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E. E. (Elizabeth E.) Flagg.

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This Anti-Secrecy Library Is donated
hy the National Christian Association, on the
assurance, given on the part of the College,
that the books should have a good position
and be accessible to the students.

If at any time changes should occur, so that
these provisions could not be carried out,
please notify the National Christian Associ-
ation, 221 West Madison Street, Chicago, 111.,
that measures may be taken for their return.



I.I



\JX> i II I .

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA.

M^^



MAR .28 .1894 , 189










, jras - , - -^' ^ "SOT" ^^ s



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HOLDEN WITH CORDS



fW TUJ? QflPRflT

Ur 1 GJMLl



A FAITHFUL REPRESENTATION IN STORY OF THE EVIL INFLUENCE OF



FREEMASONRY



FLAGO,

Author of "Little People" "A Sunny Life" Etc,



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS,

EZRA A. COOK, PUBLISHER,

1883.



* Entered according to Act of Congress In the year 1883,

BY EZRA A. COOK,
In the office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington, D. C.






. PUBLISHER'S PREFACE.

The educating influence of stories both for good
and evil is everywhere recognized. The vile anecdotes
of the bar-room and saloon debauch the conscience
worse than the liquor they drink does their bodies.
It is notorious that it is neither the most eloquent or
worthy politician, but he who can give the most sensa-
tional illustrations, that stands the best chance of elec-
tion.

The popular legends and fables of a nation indicate
and largely determine the character of the people.

Masonic writers have not been backward in the use
of legends and narratives to bolster up that institution.

Albert G. Mackey, the most influential and extensive
Masonic writer of this country is the author of a book
entitled " THE MYSTIC TIE, or Facts and Opinions
Illustrative of the Character and Tendency of Freema-
sonry." Of course the object of the work is to show
by what Masonry has done for men, its practical value,
and such chapter headings as u Freemasonry Among
Pirates," "Masonic Courtesy in War" and u The Soldier
Mason," show the object of the author. Such stories
have doubtless led many to join the order, that by its
mystic power they might be safe among pirates and
other outlaws, little thinking they were at the same
time obligating themselves to shield these outlaws from
deserved punishment.



4 PREFACE.

But the power for good of narrations illustrative of
God's dealing with individuals affd nations must not be
overlooked, for this forms a large portion of God's
Word, and Christ himself employed narratives and
parables with great power in his teachings.

Bunyan's beautiful allegories have shown many the
blessedness of u walking with God,' 1 and the influence
of " Uncle Tom's Cabin " in showing the people the
abominations of human slavery can scarcely be over-
estimated, because it was a true picture of that iniqui-
tous system. Like the volume before the reader it was
a recital of facts, with but enough of the garb of fiction
for a covering.

For ample proof of the accuracy of the sketch
of the abduction and murder of Wm. Morgan and
the trials that followed, the reader is referred to
the " Broken Seal," by Samuel D. Greene, and to
the "History of the Abduction of Capt. Wm. Mor-
gan," prepared by seven committes of leading citizens
of the Empire State. And for the story of Mary
Lyman's wrongs the pamphlet entitled "Judge Whit-
ney's Defense,' 1 furnishes ample material. All of these
may be had in pamphlet form by addressing the pub-
lisher of this work.

After reading the aforesaid pamphlets the reader will
certainly be ready to exclaim, " Surely facts are stranger
than fiction," and will be able better to see how the
thousands of our land can be thus HOLDER WITH COBDS
of secret iniquity. THE PUBLISHER.



OTITS
"-'



CONTENTS,

CHAPTER. PAGE.

