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VOLUME III

The Earlham Sargasso

19 14



Published By

THE SENIOR CLASS OF EARLHAM COLLEGE



THE SARGASSO 1914




THE SARGASSO 1914 [



THE GYMNASIUM.



Since tlK- VL-ar iXjii an aik-quate gymnasium fur ICarlliam lias licen the
ik-sire of an increasing number of stu'ilents, alunnii and friends of the Col-
lege. This demand has heen temporarily met at two different times, first
in 1H60 when a three- sided shed with a sawdust floor, a few swinging
rings, and a turning bar was built, and second in 1889 when the students
carried on a campaign and raised $2,700.00 for the construction of the
present gymnasium. The third step was taken in igii when the graduat-
ing class decided to give $1,000.00 toward a new gymnasium. This pro-
ject was given up only because of the immediate need of funds to raise
the College debt, the $1,000.00 being the initial contribution of the $50,-
000.00 raised. The fourth move for the building of a gymnasium was
initiated by the Class of 1914. The Class launched the campaign by a gift
of $1,785.00, $1,250.00 of which was set aside to pay for the plans of the
new building.

The Senior Class undertook this action only after the Board of Trustees
approved it. The Board stated that definite plans would be a vital
factor in the early realization of the gymnasium demand that was strong-
Iv shown by the many petitions received requesting them to take definite
steps toward a campaign.

The entire program of the campaign was turned over to the student
body by the Seniors. A central committee of five, one from each class
and one from the Day Dodgers, was given general supervision. A commit-
tee of fifteen, three from each of these sources, composed an advisory
committee. Ten clubs consisting of ten students each were chosen to
present the financial proposition on the campus. These club members were
assigned the remaining students to canvass and to enlist in active work
during the summer.

It was decided to carry on the campaign on a basis of $50.00 shares,
payable in cash, or in yearly installments of $10.00 each. This plan has
suited the demands of a large number of the students. On a single share
basis $4,000.00 was given by the students.

$25,000.00 by September 15th, 1914, is the slogan of the students. This



amount will insure the early assumption of the gymnasium problem by
the Board. Every student, alunuius and friend of Earlham should hcilil
himself accountable for not less than one share in Earlham's gymnasiu.n
and should present the proposition to at least three other people.

The Board decided that the gymnasium should cost not less than $50.-
000.00 and insisted on a $25,000.00 endowment to cover the running
expenses.

.•\ committee composed of a Board member, three Faculty members,
two of whom are alumni and two students proceeded to gather all the
suggestions as to Earlham's gynniasium requirements that were extani.
These together with the plans presented by the architect have resulted in
the product that is seen on these pages.

Some of the things that were demanded were : adequate accommodation
for women's and men's gymnasium classes : an indoor track : a dirt floor
for track, baseball and football ; showers and lockers ; offices for the phys-
ical directors : a floor that will accommodate two basket ball games ; a
seating capacity of five hundred; visitors' dressing rooms; a swimming
pool and a trophy room.

Floor plans show a 30 foot by 60 foot class and apparatus room, a cin-
der track, twenty-eight laps to the mile, a 56 ft. by 75 ft. dirt floor, ample
showers and lockers, suitable offices, examination rooms, w-aiting rooms,
a 56 ft. by 76 ft. gymnasium floor, a seating capacity of five hundred, so
arranged as to in no way interfere with the gymnasium floor, visitors
dressing rooms and a trophy room at the entrance. The swimming pool
was not arranged for, since it would require an addition to the heating
plant. The architect advised that it be placed beside the building and un-
der a separate roof.

It is the opinion of all consulted that the new gymnasium meets the
needs in every particular. The ony requisite for the realization of these
plans is your co-operation.

.\DDRESS CH.MRM.W OF THE E.-VKLH.AM COLLEGE GVM-
N.\SIUM COM.MITTl'.b: b'OK P.ARTICUL.XRS .•\\'D BL.AXK
SHARES.



