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Town Topics (Princeton), Oct. 20-26, 1946 (Volume v.1, no.32) online

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• COMPETENT

• COMPLETE

• COURTEOUS

I THAT'S THE BRAND OF SERVICING YOU I
GET WHEN YOU BRING YOUR CAR TO

KLINE'S ESSO STATION

271 Nassau Street Telephone 1298 j

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One Drive

for

Eleven Agencies

When the Solicitor Calls
At Your Home,
Give Generously to

THE COMMUNITY CHEST

This Advertisement Contributed by



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PATRON



Sec. 562, P.L.&R.
U. S. POSTAGE

PAID
Princeton"; N. J.
Permit No. 106



WE NOMINATE

Henry Green Dufneld, 87-year old native of Princeton,
who at the age of 10 without parental permission, a
week after Princeton and Rutgers Universities had played
this nation's first game of intercollegiate football on No-
vember 6, 1869, in New Brunswick, climbed a rickety
fence here in Princeton to watch Old Nassau trounce
Rutgers and score Princeton's initial victory on the grid-
iron. Still remembering that second historic battle of '69
as clearly as the average sports enthusiast might recall
the details of Princeton's one-point loss to Harvard a
short week ago, Dufneld holds all existing longevity rec-
ords for continuous town and gown connections.

Born in 1859, the son of Professor John T. Duffield,
an eminent mathematician, and the brother of the late
Edward D. Duffield, acting President of Princeton in
1932, Duffield became Treasurer Emeritus of the Uni-
versity in 1930, when he retired after 45 years of service,
including three decades as guardian of Princeton's purse-
strings. No other financial officer of the College had
served as long, nor had participated in such epoch-making
developments. In 1885, the year he joined the Princeton
staff, the College of New Jersey's endowment was esti-
mated at $1,061,175 and its salary commitments for all
faculty members totalled $68,000. Upon his retirement,
the endowment was approaching $25,000,000 and the
teaching budget had catapulted to nearly $1,200,000.

Vice-President of the Class of 1881 from graduation
to 1932, and since 1932 president of his class, that now
numbers 10 members, Duffield on the baseball diamond
made Tiger athletic history, long before stringent eligibil-
ity rules were invented. One of his most spectacular per-
formances was against Yale, June 2, 1886, five years after
he had received his Princeton diploma. His first time at
bat, he reached the Eli pitcher, the immortal Alonzo Stagg,
for a home run, later collected a triple and a double.

As a Princeton resident, Duffield has been no less in-
timately connected with the growth of this municipality.
The Borough Council, the Borough Board of Education,
various planning boards, the First National Bank, the
Nassau Building and Loan Association, the Princeton
Municipal Improvement Company, the First Presbyterian
Church, the Nassau Club and historical societies have
all benefited from his services.

For representing not only the Princeton of today, but
also the Princeton of yesterday, which laid the founda-
tions for this community's remarkable advances; for per-
sonifying over the course of decades, in shouldering both
institutional and public responsibilities, unusual devotion
to duty, absolute loyalty and rare human understanding;
he is Town Topics' candidate for

PRINCETON'S

MAN OF THE WEEK

Cctober 20-2 6, 19 46



Town Topics, October 20-26, 1946



Published Every Friday Throughout the Year

Donald C. Stuart, Jr.

Dan D. Coylb

Editors and Publishers

Delivered without charge every week to every

home in Princeton Borough and Township.

Advertising Rates on Application

Box 371 Princeton, New Jersey



Vol. 1, No. 32



October 20-26, 1946







IHMIIHIIIimillllllllllllllllMIHtllllllllllllllllllllltlllllltlMIIIII

Topics of the Town



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Charter Day. Princeton University will
celebrate Saturday the 200th anniver-
sary of the granting of its charter.
To mark this impressive occasion, cere-
monies in the Chapel will be preceded
by the largest academic procession in
the college's history.

