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Manual of agriculture for the southern United States online

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one hundred and fifty to two hundred pounds to the
acre, will be sufficient to mature a good crop, mixed



238 WALL'S MANUAL

>vith ten times ite weight of well rotted woods-mold)
muck, or swamp mud, Guano should never bo
mixed with unleached ashes, potash, soda, or limo,
for these salts will "set free" the ammonia, which
will be lost in the air, and greatly diminish the effects
of the manure.

The action of guanOj Borne farmers contend,
while it produces largely increased crops for a few
years, finally exhausts the soil, This action results
from a kind of stimulating influence which it exerts
upon plants, causing in them an artificial growth, by
which they take away from the soil more fertilizing
matter than the guano has brought into it. This is
true, to a certain extent. Guano contains nothing
which is not real food for plants. It is a well
ascertained fact, that an ordinary application of
guano, gives more mineral matter to the soil than
the resulting crop takes away. But when we remember 4
that guano continues its effects for several successive crops,
the quantity of some of the mineral ingredients of
the soil may be diminished. This is especially true
of potash, lime, and sulphuric acid. We can guard
against this bad effect by using bone-dust and plaster
in combination with guano,

The long continued application of guano, will
exhaust the mineral matter in the soiL "While the
guano has an excess of ammonia, it has no humus
or mold in it, and as the caustic character of the
ammonia hastens the decomposition of the mold, the
loss is not made up by the guano, but by mixing
well-leached ashes, plaster and mold with it, there
will be no danger in its application, and a great
improvement in the soil will be the reward;



OF AGKI CULTURE,

One of the very best methods of applying guano
is in connection with green crops of peas, closer", etc^,
plowed in. It greatly increases the growth of peas,
clover, lucerne, etc., and when these crops are plowed
under, they add largely to the humus and ammonia
in the soil. Guano has the power to act upon the
vegetable matter, and convert it more rapidly into
humus or mold, than it would have done if the guano
had not been applied. It also causes the plants, by
increased vigor, to thrust their raots down deeply
into the subsoil, and thus bring up an increased
supply of mineral matter, in the proper condition to
feed succeeding crops.

A great deal of fraud has been practiced in the
sale of guana The best safe-guard against being'
imposed upon, is to buy only from reliable men,
regularly engaged in the business of selling it. One
or two simple tests may be useful.

First test. Burn one hundred grains to ashes in
an iron spoon or ladle ; the remaining ashes should
not weigh more than from thirty-five to forty grains,
and should be nearly all soluble in dilute muriatic acid.

Second test. Hub a little guano with a few grains
of freshly slacked lime, and if a strong odor of
hartshorn, or ammonia is not given off, the quality
is not good.

There are a great many other kinds of guano
besides the Peruvian, which have been used very
successfully by farmers in the Eastern and Middle
States, but it has been the experience of the best
farmers, that the pure Peruvian pays the best,
although the price is higher. The Pacific, Sea- Fowl
and Kedonda, are all favorably ksown ; while not



240

as rich in ammonia as the Peruvian, they contain a
larger proportion of the phosphate of lime, and act
very well on crops.

Swamp mud, or well- rotted peat, or woods mold,
when composted with guano and the superphosphate
of lime, forms a very valuable fertilizer. The farmer
can haul, at any time it suits his convenience, the
muck or mold, and deposit it upon the wornout spots
in his field. "When he wishes to manure the land, if
he will add guano and superphosphate of lime, at the
rate of one bushel of guano and one bushel of super-
phosphate to twenty bushels of mold, he will have a
rich manure. A handful of this mixture in a hill of
corn will have a marked effect.

Again : If the farmer mixes one bushel of super-
phosphate of lime, two bushels of strong wood ashes,
and one bushel of lime, with twenty bushels of muck
or mold, he will have a valuable fertilizer. Again : If
he uses five bushels of ashes and one bushel of lime,
with thirty bushels of muck or mold, he will have a
good manure. The lime and potash of the ashes acts
upon the vegetable matter in the muck or mold,
neutralizes the acids in it, and causes quick decompo-
sition of the vegetable matter, converting it into
mold.

