Copyright
Easton (N.H.).

Annual report for the Town of Easton, New Hampshire (Volume 1966) online

. (page 2 of 2)
Online LibraryEaston (N.H.)Annual report for the Town of Easton, New Hampshire (Volume 1966) → online text (page 2 of 2)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


$


117.13


Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1966


$


181.93


JANE K.


CUTTER, Treasurer



AUDITOR'S STATEMENT

This is to certify that I have examined the books,
vouchers, bank statements, and other financial records of
the Town of Easton for the fiscal year ending December
31, 1966 and find them correct to the best of my knowledge
and belief.

(Mrs.) ALICE SHEPARD,

Auditor.



26



PROGRAM OF THE WHITE MOUNTAINS REGION
ASSOCIATION 1966 (29th year)

Printed and distributed more than 300, 000 folders and booklets
promoting the White Mountains Region.

Received and answered 15,000 individual inquireswhich repre-
sents an increase of more than one hundred per cent over last year.

Wrote sixteen news releases for the use of local media and
five newsletters to the members, promoting economic development
ideas in the region.

Supported the 4-H awards program to encourage development
of agriculture.

Assisted in programs of natural beauty and good land-use prac-
tices.

Presently am initiating a program of ski area engineering re-
search to combat the snow erosion problems at ski areas.

Worked in cooperation with many other groups working to pro-
mote the economy of the White Mountains Region and the State of
New Hampshire.

Respectfully submitted,
John P. Wilson
Executive Secretary
Lancaster, New Hampshire



27



ANNUAL REPORT

of the

EASTON SCHOOL DISTRICT

For Year Ending December 31, 1966

DISTRICT OFFICERS

School Board

Mrs. Olive Nelson, Chairman Term Expires 1967

Mr. Jack Kenney Term Expires 1968

Mr. Kenneth H. Westhaver Term Expires 1969

OTHER DISTRICT OFFICERS

Mrs. Helene Schultze Moderator

Miss Jane Cutter Treasurer

Mrs. Helen Young Clerk

Mrs. Margaret Whitcomb Auditor

Mrs. Margaret Whitcomb Attendance Officer

Mr. William Grass, Jr. Superintendent of Schools

Mr. Paul W. Henry Assistant Superintendent

Mr. Oliver G. Cole, Jr. Business Administrator



28



SCHOOL WARRANT

To the Inhabitants of the School District in the Tawn
of Easton, qualified to vote in District affairs:

You are hereby notified to meet at the Town Hall in
said District on the second da} - of March, 1967, at 7:30
o'clock in the evening to act upon the following subjects:

1. To choose a Moderator for the coming year.

2. To choose a Clerk for the ensuing year.

3. To choose a Member of the School Board for the en-
suing three years.

4. To choose a Treasurer for the ensuing year.

5. To hear the reports of Agents, Auditors, Committees,
or Officers chosen, and pass any vote relating thereto.

6. To choose Agents, Auditors and Committees in re-
lation to anj'^ subject embraced in this warrant.

7. To see what sum of money the District will vote to
raise and appropriate for the support of schools, for
the payment of salaries for school district officials and
agents, and for the payment of the statutory obli-
gations of the District.

8. To transact any other business that may legally come
before this meeting.

OLIVE NELSON
JACK KENNEY
KENNETH WESTHAVER
School Board



BUDGET FOR SCHOOL DISTRICT OF EASTON 1967-1968



29



100 ADMINISTRATION

110 Salaries of District Officers
School Board
Treasurer
Clerk
Moderator

135 CONTRACTED SERVICES FOR
ADMINISTRATION
Auditor
Census



Budget
1966-


Proposed

Budget

1967-


1967


1968


$ 55.00


$ 55.00


15.00


15.00


5.00


5.00


5.00


5.00


80.00


80.00


8.00


8.00


5.00


5.00



190 OTHER EXPENSES FOR
ADMINISTRATION



90.00



90.00



500 PUPIL TRANSPORTATION
535 Contracted Transportation

1400 OUTGOING TRANSER ACCOUNTS
1477.1 Tuitions
1477.3 Supervisory Union Expenses

CONTINGENCY FUND

TOTAL



2,900.00 3,160.00



3,611.00 4,678.00
268.13 362.23



200.00



$7,162.13



75.00



458.23



30



SCHOOL BOARD'S ESTIMATE FOR 1967 1968

School Board's statement of amounts required to support
public schools and meet other statutory obligations of the
District for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1967.