The line of march (from a point near
Nassau Hall past Whig, Clio and
Murray-Dodge) will include represen-
tatives of the undergraduate body, the
Graduate College, all alumni classes,
the faculty and trustees, the heads of
other academic institutions in the com-
munity, the New Jersey Bicentennial
Commission, a delegation from the
United Nations headed by Secretary-
General Trygve Lie, the recipients of
some 25 honorary degrees, University
officials, Senator H. Alexander Smith
and Governor Walter E. Edge.

Leading scholars from ten nations
will receive the honorary degrees Satur-
day morning. To be assured of such an
award, each must be at hand. Only
holder of a Princeton honorary degree
bestowed in absentia is Abraham Lin-
coln, who wrote December 9, 1864, from
the White House that war-time duties
demanded his presence in Washington,
got the degree anyway.



Miscellany. Harvard's band, one of
the nation's best, arrived by Pullman
at 7 a.m. last Saturday, promptly pa-
raded about the entire campus playing
"Reveille" and Harvard songs . . . when
ex-G.I.'s in pajamas pointed rifles at
(Continued on page eight)



SUPPORT
PRINCETON'S ONLY
COMMUNITY CHEST

UNIVERSITY LAUNDRY



WE TAKE PRIDE AND PLEASURE
IN ANNOUNCING THAT

MR. SAMUEL MATHER,

FORMERLY OF S. W. MATHER & SONS, TRENTON,

IS NOW IN CHARGE OF OUR

MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR DEPARTMENT

Consultation Welcomed Without Obligation

L. C. BOWERS & SONS, Inc.
180 Nassau Street Telephone 2001

SUPPORT THE COMMUNITY CHEST!



THERE'S NO SHORTAGE
OF SECURITY!



You can have all you can buy, and you can
buy it today by starting systematic savings. Nothing
will do more to dispel financial worries than the
knowledge that a steady savings plan is working
for yoar benefit in the



NASSAU BUILDING & LOAN ASS'N

$1.00 a Month Is Worth $200.00 at Maturity

$5.00 a Month Is Worth $1,000.00 at Maturity

$10.00 a Month Is Worth $2,000.00 at Maturity

NEW SERIES AVAILABLE NOVEMBER 1



ARTHUR EVERETT, Secretary
First National Bank Princeton, N. J.

SUPPORT THE COMMUNITY CHEST!



Town Topics, October 20-26, 1946



NEW COMMUNITY ENTERPRISE
Presents GREAT AMERICAN MOVIES



At the first public meeting of Princeton Group Arts a few short
weeks ago, Mayor Minot C. Morgan proclaimed his faith in and asked sup-
port of the people of Princeton for a new community enterprise. He
hailed it as "one of the many great liberal adventures to which Princeton
has always been dedicated."

Today more than 100 Princeton families are taking part in this
"adventure" and discovering that it is all that Mayor Morgan predicted.
Today, through the courtesy of Town Topics, Roy Dickinson Welch,
member of the advisory board of Princeton Group Arts, in an open letter
to the people, is able to report a new and exciting episode in this fast-
moving adventure. His letter follows:

Dear Friends:

When Mayor Minot C. Morgan first spoke of Princeton Group Arts he said
that it had its eye on a star. It was scarcely expected then that the stars would
appear so soon or in such abundance. But Princeton will be able to get its first
glimpse of them within the next two weeks.

On Sunday, October 27, Princeton Group Arts will present the first showing
in a series of the great motion pictures of the century — pictures that have won the
acclaim of millions of Americans and that have become the classics in their field.
Many of you are too young to recall one of the earliest and most famous of these
films — "The Great Train Robbery," first exhibited in 1903. More of us can recall
our original excitement at seeing the greatest of all Western screen heroes, William
S. Hart, in his famous role in "The Last Card." This goes back to 1915. And
"The Covered Wagon," produced in 1923, will always live as one of the great
dramatic spectacles of pioneer days.

