Edmund Waller.

The poems of Edmund Waller; online

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to England in 1642, and at once began to distinguish
himself in the Civil War. He was slain in an
engagement at Gainsborough, July 28, 1643, and
was buried at Newark ; his remains were removed
and laid by those of his mother at Derby, in 1675,
when this epitaph was probably written.



NOTES. 341

THE TRIPLE COMBAT.

The Duchess of Mazarin arrived in England in 1675 :
she and the Duchess of Portsmouth are sufficiently
well known, but I am unable to identify Chloris, the
third combatant : possibly the Duchess of Cleveland
may be meant. Evelyn speaks of seeing " the King
sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth,
Cleveland, and Mazarin."

P. 205, /. 20. The Duchess of Portsmouth was
born in Lower Bretagne, which was known as " Little
Britain."

F. 206, /. 42. Alluding to the ravages committed
by the French under Turenne in Alsace.

UPON OUR LATE LOSS OF THE DUKE OF

CAMBRIDGE.

Charles, Duke of Cambridge, the first son of the
Duke of York by Mary of Modena, was born Nov. 7,
1677, and died when he was about a month old.

OF THE LADA MARY, &C.

The Prince of Orange landed at Harwich, Oct. 9,
1677, and was married to Princess Mary on Nov. 4,
following.

TO THE PRINCE OF ORANGE.

This poem was first printed by Chalmers in his
edition of the British Poets, 1810.

ON THE DUKE OF MONMOUTH's EXPEDITION.

The expedition was rendered necessary by a rebel-
lion following on the murder of Archbishop Sharp,
May 3, 1679. The Duke gained a decisive victory over
the Covenanters at Bothwell-bridge, June 22, 1679.



342 EDMUND WALLER.

P. 213, //. 46 ad fin. These lines are supplied from
the common-place book of the poet's son.

UPON THE EARL OF ROSCOMMON's TRANSLATION

OF HORACE.

These lines were published in 1680 with a transla-
tion of the "Ars Poetica " by Wentworth Dillon,
fourth Earl of Roscommon. Lord Roscommon
(1633 ?-i685) was also the author of "An Essay upon
Translated Verse," and is distinguished as the first
critic who publicly praised " Paradise Lost."
P. 214, //. 7-8. Cf. p. 224, 11. 7-8.
P. 214, //. 1 1 -12. Cf. Pope, "Essay on Criti-
cism," 86-7.

" The winged courser, like a gen'rous horse,
Shows most true mettle when you check his course."

P. 215, //. 23-8. Cf. p. 226, 11. 9-14.

OF AN ELEGY MADE BY MRS. WHARTON, &C.

Mrs. Wharton, the wife of Thomas, eldest son of
Philip, Lord \Vharton, was daughter and co-heiress
with the Countess of Abingdon, of Sir Henry Lee of
Ditchley in Oxfordshire : her great-aunt was the Earl
of Rochester's mother.

TO MR. CREECH, &C.

Fenton says that this poem is not Waller's, but in
the Epistle Dedicatory to George Pitt, Esq. (2nd
edition of the translation of Lucretius), Creech says,
" But it would be improper to be my own trumpet,
and Mr. Waller, Mr. Evelyn, and a Thousand more
beside the publick approbation have freed me from
all the little disturbances of Cavils. " Thomas Creech,
(born 1659), Fellow of Wadham College, Oxford, was



MOTES. 343

the author of translations of portions of Ovid, Juvenal,
Horace, &c ; he took orders in 1699, and was
presented by his college to the living of Welwyn, in
Hertfordshire, but committed suicide in the following
year.

SUNG BY MRS. KNIGHT, &C.
The Queen was born on St. Catherine's Day, and
was frequently painted in the character of that Saint.
Mrs. Knight is frequently mentioned by Pepys and
Evelyn, and " Orinda " tells " Poliarchus " she would
be more proud to have one assurance from him, than
to have her verses " composed by Will. Lawes, were
he still alive, and sung by Mrs. Knight."

OF TEA, COMMENDED BY HER MAJESTY.

This is, as far as I have been able to discover, the
first poem in English written in praise of tea, which
was in Waller's time an article of luxury. It became
a fashionable beverage at Court, owing to the example
of the Queen, who had been accustomed to it in
Portugal, and the treatise of Bontekoe, a Dutch
physician, published in 1678, setting forth its
medicinal virtues, led to its geneial use in many parts
of Europe.

P. 222, /. i. Cf. Virgil, Eel. vii. 62, " Formosa
myrtus Veneri, sua laurea Phrebo."

OF THE INVASION AND DEFEAT OF THE TUFKS.