I. MY GRANDFATHER'S ADVICE 11

Mackey Asserts that Masonry is a ' 'Religious Institution, " Note 1 . . 12

Chase .-ays "Masonry has nothing whatever to do with the Bible.".. 12

Morris tells the "Allurements" of the Lodge, Note 3 12

"Masonry unites men of every country, sect and opinion, Note 4.. 12

Grandfather's Masonic Experience in a French Prison 13

" Secrecy has a mystic binding almost supernatural force," Note 5.. 14

II. THE "COMMON AND PROFANE" DISCUSSING FREEMASONRY 19

III. A MYSTERIOUS BOOK CHAMBERS OF IMAGERY 25

Initiation ' 'a death to the World and a resurrection to a new llf e"Note 6 29

Mackey Hints at the Stripping for Initation, Note 7 29

Taking the Entered Apprentice Oath 30

"The importance of secret keeping, '' Note 8 31

"The shock of enlightenment, " Note 9 32

' 'The social hour at high XII, " Note 10 33

IV. A TALK WITH MY GRANDFATHER .- 34

4 'This surrender of free-will to Masonic authority is absolute^Note 11 34

"Masonry is a religious institution, " Note 12 35

"The dignity of the institution depends mainly up >n its age," Note 13 36

V. PREPARATION FOR A JOURNEY PASSED AND RAISED." 38

"It isthe obligation which makes the Mason, " Note 14 38

' 'Entered Apprentices are possessed of very few rights, " Note 15 .. 45

VI. AN EVENING WITH RACHEL 47

"Do you suppose the Good Samaritan was a Freemason?" 49

VII. A CERTAIN MAN WENT DOWN FROM JERICHO 53

' ' A violent blow on the head that knocked me senseless from the

saddle" 59

' ' The horseman had flung himself off and was listening to my tale " 57

' ' Don't go to maddening me with any of your grips and signs " . . . . 59

VIII. MRS. HAGAN'S OPINION OF ELDER GUSHING 60

' ' Honest Ben Hagan " . 61

IX. MR. HAGAN T^LLS WHAT HE KNOWS ABOUT MASONRY 67

"Placing a drawn sword across the throat," Note IB 72

Treason and Rebellion not Masonic Offences, Note 17 7ii

4 'I promised to help a companion in any difficulty, right or wrong" . . 74

X. A MASONIC MURDER SUCCESS AND RETURN HOME 76

XI. MORE TALK WITH MY GRANDFATHER A MODERN PAN. 87



6 COHTEBTTS.

CHAPTEB. PAGE.
XII A FEW MASONIC PUZZLES 98

XIII. MASONIC BONDAGE. SAM TOLLER'S AFFAIBS, 107

XIV. A DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE NOT OF '76. SAM TOLLER

MISSING 115

XV. THE SPRING OF 1826. SAM TOLLER. "COMING EVENTS CAST

THEIR SHADOWS BEFORE" 126

XVI. AN ADHERING FREEMASON INCAPABLE OF ENTIRE LOYALTY TO

HIS WIFE. A LODGE QUARREL. JACHIN AND BOAZ 134

XVII LUKE THATCHER. KUMORS. MASONRY IN ITS KELIGIOUS AS-
PECTS , 144

XVIII. THE GATHERING STORM 152

XIX. A NIGHT IN BATAYIA 162

XX AN EXCITING SCENE 176

XXI. THE MYSTERIOUS CARRIAGE 187

XXII. MARK EELATES HIS MASONIC EXPERIENCES 197

' ' The ties of a Eoyal Arch Mason, " Note 23 200

"Libations are still used In some of the higher degrees, "Note 24 200

"That vail of mystery that awful secrecy, " Note 25 200

"The Ancient Freemasonry that was practiced in the Mysteries, "

Note 26 ... 203

" The Worshipful Master himself is a representative of the sun,"

