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been sent as an Austrian ultimatum to St Petersburgh,
the period for the Russian reply being limited to the i8th
of January. The Emperor of the French had made it
understood that he was prepared either to make peace on
these terms, or to continue the war with increased vigour,
and he suggested that a council of war should meet in
Paris to settle the course of action for the following spring.
In consequence, British, French, and Italian officers,
convened for the purpose, held their sittings in his capital,
while the intention of Russia was still undeclared.

The alliance, thanks to the good faith of Louis
Napoleon, having thus proved firm, the hollow preten-
sions of Russia vanished like a bubble. Her exhaustion
left her no choice but to accept. Her losses, never
accurately known, had been stupendous. Up to the end
of August those in the Crimea alone were estimated at
153,000 men, while hundreds of thousands, drawn from
the recesses of the vast Empire, had died of the hardships
of the march. Altogether it was confidently believed
that her total loss during the war was not less than half
a million of men.

On the 1 6th of January she accepted the Austrian
terms as the basis of conference, and on the 25th February
the Plenipotentiaries of the Powers met at Paris. Their
first act was to settle the conditions of an armistice, which



The Treaty of Peace. 301

was to last till the 3ist March. After that, the first
point taken was the neutralisation of the Black Sea,
and the article opening its waters to the commerce of
all nations, and interdicting it to ships of war, was
passed with unexpected facility. Another article which
excluded Russia from the bank of the Danube was
more strenuously contested by her representatives ;
but this also was finally agreed to. Also, an article
was included which admitted Turkey to a participa-
tion in the public law and concert of Europe, and
prohibited the other Powers, singly or collectively,
from interference in questions between the Sultan and
his subjects, or in the internal administration of his
Empire.

The Treaty of Paris was signed on the 3Oth March.
It was well known in the congress that, but for Eng-
land, the conditions imposed on Russia would have been
far easier. And though they were still too easy, yet
England might congratulate herself on having obtained
so much in circumstances so adverse. For the Emperor
was perhaps the only man in France who held firmly to
the alliance. The French nation had no strong interest
in the affairs of Turkey, and was now ready to believe,
and to proclaim, that it had been made the tool of
England. And Louis Napoleon himself had already
obtained from the war all that was necessary for his pur-
pose, in the victory of the Tchernaya, and the brilliant
finale of the Malakoff ; while the unfortunate condition
into which his army in the Crimea had fallen during the
winter supplied an ample reason for desiring peace.



3O2 Strength of the British Army.

Nevertheless he continued to act in thorough unison with
his ally, and again declared that he was ready to recom-
mence the war if Russia should refuse her concurrence to
the treaty. The feeling with which the two nations re-
garded the close of the war was thus expressed by the
Prince Consort : " Peace is signed. Here it has been
received with moderate satisfaction ; in Paris with exulta-
tion." That they should have cause for even moderate
satisfaction was by the British people rightly attributed
to the firm, patriotic spirit of Palmerston, who, amid
all the clamours of the Peace Party and the Oppo-
sition, steered right on, winning a popularity which,
when he appealed to the Country in the following
year, returned him to power with a largely increased
majority.

On the 2d April the Upland was for the last
time shaken by the thunders of the artillery of the
Allies. This time it proclaimed in salutes the tidings
of peace. To those who have noted the difficulty with
which we put even a small army in the field in these
days, the dislocation of all our establishments which
attends the operation, and the paucity of reserves, there
is something almost marvellous in the strength of our
Forces in the Crimea at the close of a war in which we
had lost 22,000 men. At Christmas 1855 we had there
still greater forces of men than those already enumerated,
with 1 20 guns ; and in the middle of April 18,000 fresh
.troops were mustered at a field-day in Aldershot camp.
The land transport, the commissariat, and the hospital
system of the Army were all in excellent working order.