Total amount required to meet school board's budget as
itemized in Column 2 of the Budget Report.

$8,458.23

Estimated Income of District

Balance June 30, 1967 $ 167.80

Sweepstakes Proceeds 100.00

Forest Reserve 500.00

We recommend that the District adopt the proposed
budget and raise and appropriate the sum of $8,458.23 for
the school year 1967-1968.

OLIVE NELSON,
JACK KENNEY,
KENNETH WESTHAVER,
School Board



Recommended Motion:

Moved that the District raise and appropriate for the support of
schools, for the payment of salaries for school district officials and
agents and for the payment of statutory obligations of the District the
sum of $8,458.23.



31



ANNUAL REPORT OF DISTRICT TREASURER
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1966

Cash on Hand, July 1, 1965 $ 1,318.06

Received from Selectmen: $ 5,000.00

Received from State Sources

Sweepstakes 179.21

Received from Federal Sources

National P\)rest Reserve 692.77

Received from all Other Sources

Supervisory Union No. 34 Liquidation 30.19

Error on Check No. 23 .06



Total Receipts 5,902.23

Total Amt. Available for Fiscal Year $ 7,220.29

Less School Board Orders Paid 6,256.20



Balance on Hand, June 30, 1966 $ 964.09

JANP: K. CUTTER,
Treasurer.



AUDITOR'S CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that I have examined the books, vouch-
ers, bank statements and other financial records of the
treasurer of the school district of Easton, of which the
above is a true summary for the fiscal year ending June
30, 1966 and find them correct in all respects.

MARGARET T. WHITCOMB, Auditor



32



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES
GENERAL FUND
July 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966
RECEIPTS

Cash on Hand July 1, 1965 $1,318.06

Revenue from Local Sources

Current Appropriation 5, 000. 00

Supervisory Union #34 Liquidation 30. 19

Error on check #23 . 06

Revenue from State Sources

Sweepstakes 179.21

Revenue from Federal Sources

National Forest Reserve 692.77



Grand Total Net Receipts $7, 220. 29

EXPENDITURES

100 ADMINISTRATION

110 Salaries for District Officers 25.00

135 Contracted Services 25.00

190 Other Expenses 149.53

500 PUPIL TRANSPORTATION

535 Contracted Transportation 2,774.10

1400 OUTGOING TRANSFER ACCOUNTS

1477.1 Tuition 3,051.72

1477.3 Supervisory Union Expenses 230.85*

Total Net Expenditures for All Purposes $6,256.20

Cash On Hand At End of Year, Jime 30, 1966 964.09

Grand Total Net Expenditures $7, 220. 29



♦Superintendent's salary: Bethlehem $562.73, Easton $41.52, Franconia $377.20,
Landaff $51.76, Lisbon Special $792. 84, Lisbon Town $152.21, Littleton $4, 553. 56,
Lyman $96.86, Sugar Hill $82.51, White Mts. Regional $3,538.81, State of N. H.
$2,500.00, Total $12,750.00.



33



BALANCE SHEET

June 30, 1966

ASSETS

Cash On Hand June 30, 1966 $ 964. 09

Accounts Due to District

Balance on Previous Appropriation 488. 94

Total Assets $1,453. 03

LIABILITIES

Excess of Assets Over Liabilities $1,453. 03



REVISED INCOME FOR 1966-1967

Unencumbered Balance

Cash On Hand June 30, 1966 $ 964. 09

Balance on Previous Appropriation 488. 94

Revenue from Local Sources

Appropriation as determined

by Tax Commission 5,099.62

Revenue from State Sources

Sweepstakes 109.48

Revenue from Federal Sources

National Forest Reserve 500. 00



Total Income $7, 162. 13



34



FRANCONIA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Franconia, New Hampshire

REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL

I herewith submit my eighth amiual report as Principal of the Franconia Elementary
school.

ADMINISTRATION:

The present school year began on Wednesday, September 7, with a total regis-
tration of 85 pupils. Although the enrollment has varied a great deal, as of this writing
the number remains the same. A breakdown of this figure shows that 5 are in Kinder-
garten, 17 in Grade 1, 11 inGrade2, 17 inGradeS, 13 in Grade 4, 11 in Grade 5, andllin
Grade 6. The school day for Grades 1-6 starts at 8:00 A.M. with the doors being opened
at 7:45. The school day ends at 2:30 P.M. Instrumental music for all pupils in Grades
5 and 6, whose parents wish them to participate in this program, was introduced in the
school in September. Miss Kathleen Bean of Littleton is the instructor. She comes to the
school one day a week. Mrs. Marion Callender of Lisbon continues to teach music to all
grades.

