Edmund Waller.

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si matura et cocta, decidunt : sic vitam adolescentibus
visaufert; senibus maturitas.



NOTES. 305

ON MY LADY DOROTHY SIDNEY'S PICTURE.

Anthony Vandyck arrived in England about the
end of March, or the beginning of April, 1632, having
previously paid a short visit to this country in 1630,
There are at least three portraits of Sacharissa painted
by him, to one of which this poem doubtless alludes.
The Earl of Leicester sat to him in 1632, but the
language of the lines "To Vandyck," and the
apparent age of Lady Dorothy in her portraits, seem
to point to a later date, when he had painted a series
of English pictures. Sir William Temple had a
portrait of her, probably a copy of one of Vandyck's ;
writing to him, Dorothy Osborne says : " I have sent
you my picture because you wished for it : but pray
let it not presume to disturb my lady Sunderland's."

P. 43, /. i. The reference is to the Arcadia of Sir
Philip Sidney, the great-uncle of Lady Dorothy, in
which Pyrocles and Musidorus, seeing the portraits of
Philoclea and Pamela (Musidorus' Jlaint} hanging in
the house of Calander, fall in love with them and
ultimately marry the originals. Dorus was the name
assumed by Musidorus when he disguised himself as
a shepherd and obtained entrance into the house of
Dametas, the guardian of Pamela.

P. 43, //. 4-5. Cf. p. 216, 1. 2.

TO VANDYCK.

P, 45, //. 49-50. Cf. p. 28, 11. 17-18.

AT PENSHURST.

P. 46, //. 17-20. Cf. p. 16, 11. 11-15.

P. 47, //. 25-27. Cf. Ben Jonson, To Penshurst.

13-16

"That taller Tree, which of a Nut was set,

At his great Birth, where all the Muses met.

There in the writhed Dark, are cut the Names

Of many a Sylvane, taken with his flames."

X



306 EDMUND WALLER.

TO MY LORD OF LEICESTER.

P. 47, /. 12. The Earl of Leicester started from
Rye, to act as ambassador at the Court of France,
May 17, 1636, and took his leave of the French King,
upon his return to England, March 14, 1639.

OF THE MISREPORT OF HER BEING PAINTED.

P. 50, /. 17. Cf. Spenser, Muipotmos, st. 21, 11. 3-4.
" There lavish Nature in her best attire,

Powres forth sweete odors and alluring sights."
P. 50, /. 22. Thaumantias, i.e., Iris, the daughter
of Thaumas.

OF HER PASSING THROUGH A CROWD OF PEOPLE.
P. 51, /. 8. admiral, the leading ship of a squadron.
P. 51, /. 13. insults= exults.

FABULA PHCEBI ET DAPHNES.
There is a tradition that these lines were written by
Sir John Suckling, and by him sent to Waller.

SONG Say, Lovely Dream !

This poem was printed in Beaumont's Poems, 1653 :
it was probably conveyed straight from the edition of
1645 f Waller, as a misprint, Shales for Shades,
occurs in both.

TO THE SERVANT OF A FAIR LADY.

P. 55, /. i. Dorothy Osborne, writing to Sir
William Temple, frequently speaks of her maid, Jane
Wright, as his "fellow-servant."

TO A VERY YOUNG LADY.

This lady, a younger sister of Sacharissa, was
married to John, eldest son of Sir Thomas Pelham,
Jan. 20, 1647.



NOTES. 307

TO AMORET.

Fenton says that he had heard the Duke of
Buckingham say that the person whom Waller
celebrated under the title of Amoret was Lady
Sophia Murray. This lady, the daughter of the Earl
of Annandale, was certainly an acquaintance of
Waller, she was implicated in his plot, but it seems
to me more likely that Amoret stands for Lady Anne
Cavendish, afterwards Lady Rich. In the edition of
1645 the poem which immediately follows this is
headed : On the Friendship betwixt Sacharissa and
Amoret, and the note to it in Mr. Waller's transcript
is Lady Dor. Sidnie &* Lady Anne Cam/is A u-ife
to my Lord Rich : what is said there of the friendship
between the two agrees with the lines on the death of
Lady Rich, p. 37.

ON HER COMING TO LONDON.