The Results of the War. 303

But they did not long remain so. Upon the return of
the Army, the reduction of its establishments was effected
in the usual reckless fashion. We soon reverted to our
customary condition of military inefficiency, and during
the next thirty years nearly all that remained to us as
the result of the experience which we had gained in the
war were the present excellent system of our military
hospitals, the great example of these established at
Netley, the framework of the Land Transport corps,
which still survives in the Army Service corps, and
Aldershot camp.

For a whole generation the world continued to have
the benefit of the war in the enforced quiescence of
Russia. Her wounds were too deep to permit her dur-
ing that time to attempt measures of aggression, or to
indulge a desire to disturb the peace of the world. And
this result proved that the point of attack upon her had
been rightly and fortunately selected. The small pro-
portion of coast line she exposes to the descent of an
invader, the immense distances from the extremities to
the heart of the Empire, the scarcity of roads, the rigours
of the climate, all rendered the attack of the Western
Powers upon Russia a nearly insoluble problem. But
on the other hand, when she had once resolved to bring
all her might and all her resources to bear on the defence
of Sebastopol, these conditions turned against her, and
rendered her course absolutely ruinous. Her fleets were
at once imprisoned in their ports, her troops were obliged
to traverse enormous spaces to reach the point of conflict,
the length and bad condition of the lines of communica-



304 Russia repudiates the Treaty later.

tion rendered the supply of the Army difficult and ex-
travagantly costly, the winter brought untold losses to
the columns moving through mud and snow, and exposed
to piercing winds. The requisitions for supplies and
transport disorganised Southern Russia, and ruined its
husbandry. A speedy victory of the Allies, however
complete, would have left the great resources of the
enemy untouched, and the victors without an object.
In such a case, it is difficult to say how or when the war
would have ended, or how long the Western nations
would have endured to see it drag on. But, in the
course of the long siege, every failure on the part
of the Allies, every gleam of hope which induced
Russia to send fresh reinforcements to the Crimea,
only served to prolong the terrible stress which was
exhausting her.

Therefore the war was worth all it had cost. Its
effect was not merely to defeat, but to disarm and dis-
able the enemy. But to this advantage there was a
limit. It had always been felt that Russia would not
submit to the treaty longer than it could be enforced.
A condition compelling a Power to refrain from certain
acts on which it is bent will be repudiated at a fitting
opportunity. It was when the Germans were in Ver-
sailles that the Minister of the Czar issued a Note
repudiating the Treaty of Paris. That was a moment
when the other signatories were in no condition to
enforce it, and Russia set about, among other things,
the restoration of Sebastopol as a naval station, with its
docks and arsenal. A Black Sea Fleet was once more



England retains Interest in the Crimea. 305

to ride in its harbour, and was to be again a standing
menace to Turkey. On the i8th May 1886 the Tchesma
ironclad was launched by the Czar in person at Sebas-
topol ; and on the 28th May 1890 it was announced in
the Times that "the official trials of the Imperial
Russian ironclad Sinope " (ominous name !) " were com-
pleted at Sebastopol last week, and the results were
considered highly satisfactory. This formidable war-
ship, one of the most powerful in the Russian Navy, has
been built at Sebastopol, and forms one of the Black
Sea Fleet." Thus had the great war been rounded off
into an episode, having no further connection with the
future. Other great wars have been fought out since,
with more permanent influence on the destinies of
nations ; new and pressing interests have arisen ; old
alliances, with their obligations, have been dissolved ;
and, amid the shiftings of European policy, Russia once
more makes ready for her opportunity.

