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Town Topics (Princeton), Nov. 24-30, 1946 (Volume v.1, no.37) online

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WE NOMINATE

John Howard Northrop and Wendell Meredith Stanley,
Princetonians by adoption and members of the three-
decade-old Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research,
who last week divided between them one-half of the
1946 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and thereby made it
possible for American scientists to score a clean sweep
of the world's highest honors in chemistry, physics and
medicine and physiology. Only once before in the 46-
year history of the Nobel awards has one nation (Ger-
many m 1905) captured all scientific laurels in a single
year.

Recognized by the Swedish Academy of Science for
•their major contributions to the knowledge of the protein
m all of its puzzling forms, both men were attracted to
the Rockefeller lodestar within five years after com-
pleting their undergraduate careers. Northrop, the 55-
year old father of an outstanding Princeton University
athlete and a native of Yonkers, N. Y., was educated at
Columbia University (B.S.., 1912; M.A., 1913; and Ph.D.,
1915) and joined the Institute in 1916. Stanley, at 42
the youngest of the 1946 Nobel group and well below
the age - level at which Nobel Prizes are generally
bestowed, is a Hoosier, born in tiny Ridgeville, Indiana.
A member of the class of 1926 at Earlham College,
Richmond, Indiana, he took both his B.S. and Ph.D. at
the University of Illinois, later held a National Research
Fellowship and in 1931 became affiliated with the In-
stitute.

Northrop, a captain in the Chemical Warfare Service in
World War I and one of the handful of men to hold
honorary degrees from Yale, Harvard and Princeton,
has done his most notable work in the field of enzymes,
the chemical reagents that make digestion, respiration
and other vital processes possible. This fall he made
public the discovery of proteinogen, the name he gave
to a mother substance of all proteins, whether they occur
in meat, enzymes, viruses or antibodies. Stanley, the
creator of a miraculous centifuge type influenza vaccine
providing immunity to the virulent disease that in 1918
killed 15,000,000 persons, has specialized in -researches
on the borderline of life and has paved the way for
the study of all virus disease.

For their eminent leadership in science, leadership as
important to the present and future well being of the
world as the efforts of statesmen in uprooting the causes
of war; for their unwavering devotion to the demanding
ideals of fundamental scientific inquiry into the causes
of things; for simply being part of this community; they
are Town Topics' candidates for

PRINCETON'S

MEN OF THE WEEK
November 2 4-30, 19 46



tE^ottjn ^opiti



■Town Topics, November 24-30, 1946-



Published Every Friday Throughout the Year

Donald C. Stuart, Jr.

Dan D. Coyle

Editors and Publishers

Mailed •without charge every week to every

home in Princeton Borough and Township.

Advertising Rates on Application

Box 371 Princeton, New Jersey

Vol. I, No. 37 November 24-30, 1946



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1



Topics of the Town \

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The Men Who Know. "If war breaks
out, atomic bombs will be used and
they will surely destroy our civiliza-
tion. There is no solution to this prcyb-
lem except international control of
atomic energy, and ultimately, the elimi-
nation of war."

So spoke Dr. Albert Einstein ami
eight of his fellow scientists who gath-
ered Sunday at the Institute for Ad-
vanced Study. The occasion marked
the start of a drive to raise a $1,000,000
fund to educate the public on the im-
plications of atomic energy.

"Atomic bombs are cheap, will become
more destructive; there is no military
defense against them and none can be
expected," they wrote in their joint
statement. On the eve of their cam-
paign to save the world from eventual
disaster too horrible to comprehend,
there was doubt whether the many self-
interest seekers at work today would
pause to listen.

But one thing was sure: the men
who made the bomb knew whereof they
spoke.



"Unwarranted, Vindictive Attack."

Accusing the mayor and council of
"barring citizens from important mu-
nicipal meetings," and pursuing a "closed
door policy" which is detrimental to
the public interest, the Princeton Packet
last week accomplished at least one of
its aims: it got under the skin of the
governing body and many another Bor-
ough official.