A great variety of vegetable manures may be
formed upon the spots of ground which need them
most, if the former bears in mind the principle, or
fact, that a small amount of lime, potash, or soda, will
act upon an indefinite quantity of vegetable matter, in
the compost heap, causing quick fermentation, which
ends in the entire decomposition of the vegetable
matter.



OF AGRICULTURE.

GHAPTEE IX.



241



USEFUL TABLES FOR FARMERS.

The following table will be useful for readily
determining the number of hills, plants, trees, etc.,
which may be grown on an acre of land :



DI8TAWCB8 APART.



NO. PLANTS, ETC.
TO AN ACR1.



3 inches by 3 inches 696,900

4 " "4 " 392,040

6 " "6 " 174,240

9 " "9 " 77,440

1 foot " 1 foot 43,500

1% feet " 1% feet 19,300

2 ' 1 foot 21,780

2 " "2 feet 10,890

2^ " " 2^ " 6,909

1 1 foot 14,520

8 " "2 feet 7,200

5 " " 3 " 4,840

VA " ;; &A ; 3,555

4 " "1 foot 10,890

4 " 2 feet 5,445

4 ' " 3 3,630

4 " 4 2,722

* 1 A ' " VA " 2,151

5 ' 1 foot 8712

5 " " 2 feet 4,356

fi " 3 ' 2,904

5 ' 2,178

5 " "5 " 1742

&A " " 5^ " 1J417

6 ' 6 ' 1210

6^ " " 6^ " 1031

7 ' 7 888

8 " 8 680

9 " 9 537

10 ' "10. " 435

11 ' "11 " 360

12 ' "12 " 302

13 13 " 257

14 '14 " 222

W 15 " 193

16 10 "

IP ^ " ::::::::::::::::::::::::::r;:::::::::::::::::r &

18 18 " {34

19 19 " 120

*) 20 1 08

25 25 " 69

30 30 ... '. 48

3 33 " Jo

40 40 ' 27

50 50 " 17

60 60 " 12

68



242 WALL'S MANUAL

This table can be used also to determine how many
piles of manure to a load, it will take to spread on an
acre, at any of the above distances apart.

TABLES.

The following tables may often be useful to farmers
for reference.

Money. The -'prices current" of foreign markets
are frequently quoted in newspapers, in accordance
with foreign currencies, hence these tables are given.

ENGLISH MONET.

4 Farthings make 1 penny = $0.02 1-00

12 Pence make 1 shilling = 0.24 1-5

2(i Shillings (a sovereign) make 1 pound =. 4.84

21 " make 1 guinea = 5.10

.-> " " 1 crown = 1.21

FRENCH MONEY.

1 Fnmo = $0.18 3-5

5 Franc-piece =-= 0.93

1 Crown, = 1.10

1 Napoleon (20 francs) = 3.85

OTHKR FOREIGN MONEY.

1 Florin (Austria) $0.48

1 Rupee (Bombay) = 0.50

1 Thaler (Prussia) = 0.73

1 Ruble (Russia) = 0.75

1 Ducat (Germany) ==. 2.23l^

1 Ducat (Holland) = 2.27M

1 Doubloon (Mexico) = 5.53%

Weights. Avoirdupois weight is used in all business
transactions. The long ton, of two thousand two
hundred and forty pounds, has generally passed out
of use in this country, except at the custom-house.

TABLE OF AVOIRDUPOIS WEIGHTS.

10 Drams make 1 ounce (oz.)

1C Ounces " 1 pound (lb.)