These lines are here for the first time included in
Waller's poems ; they occur among the State Papers,
Dom. Charles I. ccccxiv. 19, and were sent to
Notes and Queries, 4th series, iii. I, by Mr. John
Bruce. In places, the paper upon which they are
written is worn, and the words in brackets are conjec-
tural. At the end of the poem is written, Intended
to her La* at her coming to London, March the 2,
1638. The figure "8" has apparently been written
over a "7."

AT PENSHURST.

P. 64, //. 21-23. An allusion to Mount Sion, a hill
from the foot of which the mineral waters at Tun-
bridge Wells issue.

X 2



3o8 EDMUND WALLER.

THE BATTLE OF THE SUMMER ISLANDS.

The Bermudas derived their name of Summer
Islands from the fact that Sir George Somers was
wrecked upon them in 1609 while on his way to
Virginia. James I. granted a charter to certain
merchant-adventurers for the colonization and govern-
ment of the islands, and the rules and regulations of
the Company were published in 1621 " Orders and
Constitutions. Partly collected out of his Majestie's
Letters Patents ; and partly by authority and in
vertue of the said Letters Patents." Waller, in
speaking of them as " late-discovered isles," appears
to have been ignorant of, or to have purposely
ignored, the visit which Juan Bermudez, a Spaniard,
is said to have paid to them in 1522. Historians of
the Bermudas have delighted to point out inaccuracies
in Waller's description, and have even declared that
the event which this poem celebrates is geographically
impossible. There is no evidence, beyond a vague
tradition, that the poet ever visited the islands,
and when he says, " Bermudas walled with rocks,
who does not know ? " he is only crediting his audience
with the same kind of familiarity with the place as he
had himself, such as could be derived from the
accounts of others. Waller certainly did not invent
this story of the Whales, and it is possible that Marvell
may have had this particular incident in his mind
when he wrote of the Bermudas

' Where He the huge sea-monsters wracks,
That lift the deep upon their backs."

Marvell, vol. i. p. 39 (ed. Aitken).

The whole of Marvell's poem, Fairfax, "Godfrey of



NOTES. 309

Bulloigne," xv. 35-36, xvi. n, and Spenser, "Faerie
Queene," iii. 6. 42, should be compared with Waller's
description of the islands.

P. 66, /. 12. No. 200 of the "Orders" above
mentioned is a curious commentary on this line
"No kind of Timber-wood growing in the said Hands
shall be used for firewood." It appears that the orange-
crop had suffered severely from the loss of the protection
from the wind which the cedars had afforded.

P. 67, //. 46-47. Cf. Oldham, "Verses. Presenting
a Book to Cosmelia"

" Sure Heaven preserv'd her by the Fall uncurst,
To tell how good the Sex was made at first."

P. 70, //. 29-30. Cf. Horace, Odes i. 3. 9-12.

P. 70, /. 49. Robert Rich, Earl of Warwick, was
one of the principal proprietors of the Bermudas (a
parish there still bears his name) ; he had been mainly
instrumental in settling the colony there and else-
where in the West Indies. He disposed of twenty
of his shares in the Bermuda Company to one Trott
for .600, a sale which involved his family in liti-
gation after his death.

P. 71, /. II. Spenser, "Faerie Queene," v. I. 12.

P. 73, /. 64. .rEn. n, 749. Repeat = seek again,
I^atin repeto. Cf. Dryden, "Annus Mirabilis," 257

" And while through burning labyrinths they retire,
With loathing eyes repeat what they would shun."

WHEN HE WAS AT SKA.

These lines were first printed by Neve {Cursory
Remarks on English Poets, 1789,) and afterwards,
from anptherMS.,in the "Tixall Poetry," 1813.



3io



EDMUND WALLER.



TO MY LORD OF FALKLAND.



[Cf. Cowley, To the Lord Falkland. For his safe
Return from the Northern Expedition against the
SCOTS.]

This poem was occasioned by the miserable expedi-
tion against the Scots which was organized in Feb. ,
1639. The General-in-Chief was the Earl of Arundel,
and, in spite of his protests, the Earl of Holland,
" the most incompetent of men," was forced upon
him as his General of Horse. Holland, celebrated
for the courtliness of his manners and his handsome
person, owed his appointment solely to the favour of
the Queen, and his conduct was said to have led to
the failure of the Expedition, though Professor
Gardiner (Fall of the Monarchy of Charles /., vol. i.
pp. 230-1) acquits him of the treachery with which he
has been charged.

