Edgar N. Blake.

Practical and dainty recipes; luncheons and dinner giving in Woodward, Oklahoma. A useful and valuable book of recipes, all of which are tested and tried .. online

. (page 8 of 8)
Online LibraryEdgar N. BlakePractical and dainty recipes; luncheons and dinner giving in Woodward, Oklahoma. A useful and valuable book of recipes, all of which are tested and tried .. → online text (page 8 of 8)
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fire and set the sauce pan carefully aside to cool.
Shake as little as possible and put it in a dry place,
and it must not stand in the wind or a strong draft. If
these precautions are not taken, it may granulate and
have to be boiled over again.

When cool enough to bear the hand, begin stir-
ring, and when too stiff to stir with a wooden spoon, pour
out on board and knead and work with the hands like
dough. The soft, elastic mass should be as smooth as
butter, and not unlike firm butter in consist-
ency. In a covered jar it will keep for weeks, and by
slightly melting a little at a time in a bowl set in boiling
water, it may be flavored at v/ill and made up in an im.-
mense variety of forms, to suit the most exacting taste.

Wafers — Melt fondant as above, flavor with two
or three drops of oil of peppermint, wintergreen or cin-
namon and drop in small round wafers on paper. Make
peppermint white, v/intergreen pink and cinnamon
brown by slightly coloring with chocolate.



•n «#,



100

Walnut Creams. -Roil a piece of white fondant
into a ball about one inch in diameter and press half a
walnut meat firmly into each side. If hickorynuts are
used, make balls smaller.

Nuts and Fruit Creams.— Almonds, pecans,
filberts and peanuts, stoned dates, figs and citron cut in
slices, candied cherries, etc., make delicious creams by
simply placing thtm inside a ball or cone of fondant

— Mrs. Ed^ar N. Blake,

Cre£kUl lj.andy. -Two cupsful sugar, three-
fourths cupful of water, two tablespoonsf ul glucose, boil
until it forms a soft ball, when cool stir until soft and
creamy. Mold in desired shapes.— Mrs, Paut Meliinger.

Uncooked tandy — Take the white of one eg;g
and as much water as egg, measure carefully, thtn stir
in powdered sugar until st ff as can be stirred, then
take on to a board and kneai as bread until creamy.
Flavor to suit taste and mold any shape desired.— Mrs.

J. Thomas.

MoIassdS Candy. -One pint N. 0. mollasses,
one-half pint brown sugar, one tablespoonful vinegar,
two tablespoonsful melted butter, one tablespoonful
vanilla. Boil until it hardens in cold water, add pinch
of soda. Cool in buttered pans and pull until yellow.
This may be used to pour over nuts.— M i s s Corne.iia

kSewfon, Jt^rsKvville, III.

iVlolasf^ej* Taffy.— One cupful of molasses*
two cupsful brown sugar, let boil, until a little dropped
in cold water becomes hard, remove from the stove,
stir in thoroughly one heaping teaspoonful of soda, let

cool and pull. — Mary PaUoa

Brown 8u"^ar Cream Ccindy.- Two cups-
ful brown sugar covered with water, let boil until a
little dropped in cold water becomes brittle. Let cool
and pull imti! it becomes like tafCy. It is very nice with
Englisli walnuts added, — Marv PaHon.



101

Divinity.— Three pints sugar, one pint corn
syrup, one and one-half pints cream, mix all together
and cook over a slow fire in a broad shallow kettle until
it will form a firm soft ball when dropped in cold water.
Take from the fire and stir, after stirring a few
minutes, add a pound of almonds, which have previously-
been blanched, sliced or chopped and thorou'vhly dried.

— Mrs, F. M Cline..

PepperiBint Wafers.-Two cupsf ul granula-
ted sugar, one-half cupful cold water, boil until it spins
a thread, add a few drops of peppermint and whip until
white and drop on buttered tins size of a half dollar.

— Mrs. r. L. O' Bryan.



102



Beverages.

"Wfth many a cup and m«&v a Amiie th« festal mooi^ufs we baSutle"

Old Colonial Punch.— For eight quarts, take
nine lemons, twelve limes, three oranges, a pineapple,
eighteen spoonsful sugar, grate peel of the limes, lem-
ons and oranges remove the v^hite pith and slice the
fruit, pour one quart of hot water over, cover, stand in
ice chest for twenty-four hours, then strain, add one
quart of shaved ice, one quart of grape juice, one quart
of Maraschino cherries, put the bowl in a larger one of
chopped ice. In the absence of limes use lemons.

