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him per the Dutch certain years past. God grant Walter may
escape and then I doubt not but a good part of our goods will be
returned. Also there is reports that Captain Chongro's junk is
cast away in returning. And our host at Langasaque is returned
from the Phillipinas, and bringeth news that above 20 sail of
Hollanders are come thither from the Moloucas, amongst whom
are two or three sail of English ships, but I cannot believe that,
except it be the Pearl or such like. If this be true, out of doubt
it goeth ill with the Spaniards in the Molucas. In my next I will
advise you more hereof. At present we are about preparing a
ship or junk to make a voyage for Syam ; and, seeing it hath
pleased God to take away Mr. Peacock, of necessity you or my
countryman Mr. Eaton must be employed about that voyage ;
and the ship will be ready to depart some four months hence.
John Yoosen is returned from Syam with Mr. Melchar and Signor
William. Lucas Antheunis hath wrote me two humorous letters
of one date and effect, and hath trusted John Yoosen with 748
taels more to be paid to me here for use of the Company of the
Seventh Voyage ; Melchar Van Sanford is surety for payment
thereof. But I have not one word in writing from any English-
man, there being none with him but an old chirurgeon and a
mariner which can neither write nor read, and one Englishman
which lieth up in the country to make sale of commodities, but at



EAST INDIA COMPANY'S RECORDS 69

present could not come down to him per means of wars which is
betwixt the place where he lieth and the other where Lucas
Antheunis is. I wish our Company were served with English-
men, for I doubt our Dutch factors will breed inconveniences etc.
And as concerning your opinion to send commodities to a place
to the northwards, you may use your own discretion, but deal
upon sure grounds ; as also you may trust men which you know
are to be trusted. For though I advise you not to trust the
Company's goods without ready payment, yet that is to be under-
stood such as are not to be trusted ; otherwise you may lie still
and do nothing while other men sell ; and the Hollanders' course
in putting their cloth into merchants' (or brokers') hands to make
sale thereof, it is a good course so they be men sufficient to be
trusted.

And as I was about to seal up this letter news came that two
ships are without, some 7 or 8 leagues off, but whether they be
both Hollanders or one of them an Englishman I do not know ;
yet I sent out a pinnace with Signor Zanzebar and a Juribasso
and wrote a word or two to deliver the Captain, if they be
English, or else return it. And as concerning the 20 pieces
cassidie nill which you say you want, it is no reason you should be
charged with them if you have them not. My countryman
Mr. Eaton knoweth nothing thereof, neither at present had I any
leisure to examine over matters, etc. And for the 1356 catties
lead which you write me as wanting in the weight, I see not how
we can help ourselves, for Captain Adams saith he hath a note of
every draft at weighing and how many bars were in each draft,
and that there wanted but 3 bars in all, he himself being present
at the weighing thereof. Cornelius, Captain Brower's kinsman,
is slain with their Juribasso, but Adrian, being sent to another
place, is thought to be escaped. I shall not be quiet till I hear
of Walter, God grant he be escaped. And so I rest, always

Your loving friend,

Richard Cocks.



7o EAST INDIA COMPANY'S RECORDS



Firando in Japan the 25th of July, 1614.

HE invoice of goods sent to Mr. Richard Wickham for
Edo, by John Phebe, as hereafter followeth, viz.

One chest No. 1, containing




£


s.


d.


17


10


00


06


10


00



1 black cloth No. 121, qt 32 yards, cost
£ a popingay No. 064, qt 13^ yards, cost
5 pieces of allejas of 20 rials of eight per

corge 01 00 00

One chest No. 2, containing
1 black cloth No. 124, qt 33 yards, cost . 19 00 00
£ a popingay No. dicto 64, qt 13! yards,
cost .......

3 pieces of allejas dicto, cost

One chest No. 3, qt
1 black cloth No. 119, qt 34 yards, cost
£ a tawny No. 172, qt 13^ yards, cost
3 pieces of allejas dicto, cost

One chest No. 4, containing
1 black cloth No. 37, qt 32 yards, cost
£ a tawny No. 172 dicto, qt 13^ yards, cost

3 pieces of allejas dicto, cost

One chest No. 5, containing
1 black cloth No. 171, qt 31 yards, cost
\ a cinnamon No. 125, qt 17 yards, cost .