P. 76, //. 26-28. Cf. Oldham, "To the Memory
of Mr. Atwood "

" Like the fair teeming Hebrew, she
Did travail with a wrangling progeny,
And harbour'd in her bowels feuds and civil wars."

Cf. Fairfax, "Godfrey of Bulloigne," xx. 114

" And as a Lyon strikes him with his train,
His Native Wrath to quicken and to move ;
So he awak'd his fury and disdain "
and xv. 50.

Cowley, "On his Majesties Return out of Scot-
land "

" How justly would our Neighbours smile

At these mad quarrels of our Isle
Sweld with proud hopes to snatch the whole away,"



NOTES. 311

" This noise at home was but Fates policie

To raise our Spirits more high.
So a bold Lyon ere he seeks his prey,
Lashes his sides, and roars, and then away "

Dryden, "Astrzea Redux," 115-18

" Tremble, ye nations, who secure before,
Laughed at those arms that 'gainst ourselves we bore
Roused by the lash of his own stubborn tail,
Our Lion now will foreign foes assail."

OF THE QUEEN.

The opening of this poem has been imitated by
Leigh Hunt in his address to Queen Victoria.

" The lark dwells lowly, Madam, on the ground,
And yet his Song within the heavens is found," &c.

THE APOLOGY OF SLEEP, &C.

Mr. Gosse (Shakespeare to Pofe, p. 69), followed
by Mrs. Ady (SacAarissa, Julia Cartwright, p. 34),
has treated this poem as addressed to Sacharissa
"The Lady who can do anything but Sleep when she
pleaseth " is, of course, the Queen.

PUERPERIUM.

Fenton supposes that this poem was written shortly
before the Queen was delivered of her fourth son,
Henry, Duke of Gloucester (born at Oatlands, July
20, 1640), in the midst of the Scotch troubles.

P. 82, //. 5-12. Cf. Lucretius, I. 29-40.

P. 82, /. 1 6. Fenton has remarked upon Waller's
accentuation of "halcyon," "in which he has never
been, nor deserves to be imitated by others"; he



312 EDMUND WALLER.

quotes Sandys, Translation of the Metamorphoses,

Bk. xi.

" Seven winter days with peaceful calms possest,
Alcyon sits upon her floating nest."

TO AMORET.

P. 83, //. 1-2. Cf. Suckling, Brenroralt
" Her face is like the milky way i' th' sky,

A meeting of gentle lights without a name."
P. 83, //. 6-1 1. These lines are printed, with
some variations, as part of a poem, a patchwork of
several of Waller's, in Wits' Recreations, 1640. I have
not thought it necessary to note the variations which
appear in such of Waller's poems as are contained
in the above collection, they are obviously the result
of faulty copying or imperfect recollection.
TO PHYLLIS.

This appears in W. R. t as "The cunning Cur-
tezan," and is followed by " The Fall " (p. 96),
which is headed " The Reply."

A LA MALADE.

P. 85, //. 19-20. " I mention them not upon
account of that couplet, but one that follows ; which
ends with the very same rhymes and words (appear
and clear} that the couplet but one after that does ;
and therefore in my Waller there is a various reading
of the first of these couplets; for there it runs thus
" ' So lightnings in a stormy air,

Scorch more than when the sky is fair." "

Bp. of Rochester to Pope, Sept. 27, 1721.

P. 86, //. 22-24. Cf. Oldham, "To Madam

L. E."

" By every breach in that fair lodging made,
Its blest Inhabitant is more display'd,"

and p. 272, 11. 13-14.



NOTES. 313

FOR DRINKING OF HEALTHS.

In Mr. Waller's transcript, from which the first six
and last ten lines of this poem are here for the first
time printed, this piece is headed, " An answeare to
on that writ against Healths." It may have been
directed against Prynne, who in 1628 published
Healthes : Sicknesse. Or A Compendious And brief e
Discourse; f rotting the drinking and pledging of
Healthes, to be Sinfull, and utterly Unlaivfull unto
Christians.

Cf. Fuller, " David's Heinous Sin," st. 27

' My prayers for friends' prosperity and wealth
Shall ne'er be wanting ; but if I refuse
To hurt myself by drinking others' health,
O, let ingenuous natures me excuse.
If men bad manners this esteem, then I
Desire to be esteem'd unmannerly.
That to live well will suffer wine to die."

OF MY LADY ISABELLA, &C.