Terming the attack "unwarranted and
vindictive," Mayor Morgan read a state-
ment Monday night which half a dozen
present rose to back. Said Mr. Morgan:

"The editor of The Packet permitted
editorial comment of a highly critical
nature on his front page under the
(Continued on page four)

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HEADACHE

Nature's semaphore




•if The causes of headache are multitudi-
nous. It is, perhaps, the most common ail-
ment of man. Many headaches are simple,
and respond to simple home treatment.

It should be remembered that headache
is a symptom, and not a disease. It is na-
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If headaches persist or recur, see your physician at
once. If medication is needed, we are equipped to fill
vour prescription promptly and accurately.

EDWARD A. THORNE, Druggist

168 Nassau Street Princeton, New Jersey



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Going Up. Interviews wth Cousins
Company and The Wine and Game Shop
have provided us with considerable in-
formation on the immediate future of
liquor prices. In brief, the trend is up.

The Wine and Game Shop has thrown
our way the bad news itself: as of De-
cember 1, prices will rise from a small
(25 to i50 cents a fifth) increase in
blended whiskies to a soaring boost in
straight Bourbons and Scotches, soon
to be priced from $7 to $10 a fifth.

From Cousins come sidelights and
comments which should be of interest
to the average consumer. Since neither
wholesaler or retailer has had a fair
profit on blends during the war — be-
cause of the heavy federal tax — it is
felt that the prospective price rise is
wholly legitimate. But insofar as the
jump in Bourbon and Scotch prices are
concerned, Mr. Stockton, advocating a
buyers' strike, feels the entire procedure
is "outrageous." See his advertisement
on page eight. Our thanks to both our
informants for a fair appraisal of
what we may expect.



-Town Topics, November 24-30, 1946-

a superior combination of good looks,
adaptability and comfort. The first two
qualities are due to a smooth^fitting
tailored yet feminine appearance, which
keeps the lady-at-home from looking as
if she should be in a bedroom, that
negligee look being frequently overdone
when it comes to housecoats. Long-
cuffed sleeves, which can be worn all
the way down or turned back for three-
quarter length variation, are additional
clever designing ideas. An extra spot
(Continued on page eight)



French China. The list of tangibles
missing fr^m the American scene during
the last five years is long. We have
looked forward to the return of some of
them with the expectation of changes
and improvements; others we have
wanted exactly as they were when last
we saw them. Among the latter is the
ever-lovely French China typified by
Limoges, Clamecy and Quimper which
has just been received at The Center
on Nassau Street.

Starting at only $1, there is a selec-
tion of pieces varying in appearance
and purpose. Choicest of all are the
Limoge perfume bottles. Their graceful
shape is accentuated by pink roses above
a base of blue, highlighted by just-right
touches of gold.

Small but appealing bits of Clamecy
are the flower vases in -white or an
especially colorful yellow-, both with a
delicate floral pattern. Unique evidence
of practical French thinking is found in
the holes around the top outside the
neck, which should make a steady and
effective flower arrangement inevitable.

The popular Quimper, with its quaint
peasant figures, is represented in cig-
arette boxes, match-holders and small
dishes, which can be turned into .-ish
trays, coastei-s or butter plates. Particu-
larly eye-catching are the match-holders
in the form of small, ®ay sabots.



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DRESSES

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■Town Topics, November 24-30, 1946-
TOPICS OF THE TOWN



(Continued from page tivo)

guise of a new.s story. The majority
of the backhand criticisms included in
the article arose from the fact that the
Mayor and .Council saw fit to go into
executive session on a highly controver-
sial subject following their last regular
meeting. This is an entirely normal
procedure and any member of the press
was at liberty to request permission to
attend the executive session if he were
willing to respect the restricted nature
of the subject under discussion."

Councilman Joseph J. Redding's com-
ment: "The most unfortunate article
I have seen in the local press as long
as I have lived in Princeton."