One chest No. 6, containing
1 black cloth No. 123, qt 31 yards, cost . 20 00 00
\ a cinnamon colour cloth No. 125 dicto,

qt 17 yards . . . . . . 07 10 00

4 pieces of allejas dicto, cost . . . 00 16 00



06


10


00


00


12


00


17


10


00


07


00


00


00


12


00


22


00


00


07


00


00


00


12


00


20


00


00


07


10


00



£l6l 12 00



Sum of the whole cargazon is £161 12s. ood.



EAST INDIA COMPANY'S RECORDS 71

Firando the 26th July, 1614.
The two ships which are without are both Hollanders and
come from Pattania, and Jacob Speck, who was principal at first
in this place, is come captain in the Admiral called the Red
Lion with the pile, but not that which came from Holland and
was at Molucas when we were there, or else reports are false.
They say they came from Pottania and know nothing of matters
at Phillipinas. They cannot want to bring much pepper; and
therefore put away yours if it be possible.

Richard Cocks.




I55A

William Nealson to [Richard Wickham] .
[Firando, about February, 1614 ?] .
Morrow, bully ; morrow, morrow.

SPECIAL and well beloved friend, all due compliments
remembered. Two of your letters I have received,
whereof I think myself not a little beholden unto you
for your kind remembrance. An answer to your first
letter I had written, but George protracting the time stayed till I
received the last, which hath made me cancel the first and answer
both together. In your first you willed me to deliver to Mr. P.
[Peacock] two of your pieces, but ere I received it Mr. C. [Cocks]
had delivered them all four unto him, yet in consideration as well
of your writing as also that he refused to give a receipt for them
I detained two of them ; which they be I know not, for being
made clean they were all close wrapped with ropes, and Mr. P.
being upon departure would not suffer them to be opened. They
would offer but 8 rials apiece for them, affirming that you offered
them for 12 rials till September. I offered them as your price
was, at which they would not deal nor I abate so unreasonably.
These two I have shall be safely kept, but here is no hope of sale
for them as you know, and therefore for this I rest till I hear
further from you.



7 2 EAST INDIA COMPANY'S RECORDS

Your things in your chamber is and shall be safe ; your chest
in the godown. A receipt for your stones I demanded but could
not obtain, and this instant I have written both to Gwalter and
Mr. P. to Nangasaque about it, which I hope to obtain. Whereas
you write to Mr. Cocks for a boy, assure yourself he and I will do
the best we can for one, but yesterday G. Droit affirmed to Mr. C.
in my hearing that certain Dutchmen had given out reports of
you that you would beat and misuse any boy unreasonably in
your anger, which made their parents unwilling to put any unto
you, which how true that was both Mr. Cocks showed, and
affirmed besides that it must be but surmised, by reason you yet
had not here any servant, that they had seen the proof of.
Assure yourself of this, I will not be un [mindful ?] . Mr. P. is upon
departure from Nangasaque. His behaviour hath been such since
your departure that Mr. C. hath often protested unto me that if
you were here he should not go upon that voyage. He hath
forgot himself in letters and otherwise so to Mr. Cocks that I
assure you he utterly mislikes him. The opinion he hath taken
of you is such as, believe it, you would little think ; but thus
assure yourself of any kindness he can do you.

Before Mr. C. sealed his letter he showed it me, wherein he
hath informed you of all business, so as for me to write thereof
should be but a tedious iteration. Now to the purpose. Con-
cerning our domestic affairs, we live well and contentedly, and
believe me, if you were here, I could think we were and should be
a happy company, without strife or brawling. Of late I caught a
great cold for want of bedstaves, but I have taken order for
falling into the like inconveniences. For first, to recover my
former health, I forgot not, fasting, a pot of blue burning ale
with a fiery flaming toast and after (for recreation's sake) provided
a long staff with a pike in the end of it to jump over joined stools
with. Hem.

Notwithstanding I may sing honononera, for my trade is quite
decayed. Before I had sale for my nails faster than I could make
them, but now they lie on my hand. For my shoes none will
sell, because long lying abed in the morning saves shoe leather,
and driving of great nails puts my small nails quite out of request,
yea, even with my best customer ; so that where every day he had



EAST INDIA COMPANY'S RECORDS 73

wont to buy his dozen nails in the morning, I can scarcely get his
custom once in two or three. Well this world will mend one day,
but beware the grey mare eat not the grinding stone. I have
had two satirical letters about this matter from Mr. Peacock,
which pleased him as little as me, but I think he is so paid home
at his own weapon as he will take better heed how he carp with-
out cause. It was not more to me, but broader to Mr. Cocks. I
know the parties which I speak of you would gladly know ; for
your satisfaction herein I cannot make you know mine, because I
think you never see her ; but I think God made her a woman and
I a W. For the other, it is such a one as hardly or no I know
you would not dream of. But yet for exposition of this riddle,
construe this : all is not cuckolds that wear horns. Read this
reversed, Ab dextro ad sinistra. OIGNITAM. What,
man ! what is the matter ? methinks you make crosses. For
never muse on the matter ; it is true. I am now grown poetical.