25 Pounds ' 1 quarter (qr.)

4 Quarters (100 Ibs.) ' 1 hundred (cwt.)

20 Hundred weight (2000 Ibs.) ' I ton (T.)

56 Pounds of butter " 1 firkin



56
14

100
196

200
560

(id



of hay ' 1 truss

(an English weight).... " 1 stone

of fish " 1 quintal

of flour " 1 barrel

of beet or pork ' 1 barrel

of wheat " 1 quarter (English)

of wheat ' 1 bushel (United States)

of wheat ' I bushel (English)



OF AGRICULTURE.



243



Measures. The standard of dry measures in the
United States is the Winchester bushel, containing
2150 2-5 cubic inches. A circular measure, eighteen
and a half inches in diameter and eight inches deep,
holds a bushel.

PET MEASURE.

2 Pints make 1 quart

8 Quarts , " 1 peck

4 Pecks " 1 bushel

5 Bushels of corn (shelled, South) 1 barrel

8 Bushels of wheat (English) 1 quarter

Liquid Measure. The wine-gallon is the standard
by which liquids are generally bought and sold. It
contains two hundred and thirty- one cubic inches.

COMMON OR LIQUID MEASURE.

4 Gills make 1 pint

2 Pints " 1 quart

4 Quarts " 1 gallon

31^ Gallons " 1 barrel

42 Gallons " 1 tierce

63 Gallons M 1 hogshead

LONG OR LINEAR MEASURE.

12 Inches make 1 foot

3 Feet 1 yard

5% Yards (16^ feet) 1 rod, pole, or perch

40 Rods (220 yards) 1 furlong

8 Furlongs (1760 yards) 1 mile

4 Inches hand

6 Feet fathom

4 Poles (66 feet) chain

80 Chains mile

3 Miles league

LAND AND SQUARE MEASURE.

144 Square inches make 1 square foot

9 feet 1 yard

30*< yards 1 po ]e

40 poles 1 rood

16 " 1 chain

10 chains 1 acre

640 acres ' 1 square mile

CUBIC, OR SOLID MEASURE.



1728 cubic inches (12x12x12) make 1 cubic foot.

27 " feet " 1 " yard

128 " " (8 ft, long, 4 ft, high, 4 ft, wide) " 1 cord.

&% " "of stone (16^ ft. long, 1% ft. wide and

Jft. high) 1 solid perch,



244 WALL'S MANUAL

A FEW SIMPLE AND USEFUL EULES.

I. To calculate simple interest at six per cent
Multiply the dollars by half the number of months,
and the result will be the interest in cents. For odd
days, multiply the dollars by the whole number of
days, and divide by sixty the result will be the
interest in cents.

For any other rate of interest, as seven or eight per
cent. Multiply the dollars by the rate per cent. the
result will be the interest for one year in cents. This,
divided by twelve, is the interest for one month. The
interest for one month, divided by thirty, gives the
interest for one day. From these, the interest for
any period may be calculated.

II. To determine how many bushels a given space
will hold. Multiply the length, width and depth,
measured in feet. This will give the contents in
cubic feet. Now, as there are two thousand one
hundred and fifty cubic inches in a bushel and one
thousand seven hundred and twenty- eight in a foot,
these numbers stand (nearly) to each other as four to
five. Hence, multiply the cubic feet of the given
space by four and divide by five, will give the bushels
(very nearly).

Example. A crib eight feet long, five feet wide,
and six feet deep, contains (8x5x6) = 240 cubic
feet, then 240 x 4 = 960 cubic feet, which, divided by
five, gives one hundred and ninety- two bushels as the
contents of the crib, very nearly.



OF AGRICULTURE. 245

EXPLANATION OF TEEMS.

Absorb To soak up a liquid or gas, to take sub-
stances from the air, or from watery solutions.
Abstract To take from.
Acid Sour, acrid; a sour substance.
Agriculture The art of cultivating the soil.
Alkali The direct opposite of an acid, with which

it has a tendency to unite, neutralizing.
Alumina The base of clay.
Analysis Separating into its primary parts any

compound substance.
Carbonate A compound, consisting of carbonic acid

and a base (metallic oxyde).
Caustic Burning.

