
Jacob Van Alstine, Henry Winchell, and the Munro family.

GaylordNobleSherwood was born in Fairfield, N. Y., April 18, 1805,
came to Camillus village in 1827, married a sister of David Bennett in
1828, and the same year opened a store, which recently passed into the
possession of Sidney H. Cook, jr. Mr. Sherwood was in business here
forty years. He also had stores at Amboy, Baldwinsville, Syracuse,
Fulton . and elsewhere, and was chairm^an of the Board of Supervisors
for some time. He finally removed to Buffalo, where he died January
10, 1895. His sons, E. Duane and Charles E. Sherwood, conducted the
Camillus store for some time.

Sidney H. Cook, sr., was a son of Lyman Cook (who died in Van
Buren, June 30, 1837), and was born in Marcellus on August 31, 1806.
He became a lieutenant-colonel in the old State militia, was constable



680 ONONDAGA'S CENTENNIAL.

and collector in Marcellus, and in 1841 removed to Camillus village,
where he spent the remainder of his life in mercantile trade, and was
successfully engaged in storage and forwarding and in purchasing
grain. He held many positions of trust, and several times was justice
of sessions. His children were Dr. George W., Mary E., Morris A.,
Emily H., Mansfield J., Orange L., C. Janette, Sidney H., jr., Samuel
and Frances A. His son, Sidney H., is a general merchant in Camillus
village.

Among other merchants in the village of Camillus were Gould & Hess, Hoar &
Wheeler, William A. Cook, John C. Ellis, Sher.wood & Chase, Knapp & Smith, John
L. Sherwood, George Kimberly and son Oliver, Abram Otman, George Gee ; Robert
Dickey, James Patten, Ur. John O. Slocum, Albert Harmon, C. S. Safford, E. B,
Bush, drugs; Seth Dunbar, Benjamin Bucklin & Son (William B.), and E. S. Darling,
hardware ; Charles Land, long a harnessmaker and prominent citizen ; and Ira Saf-
ford, cabinetmaker and undertaker. In 1836 the village contained one saw and one
grist mill, a carding and cloth dressing establishment, three taverns, four stores, two
churches, and about fifty dwellings. Among the postmasters were Grove Lawrence,
Robert Dickey, J. N. Sherwood, Henry Kimberly, Albert Harmon, Benjamin Brown,
and Sidney H. Cook, jr., incumbent.

The year 1838 witnessed the opening of another channel of com-
munication which was destined to work radical changes in local busi-
ness affairs, and particularly in manufacturing enterprises. This was
the Syracuse and Auburn Railroad, which was first operated by horse
power and later equipped with iron rails and steam. It gave existence
to the little hamlet at Marcellus Station, inaugurated a new impetus in
the village of Camillus, and in a measure influenced the settlement at
Fairmount, where a post-ofiSce was established and more recently a
tract laid out into building lots; but it withdrew in time the business
industries from Amboy and Wellington, eventually leaving those ham-
lets with only the ruins of their former importance. Soon after the
completion of the railroad a large grain business sprang up and con-
tinued until about 1870, but this was mainly carried on by the aid of
the canal. Camillus was for several years the banner town in Central
New York for home produce and grain market, and among the promi-
nent dealers were James M. Baker, E. W. Clark, Ephraim Shed, and
James M. Munro. The latter, in 1860, bought and shipped to Albany
248,000 bushels of barley in sixty days. The raising of grain has
largely given place to mixed farming ; among the leading products now
are hay, tobacco, winter wheat, barley, oats, fruit, potatoes, etc., and
dairying, considerable milk being sent to Syracuse for consumption.

The early settlers in the town of the Baptist faith worshiped in the



THE TOWN OF CAMILLUS. 681

" First Baptist church of Onondaga," which was organized at Hewlett
Hill in January, 1804, with six male and seven female members. An
edifice was built there and dedicated in 1831 ; in 1844 the society was
removed to Camillus village, where a church was erected in 1849 and
dedicated January 8, 1851. The name was changed to the First Bap-
tist church of Camillus, and about 1878 the edifice was replaced by the
present brick structure. The first pastor after the removal and re-
organization was Rev. Henry Brown. Among other pastors have been
Revs. A. L. Freeman, D. McFarland, and G. F. Genung. The year
1845 saw the formation of the society and erection of the Presbyterian
church at Amboy, which was dedicated December 33 of that year.
The society consisted of forty-nine members dismissed from the Con-
gregational church at Van Buren Center and the Presbyterian church
at Camillus. The first pastor was Rev. Alfred C. Lathrop, and among
his successors were Revs. Richard Dunning, John S. Bacon, Frederick
Hebard, A. J. Quick, and Benjamin B. Dayton. Among the prominent
members may be mentioned the names of Heman Warner, J. Skinner,
Jonathan White, William Reed, Truman Skinner, Pardee Ladd, Henry
Li. Warner, Samuel Parsons, the Hopkins families, and J. E. Meyers.
Six years later, in 1851, an M. E. church was built at Belle Isle ; the
first trustees were Jabin Armstrong, Henry Safford, and John C. Hat-
ton. The first pastor was Rev. Mr. Coop.

