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Town Topics (Princeton), Nov. 10-16, 1946 (Volume v.1, no.35) online

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1 Old Thompson

I $3.50 Per Bottle

1 WINES ® SPIRITS ® BEERS

THE WINE & GAME SHOP



..0




1 6 Nassau Street



Telephone 2468 \



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B



Crystal Gazing Has

Never Been Perfected!

There is no sure way of telling what the
future will bring, what problems it holds in
store for you. But there is a sure v/ay of being
prepared to meet them: start saving regularly
and

INVEST TODAY IN SHARES OF

NASSAU BUILDING AND LOAN ASSl

$1.00 a Month Is Worth $200.00 at Maturity

$5.00 a Month Is Worth $1,000 at Maturity

$10.00 a Month Is Worth $2,009 at Maturity

NEW SERIES AVAILABLE NOW



ARTHUR EVERETT, Secretary

First National Bank , . . Princeton, N. J.



PATRON



Sec. 562, P.L.&R.
U. S. POSTAGE

PAID
Princeton, N. J.
Permit No. 106



WE NOMINATE

Howard Alexander Smith, this community's current
claim to fame in the Halls of Congress, whose relatively
easy victory at the polls last Tuesday demonstrated that
New Jersey voters and the American people, regardless
of avowed political affiliations, are eager to endorse
leaders whom they believe are motivated by the national
good rather than by partisan interest. In winning re-
election to the United States Senate by trouncing Demo-
crat George E. Brunner, Smith, now 66 years old, reached
his full political stature and thereby helped G.O.P. strate-
gists sense that rock-ribbed Republicanism of the Taft
variety is as dead as the proverbial doornail.

The son of a physician, and the descendant of an old
New Jersey family that helped develop three of the State's
21 counties. Smith is certainly one of the Senate's best
informed members and is probably among its most ver-
satile, for his career embraces noteworthy achievements
in tlie spheres of education, law, business and politics.
He was graduated from Princeton University with honors
in 1901 and three years later, from Columbia Law School.

A decade-plus in Colorado, practicing law and gaining
first-hand imderstanding of mining, irrigation, oil pros-
pecting and railroad construction, preceded his appearance
on the national scene. In 1917, he was summoned to
Washington to join Herbert Hoover's highly successful
World War I Food Commission and the American Relief
Administration, a period of service which included an
investigation of food conditions in starving Europe. With
characteristic enthusiasm. Smith turned from war work to
education, helping Princeton ease administrative head-
aches as Executive Secretary of the University and later
lecturing on international affairs.

His lifelong interest in public affairs led inevitably
to the political arena and his return to a New York law
firm coincided with the beginning of a traditional Re-
publican apprenticeship. Smith rose steadily in G.O-P.
circles, from Treasurer of the Republican State Committee
in 1934, to the State Committee Chairmanship in 1942,
to the Republican National Committee the following year.
In 1944, with the death of the late W. Warren Barbour,
he tossed his hat in the ring and carried New Jersey in
the teeth of prevailing Democratic gales.

For the widespread recognition he has earned in two
short years, the kind of recognition generally denied to
freshman senators; for looking at national and inter-
national horizons and frequently disregarding hard-and-
fast party lines; for insisting time and again that this
country must keep in step with the times and "cannot
safely ignore the responsibilities of leadership that are
purs," he is TowN Topics' candidate for

PRINCETON'S

MAN OF THE WEEK

November 10-16, 1946



Coton l^opicg



Town Topics, November 10-16, 1946-



Published Every Friday Throughout the Yeai

Donald C. Stuart, Jr.

Dan D. Coyle

Editors and Publishers

Mailed without charge every week to every

home in Princeton Borough and Township.

Advertising Rates on Application

Box 371 Princeton, New Jersey

Vol. 1, No. 35 November 10-16, 1946



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Topics of the Town j

5

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Election Results. By margins of about
3 to 2, Republicans J. Dayton Voorhees
and George R. Griffing were named to
the Borough Council Tuesday. In Prince-
ton Township, G.O.P. incumbent William
T. White defeated Robert B. Buggs, a
Democrat who had qualified after a
write-in vote in the June primaries.

In a paragraph, that was the Prince-
ton story. Professor Voorhees, starting
a third term, was high on the ballot
with 1,787 votes. Mr. Griffing, in public
office for the first time, polled 1,728.
Totals for Mr. Winans and Mr. Servis,
respectively, were 1,170 and 1,107.