Chloride A compound containing chlorine.
Decompose To separate the constituents of any

body from their combinations ; to decay or rot.
Digestion The decomposition of food in the stomach

and intestines of animals. (Agricultural.)
Fermentation A kind of decomposition.
Gas Air ; aeriform matter.
Ingredient Component part of any substance.
Inorganic Mineral, or earthy ; not organized by

animal or vegetable life.
Mulching Covering the soil with litter, leaves, or

straw.
Neutralize To overcome or destroy the properties

or effects of.
Organic matter That kind of matter whicn possesses

or has possessed life,



246 WALL'S MANUAL

Oxyde A compound of oxygen with an clement.
Phosphate A compound of phosphoric acid with

a base.

Pungent Sharp ; acrid.
Putrefaction Hotting.

Saturate To fill the pores of any substance, as a
sponge with water, or charcoal with ammonia.

Silicate A compound of silicic acid with a base.

Soluble Capable of being dissolved in water.

Saturated Solution One which contains as much of
the foreign substances as it is capable of holding.

Sulphate A compound of sulphuric acid and a base.

Vapor Moist air see gas.

END.



Errata.

On page 19, first line, germs should read gums.

On page 34, eighth line, Phospllc should read Phosphoric.

On page 111, second line, Planting in should read Plowing in.

On page 212, first line in last paragraph, difficulty should
read deficiency.

On page 145, twentieth line, congulated should read coagu-
lated.



INDEX.



PAGE.

ABSORBENTS 45

ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE MANURES 232

Analysis of Peruvian Guano 237

Night Soil 235

Peruvian Guano 237

Poudrette and Urate 234

A STATEMENT OF LEADING FACTS 38

CARE OF STOCK 177

Horses 177

Cattle 179

Hogs 179

Bad Habits 179

CHEMICAL INGREDIENTS OF KOCKS AND SOILS 191

Elementary Bodies 192

Bases 193

Experiments Silica 193

Metalloid Compounds Salts 194

Simple Minerals 196

CHEMICAL TREATMENT OF THE SOIL 83

Analysis of Ashes of Crops 24

CHEMISTRY AS APPLIED TO THE SOIL

The Best Soil How Formed 189

Formation of Deposits , 190

CONCLUSION TO PART 1 179

COTTON

Its Origin 62

The Disease! of Kust 67

Sore Shin 68

Rot 68

Blight 70

Insecti btneficial and injurious to 71

11*



250 INDEX.

COTTON Continued. ?AE

Insects Frequenting 71

Insects which feed upon the Stalk 73

Insects found on the Leaf. 74

Caterpillar 75

Boll Worm 77

Insects beneficial to 80

Planting, Cultivating and Gathering 87

Kind of Soil 87

Planting '. 89

Mode of Planting 90

Culture 91

Selection of Seed 92

Analysis 98

Cotton Seed as a fertilizer 94

Caution to Planters 101

Experiments of Rains, 18G8 101

CULIVATION OF WHEAT, EYE AND OATS

Preparation of the Soil 102

Wheat 104

Rye 106

Oats 106

DRAINING 20

ERRATA ::'.:' 247

EXPLANATION OF TERMS i'.-.-i 245

HAY CROP

Clover.., 112

Grasses ..V. 114

Pasture? 116

Experiments 117

How PLANTS VEGETATE AND GROW 15

Germination 16

Roots 10

The Stem 19

Th Leaf. 20

Flowers and Fruits ,. ., , 22

INBIAN COK il

INTRODUCTION 3



INDEX. 251

PAGE.