Miscellany. The sun's eclipse Saturday
will begin here at 10:50 and last until
1:55, reaching its maximum (56 percent
of totality) at 12:26 . . . Professor John
Q. Stewart declares it to be one of a
series, currently semi-annual, which be-
gan November 24, 957 B.C.

An imposter representing himself as
a former member of the Princeton po-
lice Department was seeking funds in
Monmouth Junction last week ... he
got $5 from at least one house before
his activities were discovered, announc-
ing that he was raising money for a
Thanksgiving benefit which the depart-
ment was planning for the "poor people
of Princeton."



What is probably the first strike of
white collar workers in Princeton oc-
curred this week at Opinion Research,
I'nc. . . . Ten girls walked off their jobs
in the coding department, having asked
for a pay boost which they failed to
get . . . "because," Vice-President George
Dean was quoted by the Daily Prince-
tonian, "having instituted a 20 percent
base pay raise recently, we feel a 25
percent increase at this time is un-
reasonable."

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UTILITY SERVICE

Housecleaning, Floors Waxed, Window

Washing, Cellars Cleaned, Hauling

Telephones: 3158-W, 3172-W



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■ a

We Recommend 1

THEORY OF THE |

LEISURE CLASS I



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"The Book of the Week" i

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I As We Observe This

I Thanksgiving Season

z

I Let us give special thanks that

i Princeton, with its splendid in-

I stitutions and schools, its educa-

1 tional advantages, its beautiful

: trees and gardens, its charming

j homes and fine people, is o//r

I bowe town.

\ Edmiws'd D. Cook



63 Palmer Square



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Saturday, November 23rd

12;00: Football: Princeton University Junior

Varsity vs. Dartmouth, Fitzpatrick Field.

2:00 p.m.: Football: Princeton University

vs. Dartmouth, Palmer Stadium.
8:30 p.m.: Princeton University Concert;
Adolph Busch, violinist, and Rudolph
Serkin, pianist; McCarter Theatre.
Sunday, November 24ith
7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:00 a.m.: Mass, St.
Paul's Roman Catholic Church.
11:00 a.m.: "A Thanksgiving Tragedy," the
Rev. Glen Martin; Senior and Junior
Choirs; Methodist Church.
"The Peace of Perfect Functioning," the
Rev. Dr. Frank S, Niles, First Presby-
terian Church.

"A Nation Thankful to God," the Rev.
Dr. William L. Tucker; Thanksgiving
Music; Second Presbyterian Church.
"Soul and Body," Lesson-Sermon, First
Church of Christ, Scientist.
Sermon, the Rev. Victor R. Stanley- Jr.,
Trinity Episcopal Church.
University Chapel Service, Dean Robert
R. Wicks, University Chapel.
Princeton United Meeting, Society of
Friends, Cabinet Room of Murray-Dodge
Hall, University Campus.
7:00 p.m.: Joint Meeting: Wesley Founda-
tion for College Students and Young
People's Society of Presbyterian Church,
First Presbyterian Church.
7:30 p.m.: Evensong, address by the Rev.

Stanley; Trinity Episcopal Church.
8:00 p.m.: Service of Music; Westminster
Chapel Choir, Massed Choirs of 110
voices ; First Presbyterian Church.
8:15 p.m.: Evening Service, First Church of
Christ, Scientist.

Monday, November 25th
1:00 p.m.: Free Medical Clinic, Out-Patient
Department Building, Princeton Hospital.
Tuesday, November 26th
1:00 p.m.: Free Surgical Clinic, Out-Patient
Departm.ent Building, Princeton Hospital.
8:00 p.m.: Borough Board of Education
Meeting, Princeton High School.
Wednesday, November 27th
8:00 p.m.: Preparatory Communion Service,

Second Presbyterian Church.
8:15 p.m.: Mid-Week Service, First Church
of Christ, Scientist.