But the interest of England in that Upland, and
those valleys, on which her eyes and thoughts were once
so earnestly bent, has not yet entirely ceased. Their
soil still holds a multitude of her sons, the memory of
whom has not altogether died out. In spots outside
the several camps to which the dead could be most
readily conveyed, in the precincts of battlefields, in the
neighbourhood of conflicts in the trenches, a great
number of burial-grounds had been formed, which were
afterwards enclosed with some kind of fence, and gar-
nished with memorials. A commanding point of the
exterior range of hills, which extended between the



306 The Graves of the Crimea.

camps of the British Divisions and their siege batteries,
was known as Cathcart's Hill, because the general who
fell at Inkerman was buried there, with many others.
It had become the chief cemetery; it was enclosed with
a lofty wall, and the graves, carefully tended by the com-
rades of those who lay there, were marked with head-
stones and crosses, and more considerable mementoes.
Englishmen visiting the plateau in recent times noticed
that the fences of these grave-yards had become ruin-
ous, and that many of the bones were scattered. When
this became known at home, it was resolved that all the
remains which had not yet mixed with the soil, and
reappeared in the grass and the flowers, should be trans-
ported, along with their memorial stones, to Cathcart's
Hill, the cemetery on which should be placed in repair,
and provision made for so maintaining it. All this was
effected a few years ago. The Englishman who may
still be attracted to the spot reads there names once
well known in England ; and looking on the neighbour-
ing hills and hollows, where so protracted a strife was
waged, and where so many thousands fell, he sees the
points which mark the Russian lines of defence, with
the famous Malakoff and Mamelon standing up in all
their former defiance ; while beyond, against the blue
of the Euxine, are the streets and domes and churches
of the city, risen from its ashes. New batteries protect
the shore, the docks once more resound with the clang
of labour, the port is filled with the barks of commerce,
and guarded by the vessels of war. Yet a few years,
and all those who still remember how passionately the



All that remains of the War. 307

thoughts and wishes of the people of England were
once directed on this spot, will themselves have de-
parted, and nothing will then survive to remind the
world of this long and desperate conflict of giants
except a page in history.



THE END.



INDEX.



A.

ABERDEEN, Lord, 5, 13, 183.

Adams, Brigadier, 31, 56, 145, 148.

Agamemnon, The, 30, 38, 106.

Airey. General, 75, 187.

Aldershot, 303.

Alexander II., Czar, 216.

Alexander, Fort. 81.

Allied Armies, Landing of, 40.

Allied Armies, Losses of, 62, 106, 158, 176, 254,

260 271, 281, 285.

Allied Armies, Strength of, 31, 40, 98, 128, 268.
Allied Fleets, 10, 14, 22, 30, 68, 98, 106.
Alma, Battle of, 54.
Alma, River, 38, 47, 66.
Alma Tamack, 47.
Aloushta, 219, 228, 235.
Anapa, 242.
Arabat, Fort, 242.
Argonauts, 24-
Army Service Corps, 303.
Artillery Fort, 81.
Austria, 3, 21. 217, 223, 297.
Austria, Emperor of, 3, 20.
Austrian Ultimatum, 300.
Azof, Sea of, 226, 240.

B.

BAIDAR, Valley of, 219, 228, 235, 243, 291, 294.

Bakshisarai, 37, 43, 71, 76, 219, 235, 294.

Balaklava, 36, 38, 72, 78. 80, 167.

Balaklava, Battle of, no.

Balchick, Bay of, 29.

Balkans, The, 19.

Barrack Battery, 92.

' Barrier, The,' 142, 145, 147.

Bastion No. i, 89.

Bazaine, General, 291.

Belbek River, 38, 76, 269.

Bellegarde, General, 269.

Bentinck, General. 31.

Berlin, 298.

Bisson. General, 278.

Bizot, General. 199, 227.

Black Sea, 17, 22, 36, 223, 240, .288, 299, 301.

Bladensburg, 32.

Bomarsund, 204.

Bombardment, 104, 210, 248, 277,



Bosphorus, 2, 10, 16, 180.

Bosquet. General, 50, 54, 82, 124, 139, 153, 250,

255, 27^8, 280.
Bouat, General, 279.
Bourbaki, General, 153, 278.
Bourliouk, 47, 51, 53, 66.
Brancion, Colonel, 251.
Breton, General, 279.
Bright, Mr, 162.
Brown, Sir George, 32, 55, 153.
Bruat, Admiral. 226.
Brunei, General, 261.
Bug, River, 291.
Bulganak, River, 38, 44.
Bulgaria, 28.