This lady was Lady Isabella Rich, daughter of the
Earl of Holland, afterwards married to Sir James
Thynne of Longleat. She was the subject of much
scandal in her day, and Dorothy Osborne, writing to
Sir W Temple, says, "But my Lady Isabella, that
speaks, and looks and sings and plays and all so
prettily, why cannot I say that she is free from faults
as her sister believes her ? "

OF MRS. ARDEN.

Fenton suggests that this lady may have been a
Maid of Honour or a Gentlewoman of the Bed-
chamber to Henrietta Maria, and the same who is



3 H EDMUND WALLER.

mentioned as having taken part in Montague's
Shepherd's Paradise. Cf. Marvell, "The Fair
Singer. "

OF THE MARRIAGE OF THE DWARFS.
This poem, which appears in W. R. 1640, headed
' ' On the two Dwarfs that were marryed at Court, not
long before Shrovetide," celebrates the marriage of
Richard Gibson and Anne Shepherd, each of whom
was three feet ten inches high. Charles I. and his
Queen were present at the wedding, and the latter
appears to have promised the bride a diamond ring,
which, however, she never received. Richard
Gibson was page to the King. Under Franz Cleyn
he attained considerable success in painting, and
taught Queen Anne and her sister. He died July 23,
1690, in the 75th year of his age ; his widow survived
till 1709, when she was 89 years old.
THF. FALL.

P 96, //. 15-16. Cf. Oldham, "The Dream"
" So heretofore were the first Lovers laid
On the same Turf of which themselves were made."

P. 96, //. 23-4. Cf. Ayres, "On the Death of
Cynthia's Horse "

" A Heaven of Beauty overpressed thy Back,
This might have made Alcides shoulders crack,
And Atlas truckled under such a weight."

OF SYLVIA.

P. 97, /. I. Cf. Horace, Odes iv. 13. I.
" Audivere, Lyce, Di mea vota. "

THE BUD.
Printed in W. J?. t 1640, and Ayres and Dialogues,

1653-



NOTES. 3S

P. 98, /. 8. D'Israeli omitted to notice this line
in discussing the meaning and use of purpureus and
purple in the Curiosities of Literature, q. v.

P. 98, /. 14. The text of this line is unsatisfactory.
In W. R. the passage runs

" And if loose breath so much can do,
It may as well inform of love."

The verb " inform " is used by Waller (see p. 77,
1. II, and p. 78, 1. 24), and Hammond (Poems, By
W. H., 1655) has

" For lamely would the Will's bright Chariot move.
If not inform'd by friendly heat of Love."

One would have preferred informed, if it had not
been corrected in the Errata of the edition of 1682 :
" in forms of love," i.e., constrained into the language
of love, affords perhaps some contrast to " our loose
breath."

ON THE DISCOVERY OF A LADY'S PAINTING.

In W. R., 1640, " On a patch'd up Madam."

OF LOVING AT FIRST SIGHT.

Printed in W. R., 1640, where it immediately
follows the preceding poem, and is headed " The
Reply on the Contrary " ; it also appears in Francis
Beaumont's Poems, 1653, signed Tho. Batt.

P. loo, //. 3-4. In W. R.

" I now no painted colours find,
But settled stand upon the shore."

" Snatched from myself," from Horace, Odes iv.
13. 20. "Quae me surpuerat mihi."



316 EDMUND WALLER.

THE SELF-BANISHED.

W. R., 164.0, " The Melancholy Lover: " it forms
the beginning of the patchwork poem referred to in
the note on p. 83, 11. 6-n: also printed in Ayres and
Dialogues, 1653.

TO A FRIEND, &C.

W. R., 1640, "The Variable Lover; or a Reply
to the Melancholy Lover." Robert Keck says this
poem is addressed to " Mr. Alexander Hambden,
a cousin of the Author." Keck appears to have
contemplated an edition of Waller, and has left
behind him a copy of the edition of 1705 with MS.
notes, which is now in the Dyce Collection at South
Kensington.

TO ZELINDA.

In the edition of 1645 this poem is headed
" Palamede to Zelinde. Ariana, lib. 6"; it had appeared
in W. R., 1640, as "The Ladyes Slave to his
Mistresse." In one of the tales added in the 1639
edition of the " Ariane" of Des Marets, Zelinde, in
answer to Palamede, expresses her determination to
wed none but a Prince.

TO A LADY SINGING A SONG OF HIS COMPOSING.

Ayres and Dialogues ; " To the same Lady singing
the former Song," i.e., " While I listen," &c.