Golden Slipper.— To make this attractive drink,
allow for each guest peel from one lemon which should
be cut in long pieces, put in a tall, thin glass, add half
a bottle of ginger ale, shaved ice and fill with seltzer
water. Two straws are placed in each glass, then the
lemon peel is wound about so as to be the length of the
glass, the knob formed by the stem end is caught on
the rim. The peel must be cut as free from tough white
inner skin as is x)ossible.

Iced Coffee.— Make strong coffee, place shaved
ice in tall, thin glasses, add one heaping teaspoonful of
sugar, pour hot coffee over, place a tablespoonf ul of
whipped cream on top. Allow for each guest two table-
spoonsful of finely ground coffee. For each cupful of
coffee use yolk and shell of one e^g. Mix all in bowl,
add one cupful of cold water, then add six cupsf ul fresh-
ly boiled v/ater, set on fire to boil about five minutes,
put back to settle, adding quarter cupful of cold water.
This makes a very strong coffee, which will he weaken-
ed by the shaved ice.

Hot Coffee. - Scald a granite coffee pot, wash an
egg, break and beat .slightly, dilute with one-half cup-
ful of cold water, add the crushed shell and mix with a
cupful of finely ground coffee. Turn into^the coffee pot.

Pour on six cupsf ul of boiling water and stir thoroughly,
'lace on front ox range and boil three minutes. If not



.103

boiled coffee is clouded. If boiled to long to much tan-
nic acid is developed. The spout of the pot should be
covered or stuffed with soft paper to prevent the escape
of the fragrant aroma. Stir and pour some in a cup,
to be sure that the spout is free from grounds. Serve
very hot with whipped cream and sugar.

Iced Tea,— Make a strong tea, (English Break-
fast is my favorite tea) then dilute to the desired
strength. Stand away in stone jar to cool, when cold
it is ready to serve. Have ready plenty of cracked ice,
fill glasses half full of ice then fill up with the tea.
Serve in tall glasses on small plates, with loaf sugar and

sliced le ..OnS. — Mrs. fld^ar IJ^. Biako.

Grape fU!<^e.— To prepare the grape juice cut
the bunches of grapes a little, trimming off superfluous
stems and taking out the unsound berries. Put in a
graniteware or porcelain lined kettle, covering with
water for two or three inches. The proportion of water
is about three quarts to eighteen pounds of fruit. Cook
until the grapes burst and the juice exudes, crushing oc-
casionally, with a wooden spoon. Put a collander over
a large jar and cover with a square of cheese cloth,
turn fruit and juice into this, drain, mxeasure and re-
turn to a clean preserving ketttle. Let it come to a
boil and skim. Nov/ add sugar to taste (a half cupful
to each quart is a good proportion) stir until dissolved
then cook five minutes, skimming carefully. Have
ready cans or bottles sterilized and heated in pans of
billing water. Fill with the hot juice, then seal. If
bottles are enmployed be sure the corks are sterilized
as well as the bottles themselves, Keep in a cool, dark
place. If preferred the grapes may be cooked without
water, then diluted v/hen ready to drink.— \i r».j s.

Stallin'fjs, St. Louis, Mo.

Unfern^entcd Qrape juice PuiuJi.

—One Gallon Mixture.— Put in a punch bowl (with a
piece of ice,) the juice of one-half dozen lemons one-
third dozen oranges, cut in slices, one can of pineapples,
three quarts of unfermented grape juice, one quart of
apollinaris or carbonated water. Stir the above ingre-



104
dients thoroughly and serve in fancy goblets with fruit.

— Mrs. Geo, iVl. tlamtton.

Cranberry Punch.— in cooking cranberries
when only sauce is wanted, add extra water, after strain-
ing add sugar, little lemon juice and cracked ice. Serve
in glasses. Any other fruit juices may be added if they
are handy. — Mrs I1. » sfaiiings.



105



Luncheons and Dinners.
Luncheon

<{fveii by
Mesdames Davis and Muag.

Clear Boullion with Whipped Cream
Salted Wafers
Veal Loaf Aspic Jelly-

Potato Chips
Fruit Salad with Mayonaise
Sandwiches Olives



Ice Cream with Pecans
Cake Mints Coffee



Luncheon

S'ven by
Mrs. Guy B. Baysin^er.