Buller, General, 32, 56, 139, 143.
Burgoyne, General, 93.
Burgoyne, Sir John, 38, 69, 93, 103, 105, 178,

191, 198, 207, 224.

C.

CAMBRIDGE, Duke of, 31.

Camou, General, 278.

Campbell, Brigadier, 31, 260.

Campbell, Sir Colin, 31, 61, 127.

Candia, n.

Canrobert, General, 38, 50, 54, 79, 122, 156, 171,

175, 199, 226, 228, 242.
Canrobert's Hill, no.
Caradoc, The, 38, 266.
Cardigan, Lord, 32, 115, 118, 187.
Careenage Creek, 81, 83, 89, 256.
Careenage Ravine, 96, 123, 135, 139, 151, 249.
Cathcart, Sir George, 31, 77, 89, 139, 147, 149,

Cathcart's Hill Cemetery, 306.
Catherine, Empress, 8.
Cemetery, 238, 260.
Central Bastion, 92, 97, 192, 238, 283.
Chapman's Battery, 95.
Changarnier, General, 230.
Chasseurs d'Afrique, 119.
Chasseurs Green, 251.
Chersonese, see Upland.
Cholera, 28. 66, 78, 93, 165.
Christians in Turkey, 6, 8, 12.
Cialdini, General, 279.
Circassia, 240, 295.



u



IO



Index.



Clarendon, Lord, 8, 14, 17, 220, 293.

Codrington, General, 32, 56, 139, 278, 282.

Col, The, 127, 178.

Committee of Inquiry, 183, 187.

Constantine, Fort, 81, 106.

Constantinople, 2, 7, 14, ao, 174, 180, 219, 295.

Couston, General, 279.

Cowley, Lord, 224, 293, 299.

Crimea, 24, 36, 109, 131, 163, 219, 236, 242, 290,

300.
Crimean Army Fund, 178.

D.

D'ALLONVILLE, General, 116, 291, 294.

Dannenberg, General, 137, 147.

Dante, 174.

Danube, 19, 21, 25, 301.

Danubian Principalities, 7, 19, 21.

Dardanelles, 2, 14, 299.

D'Autemarre, 279.

Decaen, General, 278.

Declaration of War, 9, 19.

De Failly, General, 278.

Delane, Mr John. 23.

De Salles, General, 279.

De Wimpffen, General, 278/291.

Diana, Temple of, 244.

Disraeli, Mr, 225.

Dnieper, River, 291.

Docks Ravine, 96, 200.

Don, River, 240.

Dragoon Guards, 4th, 112.

Dragoon Guards, sth, 112.

Dragoons, 4th Light, 32, 120.

Dragoons, i3th Light, 32, 121.

Dulac, General, 278.

Dundas, Admiral, 30, 99.

E.

EASTERN Question, 15.

Egerton, Colonel, 248.

Egypt, ii.

Engineer Journal, 193, 283.

England, 3, 10, 297, 301, 305.

England, NavaJ Power of, 4, 28, 297.

England, Public feeling in, 17, 22, 162, 174,

1 80. 183, 302.

English Army in the Crimea, 184, 296, 302.
Eupatoria, 37, 43, 205, 292, 294.
Evans, Sir De Lacy, 31, 35, 55, 56, 127, 132.
Eyre, General, 31, 260.

F.

FEDIOUKINE Heights, 79, 116, 129, 268.
Filder, Mr (Commissary-General), 165, 167,

185.

Flagstaff Bastion, 82, 92, 97, 103, 128, 190, 246.
Forage, Want of, 169, 186.
Fore Ririge, 136, 148, 191.
Forey. General, 50, 82.
France, 3, 295.

France, Public feeling in, 18, 301.
Francis I., 6.
French Empire, 15.



GARDEN Batteries, 260.