P. 105, //. 5-8. It is impossible to arrive at the
origin of this figure ; it occurs in a fragment of
"The Myrmidons" of .-Eschylus, where it is intro-
duced by the words, " Os SVorJ fivduv TUV At,3i/<rrt/cwj'



NOTES. 317

Xo'yos," and Person, in his edition of the "Medea,"
has collected instances of its use by other classical
authors. This is, I believe, its first appearance in
English poetry, though probably few who have ad-
mired Byron's well-known lines are aware of it.
Cf. K. Philips, "On Controversies in Religion"

" And meets that Eagle's destiny, whose breast
Felt the same shaft which his own feathers drest."



TO THE MUTABLE FAIR.

In W. /?., 1640, this follows "Fairest piece,"
&c., and is headed " The Reply " ; it was also
printed in Francis Beaumont's Poems, 1653.

P. 1 08, //. 55-56. Cf. p. 104, 11. 39-40. "Ca-
moens, speaking of the voyages of the Argonauts and
of Ulysses, says that the undertakings of the Portu-
guese shall give credit to all those fables in sur-
passing them." Bayle, iv. 84.

TO CHLOR1S.

In the edition of 1645 these verses were headed
" To Chloris uppon a favour receaved." Fenton had
seen a copy of an old edition in which there was a
note that Mr. Waller said this poem was "supposi-
titious " ; he was unable to reject it, and could only
suppose that the poet " wrote it when he was young,
and afterwards was too delicate to own it under the
title which it bears in the first impression " ; it
appears in Ayrcs and Dialogues, vol. ii., 1655, headed
" To a Lady, more affable since the war began " !



3i8 EDMUND WALLER.

CHLORIS AND HYLAS.

In W. R. , 1640, " On the approaching Spring."
/". 114, //. 1-2. Cf. Pope, " Spring," 25-26.

" Why sit we mute, when early linnets sing,
When warbling Philomel salutes the spring ? "

IN ANSWER OF SIR JOHN SUCKLING'S VERSES.

P. 117, /. 28. Cf. Oldham, "A fragment of
Petronius paraphras'd "

" I hate Fruition, now 'tis past,
'Tis all but nastiness at best ;
The homeliest thing that man can do."

ON A BREDE OF DIVERS COLOURS.

In W. R., 1640, "On a brede of divers colours,
woven by four Maids of Honour, and presented to
the Queen on New Year's Day last."

P. 121, //. 5-6. Cf. p. 242, 11. 11-12.

TO CHLORIS.

These lines, after appearing in the edition of 1645,
were, for some reason, omitted from all the other
editions published during Waller's life.

BEHOLD THE BRAND OF BEAUTY TOSSED!

Printed in Francis Beaumont's Poems, 1653.

WHILE I LISTEN TO THY VOICE.
Ayres and Dialogues, 1653-

GO, LOVELY ROSE !

W. R., 1640, "On the Rose." Ayres and
Dialogues, vol. ii., 1655.



NOTES. 319

Cf. Pope, " Spring," 61 et seq. in the original MS.
" Go flow'ry wreath, and let my Sylvia know,
Compared to thine how bright her beauties show ;
Then die ; and dying, teach the lovely maid
How soon the brightest beauties are decayed."

The above seem to be a direct imitation of Waller's
lines, but as has been pointed out (Notes and Queries,
5th series, xi. 275), the simile was so common in the
sixteenth and seventeenth centuries " that it would
be almost impossible to say who did not use it.
Among the best known are Spenser, Faerie Queene,
Bk. ii. 12. 74-75. Fairfax, Tasso, xvi. 14-15.
Giles Fletcher, Christ's Victorie. Fanshawe's transl.
Pastor Ftdo, and again in Additional Poems. Samuel
Daniel, Description of Beauty translated out of Marino >
and again in Sonnet to Delia. Stanley, Time Re-
covered. Harrington, Orlando Furioso, Bk. i. 42-43.
It is used by Erasmus in his Colloquies more than
once, and is to be found in Ausonius, Catullus, (both
quoted by Burton in his Anatomy) and the Book of
Wisdom. It is also more or less closely followed by
Chaucer, Drummond, Cleveland, Prior, &c." To
the above may be added, Robert Chester, and,
perhaps best known of all, Herrick.
Kirke White added

" Yet, though thou fade,

From thy dead leaves let fragrance rise ;

And teach the maid

That goodness Time's rude hand defies,

That Virtue lives when Beauty dies."
Lines, which, in Southey's opinion, Waller might
have written if he had pursued the subject in this



320 EDMUND WALLER.

UNDER A LADY'S PICTURE.