ONE SHARE IN THE EARLHAM GYMNASIUM.



of the fat-



that the



Alu



m raising $75,000.00 for the constructlo
not less than $50.000. 00 and balance to
maintenance of the building, I, the und.
of $10.00 per year for five years in ann
1914, to The Treasurer of The Earlham



Ind.



pa



lined



mni and friends of Ear


ha


n of a gymnasium, said


bu


become a permanent en


lo'


erslgned. do hereby agre


e 1


ual Installments, beginn


Ig


I College Gymnasium Co





Ihls



THE SARGASSO 1914



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THE SARGASSO 1914



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THE SARGASSO 1914




THE SARGASSO 1914



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THE SARGASSO 1914 C



^


CONTENTS


^



Page

The rivmnasiuni 4

!•" acuity 1 1

Earlham College, by Pres. Kelly 20

Seniors 2^,

l-'ublic Places J2

Juniors 43

Sophomores 45

Freshmen 47

Clubs and Organizatior.s 49

In the Dormitories 82

Oratory and Debates 1^3

Athletics 89

Alumni 107

Ex. 14, The Babies 112

Jolly Times 113

Clubs, Ex Officio 114

Just Memories 115

Editor's Corner 117

Cases and Near Cases 118

Calendar 119



THE SARGASSO 1914




EARLHAM HALL



1 THE SARGASSO 1914 I




THE SARGASSO 1914





President and Professor of Philosophy
Respedled and admired by all, our President is
vibrant, tense, and so full of humor that he can scarce
contain himself, even while introducing a chapel
speaker. A distindtive little swing to his walk marks
him from afar. He is famous as baccalauerate and
commencement speaker, and his reputation as one of
the finest after dinner speakers in the state is still grow-
ing, but we do wish he had more time at home for us
to know him better.




1)A\1I) WORTH I)EXX!>.

A. .M.. Ph. D.

Professor of Biology.

"l)a(Ul.y" Dennis knows nil
about everything; how the
universe evoluted from chaos
clear up to the Panama ca-
nal; the songs of the hco.i
and the birds and Ihe se-
crets of the out-door w'orhl.
He is a cham))ion of peiu-c.
and when •■Daildv Dennis"
has his way all swords sliall
be turned inti." ])loiigh sh-.ires
and cannons into sewer
pipes. His wealth of knowl-
edge, his store of fun, his
dynamic personality make
his classes a rare privilege.



W.M. X. TRrKHLdnl)
Picifessor of Litciatuic. aiul
Anglo-Sa.xoM.

\^'ho can ever forget that
fine, lenient smile that
spreads over Prof. William
N.'s face when some youth-
ful upstart makes a wild
mistake? A grand old man,
still younger than some of
his students. He uses yards
of chalk in giving out the
truth in English; and his
]iliilosophv of life speaks for
itself.



KDWIX P. TIUKISLOOD,



A. M.

Professor "iMi." the man
behind the gun in oratory
and debates, has a happy
way of injecting so much
ginger that an Earlham
speaker talks with real feel-
ing instead of Hot Air. His
whole heart (and he has a
great big one) goes into ev-
ery good cause. The stndent.3
love him.



HAKLIIW i.iXDI.KY.
Profess, .r of Histnr



Eaitha
•ans thi



flit



last and tries
to tcarli lii^li.iy to repeat it-
self. \oluble and good nat-
ured, he is a .scholar, and
wins friends among the stu-
dents who are lucky enougli
to kno\\' him.



ALLi:X 1). HDLK. A. .M.,

Ph. D.

Professor of Geology and

Curator of the Joseph Moore

Museum.

At first blush this tall
thin man with a high voice
and a larpc mustache could
harillv l)i' cx|ip.tiMl to curate
the Kaillunii Mu-i'um, head
the (loology Department,
and lead the Peace move-
ment for Frienils in Amer-
ica all at the same time,
but "Daddy" Hole does all
this and some more, besides
raising a family. He is the
acme of neatness and sipmre,
exacting pedagogy.




ELBERT RUSSELL, A. M.
Professor of Biblical Litera-
ture and Church History ami
College Pastor.

Professor Russell has a
place in the hearts of the
students that neither tongue
nor pen can make or mar.
Friend and helper to many
a "doubting Thomas" is he.
From the chapel platform or
in the class room always wo
get the inspiration of an
earnest mind. His rare smile
betrays a rare humanity.