The Turks, under the Grand Vizier, Cara
Mustapha, laid siege to Vienna in July, 1683, but on
Sept. 10 they were driven from the walls in great
disorder by John Sobieski, king of Poland. To
shield himself from the obloquy of this defeat, the



344 EDMUND WALLER.

Sultan was compelled to sacrifice his favourite, the
Grand Vizier, who was strangled at Belgrade, Dec. 25,
1683.

P. 228, /. 1 6. Ibrahim, the father of the Sultan
Mahomet, had been deposed and strangled in 1649.

P. 229, /. 23. The Grand Vizier had ordered the
execution of the Bassa of Buda, on the pretended
ground that he had failed in performing his duty in
an engagement with the Imperialists before Vienna.

P. 229, //. 39-40. Cf. p. 234, 11. 1-2.
A PRESAGE OF THE RUIN OF THE TURKISH EMPIRE.

P. 233. "Ausus et ipse," &c. Virgil. JEn. v.
499.

TO HIS MAJESTY, UPON HIS MOTTO, &C.

This poem, reprinted here for the first time, is
found in some copies of the edition of 1686, on a
separate leaf inserted after the Table of Contents.
Buda fell .September 2, 1 686, so it was probably
written while the book was going through the press.

EPITAPH OX SIR GEORGE SPEKE.

Sir George Speke, second Baronet, was the son of
Hugh Speke of Hasilbury, who died July 15, 1661.
Sir George represented Bath and Chippenham in
several Parliaments, and died Jan. 14, 1682. His
mother (born Mayney) was Waller's niece.

EPITAPH ON HENRY DUNCH, ESQ.
This gentleman was a member of the family of
Dunch, settled at Newington, a branch of the family
of the same name of Little Wittenham, in Berkshire :
they were connected by marriage with both Cromwell
and Waller.



NOTES. 345

TO MB. GRANVILLE.

George Granville, or Grenville, second son of
Bernard Granville, was born in 1667 ; he was entered
at Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1677, and before
he was twelve years old recited verses of his own to
the Duchess of York when she visited the University.
He was created Lord Lansdowne, Dec. 30, 1711,
and died Jan. 30, 173$. Johnson says of him, "he
had no ambition above the imitation of Waller, of
whom he has copied the faults and very little more."

EPITAPH ON THE LADY SEDLEY.

Lady Sedley, mother of the poet, was the daughter
of Sir Henry Savil, the learned Provost of Eton.

P. 243, //. 27-8. Cf. Walpole, Account of Lord
Somtrs, " one of those divine men, who, like a chapel
in a palace, remain unprofaned, while all the rest is
Tyranny, Corruption, and Folly."

UPON A LADY'S FISHING.

Printed here for the first time from a MS. in the
Library of the Royal Society.

ON MRS. HIGGONS.

These lines were first printed by Chalmers, in 1810.
DIVINE POEMS.

Waller's "Divine Poems " were, with the exception
of the lines on " The Fear of God," collected and
published in 1685. I only know of the existence of
one copy of the book, that in the library of Mr.
H. Buxton Forman, who has very kindly allowed me
to collate it.

Divine | Poems. | By Edmond Waller Esq ; j



346 EDMUND WALLER.

Licensed, | Octob. 3. 1685 | Rob. Miclgley. | In the
Savoy : | Printed for Henry Herringman ; and are
to | be sold by Jos. Knight and Fran. Saun- | ders, at
the Sign of the Anchor in the | Lower Walk of the
New-Exchange in the | Strand. 1685. A 2 C2 in
eights.

P. 255, /. 1 8. This line was correctly printed in
the editions of 1682 and 1686, but in that of 1694,
by some accident, the word " Nature " dropped out ;
the editor of the next edition substituted " several,"
which has since appeared in the text, and destroyed
the sense.

/". 258. The Latin lines are adapted from
Lucretius iii. 1.1-16, omitting 1. 15

" Floriferis ut apes in saltibus omnia libant,
Omnia nos itidem depascimur aurea dicta,
Aurea perpetua semper dignissima vita,
Nam simul ac ratio tua ccepit vociferari.

Diffugiunt animi terrores "
and Ovid, De Trist, iv. I. 2-3, and 43-44

" Sic ubi rnota calent viridi mea pectora thyrso
Altior," &c.

OF THE LAST VERSES IN THE BOOK.

Mr. Waller has a transcript of these lines, headed,
" The last verses my dear ffather made."

P. 272, //. 12-13. Fuller says that Monica, the
mother of Augustine, "saw a glimpse of happiness
through the chinks of her sickness-broken body."