Mr. White, who will start an eighth
term on the Township Committee, was
given 743 votes. Mr. Buggs, whose
"campaign" was so quiet that the local
press omitted mention of him, the
League of Women Voters' election sheet
overlooked him and Democratic political
advertising carried no mention of his
name, still polled 240 votes.



Largest totals from Princeton in
each party went to alumni of the
university, which will no doubt greatly
increase the belief in some quarters
that it plays a heavy hand in jiolitical
activities. Of Senator H. Alexander
Smith's impressive State-wide total,
8,084 votes came from his own commu-
nity. This was a margin of about 3%
to 1 over Camden's Mayor Brunner. Mr.
Smith is '01, giving him 45 years to
do his electioneering.

Side Ridolfl, who graduated from here
(Continued on page eight)



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180 Nassau Street Telephone 2001

SUPPORT THE COMMUmTY CHEST!



1





• Your doctor adds at least seven
years of study to his high school
education. Then he spends one or
more years in a hospital with lit-
tle or no compensation. Is it not
reasonable to believe that he is
I better qualified to advise you in

matters of health than your well-meaning ftiend?
who have not had this education and experience?
When you do not feel well there are two safe
things to do. First, consult your physician. Then
bring his prescriptions to us for expert com-
pounding.

EDWARD A. THORNE, Druggist

168 Nassau Street Princeton, New Jersey



■«■•«!«•■



-Town Topics, November 10-16, 1946-



FOR SALE

6 lots— Overbrook— 200' x250' $4500 each

Brooks - = - Trees - - - View

Streets and Water

10 lots 70'xl50' ........ .$550 each

10 lots 70'x300'

40 lots— Pretty Brook Gardens

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Utilities




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20 Nassau St



Phone 822



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DURNER'S
BARBER SHOP

120 Nassau Street Tel. 3246

m- S

ARE UNBALANCED WHEELS

Pounding Your Car to Pieces?

Stop in TODAY to ask about
our New Balance Inspection
Equipment. A check NOW may
save wear on your tires and
car, may even prevent a serious
accident !



Kline's Esso Station

271 Nassau Street Telephone 1298

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Are You
Discouraged or Disillusioned
With Unsatisfactory Methods?



Then come to

Esther's Beauty Salon,

176 Nassau Street, for

reliable service,

tested methods and lecog-

nized courtesy.

For appointment, call 78



-Town Topics, November 10-16, 1946 4



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III



DON'T DELAY

CHRISTMAS CARDS

with name imprinted must
be ordered within
The Next Two Weeks

Shop Now for Christmas

ZAVELLE'S

Palmer Square West
Telephone 813
GIFTS - BOOKS - RECORDS



I Ifs New to Us 1

I i

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Teddy Bear Coats. Old standbys with
new faces are these adaptable versions
of the Teddy Bear classics at The
Clothesline on Chambers Street. Of a
convenient three-quarter length with
casual push-up sleeves, they are avail-
able in beige or gray with quilted lin-
ing. A short model also conies in white
lined with plaid. Cut loose and full,
their adaptable simplicity, appropriate
for wearing almost anywhere, is high-
lighted by slit pockets, a neckline high
enough to provide ample warmth, 'but
collarless to prevent that bulky look.

For $46.95 these year-in, year-out fav^
orites are more than ever personaliti-
ful, more than ever a sound buy.



"The Saint and The Hunchback." This
newly published cifering by one of
Princeton's own citizens, Donald A.
Stauffer, is a "strange, beautiful and
unclassifiable novel ... of ideas, yet
one which is crowded with action." Set
in the seventh century and based on
the conflict between faith and skepti-
cism, the book is an originally con-
ceived and presented approach to a
theme ever-present in human conscious-
ness or sub-consciousness.

The author, a Marine Corps officer
during the war, is a professor of Eng-
lish at the University, as well as a
member of the editorial boards of "The
American Scholar" and the Princeton
University Press.

"The Saint and The Hunchback" is
available at Zavelle's on Palmer Square.



Christmas Wrappings. So unusual and
so attractive is the variety of Christ-
mas wrappings at The Center on Nassau
Street that we consider them almost
worthy of being gifts in themselves. In
any case, it will be a lucky recipient
who is given a present done up with
the charm that they can provide, no
matter what is put inside.