AHTHLR M. CHARLES.

A. .\I.

Professor i>f German.

A tall, (luiet Tiian wl.o can
hold forth in any language,
French, German, or other-
wise. He has the idea we
came here to study and has
not yet discovered his mis-
take.'



EDWIN MORRISON, M.S.
Professor of Physics.

Jlorrison. meek-easy -going,
with a drawd, is our physics
jirof.. who. though trying to
"tighten up" his courses, is
liked by all. His broad, be-
wrinkled, kindly face ano his
"as we call it" will have a
firm jilace in all his stu-
ilcnts' mental mcniorv books.



J. HERSCHKL COFFIN,
Ph. D.
Professor of Psychology and
Education.
Our dainty, handsome Ph.
D. with a strong predilection
for music and good looking
clothes broke quietly into
the aiithoi-'s circle recently
with his "Socialized Con-
science." His book is being
adopted in universities and
colleges by leaps and bounds.
Also he is the patron saint
of The Glee Club.
"Hair thins as wisdom
grows."



HARRY N. HOLMES, M. S.

Ph. 1).

Professor of Chemistry.

If you hear a Gatlinggun
in chapel or a rapid-fire
field piece in the "cheni lab"
or a war drum at the head
of the songs committee —
that's Dr. Holmes. He's full
of "pep" and likes to make
the atmosphere tremble
around him, but he has a
heart and a smile, too, for
human frailty, cowering
Freshmen to the Contrary
notwithstanding.




WM. O. MENDENHALL,

A. M., Ph. D.
Professor of Mathematics.

Another "daddy" in our
midst! He has a thoughtful
face and a quiet manner of
saying things, but his eye^
shine forth with kindliness
itself. And he has a way of
getting close to Earlham
boys and girls that has in-
spired many a discouraged



LAUREXCE HADLEY,

A.M.

Professor of Mathematics.

Professor Hadley, with the
soft smooth voice and com-
fortable-looking rotundity,
was once accused of being
partial to the girls. That
may have been because ha
is unmarried. But we per-
sonally "deny the allegator
and defy the allegation." He
is a favorite — especially with
the Glee Club, and can keep
his finger on the pulse of
Bundy Dorm.



• KIHX 1). REA. JI. A.

Pi'ofessor of Classical and

English Literature.

The "Day Dodger." clad-
always-in-black man who
looks so formidable to those
who don't know him. Evi-
dence his little book of Earl-
ham Verse, published this
spring, the result of some of
his definite notions about
what is good in literature.
You may not think it, but
he's a side-splitter!



ELIZABETH CONRAD,

A. M.

Professor of French and

Dean of Women.

The dean of Earlham Hall,
"ze French woman with ze
liftable eyebrows and shrug-
able shoulders." With queen-
ly grace or athletic stride
she is suitable for all occa-
sions. She can assume the
the "irate dean" to perfec-
tion, but some of us know
how kind a heart that cloak
conceals.



WALTER C. WOODWARD,

M. A., Ph. D.

Professor of History and

Political Science.

The readiest wit, the long-
est legs, the sharpest tongue,
the funniest man on the fac-
ulty. Entering with us four
years ago "Steve" has been
GUI' favorite chaperone, and
we are proud to say that he
has taken out his naturali-
zation papers with our class,
— our only honorary mem-
ber.




CIIAKLICS H. llAILi:. I'll. I).
Assistant l'r„lcsM,r ul Clas-



MII.I.AIil) S. MAKKI.I':

M. S..

I'lMl.-ssur ..I' Hotaiiv.



.1(11 IN I , AXDIilv^smiX.

A. .\1.

Instnictor in Oeiman.