These are the three movies Princeton Group Arts will present in its triple-
feature bill on Sunday afternoon at 5 p.m. on October 27th. And this, let me
add, is only the opening gun of a plan to put on ten separate showings through-
out the winter. If this plan meets with your support you will have a chance to see
a total of nineteen of some of the greatest films of all time.

You may wonder why Princeton Group Arts chose to present a series of this
kind. The answer is really quite simple. One of the principal aims of this young
and vigorous enterprise is to get the people of Princeton together — working together,
playing together, singing together, and learning together. For it is only by doing
things together in which they are interested that people can really know and un-
derstand each other.

Most people like to go to the movies — and since these movies have historic
value beyond their surface entertainment, it seemed worthwhile for Princeton Group
Arts to offer them to the citizens of the community.

But whatever reason you may have for seeing these great movies, I know
that you will enjoy them and look back on the occasion as a rewarding experience.

Personally, I hope you will do more than this. I hope that these movies will
serve as an introduction to the great possibilities that Princeton Group Arts opens
up as a joint community endeavor — a spur to each of you to take part in its varied
and fascinating activities. I believe it continues to have its eye on a star, and that
under this star the whole community of Princeton will prosper.

— Roy Dickinson Welch



There's Fan
For Everyone!

SEE Sundays

1) The Great Train Robbery

Oct. 27
The Last Card

WILLIAM S. HART
The Covered Wagon

2) Uncle Tom's Cabin Nov 10
Tol'able David

RICHARD BARTHLEMESS

3) Greed Nov. 24

ZAZU PITTS

4) The General Dec. 15

BUSTER KEATON

5) The Italian Straw Hat Jan. 12

From the Library of the Museum of
Modern Art in New York City

Membership fee for above series:

Individual $2.50

Present members 1.00

Family 5.00

Trial (one) 65

ADVISORY BOARD

Elmer Adler
B. Franklin Bunn
John Carradine
B. Woodhull Davis
Shirley Davis
Mrs. Anna Higginbotham
Mrs. E. Gaylord Howell
Gordon Knox
Mrs. C. W. Link
Dr. Erwin Panofsky
Rev. Otto Piper
Mrs. Daniel Sayre
Dr. Marion Spear
Donald A. Stauffer
Mrs. Willard Thorp
Peg Wangler

Howard B. Waxwood, Jr.
Dr. Roy D. Welch



Please sign this coupon

To Princeton Group Arts, Inc., 14 Spring St., Princeton, N. J.

Dear Sirs: Kindly accept this request for membership in Princeton Group Arts, Inc., including the classic movie series
October 27, 1945 — January 12, 1947. Please mail membership cards to the following:

Name Address „ \

N— " " AddrCSS " (if Family

Name - Address — _ > Membership applied for,

, ,1 I list all names

Name...- - Address — _ J for separate cards

Name - - Address /



Signature..
Address.....



Check enclosed
Bill me



Town Topics, October 20-26, 1946



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120 Nassau Street Tel. 3246



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6 Nassau Street Telephone 2468



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Or Apply

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Ifs New to Us

| 3

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Electric Trains. Those two magic
words and the fact that Zapf's Hard-
ware on Nassau Street has them portend
a Christmas that can be all it should
be this year for boys of every age.
There are two sets: the "Atlantic Pas-
senger Train" for $19.95 and the "Penn-
sylvania Freight Train" for $22.95. Both
are designed to carry the electric cur-
rent through the wheels, making pos-
sible the use of authentic two-rail
tracks, a feature heretofore available
only in the most expensive models.

The passenger train set consists of
a locomotive, tender, baggage car, two
coaches and track, curved and straight,
with a built-in uncoupling device and
control box. The gleaming black locomo-
tive has four mighty drive wheels with
eccentric arm double-action piston rods
and lucite electric headlights. The
freight train has other intriguing de-
tails, among them a die-cast locomotive
with jeweled markers, an oil car with
a brake wheel, and a hooper car with
a manual control lever for dumping. Run
at night with house lights off, the elec-
tric headlight and illuminated caboose
cast an awesome glare over the track.