MECHANICAL TREATMENT or THE SOIL 23

MINERAL FERTILIZERS THEIR ACTION UPON THE SOIL.... 211

Silex 211

Lime 212

Gypsum Sulphate of Lime or Plaster 215

Marl 215

' Potash 216

Soda 216

Magnesia 217

Sulphur 217

Phosphorus 218

Analysis of Bones 219

Calcined Bones 220

Sugar-house Eefuse 220

Chilian Saltpetre, or Common Salt 222

'Columbian Guano 222

Quartz 223

Artificial Silicates 224

Acids 225

MUCK, OR VEGETABLE MOLD......... 46

MUTUAL ACTION OF THE ORGANIC AND INORGANIC ELE-
MENTS or THE SOIL 206

PEA CROP 107

Varieties 108

Soil 108

Planting, or Sowing . 109

POTATO CROP

Climate 117

Soil 118

Varieties 118

Plant Beds 119

Preparation of Beds 120

Sowing the Seed..... 121

Preparation of Soil 122

Planting 123

Culture 124

Digging 137



252 INDEX.

POTATO CROP Continued. PAGE.

Selections for Planting 138

Degeneration 138

The Potatoes 139

Preparation of Land for Planting 139

PREPARATION OF FOOD FOR STOCK , 174

PROPERTIES AND CHEMICAL ACTION OF THE MINERAL

INGREDIENTS OF THE SOIL 197

Naming Acids 198

Glass Analysis of Granite 199

REASONS WHY AGRICULTURAL BOOKS SHOULD BE READ 6

RECAPITULATION 159

RELATION BETWEEN PLANTS AND ANIMALS 165

RICE

Varieties 156

Cultivation of Low land Rice 165

Cultivation of Up land Rice 157

SORGHUM CANES 142

Manufacture of Syrup from its Juice 144

SOURCES FROM WHICH PLANTS DERIVE THBIR NOURISH-
MENT 11

SUGAR CANB

Saccharine Officinarum 146

Ribbon Cane Creole or Malabar Cane 147

Varieties 147

Soil 148

Seed Cane ; 148

Preservation of Seed Cane 148

Preparation for Planting 149

Planting 151

Cultivating 152

Harvesting 153

Analysis of Ashes of Sugar Cane 154

Manures for Canes 154

TOBACCO CROP

Climate , 117

Soil 118

Varieties .,... 118



INDEX. 253

TOBACCO CROP Continued. PAGE

Plant Beds 120

Sowing the Seed 121

Preparation of Soil 122

Planting 123

Culture 124

Priming or Topping 124

Cutting 126

Curing 126

The Chemistry of Curing 127

Stripping and Handling 128

Cultivation of Cuba Tobacco 131

TURNIP CROP 141

TABLES FOR FARMERS 241

Money 242

Weights 242

Measures 243

USEFUL KDLES 244

VALUE OF CROPS AS FOOD 168

VEGETABLE OR ORGANIC CONSTITUENTS OF THE SOIL 201

Humus, or Vegetable Mold 205



ALLISON BROTHERS

Importers and Dealers in

HARDWARE,

GUNS, CUTLEBY, STEEL,

CASTINGS, NAILS, MAINS,

And every description of

Agricultural Implements



AND



Farming Tools.

Mechanics' and Builders' Hardware, Plows,
Hoes, Anvils, Bellows, Vises, etc.



ROLE AGE.NTS FOR HILL MAN BROTHERS & SONS'

CELEBRATED TENNESSEE CHARCOAL

AND COMMON IRON. E. CARVER

& CO'S. COTTON GINS AND

LINTERS. LANE &

BODLEY'S STEAM
, ENGINES.

270 Front St., Memphis, Tenn.



CENTRAL DEPOT FOR THE SOUTHWEST




RHODES'




SUPERPHOSPHATE OF



THE STANDARD MANURE AND FERTILIZER, THE

OLDEST AND MOST RELIABLE ON THE

AMERICAN CONTINENT.

Also of the

ORCHILLA. GTJA^O.