Creamed Chicken Tomato Aspic Jelly-
Salmon Loaf Cheese balls



Bread and Butter Sandwiches
Caramel lea Cream Cake



Luncheon

§iven by
iVIesdames Cline and Laune.

Fruit ReHsh



Veal Loaf Cheese Straws
Pickles Olives

Cream Potatoes



Bannana Salad Wafers



Ice Cream Cake

Coffee



106
Pink and White t>eception

§iven by

Mesdames Appelget, Walterhouse and Hulse.

Creamed Chicken in Pattie Shells
Saratoga Chips Olives Hot Rolls

Marsh Mallow Pudding with Whipped Cream
Angel Food Pink and White Layer Cake

Hot Coffee
Mint Wafer Salted Almonds



8even O'clock Dinner

ijivt-n by
Miss French.



Blue Points



Cream of Celery Soup
Olives Salted Nuts

Sherry

Smothered Chicken French Peas

Asparagus Tips on Toast

Cranberry Frappe

Chicken Salai
Wafers Cheese



Neapolitan Ice Cream
Cake.

Coffee



I ndex.

PAGE.

Directions . . _ _ q — 7

Miscellaneous - - . _ 7

Table of Comparative Measures - - 8

Time Table for Roasting Meats and Fish - 8

Time Table for Boiling Meats - - 8

Soup - - - - - 9—13

Bread, Biscuits and Rolls - - 14— 20

Fish - - - - - 21— 24

Meats - - . - - 25- 31

Fish and Meat Sauces - - - 32— 34

Poultry and Game _ . . 35 — 38

Salads 39— 43

Salad Dressings - _ _ . 44— 45

Entrees 46— 50

Sandvviches - . - _ _ 51 — 54

Vegetables - - - 55— 60

Eggs - - - 61- 63

Cheesa - - - 64 — 65

Pastry 65— 70

Cakes 71- 77

Cake Fillings and Frostings - - 78— 82

Puddings and Miscellaneous Desserts - 83 — 88

Frozen Desserts - - - 89— 92

Pickles, Marmalades and Sweet Pickles - 93 — f8

Candies 99-101

Beverages . . . . 102—104

Luncheons and Dinners - - - 105 — 106



Always the Same




elt ilk* M \}mj



o






THING
TO LEAN




It is not the Cook "but the WomarQ behind the
Cook"- who rules the world. When cooks fail and
servants fail and everythiu:^- else fails there is

SHREDDED WHOLE WHE^T

for the Housekeeper to lean u pon iu every emergency.
Ready-cooked, ready-to-serve, it contains all ol the whole
wtieat, bteaia-cooked and diuwn into fine porous shreds
so that the stomach may easily take up all its strength-
givin<2- properties.

Heated in the oven, Shreilded Wheat Biscuit is de-
licious, for breakfast with milk or cream. Recipes for
miiiiug many wholesome and palatable combinations
\vith fresh fruit or, creamed veretfbles or meats will be
found iu this book ^.-rrr^^"'"™'^'^ " - „<&



SHR3 0DED WHEAT

BIS ;UIT and TiiL-i-

CUIT (the Slireddjd

Wheat Wafer) are '■■:

made by the National -;

Food Company at Ni- '< ,

agra Falls in the clean- ^*S. ''^-^S^

est and ^ most hygienic ,-'-

factory in the world.

Our new cookbook is

s-^nt free for the asking



"it's All in the Sliretis



It is ESSENTIAL that you have GOOD WORK
done iu the iustallatiou of jour plumbiug system as
well as 4 grade tixtures.

The IM PC HI ANT POINT IS GOOD WORK. A
largf part of every plumbiug system is the concealed
work. Just here is where REALLY GOOD WOH.K
means health aud cleanliness; while poor woik, eitiier
fiom lack of kuowledg of .sanitary laws, unskilled lubor,
I or willful disrej^ar I of just common honesty, leaves a
breeding place for filth and disease

By A grade we mean fixtures that are guaranteed
to you against defects in the enamelini.-^; that is. the
fixture will be repliced t^bould the enamel scale or crack
within a given jteriod.

These are things foi- you to remember when you
have them both equipj-ed, We are glad to oi^e you,
at any time, an estimate on the cost of sanitary plumb-
ing.

BoiXE Bros.,

Sanitary Plumbers.



J. W. via^ee Lumber Co.

Dealers in all kinds of



SATISFACTIO^^ GUAKANTIEED.



"When you want a square deal call on them — you will
not be disappointed.