W. R., 1640, " To be ingraven under the Queen's
Picture." Lines 1-2 are here printed for the first
time from a common-place book of Edmund Waller,
the son of the poet, now in the possession of Mr.
Waller; there the heading is, "This was written
under my Lady Speke's Picture."

WRITTEN IN MY LADY SPEKE'S SINGING-BOOK.

These lines, printed here for the first time, are
taken from the common-place book mentioned above.
See note on " Epitaph on Sir George Speke."

TO ONE MARRIED TO AN OLD MAN.

W. R., 1640, " To the wife being marryed to that
old man" (referring to another epigram which
precedes).

AN EPIGRAM ON A PAINTED LADY, &C.

This appeared in the edition of 1645, and was not
reprinted during Waller's life.

P. 131, //. 1-2. Cf. Vaughan, Upon Mr. Fletcher's
Playes.

" For thou hast drain'd Invention, and he
That writes hereafter, doth but pillage thee."

P. 132, /. 8 and 1. 12. Melantius and Aspasia are
characters in "The Maid's Tragedy," which Waller
"altered." While all the critics agree in regarding
"The Maid's Tragedy" as the joint production of
the two dramatists, some have ascribed more than
three-fourths of it to Beaumont.



NOTES, 321

VERSES TO DR. GEORGE ROGERS, &C.

These lines first appeared with the Oratio In Gym-
nasio Patavino Habita Prid. Col. Maii An. 1646,
&c., a Georgia Rogers Anglo, Doctura gradu smcepto,
in what the bookseller calls Auctarium rive super-
pondium hoc poeticum, given him by Dr. Downes,
F.C.P.L. There are several other copies of verses,
all but Waller's, in Latin, among them one signed
loan. Euelinus Anglus. Dr. Rogers was incorporated
in the University of Oxford, April 14, 1647, and
afterwards became President of the College of
Physicians.

TO MY LADY MORTON, &C.

This poem first appeared as a broadside, London,
Printed for Henry Herriitgman on tfie Lower walk
of the New Exchange. 1661. It was doubtless
written, as it purports to have been, in France, and
was printed by Waller when the prophecy contained
in 11. 45-46 had been fulfilled. I suppose it is in
connection with this poem that Robert Wild speaks
of Waller as "Great Poet and true Prophet too."
Ann, Countess of Morton, was the daughter of Sir
Edward Villiers, half-brother of George, first Duke of
Buckingham. She married Robert Douglas, Lord
Dalkeith, who, on the death of his father, became
Earl of Morton. The story of her flight, disguised as
a French servant, from Oatlands to France, in 1646,
with the Princess Henrietta, is well known. She
died in December, 1654.

P. 135, //. 31-32. Cf. p. 200, 1. 5.

Y



322 EDMUND WALLER.

TO SIR WILLIAM DAVENANT, &C.

These lines first appeared in a little lamo book
published in Paris in 1650, A Discourse upon Gondi-
bert. An Heroick Poem Written by Sir William
D'Avenant With an Answer to it by Mr. Hobbs>
they were reprinted with both the editions of " Gondi-
bert " published in 1651. The heading at first was,
"To Sir William D'Avenant, Upon his two first
books of Gondibert, finished before his Voyage to
America" the words "Written in France," were
substituted for the last six of this title, in the " 1664"
and other editions of Waller's Poems. Sir William
Davenant (1606-1668), his "Gondibert," his mis-
fortunes, and the sport he made for the wits of his time
are all too well known to need particular mention
here. He had been in trouble in connection with the
Army Plot in 1641, and had fled to France, but
afterwards returned to England, and was, on
March 8, 1644, accused by the Parliament of High
Treason. He formed the design of conveying a party
of artificers, chiefly weavers, from France to Virginia,
but the vessel in which he had embarked having been
captured by one of the ships in the service of the
English Parliament, he was confined in Cowes Castle,
and afterwards in the Tower.

A PANEGYRIC TO MY LORD PROTECTOR, &C.

There were two editions of this poem in 1655
(i) A | Panegyrick | To j My Lord Protector, |
Of | The present Greatness and joynt Inn | terest of


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