Note 27 203

XXIII AN EVENING IN THE LODGE 207

' The Ancient Mysteries, " Note 23 210

XXIV. FREEMASONRY'S MASK REMOVED SILENT ANTIMASONS, THE
CIRCUIT PREACHER. RACHEL FINDS PEACE. HE GIVETH

His BELOVED SLEEP 217

XXV. MOVING. THE MASONIC OBLIGATION REMOVED. THE WARFARE

BEGINS 229

XXVI. THE FALL OF 1826. OUR JOURNEY. FREEMASONRY vs. JUSTICE 238

XXVII THE SWORD OF DAMOCLES 249

XXVIII. MASONRY REVEALED SAM TOLLER'S MASONRY. THE MYSTERY

OF OAK ORCHARD CREEK 257

XXIX. SUNDRY HAPPENINGS 267

XXX. MASONIC SLANDER. THE ENGAGEMENT. RATTLESNAKE COBNEU 275

XXXI. NEW SCENES AND OLD FACES 286

XXXII. THE MYSTERY OF INIQUITY 294

XXXIII. AUGEAN STABLES 301

XXXIV. ONE MORE UNFORTUNATE 308

XXXV. MASONRY PROTECTING MURDERERS. Vox POPULI, Vox DEI 317

XXXVI. SOME EXAMPLES OF MASONIC BENEVOLENCE AND MORALITY 333

XXXVII. HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF 348

" Masonry is strong enough to spread its protecting wing over

the vilest criminal" 349

XXXVIII. UNDER THE JUNIPER TREE 360

XXXIX. A FORETASTE 369

LX. THK VICTORY OVER THE BEAST 376

** I would not wish to enter Heaven with one honorable scar the

less" 379

*Will you be the slaves of the lodge, HOLDER WITH CORDS of

secret iniquity?" 884



INTRODUCTION.



For clothing fact in the garb of fiction the writer
deems no apology necessary, having only followed in
so doing the universal fashion of the day; but in order
to establish between author and reader a sympathetic
understanding from the outset, it has seemed both
proper and needful to give some of the reasons which
lead to the writing of this volume.

Once in their past history has God in His providence
placed before the American people a great moral issue
that could be neither shirked, nor ignored, nor met
half way. In vain statesmen compromised, in vain
pulpit and press cried " peace, peace!' 1 when there was
no peace. God continually sent ''prophets and righteous
men," who kept that one issue sternly before the pop-
ular mind, and in many cases sealed the truth they
spoke with their blood. The sequel we all know. The
question God had been asking the American nation so
many years in the terrible, relentless logic of events,
was forced upon us at last but it was at the point of
the sword. Shall the lesson be in vain?

It would seem as if God intended America to be the
great moral battle field for the world. In her freedom
from priestcraft and kingcraft; in the sacred traditions
that cluster about her past and the bow of promise
which spans her future she occupies a vantage ground
in such moral struggles impossible of attainment to a
people fettered, as are the nations of the Old World,



8 INTKODTJCTION.

with the remnants of feudalism, and bowed down with
centuries of oppression, and toil, and ignorance. To
America, the pole star of the world's liberties, their
eyes are looking with loflf ing desire. In every great
question that agitates us, which affects the freedom of
our government and the stability of our institutions,
they have a vital interest. Shall the simple, hardy,
honest emigrant escaping from the despotisms of Eu-
rope, find enthroned on our shores the more hopeless
despotism of the Secret Empire, with its Grand Mas-
ters and Sir Knights and Sublime Princes, its Kings
and Prelates and Inquisitor Generals, its secret cliques
and rings and combinations? This is one phase of the
question which the sons of Pilgrim and Revolutionary
sires will be called upon at no distant day to answer,
and whether the shadow on the dial-plate of human
freedom is to go forward or backward in the next gen-
eration depends in no small degree on the readiness
with which they wake to the danger and their right
understanding of a subject fraught with such far-reach-
ing consequences to themselves and their posterity.

Thus it will be seen that the writer would have found
in motives of mere patriotism more than sufficient ex-
cuse for desiring to embody in a living dramatic form
a true picture of the Masonic system both in its past
history and its present revival. From the Morgan
tragedy, unlocked at last by the sworn testimony of
that great Christian statesman, Thurlow Weed, to the
closing scenes of the book, not a single incident of im-
portance has been introduced which cannot be easily
veritied, the writer allowing no artistic considerations
to blunt the force of that mightiest of weapons against
error the simple, unvarnished truth.