"Indoor Gardens." That name alone,
although giving some idea of what these
miniature masterpieces are, cannot in ii •
self indicate their charm and originality.
Colorful foilage plants, including small
cacti, variegated ivies, philodendrons,
cocoa palms and others which require a
minimum of watering, are set in unique
and imaginative containers.

Copper and brass in many intriguing
shapes are used, as well as hand-painted
tole in early American reproductions. If
forced to choose from among the end-
less variety (there will be 350 types of
"Indoor Gardens" during the months to
come), we would probably be able to
narrow our favorites down to four.
These would be a copper Russian double-
handled drinking mug, a white tole scoop
with cherry, painted flowers, hand dec-
(Continued on page eight)



Gabardine Dresses

Women's Sizes: 38-44
Remember the Community Chest!

Elise Goupil

162 Nassau St. Phone 3466



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Chicken Waterers, Feeders, *

Brooders, Egg Baskets, etc. at \

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262 Alexander St. Telephone 142



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We Recommend f

PRINCIPIA

(IN MODERN ENGLISH)

By Isaac Newton

as

"The Book of the Week" 1



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Saturday, October 19th

10:30 a.m.: Princeton University's Charter
Day Convocation, preceded by academic
procession, University Chapel.
2:30 p.m.: Football: Princeton University
vs. Rutgers, with re-enactment of first
Princeton-Rutgers football game between
halves; Palmer Stadium.

Sunday, October 20th
7:30, 8:30, 10:00, 11:00 a.m.: Mass, St.

Paul's Roman Catholic Church.
11:00 a.m.: Second Bicentennial Sermon, The
Rt. Rev. Donald Aldrich, University
Chapel.

"The Dilemna of Power," the Rev.
Lynn H. Corson, Methodist Church.
"A Faith That Is Grounded in Knowl-
edge," the Rev. Dr. Frank S. Niles,
First Presbyterian Church.
Sermon, Second Presbyterian Church.
Sermon, the Rev. Dr. Arthur L. Kin-
solving, Trinity Episcopal Church.
Lesson-Sermon, First Church of Christ,
Scientist.

Princeton United Meeting, Society of
Friends, Cabinet Room of Murray-Dodge
Hall, University Campus.
12:00-12:30 p.m.: CBS Radio Network Pro-
gram (WABC-880), Princeton University Bi-
centennial Program "What Are The
Boundaries of Humanistic Studies."
2:30 p.m. Dedication of "Princeton Battle-
field State Park"; Dr. Harold W. Dodds
and Douglas Southall Freeman; Pyne
Estate.
6:00 p.m.: Theta Sigma Society Supper for
benefit of Greek crippled children; all
high school young people invited; First
Presbyterian Church.
7:30 p.m.: Evensong; Address by the Rev.
Victor B. Stanley Jr. ; Trinity Episcopal
Church.
8:00 p.m.: "The Value of Christian Mis-
sions," Mr. Will Galloway; Methodist
Church.

"The Depths of the Sea," the Rev. Dr.
Niles ; First Presbyterian Church.
8:15 p.m.: Evening Service, First Church of
Christ, Scientist.

Monday, October 21st
1:00 p.m.: Free Medical Clinic, Out- Patient
Department Building, Princeton Hospital.
8:45-9:00 p.m.: Princeton University Bicen-
tennial Radio Program, Radio Station
WAAT (Dial 970), Monday through
Saturday.

Tuesday, October 22nd
1:00 p.m.: Free Surgical Clinic, Out-Patient
Department Building, Princeton Hospital.
Wednesday, October 23rd
9:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m.: Princeton Hospital
Annual Fall Rummage Sale, Chambers
Street Firehouse.
8:00 p.m.: Mid-Week Devotional Service,
Methodist Church.

Mid-Week Bible-Study Group, First Pres-
byterian Church.
8:15 p.m.: Mid-Week Service, First Church
of Christ, Scientist.