MriiHAVS. KKNWdKTIlV, K.Utl.K S. XI.DKX, A. .M

A.M. A.s.sistaiit I'rolV.ssur of

Assistant Professor of Bib- Kn.s.'lisli.

lira iteiatuic. With a littlr Harvard miis- The man who (cnirlicd tlio An nnassninint; man, but The taffy-haired, twinkly-

If yon ever heard him say taehe and a well eultivated lu.arts of Karlhaniites with one who aecomplishes many bl>ie-cyed per-sonago that

■•imposhible" yon'd certainly tt*Tir7!' n'^'nT "'•V' the "Solemn Ass." He, the things. His nntiring pa- J)?bs in and ont Room 12.

... , , ■ , ,, ,. den stole tastnlionsly into . " ** ' Lindlev Hall, and he tries

think so! One ot the tac- ,„„. „^^,^^^ for the first time slow-moving, still-water tienee has endeared him to to make us get the "gefnhl"

iilty iiK'inbers with whom this year with some very kind that looks ever at the lis all. And we woniler yet of the German language.

we arc not well acquainted. did'inite notions of Knglisli. ^f.,,., ,„„i thinks how one small head can "'''■'^ " kindred spirit to all

Who ,-an tell what we have two well-grooincd ha„d^^ and ^,,1 |^,. |.,,,,^^,^ ,,,,,^^,,. yonngst..rs whether because

some good looking necktie-. • ol his vonthtul appearance

""»'*''''■■ He is a seladarlv man of " ' ■" '■ ' ' "

poise, of strong ('onvietions

and withal a pretty .jolly

fellow.



carry all
ally" seei
a bicycle



with ,,|. y^uithfnl heart, we can't
say.




FACULTY AND STUDENT BODY, EARLHAM COLLEGE, 1914.




AND STUDENT BODY, EARLH\M COLLEGE, 1914.




NETTIE TERRIL MOORE,

Ph. B.

Instructor in Frencli.

A demure southern lady
with a pretty drawl, a droll
dry wit, and a high collar.



MARY A. .lAV HAI.LAKI),

A. B.

Instnictor in Spanish, and

Registrar.

Few of us know the kind-
ly little registrar except as
she beams up at us from a
desk swamped with books
and papers. Busy always,
but ever ready to help a
fellow in a muddle. Always
the same cheery temper
even on the day Freshmen
sign up!



LAURA (.'. (iASTOX.

Director of the Department

of Music and Instructor in

Piano.

She is the lady with the
truly musical temperament.
Yes, she may seem flighty
and piratical at times, but
it's all toward a good cause ;
she just sees things with a
musical eye — that's all. And
if you misunderstand her at
times, it's because you
haven't a musical ear —
that's all.



(JLENN FRIERMOOD
Instructor in Vocal Music.

A dark man with mysteri-
ous eyes glides in and out of
Earlham and few see or
know him, for Friermood,
the handsome voice cultur-
alist, has little time for any
but his own people and the
singing sisterhood. He has
adopted Madrigal and made
a hit. He had chorus — but
dropped h — it.



ELSIE MARSHALL, A. B.

Instructor in Domestic

Science.

That Miss Marshall "gets
tliere" every time you can
tell by her walk; that there
will always be the right
amount of salt in the soup
she makes you can tell by
the set of the little bow at
her neck; that she is popu-
lar, every member of the
student body will testify.




(.■lIKSTiOH I



Dircctiir of Atliletics. Cuv-
crnor of Buiiiiy Hall.

Coach, bif; — burly — jolly,
with a persistent habit of
teasing the pretty girls, has
ki'pt himself busy tuning up
Rarlhain athletes this year
and making week-end trips
to Logansport. His juui])
from the stmlent body to
the faculty of Earlliam has
not hurt Dea — ah Coach one
hit.



I'.UI, II. liKnWX. II. ;
Instructor in Physics ;
C licmistry and A.ssistant
Physical Training.



The



on Re

■'iris



faculty baby has
hit with the fellows
Id and with the
liing Dmncstic



d r



i;l..\l)'iS S. H.A.^.SKTT.
A. 11, Vassar.
Director of Women's Physi-
cal Training.

A .jolly, happy-go-lucky
young personage with a few
decided ideas of her own,
who settled in our midst to
resurrect girls' athletics.
Though generally taken for
a Freshman, her capability
speaks for itself; and as
chaperon and meriy maid
she has won her ]>opularity.