The paper can be purchased by the
roll or by the piece from a choice of
gold or silver foil, silver polka dot,
green and red candy stripe, white quilt-
ed or red cellophane. All are so engag-
ingly gay that they will even rival the
tree which they surround on Christmas
morn.

Unlike anything wc have encountered
and most delightful is a wide perfo-
rated, metal-type ribbon in gold, silver
or red, which can be bought by the
foot, yard or roll. If you want your
gifts fairly to burst with Christmas
s.pirit. We suggest you entrust the job
to any of these papers encircled by this
unique ribbon.



BONE MEAL and
HYPER HUMUS

ROSEDALE, Inc.
'^ 262 Alexander St. Telephone 142

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THE CONNECTICUT WITS
by Leon Howard

as
"The Book of the Week"

I •

I Parnassus Bookshop

\ 167 Nassau Street



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Again Serving

Lancheon and Tea
\

j "The Center"

I 116-118 Nassau Street

I Q)mmunxty Chest — War Fund
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The kind of construction cost-
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■Town Topics, November 10-16, 1946-



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Saturday, November 9th

12;00: Soccer: Princeton University Varsity
vs. Lafayette, Poe Field.
Football: Princeton University 1950 vs.
Pennsylvania 1950, Fitzpatrick Field.

2:00 p.m.: Football: Princeton University vs.
University of Virginia, Palmer Stadium.
Sunday, November 10th

7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:00 a.m.: Mass, St.

Paul's Roman Catholic Church.
11:00 a.m.: First in series of Anniversary
Preachers, celebrating 100th Anniversary
of founding of Princeton Methodist
Church, Dr. Nolan B. Harmon Jr.
"Saved by Hope," The Rev. Dr. Frank
S. Niles; First Presbyterian Church.
Sermon, the Rev. Victor B. Stanley Jr.;
address on Every Member Canvass, James
Carey; Trinity Episcopal Church.
Lesson-Sermon, First Church of Christ,
Scientist.

Princeton United Meeting, Society of
Friends, Cabinet Room of Murray-Dodge.
"The World Community," The Rev. Dr.
William L. Tucker; Second Presbyterian
Church.

University Chapel Service, The Rev. Bur-
ton A. MacLean, University Chapel.

7:30 p.m.: Evensong, address, the Rev.
Stanley; Trinity Episcopal Church.

8:U0 p.m.: "The Dangers of Security," the
Rev. Dr. Niles ; First Presbyterian Church.
Annual Church Service, American Legion
Post No. 76 ; Dr. John Carruthers, speak-
er; Second Presbyterian Church.

8:15 p.m.: Evening Service, First Church of
Christ, Scientist.

Monday, November 11th

4:00 p.m.: Armistice Day Memorial Service,
sponsored by New Jersey Society, Sons
of the Revolution; University Chapel.

8:30 p.m.: "Christian Science: The Science
of Divine Mind," free public Lecture, by
Florence Middaugh, C.S.: Elementary
School Auditorium.

Tuesday, November 12th

8:00 p.m.: Borough Council Meeting, Bor-
ough Hall.

Address, the Rev. Dr. Frederick W.
Evans, Moderator of the General Assem-
bly of the Presbyterian Church in this
country; First Presbyterian Church.
Meeting, Elementary School Parent-
Teacher Association; group singing anJ
square dancing; Elementary School.

9:30 p.m.: Audience Participation Radio
Program, Princeton University Bicenten-
nial; Mutual Radio Network; "American
Forum of the Air," McCarter Theatre.
Wednesday, November 13th

8:00 p.m.: Mid- Week Devotional Service,
Methodist Church.

Mid-Week Bible Study, Second Presby-
terian Church.

8:15 p.m.: Mid-Week Service, First Church
of Christ, Scientist.

Thursday, November 14th

6:15-6:45 p.m.: Princeton University Bicen-
tennial Radio Program NBC Radio Net-
work. Address, the Honorable James
Forrestal, Secretary of the Navy.

8:30 p.m.: World Fellowship Meeting, the
Rev. Andrew T. Roy; Witherspoon
Branch Y.M.C.A.

8:30 p.m.: Public Session, Princeton Univer-
sity Bicentennial Conference; McCarter
Theater



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OF PR.INCETON

Phincetdn, N. J.

Member: Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Federal Reserve System.