The village of Camillus was for rtiany years a center of great activ-
ity, and promised a brilliant future. It was an important grain market
and shipping point, especially by the canal, and the volume of business
transacted reached extensive proportions. In 1853 the village received
corporate privileges; the first officers were Gaylord N. Sherwood, pre-
sident; Samuel B. Rowe, Ira Safford, David A. Munro, and Charles
Land, trustees ; and Crayton B. Wheeler, clerk. The growing trans-
portation facilities afforded by the railroad and the increasing advan-
tages offered in Syracuse eventually militated against the interests of
the place, and diverted much of its trade into other channels, while the
abandonment of the Genesee turnpike as a popular route of travel ex-
tinguished its great importance and prestige, leaving it to depend upon
the resources of the adjacent country.

In the same year (1853) the first Roman Catholic priest took up his

his residence in Camillus. This was Rev. William McCallion, and

among his successors were Revs. Joseph Butler, Francis J. Purcell,

William Carroll, T. F. Smith, J. E. O'Sullivan, and William A, Ryan,

86



682 ONONDAGA'S CENTENNIAL.

This parish and the one at Jordan were organized by Father Haias, of
Salina. Services were first held in a barn, which was fitted up for the
purpose, and later in the present brick parsonage. About 1870, under
the pastorate of Father Carroll, a brick church was erected.

It is said that the first political meeting in the United States that
represented the principles upon which the Republican party was subse-
quently founded, was held at Rowe's Hotel in Camillus on January 27,
1852. The call for this gathering preceded the national organization by
-three years. An old placard sets forth " that those of you who are op-
posed to the Fugitive Slave law, to the extension of slavery over Free
Soil, to the admission of anymore Slave States, and are disposed to waive
former political preferences and party predilections, and unite your
strength that your influence may be felt in the cause of Freedom and
Humanity, are cordially invited to meet with us at Rowe's Hotel on the
17th day of January inst.^ — Camillus, Jan. 3, 1852. " The call was signed
by D. A. Munro, J. M. Munro, Wheeler Truesdell, M. W. Lyon, D. L.
Pickard, E. Marks, D. C. Le Roy, C. B. Wheeler, John Truesdell,
Daniel Bennett, J. B. and L. B. Bennett, and 324 other well-known
citizens of the town. From this time until the close of the Rebellion
political excitement ran high, and during the four years of war and
carnage no town in the State manifested deeper patriotism or supported
the Union with greater loyalty. Full quotas were promptly contrib-
uted to the cause, and large sums of money were raised for bounties,
etc.

On December 31, 1875, Sapphire Lodge No. 768, F. & A. M., was
chartered with twenty-one members, as follows :

C. S. Safford, secretary; J.H. Lyboult, S. W. ; W. B. Bucklin, S. H. Cook, jr.,
T. A. Fish, J. W. ; J. H. Paddock, E. R. Glynn, J O. Slocum, T. V. Owens, La-
Fayette Burdick, S. L. Hopkins, Merril Skinner, A. L. Hinsdale, A. R. Hopkins,
T. M. Sheens, W. M. ; E. C. Skinner, Cyrus Sweet, E. D. Sherwood, treasurer, E.
D. Larkin, H. D. Burdick, J. Paddock.

On January 1, 1895, the Camillus Enterprise, a weekly newspaper,
was started by C. A. Roe, of Marcellus, where it is printed at the
Observer office.

The population has been as follows: In 1830, 2,518; 1835, 8,006; 1840, 8,957; 1845,
2,976; 1850, 3,106; 1855, 2,740; 1860, 2,940; 1865, 2,552; 1870, 2,423; 1875, 2,604;
1880, 2,416; 1890, 2.678; 1892, 2,522.



THE TOWN OP BLBRIDGE. 683



CHAPTER XXXII.
THE TOWN OF ELBRIDGE.

In what is now the town of Elbridge occurred practically the second
settlement of white men in the present county of Onondaga. The
territory was then a densely wooded wilderness, frequented by Indians
and inhabited by bears, wolves, and other beasts of the forest, and
could not have presented an appearance other than of a gloomy waste.
More than a century has passed since the transition was made, and to-
day we look back upon the transformation of an uninviting scene into
a prosperous and attractive community.

The beginning of the story dates from 1791, when the territory under
consideration belonged to the great county of Herkimer. In that year,
probably in the spring or summer, Josiah Buck came into this region
to survey the military township of Camillus into lots, and selecting a
site a little west of Elbridge village built for himself and party a tem-
porary shelter. In the autumn he was found here by Lieut. -Col. Will-
iam Stevens and a party of surveyors and explorers. Colonel Stevens
came in from the east and passed over the site of what is now Camillus
village, or near there, thence on to the Skaneateles outlet, down that
stream to the site of the village of Elbridge, and from there to Buck's
location. He kept a very complete account of his travels, which is
now in the possession of his granddaughter, Mrs. Andrew G. Graham,
and from it are taken the following extracts. Reaching this region in
October, 1791, the party stopped overnight with Asa Danforth at On-



Online LibraryDwight H. (Dwight Hall) BruceOnondaga's centennial. Gleanings of a century → online text (page 74 of 101)