German Legion, 296.

Germany, 3, 22, 295.

Giurgevo, 21.

Gladstone, Mr. 225.

Gordon, Charles, 202.

Gordon's Battery, 96.

Gortschakoff, Prince, 129, 137, 147, 153, 155

206, 268, 273.

Gortschakoff, 'Prince (Minister at Vienna), 216.
Grape shot, 259.
Greek Church, 6.
Green Hill, 95. 98, 260.
Guards, Coldstream, 31, 59, 139, 161.
Guards, Grenadier, 31, 59, 139.
Guards, Scots, 31, 59, 139.

H.

HARDINGE, Lord, 224.
Heavy Brigade, 31, 112, 114.
Henri IV., Loss of the, 167.
Herbert, Mr Sidney, 179, 181.
Highlanders, 42d, 31, 59, 61, 127, 203.
Highlanders, 79th, 31, 59, 61. 127.
Highlanders, 93_d, 31, 59, 61, 83, no, 114, 127.
Holy Places, Dispute about. 6.
Hospitals, 66, 166, 172, 182. 286, 303
Hungary, 3.
Hurricane, 166.
Hussars, Sth, 120.
Hussars, nth, 32, 120.

I.

INKERMAN, Battle of, 72, 125, 131, 191.
Inkerman Heights, 70, 83, 123, 290.
Inkerman, Mount, 135, 140, 191.
Inniskillings, 112.
Istomine, Admiral, 207, 267.
Italy, 3, 242.

JANNIN, Colonel, 278.

Jason, 24, 244.

Jones, General Harry, 207.

K.

KADIKOI, in, 178, 245.
Kalafat, 19.
Kalamita Bay, 39.
Kamara, 83, no, 203, 244.
Kamiesch, Bay of, 39, 82, 239.
Katcha. River, 38, 66.
Kazan Regiment, 56. 58, 61.
Kazatch, 82, 266.
Kertch, 226. 235, 240, 295.
Kherson. Cape,' 38, 82.
Khrouleff, General, 278.
Kinburn, 291, 293. 295.
Kinglake 54. 57, 67. 142.
Kitspur, The, 136.
Karabelnaia. 81.
Korniloff, Admiral, 84. 105. 207,
Kourgane" Hill, 48, 51, 53, 61.
Kulali, 1 80.



Index.



LA MARMORA, General, 242.
La Motterouge, General, 278.
Lancaster Battery, 96.
Lancers, i7th, 32, 120.
Lansdowne, Lord, 271.
Latin Church, 6, 15.
Lazareff. Admiral, 267.
Levaillant, General, 279.
Light Brigade, 29, 32, 112, 116, 118.
Liprandi, General, 109, 116, 269.
London, The, 106.
Lucan, Lord, 112, 115, 171, 187.
Lyndhurst, Lord, 23.

Lyons, Admiral, Sir Edmund, 30, 68, 77, 80,
101, 106.

M.

MACDONALD, Mr, 181.

Mackenzie's Farm, 72, 7=;, 219, 270, 294.

MacMahon, General, 278.

MacMurdo, Colonel, 208.

M'Neill, Sir John, 184.

Malakoff, 82, 89, 92, 103, 190, 248, 255, 262,

274, 281, 285. 301.
Malta, 14.

Mamelon, 197, 232, 246, 251.
Marines, 83, 103. no, 244.
Markham, General, 278.
Marolles. General, 278.
Mayran, General, 261.
Medea, 244.
Mediterranean, 2.
Mediterranean Squadron, 14.
Mellinet, General, 278.
Menschikoff, Prince 7. 13, 49, 51, 63, 69, 76,

84, 103, 109, 116, 132, 136, 206.
Michael, Grand Duke, 130.
Mines, 196.
Minie Rifle, 36. 146.
Minto, Colonel. 79.
Monastery of St George, 243.
Monet, General, 197.
Montenegro, 3.
Moore, Sir John, 94.
Morris, General, 119.