ART NEEDLE WORK
EMPORIUM

MRS. H. L. THOMAS. PROP.

Latest ideas ia all kiada of hand work. Open for in-
spection at

THOMAs' DRUG STORE. I

DEALER IK

I

I Hardware ^ Furniture



Woodward OkU.



i



N. K. BEARDSLEE

GROCERIES, NOTIONS, FRESH
FRUITS, CANDY AND NUTS.

PHONE 30-



m\mm m umnu



tLovLkea furnished complete at prices to suit purchaser.



Embalmer and Undertaker.

Complete line oi supplies,
Woodward, Okla.



JOHN GARVEY PRCS. CHAS H, MARTIN. VlCE-PRES.

J. W. MARTIN. Cashier.



CENTRAL EXCHANGE
BANK.



WOODWARD, OKLAHOMA. I



LADIES~~you should buy the best groceries.



n

'' Kin § Parrot"

Brand

Canned Goods

and Spices

are the best— conform to all Pure Food Laws. |
Call for them at your Grocers.



i



Take No Other*



Qei the liabit

It petys to Trad© Witla




Woodward's Exclusive Clothier and Gents
Furnisher.



R E. DAVIS, A. C, DAVIS g



R. E. Davis Drug Co.



t



WOODWARD. OKLA.
Phond 40



YORK-KEY'S

I For ElvortjtlninO

Satisfaction or your money back.
iVlAliTKNSON & K^AYNOa

'^^General Merchandiser

"What others advertise we sell for less."



i



I



We handle all kinds of Building Material.




C K. Luce Lumber ^.

WoodwiirtS, Okl ;



QEIRfi4C5lt|-H01?KlisaS



ISiEf^G/4!SS~liiE 0;t).



nOOllfVAliSS OKI. A.



Distributors of Bargains

Womens l^eady-to-wear; Mens Furnishings

Dry sToods, and Notions,

Hats, Caps and Shoes.



ROBT. MOODY, JOHN J. GERLACH, L. H. PATTON,

Vice Presidrnt, President. Cashier

GEO. GERLACH, Vice President, W. V. SHY, Asst. Cashier.

1893— OLDEST BANK IN WOOD WARD COUNTY— 1907

THE GERLACH BANK

WE SHOW TOU

Capital $50,000.00

Surplus 15,000.00

Undivided Profits 15,000.00

Stockholders' Liability 50.000.00

Total $130,000.00

COUNTY AND CITY DEPOSITORY,
WE ISSUE MONEYORDERS, AMERICAN BANKING ASSOCIATION FORM

CALL AKD SEE OUR SAVINGS BANKS.

Interest paid on Time Certifi( a*ep of Deposit, larjre or sma'l. Every ac-
commocai ion extended consistent with safe and conservative banking.

WE SOLICIT TOUR BUSINESS.

WOODWARD OKLAHOMA.



«^' > }. M. SELF

f they are new and clean, easy to cook and good to
eat. Once a customer, always a customer. Give
him your business and be happy.

Phono 2 ! 7



JHTT and WOOlS)



Wholesale Grocers



WICHITA. KANS.



The
Harvest Home Brand



Is the Best in the Land.



CANNED GOODS & (PICES OF ALL KINDS
Try Them aid Yoj will want none other.



ALIVR, AWAKE,
Courteous to all-

First National Bank

WOODWARD, OKIaA.

Inveptigate our Savings Department.



WE CANT COOK

but we can

SUPPLY YOU WITH 1



and

.... . ,.,^r-.., TOSUITYCUR

MILL WORK TASTE
C. E. SHARP LUMBER CO.



KftNDY KlTCHeN

FOR

COLORED SUGARS, CANDIES FRESH FRUITS
AND NUTS.

DUGGIN BliOTHEliS

DEALERS IN

Groceries* FreSli

Krtiits KLtG*

Phone 38



USEL



r\



m



^RS CRUSHE
OATS



THE GREAT WESTERN CEREAL COMPANY
CHICAGO, U. S. A.



[FAd'03



\^



- — . ^

Practical

and

Dainty Recipes



Luncheons

and

Dinner Giving

in
Woodward, Oklahoma.




/\



\'V4



1^





1 2 3 4 5 6 8

Online LibraryEdgar N. BlakePractical and dainty recipes; luncheons and dinner giving in Woodward, Oklahoma. A useful and valuable book of recipes, all of which are tested and tried .. → online text (page 8 of 8)