Detailed information furnished on application to the

SOLE AGENTS,

JENSEN & ROESSEL,
COTTON FAOTOES AND COMMISSION MEBOHANTS,

No?!. 102 and 104 Peters, late New Levee, and 32 and 34
Commerce Streets,

!N~ew Orleans, Louisiana.



. G. CRAI& k CO.,



DEALEBS IN



Seeds, Implements, Fertilizers,

377-379, Main Street,

Memphis, Tenn.




Also Agents for



RAW BONE FERTILIZER,

.Made from the Blood, Meat and Bone of
the Animal.

Price $6 per Barrel; $55 per Ton of 2000 Ibs.




For 187O.

DR. M, W, PHILIPS, Editor-in-Chief,

Assisted by a Corps of ABLE WRITERS, PRACTI-
CAL FARMERS and HORTICULTURISTS,

It has reached its FOURTH VOLUME, and is an

UNPARALLELED SUCCESS.
XJSSTULO ZLO,OOO.

It has become the Standard Agricultural Paper
for the Southwest.

Every FARMER should read it.
Every FARMER'S SON should read it.
Every FARMER'S WIFE should read it.
Every FARMER'S DAUGHTER should read it.
Every STOCK RAISER should read it
Every FRUIT GROWER should read it.
Every GARDENER should read it.
It will teach you how to save labor.
It will teach you how to save money.
It will teach you how to make money.
It will teach you how to raise stock.
It will teach you how to economise.
It will teach you how to live.

[From the New Orleans Picayune.]

THE SOUTHERN FARMER. This sterling and useful Southern journal of
Agriculture, edited by the veteran and reliable Dr. M. W. PHILIPS, began
a new year with January, and has an increase in the variety and amount
of its matter. The study of the experience of others, is of the greatest
value to the farmer and planter, who should avail himself of it as far as
he can, and in the SOUTHERN FARMER he will find it ; for the numerous
contributors to that journal are among the most candid, enterprising
and fairest of all those who are trying to improve the agriculture of the
South.



TERMS, S2 J YE.AR.

Send. Ten Cents for a Specimen Copy.
Local Agents and Canvassers wanted, and good pay
given. Address



3 61 Main st., Memphis, Tenn.



THE SOUTHERN FARMER AGENCY



THE writer, M. W. PHILIPS, being now one of the fixtures, and so long
as the agriculturist requires it, and can find no better a servant, would
inform subscribers, and others, who desire anything in the agricultural
line from a dog chain to a steam engine that he will, to the Lest of his
ability to purchase for them, and will always strive to obtain information
touching the various machines from those who are experts. The per
cent, is not the main question, and old friends will bear us out that we
have ever been actuated by a desire to be of use.

MACHINERY FOR SOUTHERN FARM LIFE.

Having moved to the Southwest in 1830, and settled in a new Country,
where mills and mechanics were not ; although immediately from school,
we were forced to use a talont given to us. Thus forced, our mind was
drawn out on mechanism, and we tried all labor-saving machinery we
could procure. Thus apprenticed and serving our full time as such, we
think we are somewhat prepared to select Gin Stands, Presses, Running
Gear, Mills, etc., etc. ; and, from our particular bias to test thus, we have
bought, used and laid aside three different Presses, several Gin Stands,
Mills and Running Gear. We will give our best attention and discretion
to a selection. Our only brother, Col. Z. A. P., is fully posted up on Steam
Engines, and we will avail ourself of his knowledge. We have had many,
the most of what is justly termed improved stock, and, although our
prejudices may have swerved us, yet we are honest in our convictions
and will try to select the best.



PRICES OF BLOODED STOCK, &c.

owing are the
New York and elsewhere :



The following are the prices of Blooded Stock, etc., in Pennsylvania,
el



CATTLE.



Durham, age and quality ..... [email protected] I Alderney, age and quality. ..$60(o>300
Ayrshire, " " " " ..... [email protected] | Jersey, " " " ... [email protected]



HOGUS.