Cf. Pope, "Dunciad," iv. 125-26

" And you, my Critics, in the chequer'd shade,
Admire new light thro' holes yourselves have made."



INDEX TO FIRST LINES.

PACK

Ah, lovely Amoret ! the care 85

Aid me Bellona ! while the dreadful fight ... 66
All this her weeping sister does repeat ... ... 157

Amaze us not with that majestic frown,... ... 223

Amoret ! the Milky Way 83

An early plant ! which such a blossom bears, .. 239
And is antiquity of no more force ! . . ... 89

Anger, in hasty words or blows ... ... ... 87

Arcadiae juvenis Thyrsis, Phoebique sacerdos ... 53
As gathered flowers, while their wounds are new, 195
As in old chaos (heaven with earth confused, ... 51
As lately I on silver Thames did ride, ... ... 40

As once the lion honey gave, ... ... ... 208

As when a sort of wolves infest the night ... 50

Aspasia bleeding on the stage does lie, ... ... 227

Balls of this metal slacked Atlanta's pace ... 1 1 1

Behold, and listen while the fair ... ... ... 91

Behold the brand of beauty tossed ! ... ... 126

Bold is the man that dares engage ... ... 201

Brave Holland leads, and with him Falkland

goes. ... 75

Buda and Rhodes proud Solyman had torn ... 234

Chloris ! farewell. I now must go; ... ... 238

Chloris ! since first our calm of peace ... ... 112

Chloris ! what's eminent, we know 122

Chloris! yourself you so excel, ... ... ... 105

Circles are praised, not that abound 240



348 EDMUND WALLER.

PAGE

Darkness which fairest nymphs disarms, ... 193

Design, or chance, makes others wive; ... ... 92

Earth praises conquerors for shedding blood, ... 270
Fade, flowers ! fade, Nature will have it so ; ... 240
Fair fellow-servant ! may your gentle ear ... 55

Fair hand ! that can on virgin paper write, ... 196
Fair! that you may truly know ... ... ... $8

Fairest piece of well-formed earth ! ... ... 103

Farewell the year ! which threatened so ... 173

First draw the sea, that portion which between 176
Fletcher ! to thee we do not only owe ... ... 131

Floribus Angligenis non hanc tibi necto corollam 148

Go, lovely Rose ! ... ... ... .. ... 128

Great Queen of Europe! where thy offspring wears 35
Great Queen ! that does our island bless ... 189

Great soul ! for whom Death will no longer stay, 244

Had Sacharissa lived when mortals made ... 46

He that did first this way of writing grace, ... 261

Her fair eyes, if they could see ... ... ... 129

Here Celia ! for thy sake I part ... ... ... 106

Here lies Charles Ca'ndish : let the marble stone, 203

Here lies the learned Savil's heir ; ... ... 242

Here lies the prop and glory of his race, ... 237

Heroic nymph ! in tempests the support, .. 202

His sacred name with reverence profound ... 265

How bold a work attempts that pen, ... ... 28

Hylas, oh Hylas ! why sit we mute, ... ... 1 14

Ingenious Higgons never sought ... ... ... 246

It is not that I love you less, ... ... ... 101

Lately on yonder swelling bush, 98



INDEX TO FIRST LINES. 349

PAGE

Madam, as in some climes the warmer sun ... 94

Madam! I here present you with the rage, ... 199

Madam ! intending to have tried... ... ... 109

Madam ! new years may well expect to find ... 131

Madam ! of all the sacred Muse inspired, ... 21

May those already cursed Essex ian plains, ... 37

Mirror of poets ! mirror of our age ! ... ... 29

My charge it is those breaches to repair... ... So

No wonder sleep from careful lovers flies, ... 49

Not caring to observe the wind, ... ... ... 100

Not that thy trees at Penshurst groan, ... ... 47

Not the brave Macedonian youth alone, ... 242

Not willing terror should his image move ; ... 251

Nothing lies hid from radiant eyes ; ... ... 197

Now, for some ages, had the pride of Spain ... 151
Now had his Highness bid farewell to Spain ; ... I