Thursday, November 28th
THANKSGIVING DAY
11:00 a.m.: Community Thanksgiving Service,
Princeton University Chapel.
Thanksgiving Service; Lesson - Sermon,
"Thanksgiving"; First Church of Christ,
Scientist.

Friday, November 29th
1:00 p.m.: Free Pediatric Clinic, Out-Patient

Depajtment, Princeton Hospital.
7:30 p.m.: Classic Film Revivals, including
"The Great Train Robbery," "The Last
Card," and "The Covered Wagon" ; spon-
sored by Princeton Group Arts ; Frick
Laboratory Auditorium, Washington Road.

GIRLS' DRESSES AND COATS

Size 7-14
The LITTLE CLOTHES LINE

41 Palmer Sq. Princeton



Campus Taxi Service
PHONE 1105

<5 DAY - NIGHT - SERVICE



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•Town Topics, November 24-30, 1946 5

^ ,

SMALL BUSINESS IS VERY IMPORTANT
to the Individual Concerned
— and It Is to Us, Too

This bank never for a moment forgets that a problem involving a
small amount of money may be relative'ly more important to a person
who has only a small amount of money than a problem involving
a large amount is to a person who has plenty.

Whatever business you bring to us, whatever plans you discuss
with us are considered and given attention in the light of their
importance to YOU. Please remember that — and feel free to come
to us accordingly.




OF PRINCETON

Phincetqn.N.J.

Member: Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Federal Reserve System.



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Town Topics, November 24-30, 1946-



EVERYTHING IN INSURANCE

O. H. HUBBARD

AGENCY

142 Nassau St. Telephone 400



BOWLING STANDINGS

MAJOR LEAGUE

Final Standings

W. L.

Perone's Trucking Co 21 9

No Stars - 20 10

Tiger Garage _ - 19 U

American Legion 13 17

Peacock Alley 10 20

Frazee's Market 7 23



High
High



Single Gami
Three Games-



-Dom Talia— 243



Bruce Perone

A" LEAGUE

W.



-669



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Princeton Grill 25 5

Cenerino's Cafe 24 6

Tiger Garage 17 13

Lions Club ...- 17 13

American Legion 15 15

Dutch Neck 11 19

Turney Motor 7 23

Squatters 4 26

High Single Game - Robert Ceraso-236
High Three Games - Robert Ceraso - 624

"B" LEAGUE

W. L.

Silvester Motor Co 17 10

Veterans Foreign Wars.— 17 10

Kids 14 13

Frazee's - 13 14

Walker-Gordon 10 17

A. T. & T 10 17

High Single Game - Jim Ranallo-221

High Three Games - Hal Frazee - 594

"R.C.A." LEAGUE

Points Points

Blue . 26 Gold 20

Beavers 24 OfSce 20

Guards 23 Wiremen 17

Plating 2} Maint 16

Eng. No. 1 22 Acoustics 15

Drafting - 21 Eng. No. 2 .... 13

INDUSTRIAL LEAGUE

Points

Levey Chemical 14

Heyden Maint 12

Walker-Gordon No.. 2 , .12

Walker-Gordon No. 1 1 1 .

Kingston Trap Rock 6

Heyden Prod 5

LADIES' LEAGUE

W. L.

Frazee's - 16 5

Maples 14 7

Roll O 12 9

300 Club 10 11

Rockettes 7 14

Crack Ups 4 17

THE PRINCETON
RECREATION CENTRE

138 NasMB StTMt



News of the Theatres]



-^



The Playhouse

Nocturne (Friday, Saturday) features
George Raft and Lynn Bari in a melo-
drama that is routine in nature but ex-
citing in presentation. An eerie mood
and startling photography add to the
effect.

Never Say Goodbye (Sunday through
Wednesday) is a farce starring Errol
Flynn, Eleanor Parker and Lucile Wat-
soru There's occasional humor but the
plot about an erring husband who seeks
to win back the affections of his wife
isn't particularly appealing. It's uneven
at best.