INTRODUCTION. 9

But weighty as is this reason and let the reader
judge for himself if indifference to such facts as are
here presented is compatible with sincere love of coun-
try another and even highery^eason was the primary
force which first urged the writing of these pages.

For again God is calling the American people to face
a second great moral issue, greater than the first inas-
much as the evil we are now called upon to combat is
not merely local and sectional but national; not merely
national but world-wide. Slavery was a foul excrescence
requiring the surgeon's knife; secretism is a subtle poi-
son which, if not speedily erradicated from our body
politic will make " the. whole head sick and the whole
heart faint." Again God is commanding, " Proclaim
liberty to the captives," for though slavery exists no
longer there is a system of spiritual bondage in our
midst, a fettering of mind and conscience worthy of
the darkest days of priestly tyranny. And every
church, every individual Christian, who through dread
of agitation, fear of stirring up strife or mere lazy in-
difference countenances this great evil or refuses to bear
witness against it, has the fearful guilt to answer for of
forging those fetters anew.

More than all, Masonry is a religion, and as there can
be but one true religion in the world any more than
there can be but one true God, it follows that it is either
a false religion or else for eighteen hundred years the
hopes of humanity have centered about a cunningly
devised fable of a certain Divine Man who came on
earth, died for sinners, and rose again to be their eternal
Friend and Intercessor which was all quite unneces-
sary if Daniel Sickels, a distinguished Masonic writer,
is correct when, in speaking of the Master Mason, he



10 INTRODUCTION.

says: "We now find man complete in morality and
intelligence, with the stay of RELIGION added, to insure
him of the protection of the Deity and guard him
against ever going astray. These three degrees thus
form a perfect and harmonious whole; nor can we con-
ceive that anything can be suggested more which the
soul of man requires." SickeTs Monitor, p. 97. Be-
lieving devoutly " in one Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ
of whom the whole family in Heaven and earth is
named," the writer felt called of God to show the anti-
Christian character of the Masonic system, but at the
same time it is hoped that the reader will recognize in
the portraits of Leander's grandfather and Anson
Lovejoy a desire to do justice to the many good men
w r ho have been and still are caught in the snare of the
lodge. In truth, throughout the writing of this vol-
ume two classes have been kept continually in view as
especially needing enlightenment Masons and non-
Masons; the former being in nine cases out of ten
actually the most ignorant of the real nature and de-
signs of the institution to which they have sworn away
their, liberties and their lives.

These, in brief, are the author's reasons for present-
ing this work to the public, in the hope that many
honest and candid minds both in and out of the lodge
may be lead thereby to a still fartKer investigation of
its character and claims.

"For every one that doeth evil hateth the light, neither
cometh to the light lest his deeds should be reproved. But
he that doeth truth cometh to the light that his deeds may
be made manifest that they are wrought in God."

E. E. F.





CHAPTER I.



HAD just attained my majority. If
this sounds like an abrupt as well
as egotistical way of beginning a
story, to people who do not care to
waste their time reading long para-
bles, it will at least have the merit of
simplicity and directness, while as respects
the second charge the very fact just stated is
sufficient answer. I was egotistical. I thought
a great deal more of myself than the world did, or was
ever likely to.

But, as I said, I had just attained my majority. My
grandfather, seated taanquilly in his favorite corner,
felt it incumbent on him to give me some advice. It
was very good and excellent advice, of the same general
sort that is always given to young people, and I need
not repeat it here, except to say that counsel very like
it may be found in certain old-fashioned moral essays
called the Proverbs of King Solomon.