N. '

NAKIMOFF, Admiral, 17, 207, 251.

Napoleon, Louis, 4, 15, 23, 27, 217, 221, 235,

254. 263, 289, 298, 301.
Napoleon, Louis, his Plan of the Campaign,

219, 231, 236, 247, 293.
Napoleon, Prince, 50, 54.
Naval Brigade, 103.
Nelson, 102.
Nesselrode, 216.

Newcastle, Duke of, 25, 179, 183.
Nicholas. Czar, 3, 5, n, 18, 20, 57, 131, 215, 217,

272.

Nicholas, Fort, 81, 286.
Nicholas. Grand Duke, 130.
Niel, General, 204, 209, 217, 227, 234, 237, 262.
Nightingale, Miss, 180.



Nikolaieff, 291.
Niol, General, 279.
Nolan, Captain, i'i5, 118, 121.
Nurses, 180.

O.

ODESSA, 129.
Omar Pasha, 19, 205, 228.
Otarkoi, 76.
Ouglitz Regiment, 58.

P.

PAGET, Lord George, 120.

Palmerston, Lord, 183, 219, 224, 297, 302.

Panmure, Lord, 184. 224.

Paris, Treaty of, 301, 304.

Pate, General, 279.

Paul, Fort, 81, 286.

Pauloff, General, 129, 137, 144.

Pelissier, General. 204,229, 230,232, 234, 237,

254, 256, 260. 263, 276, 294.
Peninsula War, 35, 94.
Pennefather, Brigadier, 31. 140, 147.
Perekop, Isthmus of, 36, 205.
Picard, General, 278.
Picket House Ravine, 260.
Poland, 8.

Ponteves, General, 278.
Prince Consort, 16, 20, 220, 223, 227, 298.
Prince, Wreck of the, 166.
Prussia, 4, 21.
Pruth, River, 8.
Punch, 216.

Q.

QUARANTINE Bay, 238, 256.
Quarantine Fort, 81.
Quarries. The, 246, 248, 253.
Quarry Ravine, 141, 144, 147.

R.

RAGLAN, Lord, 25, 32, 38, 44, 50, 54, 59, 60, 62,
65, 69, 75, 80, 100, 115, 167, 171, 183, 235, 248,
256, 264.

Railway from Balaklava, 178.

Read, General, 269.

Redan, 82, 89. 92, 96, 105, 190, 246, 248, 282.

Redan, Little, 89, 274, 281.

Regiments, ist, 31 ; 7th, 32, 56, 58 ; igth,
32 ; 2oth, 31 ; 2ist. 31, 148 ; 23d, 32 ; 28th,
31 ; 3oth, 31, 59, 145 ; 33d, 32 ; 38th, 31 ;
4ist, 31, 56, 59, 145 ; 44th, 31 ; 46th, 31 ;
47th, 31, 59, 143 ; 49th, 31, 56, 59, 142 ; soth,
31; 55th, 31, 59, 60; 57th, 31, 67; 6sd, 31,
148 ; 68th, 31 ; 77th, 32, 143 ; 88th, 32, 143 ;
95th, 31. 56 ; 62d, 253.

Rifle Brigade, 32, 148.

Rifle Pits, 195, 238, 248.

Roads, Want of, 177.

Rodolph, Mount, 97, 103, 196.

Roebuck, Mr, 183.

Rousset, 262.

Royal Dragoons, 112.

Russell, Lord John, 217, 224.



312



Index.



Russia, i, 3, 297, 299, 305.

Russian Army, 52, 86, 109, 129, 194, 232, 269.

Russian Army, Losses of, 62, 106, 158. 254, 260,

267, 272, 285, 300.

Russian Fleet, 17, 30, 68, 223, 241, 288, 292.
Russian Manifesto, 8.

S.

SANDBAG Battery, 127, 136, 144, 148, 161.

Sanitary Commission, 182.

Sanspareil. The, 106.