GIRLS' TWEED COATS

%ize 7-14

The LITTLE CLOTHES LINE

41 Palmer Sq. Princeton



LEARN HOW

PRAYER CAN

HEAL YOU

How does Christian Science heal? How
does it remove fear, solve personal and
business troubles?

If you want to know sometliing about
the healing power of prayer as taught
in Christian Science, corae to

A Free Lecture

enthled,

"Christian Science:
The Science of Divine Mind,"

by Florence Middaugh, C.S., of Los
Angeles, California.

Member of the Board of Lectureship
of The Mother Church of Christ, Sci-
entist, in Boston, Massachusetts.

Monday, November 11, S:30 P. M.

Elementary School Auditorium

First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Princeton, New Jersey, cordially in-
vites you.



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-Town Topics, November 10-16, 1946-



SUPPORT
PRINCETON'S ONLY
COMMUNITY CHEST

UNIVERSITY UUNDRY



BOWLING STANDINGS

MAJOR LEAGUE

W. L.

Tiger Garage 18 6

Peione's Trucking 16 8

No Stars 16 8

American Legion 9 15

Peacock Alley 8 16

Frazee's Market 5 19

High single game — Dom Talia, 228
High 3 games: Tony Amaltitano, 620

"A" LEAGUE

W. L.

Princeton Grill 21 3

Cenerino's Cafe 19 5

American Legion 14 10

Tiger Garage 13 11

Lions Club ...- 11 13

Dutch Neck 8 16

Turney Motors 6 18

Squatters 4 20

High single game: Joe Trani, 234
High 3 games: Hank Bowers, 605

"B" LEAGUE

W. L.

VFW 14 7

Silvester Motor Co 14 7

Frazee's _ 10 11

Kids 10 11

Walker-Gordon 8 13

A. T. & T 7 14

"R.C.A." LEAGUE

Points Points

Guards 20 Drafting 16

Blue .— 20 Maint 13

Gold 19 Office 13

Plating 19 Wiremen 13

Eng. No. 1 IS Acoustics 12

Beavers 17 Eng. No. 2 11

INDUSTRIAL LEAGUE

Points

Walker-Gordon No. 2 11

Heyden Maint 8

Levey Chemical 7

Kingston Trap Rock 5

Walker-Gordon No. 1 4

Heyden Prod 1

LADIES' LEAGUE

W. L.

Frazee's _. 13 2

Maples 10 5

300 Club 7 8

Roll O 6 9

Rockettes _ 6 9

Crack Ups 3 12

THE PRINCETON
RECREATION CENTRE

138 Nassao Sire^



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\News of the Theatresl

3 I

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The Playhouse

The Bachelor's Daughters (Friday,
Saturday) is light comedy involving
four girls who move into a swank Long
Island home with bachelor Adolphe Men-
jou as their make-believe father and
Billie Burke as their equally bogus
mother. Claire Trevor and Gail Russell
head a cast tfiat is generally amusing.

Deception (Sunday through Wednes-
day) stars Bette Davis, Paul Henreid,
Claude Rains in a remake of the play
"Jealousy," which tells of a girl who
bends every effort ,to cover up six years
of her life with one man that she may
be happy with another. With the story
badly handled, none of the usually capa-
ble members of the cast is good.

Lady Luck (Thursday, Friday, Sat-
urday) tells of a girl (Barbara Hale)
who would like to eliminate the gambling
habits of her family but is plagued
first by her poker-playing grandfather
(Frank Morgan), then by a professional
sharpie (Robert Young) vidth whom she
falls in love. In the end, love proves a
cure-all. It's unoriginal, fairly good.

The Garden

Shadow of a Woman (Friday, Satur-
day) ranks well down the ladder as
murder mysteries go, having little sus-
pense, a bumbling plot, dull dialogue.

Black Angel (Monday, Tuesday, Wed-
nesday) features Dan Duryea and Peter
Lorre in a satisfactory murder story
set in Los Angeles. Action and interest
are both well maintained.

Gallant Journey (Thursday, Friday,
Saturday) is built around the first re-
corded flight of a glider, by one John
J. Montgomery in California in 1883.
Too long for the brief story it spins, it
still has several intriguing sequences
as the experiment unfolds.

Frick Auditorium

Famous Film Series. The first of these
will include "Tol'able David" and "Uncle
Tom's Cabin." Details of the rest of
this interesting opportunity will be
found on page 7 of this issue.