" Now, Leander," said my grandfather, laying down
his pipe for a final and solemn winding up, "you will
be a useful and honored man if you strictly obey these
rules. It is like the law of gravity, or any other great
principle in nature. You cannot disregard them with-
out suffering the consequences and making your friends
suffer with you. But I am going to speak of something



12 HOLDER WITH CORDS.

else. You are the right age now to become a Freema-
son, and I am of opinion that it would be an excellent
thing. No one can be a good Mason without a belief in
God 1 and the Bible, 2 and strict attendance to his moral
duties, so that it developes and trains a sense of moral
obligation in its members from the outset. Then there
are, of course, other advantages, 3 though I don't want
you to get the habit of always looking at the worldly
side of everything. We are immortal souls and should
remember that this is not our final abiding place. Still,
it is proper to use all right means for advancement in
life, and becoming a Mason will be a great help to you,
Leander, now that you are just about to start in busi-
ness for yourself. All the members of the fraternity
will be, bound to consider your success as their own, and
should you ever travel, or be taken sick away from
friends, you have onl}" to give the necessary sign and
any true Mason will minister to your wants like a
brother. 4 Now I have a story to tell at this point that

NOTE 1." The truth is, that Masonry is undoubtedly a religious institution-
Its religion being of that universal kind in which all men agree, and which.
handed down through a long succession of ages from that ancient priesthood
who first taught it, embraces the great tenets of the existence of God and the
immortality of the soul; tenets which by its peculiar symbolic language, it has
preserved from its foundation, and still continues in the same beautiful way to
teach. Beyond this for its religious faith, we must not and cannot go."
Mackey's Masonic Jurisprudence, page 95.

NOTES. "Blue Lodge Masonry has nothing whatever to do with the Bible.
It is not founded on the Bible; if it was it would not be Masonry; it would be
something else." Chase's Digest of Masonic Law, page 207.

NOTE 8. " The allurements to unite with the Masonic fraternity partake of
the nature of personal advantages. It were folly to deny that while the appli-
cant is willing to impart good to his fellows, he expects equally to receive
good.' 1 * * * " The prime advantages derived from a connection with Blue
Lodge Masonry may be summed up under three heads, viz: relief In distress,
counsel in difficulty, protection in danger." Morris's Dictionary, Art., Ad-
vantages.

NOTE 4. "Masonry unites men of every country, sect and opinion." Mor-
ris's Dictionary; Art., Brotherly Love.



MT GRANDFATHER'S ADYTCE. 13

happened let us see over twenty years ago, and I
don't know but as much as twenty-five. I guess it was,
for you wasn't born then, Leander. Well, well, l Life's
an empty show,' as the hymnbook says."

My grandfather sighed and took a pinch of snuff.

I had heard the story before but was not averse to
hearing it again. I am afraid the idea of any moral or
religious benefit to be gained by taking the step he so
strongly advised did not impress me very deeply. Bub
on the other hand the idea of joining a fraternitj 7 , all
the members of which would be bound to help me on
in life, I did find especially agreeable, for reasons that
need not now be stated.

u At the close of the last century," began my grand-
father, "French cruisers, as you know, were greatly
troubling our commerce. I was captain of the ' Martha
Ann,' and the deck of a stauncher, trimmer vessel I
never trod. I shipped with a good crew, tried and able
seamen; so, getting all things together, I was calculat-
ing by the help of Providence to have a pretty prosper-
ous, voyage. The idea of being captured hardly entered
my head till we were captured, ship, cargo, crew and
all by a French frigate that swooped down on the
1 Martha Ann ' like a hawk on a chicken^ We were
carried to the nearest French seaport and thrown into
prison, a vile, clftse hole where we nearly smothered.
The place must have been some old fortress, I think,
for there were slits in the wall like port holes, only so
high from the ground that we had to make a ladder of
each other's shoulders when we wanted to look out.
We could catch a glimpse of the water and the ships r
and though the sight used to make us so homesick that
half of us cried like babies, we all wanted to take one



14 HOLDER WITH CORDS.

turn in looking. I tell you, Leander, I felt a thousand
times worse for my poor men than I ever did for my-
self."