Thursday, October 24th
1:00 p.m.: Free Obstetrical Clinic, Out-
Patient Department Building, Princeton
Hospital.
8:30 p.m.: Candidates' Meeting sponsored by
League of Women Voters; Candidates
for Congressional Office and others: Ele-
mentary School, Nassau Street.
Friday, October 25th
1:00 p.m.: Free Pediatric Clinic, Out-Patient
Department Building, Princeton Hospital.
8:40 p.m.: Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit,"
sponsored bv Princeton Theatre Intime;
McCarter Theatre.



Town Topics, October 20-26, 1946




"I BORROW FROM THE BANK

—and KEEP my U. S. Savings Bonds!"

"I needed some money — and my first idea was to cash in enough
U. S. Savings Bonds. But the more I thought of it, the more my
conscience bothered me. Then my wife suggested:

' 'Why don't we borrow from The First National Bank?
The interest we'd pay on die loan will be very little more
than what we're getting on our U. S. Savings Bonds. The
loan will be for a short time — and we want to keep those
Bonds the full 10 years.'

"My loan from the bank is repaid now. I still have every U. S.
Savings Bond I ever bought— and I feel >a lot better about it when
I look in my safe deposit box!"



1fef®glif




PHINCETaN.N.J.

Member: Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Federal Reserve System.




THE DOCTOR
CAN WAIT




jf How often have you heard it said, "Fve
paid all my bills except the doctor's. He can
wait"?

When we have recovered, the fearful ur-
gency of that night call is easily forgotten. In
answer to our frantic call, what if the doctor
had said, "Oh, it's nothing serious. Wait until
morning and come down to the office." The chances are
we would agree to pay double if he would come at once.

Health is not an item for trade and barter. In fact, the
only wealth is health. Consider your doctor bill as your
best investment in the continued enjoyment of life. As
pharmacists, we stand ready to fill your prescriptions
promptly and accurately. _

THORNE DRUG STORE

168 Nassau Street Telephone 77



TOWN TOPICS

in cooperation with

THE PRINCETON
RECREATION CENTRE

Takes pleasure in presenting the
standings and highlights in Prince-
ton's Bowling Leagues:

Major League

W. L.

Tiger Garage 10 5

Perones Trucking 10 5

No Stars _ 10 5

American Legion 6 9

Peacock Alley 5 10

Frazees Market ..._ 4 11

High single game — Alfred Ceraso, 248
High three games — Joe Simonelli, 675

"A" League

W. L.

Princeton Grill _. 14 1

Cenerino's Cafe _ 12 3

American Legion 10 5

Tiger Garage 9 6

Lions Club 5 10

Turney Motor Co 5 10

Dutch Neck 4 11

Squatters _._ 1 14

High single game — Robert Ceraso, 240
High three games — Robert Ceraso, 609

"B" League

W. L.

Veterans Foreign Wars ..8 4

Silvester Motor Co 7 5

Frazees 7 5

Walker-Gordon 5 7

Kids 5 7

A. T. & T 4 8

High single game — Bruce Perone, 217
High three games — Bruce Perone, 566

"R.C.A." League

Points

Plating 15

Beavers 14

Guards _ 13

Blue 12

Gold 10

Eng. No. 1 10

Drafting 10

Maint 9

Office 8

Eng. No. 2 8

Wiremen 7

Accoustics 5

LADIES' LEAGUE

W L

Frazees 5 1

Roll O _. 4 2

300 Club 4 2

Rockettes 3 3

Maples „ _. 2 4

Pin Ups 6

High single game — A. Keith, 198
High three games — A. Keith, 517

THE PRINCETON
RECREATION CENTRE

138 N&ssan Street



■ Town Topics, October 20-26, 1946

QltllllMlllltllMlfllMMIitMIIUniMMIIIIIlMmiimtmillMIIIIIMIflMQ

\News of the Theatres*

z ~

Famous Films. We thoroughly doubt
that any readers of this column have
passed by the intriguing advertisement
on page three. Full details of an ex-
tremely interesting series of motion pic-
tures of by-gone days will be fount
there. We can say no more than clrfc
the coupon, go, and enjoy them. Each i&
% masterpiece of its own era.