The Chase (Thursday, Friday, Satur-
day) would be first-rate melodrama if
it ended as well as it began. A broke
ex-G.I. is hired as a chauffeur by a
murderous thug, but before he discovers
his boss' business, he has fallen in love
with his wife. A weak ending (which
requires the hand of Providence to help
out hero and heroine) is unfortunate.
With Robert Cummings, the svelte
Michele Morgan, Peter Lorre.

The Garden

Rendezvous vrith Annie (Friday, Sat-
urday) is average humor about a sol-
dier who goes AWOL, becomes a father,
is faced with the choice of his son's
legitimacy or his own court martial.
Eddie Albert and Gail Patrick.

The Cockeyed Miracle (Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday) pictures Keenan Wynn
and Frank Morgan in a whimsical piece
about father and son who have passed
on, try to straighten out a few domestic
and financial affairs before they leave
the earth. Only fair.

White Tie and Tails (Thursday, Fri-
day, Saturday) puts one-time villain
Dan Duryea in the role of a Park Ave-
nue butler impersonating a millionaire.
The usual complications ensue. With
Ella Raines and William (Bendix.

Frick Auditorium

Three Westerns. Princeton Group Arts
will offer a trilogy of famous westerns
on November 29: "The Great Train
Robbery" (made at Dover, N. J. in
i90'3); "The Last .Card," a 1915 story
of good and bad men and virtue pre-
served; and the justly famous "Covered
Wagon" of 1923.

The latter is one of the first outdoor
epics of the screen and did much to
capture the pioneer American spirit.
Tickets are available at 6 Spring Street;
you'll find it a very w orthwhile evening.

DIAPERS . . . will buy old or
new at
The LITTLE CLOTHES LINE

41 Palmer Sq. Princeton



Send Ra'js to a Laundry?

Sorely — if they have a
regular rug department.

and we have!

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LAUNDRY



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AFTER FIBE

ForHOUSEHOLD

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Fire... VALUE ^ .

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AFTER a fire, the amount of
insurance may prove less than
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A careful checkup — today —
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B. L. GuLiCK, Jr., President
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90 Nassau Street Telephone 1511



Town Topics, November 24-30, 1946-



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Sports in Short



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Dartmouth Holds the Key. When the
1946 football season began, the contest
with Dartmouth was the least impor-
tant of the Tigers' six Ivy League
clashes. Today, it ranks as the key
game in the Princeton schedule.

The reason for its prominence in
determining the success or failure of the
Nassau campaign is relatively simple:
if Princeton wins, it will reach the .500
mark for the first time in four years,
it will be well out of the Ivy League
cellar, it will have done as well or bet-
ter than could be expected with the
material at hand in all but one of its
games. The exception, of course, is Vir-
ginia.



But if the Indians, who began by
beating Holy Cross and Syracuse, have
since lost six in a row, turn in a vic-
tory over the Orange and Black tomor-
row, Princetonians will have good reason
to be downcast. The win over Penn will
look like an unbelievable flash in the
pan instead of a good team playing in-
spired football. An opponent that has
floundered badly for a month and a half
will have found itself at the Tigers'
expense.

Disappointed and 'battered (Ends Gal-
lagher and Mead, Backs Powers, Ran-
some. White, Franke are in poor shape
or out entirely), Charlie Caldwell's
eleven will have trouble with a Dart-
mouth squad that is a lot better than
its record. The odds are that Princeton
will win, but it is a certainty that it
will have to if Princeton football is to
go anywhere at all in 1947.



Elis at the Top. This department will
be quite surprised if Harvard takes the
measure of a. Yale team that is definite-
ly on the way up. The Elis began last
weekend to reach a peak that should


1

Online LibraryE LetierceTown Topics (Princeton), Nov. 24-30, 1946 (Volume v.1, no.37) → online text (page 1 of 2)