I did not doubt this statement in the least. My dear
grandfather had the kindest heart that ever beat in
mortal bosom. His very silver snuff-box reflected the
benevolence of his face like a radiator.

u One day, 1 ' he continued, " a military officer visited
the prison. I believe he was some sort of General In-
spector or something of the sort, and it flashed through
my mind that very possibly he was a Mason. Without
stopping to think I gave the sign of distress, to which
he promptly responded. And now do you wonder that
I rate highly the advantages of joining such an institu-
tion a universal brotherhood as wide as the world?
For remember, he was as ignorant of English as I was
of French. Only his vow 5 as a Mason could have led
him to take the smallest interest in my fate. Yet from
that hour my condition was entirely changed. New
and roomy^ quarters were given me, a new suit of
clothes, good food and considerable freedom everything
in short but the privilege of writing home to my family
and friends. But the condition of my poor men
weighed 6n my heart. I tried hard and used every
means in my power to exert my in^ience as a Mason

NOTE 5. " Secrecy has a mystic, binding, almost supernatural force, and
unites men more closely together than all other means combined. Suppose two
men, strangers, traveling in a distant country, should by some accident be
brought together for a few brief moments, during which they happen to be the
involuntary witnesses of some terrible deed, a deed which circumstances demand
shall remain a secret between them forever. In all the wide world only these
two men, and they strangers to each other, know the secret. They separate;
continents and oceans and many eventful years divide them ; but they cannot
forget each other, nor the dread mystery which binds them together as with an
iron chain. Neither time nor distance can weaken that mighty bond. In that
they are forever one. It is not, then, for any vain or frivolous purpose that
Masonry appeals to the principle of secrecy. " Sickens Ahiman Rezon,, p. 63.



MY GRANDFATHER'S ADVICE. 15

in their behalf, but it was of no use. They had to re-
main six months in that wretched prison, destitute of
every comfort, till finally the difficulties were settled
between our government and the French, when we
were all set free."

u But I can't see why this officer, whoever he was,
was not bound by his Masonic oath to heed your ap-
peal in behalf of the poor sailors," I said, rather in-
consequently, as my grandfather proceeded to show.

" They were noi Masons. We must draw a dividing
line somewhere. Because a general rule sometimes
bears very hard on a particular case it doesn't follow
that the rule is not good. To allow outsiders to share
its benefits would only end in the destruction of the
order. Nothing could be plainer. But then Leander,
if you don't care to join just yet I won't urge it.
There's plenty of time."

My grandfather evidently thought he had said
enough, but his sudden lapse into a tone and manner,
seemingly half indifferent, by some curious law of con-
traries produced more effect on me than his former
earnest strain.

" I don't want to put off doing anything that would
really be an advantage to me," t said.

My grandfather looked gratified.

" I'm glad to hear you say so, Leander. Procrastina-
tion is a bad thing. It has ruined the prospects of
many a young man before now. If a thing is right
and proper to do, nothing is gained, but sometimes a
good deal is lost by delay."

My grandfather shook the ashes from his pipe and
said no more, while I suddenly remembering some neg-
lected farm duties, to which the moral reflections he



16 HOLDER WITH COEDS.

had just uttered were certainly very apropos, took my
hat from its peg and hurried out.

It was the spring of 1826. It was also the spring
time of the Nineteenth century, ushered in for the Old
World in fierce storm and conflict, for us of the New
in comparative peace and quiet, though the year 1812
had left scars on our prosperity not wholly effaced,
while there was even then in the atmosphere of the
times, at least for those who had ears to hear, " a sound
as of a going in the tops of the mulherry trees 1 ' a
stir of contending moral forces, of great questions to
be answered, and great issues to be met how answered
and how met, ye brave souls who have stood so nobly



Online LibraryE. E. (Elizabeth E.) FlaggHolden with cords, or, The power of the secret empire [microform] : a faithful representation in story of the evil influence of free-masonry → online text (page 1 of 25)