Chester Whites, 6 to 8 weeks old... .$30

Improved Ohio Chester 35

Windsors (Prince Albert Suftblks) 30



Essex ......................................... $30

Berkshire ................................... 25

$2 for boxing.



Spanish (pairs) ............................ $ 8 | White Aylesbury Ducks ............... $12

Golden Hamburgs ....................... 15 | Brahrnas .................................... 7

We have access to a large variety of Fowls, such as Rouen, Cayuga
and other Ducks, Breman and other Geese, Bronze and White Turkeys ;
any of which we will order. We are anxious to make our Southern
homes more interesting.

CARAFES.

Each. Per 100

Concord ....................................................................... 25c. $18 <K)

Hartford ....................................................................... 25c. 20 00

Scuppernongs .............................................................. 25c.

SEEDS.

All the choice Seeds (Corn, Cotton, Grass, Ramie Plants, etc.) we shall
be prepared to fill for next planting. Orders solicited.
Address:

M. W. PHILIPS & CO.,

361 MAIN STREET, MEMPHIS, TENN,



(MMOmiTED IRIPIE SUPERPIOSPIUTE



-AND



THIS valuable Manure has been accepted by the most experienced
and practical Farmers of the South, as the most efficient and reliable
Fertilizer known. Three hundred pounds per acre, will double crops of
COTTON and CORN, and treble WHBAT and OAT crops.

The AMMONIATED TRIPLE SUPERPHOSPHATE

Will NOT RUST Wheat and Cotton, and in this respect is unlike most
commercial manures* and superior to all others in use. The Planters of
the South and West, will be convinced of the great value of this Manure
by a single application to COTTON, CORN, WHEAT or OATS.
For sale by

E, H. MARTIN & CO., Sole Agents,

233 Front Street, Memphis, Tenn.



" WE have handled as many varieties of Fertilizers as any Farmer in
Dixie, and we give our opinion, that the cornponate parts of the

AMMONIATED TRIPLE SUPERPHOSPHATE

Are all and each eminently valuable, and the Compound cannot fail
to give satisfaction."

EDITORS SOUTHERN FARMER.



EH
9 ii*

-DEALERS IN-

Hardware and Agricultural Implements,

232 Front St., Memphis, Fenn.



South western Publishing Co,

BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS,

PAPER DEALERS,
Printers, Booksellers,

it

STAFIONJZftS, &c.,

No. 361 Main St.,



Having largely added to our stock of Print-
ing Types and Machinery, we are enabled to
execute all kinds of Printing, on short notice>
and at the lowest prices.

' m* COUNTRY ORDERS PROMPTLY AT-
TENDED TO.




IMPROVED ATTACHMENTS

For Opening Furrows and Cultivating the Growing Crops.
Manufactured at

MUlIIl'S FLOW FAGZOBY,

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE.

Sold by citv and country merchants in all the Southern States. For
circulars and further information, address

J. H. MITJRIPEK, .A-gt., JAMES W. MURFEE,

MEMPHIS, TENN. Inventor and Patentee.
REFF.RF.KCB Dr. M. W. PHILIPS, Editor Southern Farmer.

B. B. Will & CO.,



DEALERS ir



SEEDS, FERTILIZERS,

FRUIT TREES,

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, &c., &c.,

232 Main St., Memphis, Tenn.



-AGENTS FOR



BAUGH'S RAW-BONE SUPERPHOSPHATE, BUCKEYE CULTIVATOR

OR SULKY PLOW, EXCELSIOR REAPER AND

MOWER, Etc., Etc., Etc.

Keep constantly on hand all kinds of Fertilizers, Agricultural Imple-
jnents, Seeds, etc.



GENERAL LIBRARY
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY

RETURN TO DESK FROM WHICH BORROWED

This book is due on the last date stamped below, or on the

date to which renewed.
Renewed books are subject to immediate recall.


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Online LibraryE. G WallManual of agriculture for the southern United States → online text (page 16 of 17)