He that hath a high horse may get a great fall ;
And he that hath a deaf boy, loud may he call ;
And he that hath a fair wife, sore may he dread
That he get other folks' brats to foster and to feed.

Be not a blab of your tongue, whatever I write you of hence-
forward condemn either to [ ] or the fire. I love and
honour you as a friend and so, believe it, you shall find me. Thus
leaving, but loth to leave troubling of you, I commit us both to
the protection of God, and you to my best wishes, resting

Your assured and unfeigned friend for ever and a day,

William Nealson.

I say no more, affairs call me away ;

My mare in the stable for provender doth stay.





74 EAST INDIA COMPANY'S RECORDS



156

William Eaton to Richard Wickham in Edo.
In Firando the 26th of July, 1614.

OUING and kind friend Mr. Wickham, I commend me
unto you, etc. My last letter unto you was the 17th
ultimo from Ossakey, wherein I wrote you at large of
all matters, not doubting but that you have received it
before this time, whereunto I refer me, etc. Also I wrote you
how that, in regard I had no black cloth left to send you by John
Phebe, I was determined to detain him at Ossakey until such
time that there came cloth from Mr. Cocks. But he not sending
any, I thought good to make a voyage myself to Firando, the
which I have done in company of Captain Adams, we arriving
here some five days past, having brought John Phebe with us
hither, who is now despatched back again with cloth for you and
for Ossakey by our captain, who hath sent you six black cloths
and three other colours with eighteen pieces of allejas. Your
letter of the 26th of May in Edo I received by Captain Adams the
2nd current, in which your letter you write me how that you find
20 pieces of cassidie nills wanting of your cargazon, and that you
made account they were not packed up but left behind at Firando;
the which you presume that I know thereof, being as you say by
me delivered and packed up. But I do not know anything
thereof, I protest to you ; neither did I pack anything of your
cargazon into the chests, but, as I remember, they were all put
into the chests by yourself and by no other. As concerning the
pepper I sold, I did gain by the weight thereof some small matter.
There is arrived at Langasacke the carrack and a frigate ; also a
junk from Cochin Chene who brings news how that the Holland-
ers and Mr. Peacock are there killed and all our goods lost, which
is a great grief unto us ; only Walter is escaped by his being aboard
the junk, which otherwise it is thought he should have been
served as Mr. Peacock and the rest were. For they going
to the king for money which he did owe for goods that he had



EAST INDIA COMPANY'S RECORDS 75

bought of them, and in the way were set upon and so killed. At
present here is coming into Firando two ships of the Hollanders,
which come from Pottania, as they say etc. And thus, for present,
being in great haste, the bearer staying for my letter, I end, com-
mitting you and your affairs unto the protection of the Almighty
God ; resting

Your loving friend to command,

Wm. Eaton.
Edward Saris hath him commended unto you. Your book
Suetonius I have sent you by this bearer.





157

Captain Wm. Adams to Richard Wickham in Eddoo.

In Ferando the 26th of July, 1614.

OUING and my very good friend, my hearty salutations
unto you. You shall understand that I with Mr. Eaton
arrived in Ferando the 21st of July, where, thanks be
to God, found Mr. Cocks and Mr. Nealson and
Edmund Saris are in good health, who were very glad of our
coming, etc. Since my coming hither we have heard very bad
news from Cochichinna of Mr. Peacock, which, as we hear, is
killed with all the Hollanders that went in company to Cochinna.
As we hear the king bought all the goods of Mr. Peacock and of
the Hollanders, especially the cloth, and a little before their being
ready to depart the king sent for them, and, having despatched,
being embarked to return in a small boat, the king sent a great
boat in their company, who followed the little boat and with force
ran against the little boat and overthrew her that she did sink,
and swimming in the water the Cocchichinnas cut them all to
pieces. Now Walter he went not aland but tarried in the junk,
which I hope is alive, which God grant. We have heard that the
king hath commanded to send all the junks to seek for Walter ;