Of Jason, Theseus, and such worthies old, ... 13

Of the first Paradise, there's nothing found ; ... 168

Of their alarm, and how the foes ... ... 69

Our guard upon the royal side ! ... ... ... 193

Our sighs are heard ; just Heaven declares ... 97

Peace, babbling Muse ! ... ... ... ... 124

Phyllis! 'twas love that injured you, ... ... 27

Phyllis ! why should we delay .. ... ... 84

Poets may boc.st as safely vain, ... ... ... 197

Poets we prize, when in their verse we find ... 259

Pygmalion's fate reversed is mine ; ... ... 99

Rare Artisan, whose pencil moves ... ... 44

Rome was not better by her Horace taught, ... 214

Rome's holy-days you tell, as if a guest 241



35 EDMUND WALLER.

PAGE

Say, lovely dream ! where couldst thou find ... 53
Scarce should we have the boldness to pretend... 224
Sedibus emigrans solids, comitatus inermi ... 12
See ! how the willing earth gave way, ... ... 96

See ! where the fair Clorinda sits, and seems ... 244
Sees not my love how time resumes ... ... 113

Silence, you winds! listen, ethereal lights ! ... 264
Since James the Second graced the British

throne,... ... ... ... ... ... 231

Since thou wouldst needs (bewitched with some

ill charms !) ... ... ... ... ... 130

Sir, you should rather teach our age the way ... 192
So earnest with thy God ! can no new care, ... II
So we some antique hero's strength ... ... no

Some ages hence, for it must not decay, ... ... 129

Stay here, fond youth ! and ask no more ; be

wise ; ... ... ... ... ... ... 116

Stay, Phoebus! stay; ... ... ... ... 123

Strange! that such horror and such grace ... 175
Such moving sounds from such a careless touch ! 90
Such was Philoclea, and such Dorus' flame ! ... 43
Swift as Jove's messenger, the winged God, ... 212

Tassoknew how the fairer sex to grace, .

Tell me, lovely, loving pair !

That chance and atoms make this all

That shipwrecked vessel which the Apostle bore,

That sun of beauty did among us rise ; ...

That the first Charles does here in triumph ride,

That which her slender waist confined, ...

The bloody fight, successless toil...

The boat which on the first assault did go,



INDEX TO FIRST LINES. 351

PAGE

The cards you tear in value rise ;... ... ... 220

The failing blossoms which a young plant bears, 207
The fear of God is freedom, joy, and peace, ... 267
The fear of hell, or aiming to be blessed, ... 249

The fierce Melantius was content, you see, ... 226
The Grecian Muse has all their gods survived,... 247
The lark, that shuns on lofty boughs to build ... 77
The modern Nimrod, with a safe delight ... 228

The rising sun complies with our weak sight, ... 163
The winged lion's not so fierce in fight, ... 156

They taste of death that do at heaven arrive ; ... 26
They that never had the use ... ... ... 120

This happy day two lights are seen, ... ... 220

This Iron Age (so fraudulent and bold !) ... 254

Though rocks so high about this island rise, ... 69
Though the creation (so divinely taught ! ) ... 257
Though we may seem importunate, ... ... 221

Thrice happy pair! of whom we cannot know ... 102
Thus by the music we may know ... ... 146

Thus mourn the Muses ! on the hearse... ... 217

Thus the wise nightingale that leaves her home, 136
Thyrsis, a youth of the inspired train, ... ... 52

'Tis fit the English reader should be told, ... 191
'Tis not your beauty can engage ... ... ... 125

To glory, man, or misery is born, 253

To this great loss a sea of tears is due ; ... ... 31

Treading the path to nobler ends, ... ... 93

Twice twenty slender virgin-fingers twine ... 121

Under this stone lies virtue, youth, ... ... 235

Venus her myrtle, Phoebus has his bays ; ... 222
Verse makes heroic virtue live ; ... ... ... 19



352 EDMUND WALLER.

PAGE

We must resign ! Heaven his great soul does

claim ... ... ... ... ... ... 162

Welcome, great Prince, unto this land, ... ... 210

Well fare the hand ! which to our humble sight 8

Were men so dull they could not see ... ... 131

What all men wished, but few could hope to see, 218

What fruits they have, and how Heaven smiles 66

What fury has provoked thy wit to dare, ... 24

What revolutions in the world have been, ... 221

What's she, so late from Penshurst come, ... 62

When as of old the earth's bold children strove, 133

When from black clouds no part of sky is clear, 22

When through the world fair Mazarin had run, 205

When we for age could neither read nor write, ... 272

Where'er thy navy spreads her canvas wings, 15

While I listen to thy voice, ... ... ... 127

While in the park I sing, the listening deer ... 64

While she pretends to make the graces known... 130

While with a strong and yet a gentle hand, ... 138

Whilst I was free I wrote with high conceit, ... 75

Why came I so untimely forth ... ... ... 57

With joy like ours the Thracian youth invades... 33

You gods that have the power ... ... ... 82



THE END.



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Online LibraryEdmund WallerThe poems of Edmund Waller; → online text (page 21 of 21)