Nantucket
Naturals

Joan's Dress Shop

63 Palmer Square Phone 2289



Campus Taxi Service
PHONE 1105

s) DAY - NIGHT - SERVICE



fF==



Plenty of Hoi Water
4c a Day

Duo-Therm

Automatic

Fuel Oil
Water Heater



NASSAU

APPLIANCE CO.

252 Nassau St. Phone 2100




Happy landing?

IT may cost you hundreds
of dollars from your own
pocket if some person is in-
jured on your premises and
you haven't placed Residence
Liability Insurance on your
property.

Before anything happens
INSURE NOW, with this
agency. Protect your home,
your savings and your fam-

ily.



B. L. GULICK, Jr., Inc.

B. L. GuLiCK, Jr., President
F. D. Jemison, Sec'y and Treas.

90 Nassau Street Telephone 1511



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i Sports in Short I



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Fitting Setting. The football game

which rocked the nation's sports fans
from coast to coast could not have been
played in a more appropriate place:
Princeton had never won at Franklin
Field; the 72,000 persons who witnessed
the crackup of the mighty Penn eleven
were one of the largest crowds in Nas-
sau football history; and the contest was
staged on the home field of the team
that has given the Tigers their worst
drubbings since 1940.

In the welter of words that follov.'ed
the smashing triumph, two plays seem
to have been partially overlooked. One
was the magnificent piece of quick
thinking that caused Dick West to flip
the pass to Ed Mead to tie the score
at 14-all after the try for point had
been blocked. All during the second
half, that play enabled the Orange and
(Black to rip into the Penns knowing that
they were already on even terms with
the nation's third best grid entry.

The other was a defensive play by
Whitey iVIeyer, Nassau left end, who
reached up to trip Bob Deuber on a
reverse while virtually flat on his back.
The Quaker ball carrier hit the sod for
a loss of six yards, completely spoiling
a Red and Blue advance that had car-
ried to the Tiger 12. Coming in the sec-
ond period, when the score was 14-7 for
the home forces, it might easily be
termed the play that turned the tide.
Certainly it snuffed out the last spark
in the Philadelphians' sputtering attack.



Highlights. All 17 points were scored
by an Exter-Andover axis — Ernie Ran-
some of Exeter, Ed Mead and Ken
Keuffel of Andover . . . Ransome's hip
dislocation was reported to have occur-
red after he was on the ground . . .
Val Wagner's two pass interceptions and
the catch that set up the field goal were

ESTERBROOK — Renew-point fountain
pens — Choose your favorite — the right
point for the way you write. We have
33 diflFerent type points — Retail at
$1.50— Thome Drug Store.



EVERYTHING IN INSURANCE

O. H. HUBBARD

AGENCY

142 Nassau St. Telephone 400



•Town Topics, November 10-16, 1946-

brilliant football . . . Boiling Robertson
played George Savitsky, weighing 167
to the latter's 256.

The post-gaine fracas hit the front
page with pictures on both Philadelphia
Sunday morning papers . . . the Prince-
tonian demanded an apology from Penn
Monday, had to back track Tuesday
when it found it had gone to press with
its editorial after the apology had been
received . . . Princeton will play Penn-
sylvania next Fall ... in Palmer Sta-
dium.



B"



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BROWN and MANGUM
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Washing, Cellars Cleaned, Hauling

Telephones : 3158-W, 3172-W



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CLASSIC MOVIES

You can see eight of the world's Great Movies from the
collection of the Museum of Modern Art Film Library as an
ASSOCIATE MEMBER of YOUR PRINCETON GROUP
ARTS.

5 Friday evenings at 7:30 p. m.

Frick Laboratory Auditorium

Washington Road

NOV. 15 "Tol'able David" and "Unde Tom's Cabin"

NOV. 29 "Great Train Robbery" - "Covered Wagon"

"The Last Card" with Wm. S. Hart.
DEC. 13 "The General" with Buster Keaton.
JAN. 10 "Greed"
JAN. 24 "The Italian Straw Hat"

Associate Membership costs only $2.00

Family Membership 5.00

Trial Membership 75

yon can register by mail or drop in at

PRINCETON GROUP ARTS 6 Spring Street

Telephone 2052



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Princeton, N. J.


1

Online LibraryE LetierceTown Topics (Princeton), Nov. 10-16, 1946 (Volume v.1, no.35) → online text (page 1 of 2)