76 EAST INDIA COMPANY'S RECORDS

now whether they have found him there is no certain news. Now
you shall understand that I am about a junk to proceed, and if it
shall please God, for Siam, which I hope about a three (?) months
hence I shall be ready to depart, which God grant. Now other
news here is none but such as you know of long ago, as of Foyne's
death and of a ship that is come from Macaw to Langasake with
60 or 70 Chinese junks. Now here is news come that there is 20
sails of Hollanders about Manillia with two or three English
ships, which if it be true will do no good at Manillia before their
departure. Now you shall understand concerning the reckoning
between you and me, Mr. Cocks hath told me that you have
written to him not a word thereof. Therefore I pray send by
John Phebe that you were indebted to me at my departure from
you the 27th of May, 1872 mass — 1 candarin and given to your
man Scooich 1,000 gens, cost 23 mass (picked gens) and for a chest
and ropes and charges came all to 30 mass, and John Phebe I
gave him money to carry him to Ossaka, his charges came to
33 mace and 6 candarins, so that
1872 — 1
and 30— your man 1 this reckoning I pray
and 33—6 John Phebe \ send Mr. Cocks word

of the truth thereof.



amounteth 1935 — 7
The charges which I have laid out from Eddo here to
Ferando amounteth to

0337—
which particulars I have given to Mr. Cocks so that the whole is

2272 — 7.
Now I pray send two or three words to Mr. Cocks, that at my
departure to Siam I may clear myself of all accounts. Thus
with my hearty salutation to you, your host and hostess, I
commit you to the protection of the Most High, who bless you
in this life and in the life to come. Amen.

Your unworthy friend to command in what I can,

Wm. Addames.

This day is arrived two ships, Hollanders, which be come from
the Moulocass and from Pattan. Strange news they bring none.




EAST INDIA COMPANY^ RECORDS ) 7



158

Benjamin Farie to [the East India Company] .
Pottania this 26th July, 1614.

jjjIGHT Worshipful Sir, duty remembered, etc. My last
dated the prime of August anno 1613 was from
Moccasser, wherein I certified your Worship of my
residence there with Mr. Cokayne for the making sales
of your Worships' clothing of Guggerat for monies and rice
according to Mr. Jourdain's commission left with us, which we
put in execution, viz. finding small quantity of rice then in
Moccasser it was thought fit that I should go for Lambasson,
being distant 10 leagues, there to trade for rice in truck of cloth
and money, being a place which the Hollanders hath a house at
and buyeth great store of rice every year, which they transport
for the Molloccoes and Islands of Banda. Wherefore I proceeded
therein accordingly and had bought and laded for Moccasser
per the middle of October about some 26 coyans of rice, which
makes 70 tons and cost with all charges 20 rials per coyan,
expecting English shipping to call at Moccasser in their passage
for the Islands of Banda, there to take it in ; which, for want of
shipping to transport it, now lies in the house, being great part
consumed with weevils and other vermin. The 10th of November
arrived here a junk sent per General Best and Mr. Larkin for
Succodanna, there to supply the factory with monies and goods
shipped for that place, who were driven to leeward per extremity
of weather and forced to put room for Moccasser, and hath landed
four chests of Lamken silk of China, which came to a very good
market, being then worth 440 rials the pecul. Mr. Williams,
their merchant appointed for Succodana, in their passage between
Bantom and Moccasser died. Now for that the junk could not
proceed for Succodana before the prime of May, being the time
the winds serve to go back for Succodana, considering the great
charge which would ensue and likewise the store of your



7« EAST INDIA COMPANY'S RECORDS

Worships' clothing remaining in our hands, expecting small sales
this year, by reason of the arrival of a small ship with Portugals,
with a junk likewise, from Mollacca laden with clothing of
Guggerat and Corramandell, the Mollaceans and merchants of
Macasser formerly having passed their words to take most part
of all your Worships' clothing at great rates, upon their arrival
would not perform their bargain but dealt with the Portugals for
their goods, which they put away at very low prices, we not
daring presume to sell at the like. It was therefore concluded
between Mr. George Cokayne myself and Francis Kelly that the
junk [ ] should be fitted with all convenient speed and