KKKI) W. K-MKKMIX. i;. S.
Instructor in liiology.

The latest acquisition to
the "Bug lab." Renowned
bird guide, up hill and down
dale he goes with troo].s of
seratcheil and tattered fol-
lowers vaguely wondering
the why's anil wherefore's
of "maehroehires" or "coc-
cyges." He can speak with
grave and knowing look on
anv subject, foolish or oth-
erwise; and his jokes have
a leputation all their own.



.lAMKS .MAK.MADIKK

la.rvs. M. S.

Superintendent of Buildings
ami (ti-oiuids.

llarnuiduke — who has not
felt the warmth of thy
smile, anil thanked thee for
- -an ji.xe or a key or a piece
of pipe or ])erniissian or
something! "What is Earl-
ham without .Marmadnke'r"
We hate to think of such a
thing. The handiest man on
the campus, he can repair
the steam dynamo i>r Earl-
hani's hash nmchine.




DOROTHEA ELVA MILLS,

R. N. Nuise, and Lecturer

on Hj'giene,

Everybody knows Miss
Mills; all the boys will fight
for her. Hers are the kind
hands that mend broken
bones and dose out soothing
syrup. A cheery comforter,
and friend to all.



MRS MINNIE MILLS HISS
A. B. Matron.

As sweet and dainty a
Motlier Hubbard as ever
tried to feed a hungrv mob.



FINLEY NEWLIN,
Treasurer.

Never ahead, never be-
hind, never in a hurry. He
hands out many welcome
letters, supplies us with the
necessary evils of life such
as stamps and text books,
cashes our checks and col-
lects our box rent all with
forethought and deliber-
ation.



En(;AR A. FISHER, A. B.

Assistant Treasurer and

Purchasing Agent.

"Eddie" steers carefully
between Scylla and Charyb
dis — the board and the hun
gry "dorm" folks. His de
light is in the way of econ
omy; since he began open
ing and closing the college
cash accounts E. C. has
started on the royal road to
prosperity.



VINCENT DEWITT NICH-
OLSON, A. B.
Endowment Secretary.

A tall quiet man who
keeps his troubles to him-
self has an office in the
library. They say he is En-
dowment Secretary. Who
knows how many dollars
and freshmen he has brought




THE SARGASSO 1914 [



EARLHAM COLLEGE.



The early events in the developnieiit of Earlhani we know have heen recounted so often in various
ciillese and popular pubHcations that it seems unnecessary to state them again. There are, how-
ever, certain Mutstanilini;- facts wliich friends of Earlhani shduld nut tire of liearing.

One of thciii is that at a time wiien women were given few educational privileges, the founders
of our college tlared to throw their doors open both to men and women, establishing no educatinnal
restrictions based on sex distinctions. Probably or.ly two other colleges in the country took this stand
so earlx. Women have always participated in tiie administration of the college, as well. Never
has there l.een a time when there were not able and influential women on the Board of Trustees and
in the h'aculty. .Meantime the great state Universities have developed and have justified on a large
scale the soundness of this i)rinciple in education so early adopted by the Earlham fathers and
mnthers.

Earlhani is also one of the few well-known colleges in the L'nitcd States that do not have and have
never had fraternities or sororities. This is sinipl\- another manifestation of the degree to which
the management has stood for the idea cf an educational deniocracv. The college has not fostered
aristocracy or snobbishness or secrecy. It has .stood for social solidarity and has given every student
a chance to count for as much as his talent and energy would warrant. Years of experience ha^e
proved the wisdom of the founders in this respect, and the fine spirit of CAMAR.ADERIE which
permeates the Earlham atmosphere- today is the result of the efhn-t, conscious and unconscious, to
build up a college society free from artificial barriers. Manx colleges todav that have secret soci-
eties would be glad to he rid of them and as is w.ll known st;ite legislatures have passed laws
against their existence in the high schools.