Mrs. Naomi Hodgdon of Lancaster joined the faculty as instructor of Physical
Education. She replaced Mr. Glenn Stillings who resigned to take a full time teaching
position in Lisbon. Mrs. Sally May of Littleton is again teaching Kindergarten. This is
again held in the Town Building, due to lack of space in the elementary school. Kinder-
garten is in session there from 8:00 A.M. to 10:30 A.M. each school day. Mrs. Leone
Philbrook of Sugar Hill, who taught Grades 3 and 4, was unable to return in September
due to a severe injury received just prior to the opening of school. She has been granted
a year's leave of absence. Mrs. Philbrook was replaced by Mrs. Mary Kerns of Sugar
Hill who resigned in October. Mr. Vernon Wood of Littleton is now teaching the Fourth
Grade. The other members of the faculty are Mrs. Pauline Cole of Franconia who teaches
Grades 5 and 6, and Mrs. Evelyn Howe of Lancaster who teaches Grades 2 and 3. I
continue to teach Grade 1. Mr. Richard Sullivan continues to do an outstanding job as
custodian of the elementary school. Mr. Robert Sheehan is most co-operative as the
Kindergarten custodian.

CURRICULUM:

Personal guidance and individual attention are given each pupil. The faculty strives
at all times to help each child realize his or her potential, both as a student and a good
school citizen. The basic psychological needs of childhood are carefully observed. Indi-
vidual differences are noted. Good work habits are emphasized. Much attention, of
course, is paid to the teaching of the basic fundamentals in each subject.

As I have reported in the past, the phonetic approach to reading is taught with care
and precision throughout the school. The Speed-i-o-scopes are in constant use. The
techniques developed through their use have been found very helpful in training children
in the complex task of reading. Speed and comprehension go hand in hand because it is
easier to comprehend a thought unit than an isolated word. In addition, the children
enjoy the novelty of using these mechanical devices.

Enrichment materials are continually being incorporated at all grade levels to
provide stimulation and challenge for each pupil. The Science Research Association
Reading Program is now being used in Grades 2 through 6. It encourages an individual
rate of progress in reading. Room libraries are growing rapidly. New books are added
each year. Paperback books are also being utilized. As a result, each child enjoys read-
ing at his own level of ability and interest.



35



The faculty of your school is very cognizant of the value of a good Visual Aids
Program. It continues to be a very important part of the school curriculum. New film-
strips, pertaining to all subjects, are added each year. Filmstrips, also used in corre-
lation with records, are a source of much interest and educational value to the children.
Television also is utilized to the fullest despite the handicap of a limited viewing area.

The school's testing programs are still in effect. The Achievement Tests are now
given in the fall so that they may be used for diagnostic purposes.

The new 1966 GUIDELINES AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR N.H. PUBLIC ELE-
MENTARY SCHOOLS, compiled by the N.H. Department of Education, is being carefully
studied. As in the past, the faculty of your school will continue to follow the concepts
set forth in such a report.

SCHOOL LUNCH:

The school lunch program continues to operate smoothly under the capable manag-
ership of Mrs. Thelma Oilman of Bethlehem. Mrs. Oilman replaced Mrs. Louise
Peabody who resigned at the close of the 1965-1966 school year. As of this writing, there
are approximately 68 children participating daily in this program.

SCHOOL HEALTH:

Dr. Ralph Parker and Nurse Virginia McAllister have given complete physicals to
the pupils in Kindergarten and Grades 1-6, whose parents so desired. Mrs. McAllister's
report will give further details as to her other activities in this school.

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES:

The children enjoyed a foliage tour in the fall due to the kindness of Mr. Hamilton
Ford. Refreshments, "hosted" by Mr. Richard Coney, added to the trip's enjoyment.

Open House was held during Educational Week in the fall. No special programs or
special classes were planned. The usual procedures were followed so that a true picture
of the school's activities could be obtained. Parents attendance was most gratifying.

The annual Christmas Program, with 100% pupil participation, was presented in
the school auditorium Tuesday evening, December 20. School parties were held the follow-
ing day.

The pupils in Grades 5 and 6, under the tutelage of Mrs. Cole, carried out an en-
joyable Christmas project in art. They designed and made individual gifts for all the
pupils in the school in conjunction with their other Christmas art activities.