take in clothing to proceed for the Island of Poola Waya (Pulo
Ai), being one of the Islands of Banda, being often informed by
the King and Shabunder of Moccasser, who had received letters
from the Orang Kayas of that place, understanding of the English
their residence in Moccasser, therein greatly complaining of the
oppression and cruelty of the Hollanders, as also your Worships'
promise made to them by General Keeling and Captain Middleton,
in not relieving of them accordingly, with divers other like
encouragements by merchants of that place, which for brevity I
here omit to insert. Wherefore we set carpenters awork aboard
the junk to build a steerage after the English fashion, which was
long in hand, by reason of God's visitation of sickness inflicted
upon all the junk's company, and having laden her with clothing
and rice, the 27th of February myself with Francis Kelly set sail
and went along in her for Banda, being the time of year that all
junks in these parts do take their journey for those parts. The
20th of March being in sight of Burrowe (Boeroe), having met
with great calms and contrary winds, plying to windward, not
being able to seize Burrow, we were enforced by a leak we sprang
and want of water to put room for Buttowne (Boeton), where we
arrived the 27th of March, finding in the road 33 sail of junks
laden with rice bound for Ambon (Amboina) and Banda, being
forced by contrary winds to put room for that place, some of them
having kept the sea six weeks with great extremity of misery
which they endured by calm and contrary winds, all generally
complaining of their great misery, affirming that three junks only
attained the islands of Ambon and Banda this year ; wherefore it



EAST INDIA COMPANY'S RECORDS 79

is supposed that the people of those islands will be famished for
want of food. Now having taken in fresh water, our junk's leak
being partly stopped, we put to sea again, and finding it not
possible to fetch our port, after ten days beating in the sea to
windwards, were constrained to put room for Moccasser, where
we arrived the 23rd of April and landed our goods with all speed,
which had taken much wet and part thereof rotten. And having
caulked the junk with all speed, we laded the goods aboard of her,
which was consigned for Succodana, which came from Bantom.
Wherein it was thought fit per Mr. Cokayne that I should proceed
for Succodanna and Bantam, there to advise Mr. Jourdain of our
proceedings and our wants, wherewith I was to return again.
The 8th May we departed from Moccasser and sailed for Succo-
dana, where we arrived the 21st ditto, finding the Darling in the
road, wherein was chief merchant and commander Mr. Robert
Larkin, and Nathaniel Courthope and Cassarian David his
assistants, both which were appointed to stay in Succodana and
Sambas. It was therefore thought convenient per a general
council that I should proceed with him as assistant in his
pretended voyage for Pottannia and Syam. The 13th of June,
having dispeeded the business of Succodana, we set sail for
Pottana, and the 25th of the same ditto we met with Captain
Marlowe in the James some 45 leagues from Pottanna. And the
30th we came to an anchor in the road of Pottanna, where, finding
no employments neither sales for goods, we had not made any
stay there, had it not been for the transporting of the James'
goods for Syam, they not having any other means for the accom-
plishing thereof without our assistance. It shall not be imperti-
nent to acquaint your Worships with the excessive duty which
every ship or fleet of ships is enjoined to pay which shall land
goods there in Pottanna, viz. 856 rials of eight for a general bribe
to be reparted amongst the chiefs of the country, besides 4 per
cent for the Queen's customs, of which business I make no
question but that your Worships shall be informed of at large.
And thus, craving pardon for my tediousness, I humbly take my
leave, intending, with God's permission, to write from Syam to
you at large of what hath passed in my knowledge, humbly
entreating your Worships to pay to my kinsman John Fletcher



So EAST INDIA COMPANVS RECORDS

ten pounds upon account of my wages, for my mother's use. And
thus desiring God to add a blessing to your Worships' proceed-
ings, I humbly take my leave,

Your Worships' dutiful servant,

Benjamin Farie.

Right Worshipful. The 27th of July arrived in the road of
Pottania a great ship of Holland called the Rotterdam, which
came from the Molloccoes, and per some of their company we
were given to understand that they have lost one of their castles
upon the Island of Tyddore (Tidore) with some 60 men ; also I
was credibly informed that they have 18 of their men cut off at
Banda and are there very weak and likely to lose their castle.
I humbly take my leave,

Your Worships' dutiful servant,

Benja. Farie.




159

John Gourney to the East India Company.
Patania the 28th July, 1614. By the James.

"pIGHT Worshipful, Having despatched our sales and
made our full employments, and laden into the James
for your Worships' account 186 bales and jars from
Musulpatam and in bales from Pettepoly, we de-
parted from Pettepoly the 7th of February, leaving Mr. Floris
entered into his trade for the providing of the Globe's lading,
which ship was newly gone for the river of Narsaperpeta to be
new sheathed ; our purpose being at parting, by God's grace to
go by way of Sunda, where at Bantam having taken in four or five
thousand rials to carry with us, either of Chinese or of your



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