Earlhani has been a leader in the advanced movements in education. The first conspicuous illus-
tration of this is found in the introduction of scientific studies and the laboratory method. Years
reat teachers freely put questions to nature and as freelv awaited nature's

ion to use experiiiiental methods in sci-
the museum and th" laboratories ikUc
from this period of pedagogic courage. Eater the college led in other r.,nns of practical study
md in recent years the members of the faculty have heen alert .students of educational science with
the courage to jiut their convictions to test. iMio one can keep up with the Earlhan- facnltv Ic"-



ago I'.arlliaiii

answers. No college in Indiana began so

ence study and instr.iclii n. The observator\'



THE SARGASSO 1914



islation it is because the Earlham faculty is a progressive Ijoily of
men and women, holding- to the good in the old but willing to dis-
cover the good in the new.

Earlham has always stood for sound morality as well as snunti
scholarship and has held the view that really jound morality can
be obtained only in conjunction with the religious life. The col-
lege has stood from the first therefore for po^•itivc religious ex-
perience as a factor of the highest type of personality. So neces-
sary has this been in the estimation of the management that the
discipline of the Church under whose auspices the college is con-
ducted, has been the guide in matters of amusements
as well as in the deeper things of the spirit. The college has been
loyal to its ideals in this respect also, and it finds its ultimate jus-





tification in the men and women, who, with this training, have
gone forth to bless humanity.

Material expansion has gone hand and hand with the expan-
sion of Earlham's fundamental ideals. There have been two
building eras since the erection of the original building — Earlham
Hall. The first was in 1887 when Lindley Hall and Parry Hal!
were erected: the second in 1907 when Bundy Hall, the Library,
and the Heating Plant were placed on the campus. .Since that
time the energies of the management have been expended in rais-
ing the standard of scholarship and life so that Earlham, meas-
ured by any of the modern standards, will be second to none in
the field of college work; and in improving the financial condi-



THE SARGASSO 1914 [



tion by the liquidation of the building' debt and the increasing ol
the endowment. Within about five years no less than $280,000
in cash or the equivalent has been handed over to the College by
its loyal friends. The plant of the college is now worth well nigh
a half-million, while the endowment, productive and improductive,
has gone quite bevond the half million mark.

Today nur greatest need in the way of material equipment is a
iiKKlern and liberally proportioned gymnasium, for Earlham has



always stood for the development of the body as well as the mind
and spirit. It is to be hoped that the promoters of the preserii
Sargasso will give this movement such initial momentum that th-
college historian of the next Sargasso may add a bright new chap-
ter to the story of Earlham's progress, by recounting the steps in
the materialization of our present gymnasium ideals.

ROP.ERT LINCOLX KELLY.





(X).E.§pdhr






iffi



MOSKS BAILEY,
Portland, Maine

A. B. Greek and Philosophy;
Honor Student; Earlhani
Teaching Fellowsliip, Y. M.
C. A., Cabinet 3; Student
Volunteer; Ionian 2, 3; Ora-
torical; Gospel Team; Bible
Class Leader, 3.

"A gracious gentleman he
is, and no mistake." Be-
neath this thoughtful eonn-
teiuinee there runs a vein of
humor, rich, delightful,
though not known to all. To
him who knows how to work
the combination of a three-
year diploma and highest
honor man we bow. Mose
is a baffling mystqry to the
girls and speed king among
Earlhani pedestrians.



BARBARA A. BECKMAN.
A. B.

German. Day Student. Girls'

Day Student Council :i ;

Phoenix 4; (ierman Club

2, 3, 4.

Barbai'a is a sly deceptive
creature. She tries to make
us think that she believes
''in being seen but not
heard." But those who have
been with her know that
she's as wild as m liuffahi
Bill performance.



( HAK; I). BUTLKR. B. S.
Aledo. 111.

Chcmistrv. Y. M. C. A..
Cabinet 4*; Earlhamite Staff
3, 4; Circulation Mgr. 4;
Bible Class Leader; Bundy
Student Council; Ionian 1.
2. 3, 4; Oratorical; Class
Earlhamite, 3; Sargasso
Staff: Science Club 1, 2, 3,
4; Pres. W. 3.

Here is a business nuui
with enough optimism to
insure success. He has a
mind that can get outside
of fourth year chemistry, a


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