The Ski Program, sponsored by the Franconia School District, is in effect again
this year. There are 45 children enrolled in this program. Mr. Vernon Wood, 4th grade
teacher, is supervising the children.

The University of New Hampshire Theater For Children presented "Snow White and
The Seven Dwarfs" at the Bethlehem School. The entire Franconia Elementary student
body, from Kindergarten through Grade 6, attended this performance.

Pupils from Grades 5 and 6, under the direction of Physical Education Director
Glenn Stillings, participated in the Track Meet at Lancaster in May. Mr. Ford donated
the use of his bus. Mr. Sullivan assisted in this activity.



36



An assembly, "Poetry Jubilee", was presented in the school auditorium on April
20, 1966, under the direction of Mrs. Leone Philbrook. It climaxed a poetry contest
which was part of the school's Language Arts Program. The idea of such an assembly
originated with a School Board member, Mrs. Nancy Cole.

Later every child's contribution was entered in the Creative Writing Contest con-
ducted by the Overlake Day School of Burlington and WCAX Television. There were 1, 056
entries in the contest from 52 schools located in Vermont, New Hampshire and New York.
Nine judges chose 23 winners of first place and 28 winners of honorable mention. This
school tied for first honors with the Shelburne Central School in Shelburne, Vermont,
each winning a total of seven. This school also won seven honorable mentions.
First Honors:

Grade One — Sandra Allten, Stephan Greenway
Grade Two — Kevin Catheron, Robert Girard
Grade Three — Judith Robinson, Paul Tavino
Grade Five — Christine Greenway
Honorable Mention:

Grade One — Deborah Eastman, Matthew Glover
Grade Three — Victoria Cole, Michael Kenney

Tammy Laskaris, Nelson Moody
Grade Six - Stefanie Valar
The above pupils, accompanied by three faculty members, attended the awards ceremony
at the WCAX-TV Studio in Burlington on June 17. This ceremony was taped and shown on
the air the following day.

A FieldDay for Grades 1-6 was held on June 3. Later, during a school assembly,
ribbons were presented to the winners of the various contests.

CONCLUSION:

I wish to express my appreciation to the people of Franconia; the Board of Educa-
tion; Superintendent of Schools, WilliamGrass; Educational Consultant, Leslie Cummings;
Business Administrator, Oliver Cole; and the staff and pupils for their co-operation and
assistance.

Respectfully submitted,
ALICE M. LEAVITT
Principal



37



TUITION PUPILS
1966-1967



Attending Franconia



Bonor, Wallace


Grade 1


Westhaver, Kristina


1


Branch, Philip


1


Glover, Janet


3


Branch, Michael


3


Kenney, Michael


4


Chadbourne, Linda


5


Leighton, Linda


5


Chadbourne, Herbert


6


Kenney, Peter


6


y Littleton




Kenney, David


Grade 9



38



REPORT OF SUPERD^TENDENT

To the School Board and Citizens of Easton School District:

It is with pleasure that I submit my report to you as superintendent of Schools.

During the past 3-ear (1965-1966) there were 7 pupils enrolled in the Franconia
School., and 1 pupil at Linleton Junior High School.

This school year there are 10 pupils attending Franconia School, and 1 at

Littleton High School.

The Supe2nrisor\" Union office has been consolidated into one unit at 33 ^lain
Street, Littleton, X. H. This expanded Supervisory Union is in keeping with the
State Board of Education's plan of re- organization as recommended by the In-
terim Commission of the 1963 General Court.

'Six. Paul HenrA' has been appointed the Assistant Superintendent of Schools
and JNIr. Oliver Cole Ihe Business Administrator. This organization will, I am
sure, better meet the needs and purposes that have been set forth by the State
program for impro\'ing education.

An area which has become quite controversial and one which affects our
schools in many ways, is Federal Aid to Education which I would like to review
Vi-ith you at this time.

Federal .Aid to Education has becom.e substantial this school year. Although,
this may be an area many would vrish away, I firmly believe that the amoimt in
years to come ■^■111 dwarf the 1966 figures.

A question often asked of me is, "What is this Federal Education Law?" In
answer; there are many laws assisting and affecting education financially.

1. The Elementar\"-SecondarA^ Act of 1965, or more commonly called the
S9. 10 bill.

There are 5 titles in this bill that grant aid from the local school district
up to and including the State Department of Education. However, only titles 1, 2,
and 3 affect us locally.