Sardinians. 242, 244, 268, 271, 279.

Saurian, Skeleton of, 244.

Scarlett. General, 112.

Scots Greys, 67, in, 112.

Scutari, 172, 189.

Sebastopol, 18, 23 25, 37, 43, 68, 80, 213, 291,

295, 304.
Sebastopol, Garrison and Defences of, 86, 274,

287.

Semiakine, General. 279.
Seymour. Sir Hamilton. 5, 19.
Shell Hill. 126, 136, 139, 145, 153, 191.
Shewell, Colonel, 120.
Shirley. Colonel, 253.
Shumla, 20,
Silistria, 20, 86.

Simpheropol, 37. 43, 63, 213. 219, 226, 235, 290.
Simpson, General, 267.
Sinope, 17.
Sinope, The, 305.
Soiminoff, General, 129, 137, 144.
Soujak-kale, 242.
Spencer. General. 291.

St Arnaud. Marshal, 27, 35, 44, 50, 54, 62, 69, 72.
St Jean d'Angely, Regn'aud, 256.
St Petersburgn, 132, 298.
St Pol, General, 278.
Stanley, Miss, 180.
Star Fort, 68, 71, 85, 107.
Stratford, Lord, 7, 13.
Sultan, The, 6, 301.
Surgeons, 179, 297.

T.

TAGANROG, 240.

Tarkan Cape, 38.

Tarkhanlar, 51.

Taurida, 36.

Tauric Chersonese, 24.

Tchatir-dagh Mountain, 219.

Tchernaya, River, 38, 77, 81, 109. 116,1 26, 203,

235. 268, 301.
Tchesma, the, 305.
Tchorgoun, 109, 203. 242, 269.
Telegraph Hill, 49, 61.
Tiflis, 295.
Times, The, 23, 181, 305.



Todleben. Colonel, 70, 79, 85, 86, 89, 105, 107,

126, 162, 195. 238, 261, 273, 285.
Torrens, General, 149.
Traktir Bridge, no, 116, 203, 242, 269.
Transport, Want of, 41, 168, 186, 208, 296, 303.
Trenches, The, 95, 170, 192, 200, 209. 238.
Trevelyan, Sir Charles, 208.
Trochu, General, 279.
Truce for burial, 201, 267.
Tulloch, Colonel. 184.
Turkey. 2, 297, 299, 301.
Turkish Fleet, 17, 30.
Turkish Troops, 3. 14, 21, 40, 82, no, 113, 128,

205, 243, 268.
Turkish Ultimatum, 10.
Turcos, 251.
Typhus Fever, 296.

U.
UPLAND, The, 81, 82, 93, 116, 123, 166, 242, 302,

V.

VAII.LANT, Marshal, 224, 230,235, 237, 264. 293.

Valley of the Shadow of Death, 95.

Varna, 20, 28, 36

Victoria Battery, 96.

Victoria, Queen. 12. 17, 23, 221, 298.

Victoria Ridge, 139, 192, 199.

Vienna, 298.

Vienna. Conference at, 9, 216, 222.

Vienna Note. 9. 16.

Vinoy. General, 127, 278.

Vladimir, The. 30.

Vladimir Regiment, 58, 61. 286.

W.

WALEWSKI, Count, 224.

War Office, 179.

Waterloo, 32. 258.

Wellington, Duke of, 32.

White Works, The, 198, 232. 246, 250.

Windham, Colonel, 283.

Windsor, 224.

Wood. Sir Charles. 224.

Woronzoff Mount, 96, 98, 116.

Woronzoff Road, 84, no, 115, 177, 192.

Wrangel, General, 241.



V.



YALTA, 84.

Yea, Colonel, 260



ZOUAVES, Algerine, 251
, French, 251.




COLSTON AND COMPANY, PRINTERS, EDINBURGH.



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Online LibraryEdward Bruce HamleyThe war in the Crimea → online text (page 20 of 20)