The Playhouse

Mr. Ace (Friday, Saturday) presents
George Raft and Sylvia Sidney in a
story of racketeering and machine poli-
tics. There's little to be said for it.

Cloak and Dagger (Sunday through
Wednesday) teils of this nation's efforts
to obtain atomic energy secrets from an
Italian physicist before he sells them
out to the Nazis. Gary Cooper is fea-
tured in what ranks as a first-rate spy
thriller. Note: Sunday matinees are now
continuous from 2 o'clock.

A Night in Casablanca (Thursday,
Friday, Saturday), last Spring's Marx
Brothers' comedy, is fast and usually
funny. Their first appearance in five
years is a treat for lovers of slapstick.

The Garden

The Time of Their Lives (Friday, Sat-
urday) portrays Abbott & Costello in a
farcial piece about a ghost who died in
1776, returns in 1946. Uneven but fairly
good.

Breakfast in Hollywood (Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday), based on the ra-
dio variety show of the same name, is
about as poor.

The House on 92d Street (Thursday
Friday, Saturday) is a rebooking of the
F.B.I, melodrama about a German spy
nest operating in our midst during
World War II. Better see it if you
didn't before.



Support the Community Chest



HOMES WANTED— Three. Nine weeks
old half-setter puppies would like to
grow up with dog-loving children. Tele-
phone 1232 after 5:30.



RUMMAGE SALE

Auspices Hospital Aid Committee

Wednesday, October 23
9 A. M. to 8 P. M.

CHAMBERS ST. FIRE HOUSE

Contributios received Oct. 21-22
"A Princeton Institution" . .



/ Campus Taxi Service j§
C PHONE 1105
5 DAY - NIGHT - SERVICE



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Plenty of Hot Water
4c a Day

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NASSAU
APPLIANCE CO.

252 Nassau St. Phone 2100




Someone must pay

NOBODY even wants to be
financially liable for a smash-
up! But when two cars col-
lide, someone must pay for
the damage done. The cost
of accidents comes much
higher than the cost of insur-
ance!

LET this agency protect you
with Automobile Insurance
that fills every requirement.

The Community Chest
Needs Your Support

B. L. GULICK, Jr., Inc.

B. L. Gulick, Jr., President
F. D. Jemison, Sec'y and Treat.

90 Nassau Street Telephone 1511



QUHH



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■»iQ



Sports in Short



llllllllllllllll



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.0

Three Out of Three. Its goal line
still uncrossed, Princeton High School's
able football team continues to maul its
opponents. Latest victim was Highland
Park, -which absorbed a 19-0 pasting
to become the Little Tigers' third
straight victim. This Friday at 3, it
will be the N.J. School for the Deaf.

Tom Hennon, Blue & White quarter-
back, passed to Jim Carter, husky half-
back, for two tallies against Highland
Park, then bucked over late in the
game for a third score. He now has
passed to account for five touchdowns
and has himself carried across the sixth.



JUST 1N-



BOYS* KNIT SUITS

FLANNEL PAJAMAS

WOOL PRAM-SUITS

SNOW SUITS

THE LITTLE CLOTHES LINE
41 Palmer Square



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immiii;tHMiini



Town Topics, October 20-26, 1946

First Time in Eight Years. Not since
1938 (when it bowed to Rutgers, 20-18)
had Princeton lost a football game
through failure to convert the point
after touchdown. Last weekend, an out-
played Tiger eleven matched two scores
registered by a potentially strong Har-


1

Online LibraryE LetierceTown Topics (Princeton), Oct. 20-26, 1946 (Volume v.1, no.32) → online text (page 1 of 2)