Title 1 is specifically allocated to the local districts and we have received
in the White Z^Ioimtains Supervisor^' Union =35 during 1966-67, 841,769.93 and
v,-ill receive similar amounts for the 1967-6S school year. The U.S. Congress
v,-ill determine future allocations after 1968 (as with all titles). The money re-
ceivedunder this Title 1 must be used for the educationally deprived and is being
channeled into programs which are badly needed.

Title2i5 forthe entire Super\i.sor\" Union as a unitandwe receivedS6, 091. 00
for the 196-5-66 school year. Our entitlement for the current school year is
$7,259.40. These monies must, by law, purchase library-, audio- \-isual aids,
supplies, materials, etc. , only after inventories are completed. This project
is directed by 'Six. Gordon Flight of Bethlehem and a program has been initiated
which rotates materials and equipment throtighout our 10 district Union.



39



Title 3 is for area or regloaal programs and although it is centralized in our
Super"^i.sor3' Union office, the area served is the entire North Country (7 Super-
visor}" Unions from Woods-^llle and Convray, north). This program, Project
"ARISE," has an operating budget of .574,550.00 and is concerned primarily
v-lth social enriclunent. 'Six. Stanle}- Tufts, Project Director, and his staff have
already initiated programs in which your children have become involved in an
interesting and challenging enrichment project that v.-ill have lasting effects.

2. The next major Federal Education Lav,-, that affects us here, is the Vo-
cational Education Act of 1963. This act granted the White Mcuritair-S Regional
SchoolDistrictS240, 000. 00 during 1965, of v,-hich S205,000.00 is presently being
used to construct lieir new High School Building, and S35,000.00 to purchase
vocational equipment as the new building nears comipletion. Without doubt, ad-
ditional dollars from this act v.-ill assist v,-ith emplojTi^ent of staff, etc.

3. The Economic Opportunit}' Act has several titles of which Title 2 his af-
fected our schools considerably. The 1966 Summier Head Start Progi^arr.s zz<-
erated under this act. Mr. C. Douglas ZMcIntj're of 'Whitefield is the director,
and operates one of the largest Head Start programs in Xev,- Hampshire at a cost
of S16, 354. 00 and involving approx ima tely 61 children.

The three above education acts, although the largest in dollars, are not by
any means the only Federal programs your schools deal v,i.th annually. The 1917
Smith-Hughes and George Bardeen Acts, the National Defense Education Act,
the :Manpov,-er Development k Training Act, School Lunch and Goverm^ient Siu -
plus programs, all of longstanding, direct much of the supplies, equipment, food,
milk and dollars into yotir school budgets. Each is ver}- important and each
contributes to the education and welfare of your children.

In closing, may 1 take this opportunitj- to thank the Board of Education, the
State Department of Education, our Administrators, and the staif of the Super-
intendent's office for their continued cooperation and support.



William Grass, Jr.
SUPERINTENTDENT OF SCHOOLS



40



WHITE MOUNTAINS SUPERVISORY UNION NO. 35



SCHOOL CALENDAR



1967-1968



September 5
September 6-7 Inc.
September 8
October 20
November 10
November 23-24 Inc.
Dec. 23 - Jan. 1 Inc.
January 19
February 17-25 Inc.
March 29
April 8-9 Inc.
April 10-12 Inc.
May 30
June 14



Teachers Meeting

Union #35 - Fall Workshop

Schools Open

Schools Closed - NHEA Meeting

End of 1st Quarter - 45 days completed

Schools Closed - Thanksgiving Recess

Schools Closed - Christmas Vacation

End of 2nd Quarter - 87 days completed

Winter Vacation - Schools Closed

End of 3rd Quarter - 132 days completed

Schools Closed - Union #35 Workshop

Schools Closed - Spring Vacation

Schools Closed - Memorial Day

Schools Closed - Summer Vacation
End of 4th Quarter - 181 days completed



41



o












S O tJ



u



« 1

=« cj O

O « QJ

Q ^



O



o






o
O

m

a)



0)



05


2

o


iH


^


oT


03


tH


i>N


X3
O


a


U


Q)


c3


^


§


•-3



CQ

Q






d
o

O

o
O



0)
faC



"4-1 'O

O <D



o
o

03
O



03
O



S J



•-3
U





CO




Oi .


:S


^K


^ 0)


(N 1^'


§Q


^ «


t4H


S d


0) O


-S o


-1^


CI +J


Q^


<U r-l



Ph








2

Online LibraryEaston (N.H.)Annual report for the Town of Easton, New Hampshire (Volume 1966) → online text (page 2 of 2)