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fables," being the form of teaching which also was then
most accessible to the minds of the generality. " It may
pass," he writes, " for a further indication of a concealed
and secret meaning, that some of these fables are so
absurd and idle in their narration as to show and
proclaim an allegory, even afar off." ^

At p. 1 60 of the book, the writer mentions Sir Philip
Sidney as an instance of exceptional judgment and staid
behaviour in youth, " who being but seventeene yeeres
of age when he began to travell, and coming to Paris . . .
was so admired among the graver sort of Courtiers . . .
so was he likewise esteemed in all places else where he
came in his travell, as well in Germanie as in Italy."

In the " Pastorall ^^glogue " included in Spenser's
works, which is initialled " L. B." and supposed to be
by Ludowick Bryskett, " Lycon " refers to himself as
travelling abroad with Sidney. This passage, however,
contains no information which was not common knowledge.

The following passage compares with those expressing
the same thought in Spenser's View of t/ie Present State
of Ireland, in the Faerie Queene, and in King Lear, which
I noticed in the previous chapter :

What a folly it is to beleeve that we cannot resist the
inclinations of the stars. . . . The beginning of all our operation
is undoubtedly in our selves. . . . And consequently we may by



' Cf. extract from preface to The Wisdom of the Ancients, quoted at
p. 123 above.



XX "^ DISCOURSE OF CIVILL LIFE" 591

our free choice and voluntarily give ourselves to good or to evill,
and master the inclination of the heavens, the starres or destinie,
which troubleth so much the braines of some, that in despite of
nature they will needes make themselves bond being free.

In the following passage (p. 206) the author again
shows that he was an Englishman :

And if mine author mistrusted his eloquence (as he doth) in
a matter meete to be set forth so effectually as this, what may I
say of myselfe, that am tied to declare to you in our language,
inferior much to the Italian, al that he hath set downe touching
the same ?

At the time when Bacon began to write the English
language was much inferior to the Italian as a means of
literary expression, and it was the ambition of " Immerito "
to do what he could to alter this {^Harvey Correspondence,
etc.).

Asked by Captain Norris (p. 239) the cause why it
was that " shamefastnesse maketh the red colour come
into a man's face and that feare doth make him pale,"
Bryskett replies (as regards fear) that it

maketh the mind which conceiveth it to startle, and looking
about for meanes of defence, it calleth all the bloud into the
innermost parts . . . whereby the exterior parts being abandoned
and deprived of heate, and of that colour which it had from the
bloud and the spirits, there remaineth nothing but palenesse.

This is Bacon's theory of " spirits," which I discussed

in Chapter IV. The opposite effect is described in

Spenser's Faerie Queene, where Britomart recognises

Arthegal as the lover she has seen in the enchanted

glass :

Soone as she heard the name of Artegall,
Her hart did leape, and all her hart-strings tremble.
For sudden joy and secret feare withall ;
And all her vitall powres, with motion nimble
To succour it, themselves gan there assemble ;
That by the swift recourse of flushing blood
Right plaine appeard, though she it would dissemble,
And fayned still her former angry mood.
Thinking to hide the depth by troubling of the flood.

In concluding, the writer discusses " magnanimity "



592 SPENSER AND THE BACON IMPERSONATIONS CH. xx

and " the vertues assigned to wait upon " it " somewhat
more amply than mine author, who hath (in my opinion)
a little too briefly touched them in the description of a
magnanimous man." This leads to some remarks on the
nature of wisdom, and in a passage of great interest
(p. 255 sq.) the views of the writer (who is here speaking
in his own person) are given on the nature and limits of
the human understanding in relation to scientific inquiry.
They correspond, in manner and substance, with those
of Bacon, as found in his philosophic writings. Some
further discourse follows on the nature of the soul, and,
with a pleasant remark to " Mr. Spencer " about his
having shifted the burden of the discourse on to Bryskett,
the colloquy is brought to a close.



SOME DATES RELATING TO EVENTS
AND PERSONS OF THE PERIOD



1558. Accession of Elizabeth (b. 1533). William Cecil, Secretary,

and Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper.

1559. Acts of vSupremacy and Uniformity.

1560. Foreign marriage proposals. General expectation that the

Queen would marry Dudley. Death of Francis II. of
France (Dec.) ; accession to power of Catherine de' Medici.

I 56 1. Francis Bacon born.

1564. William Shakespeare born.

1568. Mary, Queen of Scots, takes refuge in England (b. 1542 ;

Queen Consort of France, 1559; returned to Scotland,
I 561). Insurrection of the Netherlands begins.

1569. Insurrection in the northern counties on behalf of the old

religion and the liberation of Marj' Stuart, led by
Northumberland and Westmoreland.

1570. Bull of Pope Pius V. (Feb.) excommunicating Queen Elizabeth

and absolving her subjects from their allegiance.
1572. Massacre of St. Bartholomew. Execution of the Duke of
Norfolk. Burghley, Lord Treasurer.

1579. Desmond rebellion in Ireland, fostered by Spain and the

Pope; suppressed by 1583, and Munster colonised.

1580. Jesuit mission to England under Campion and Parsons.

I 58 1. Alengon visits England; public protests against the marriage.
1583. Whitgift, Archbishop of Canterbury. The High Commission

Court established on a permanent footing.
I 584. Throckmorton's conspiracy. Association to protect the Queen.

Assassination of the Prince of Orange.

1586. Whitgift's "Star Chamber Decree" (Jan.) for censoring

the press. Babington's conspiracy. Death of Sir Philip
Sidney.

1587. Execution of Mary, Queen of Scots.

1588. Defeat of the Spanish Armada. Death of Leicester. "Martin

Marprelate" attacks on Whitgift and episcopacy (continued
in 1889).

1589. Death of Catherine de' Medici. Henry of Navarre, King of

France.



593 2 Q



594 SPENSER AND THE BA CON IM PERSONA TIONS

I 590. Death of Walsingham.

I 591. Essex takes a force to France to assist Henry IV.

1595. Tyrone in open rebellion in Ireland.

1596. Expedition, led by Essex, to Cadiz. Robert Cecil, Secretary.

1598. Death of Burghley. Death of Philip of Spain (reign from

1556). Defeat of an English force at the Blackwater by
Tyrone ; rising in Munster.

1599. Essex takes command in Ireland against Tyrone ; fails, and

returns without leave ; is succeeded by Mountjoy. Death

of Spenser.
1 60 1. Abortive rising of Essex in London ; his execution.
1603. Submission of Tyrone. Death of Queen Elizabeth (March).

Accession of James I. Ralegh sentenced to death and

imprisoned in the Tower. Robert Cecil, Secretary.

161 1. Colonisation of Ulster.

161 2. Death of Salisbury (Robert Cecil).

16 16. Fall of Somerset (Robert Carr) as the King's favourite,
and rise of George Villiers (Buckingham). Death of
Shakespeare.

1 6 1 8. Execution of Ralegh.

162 I. Impeachment and fall of Bacon (Viscount St. Albans).

1623. First folio of Shakespeare's plays published.

1625. Death of King James. Accession of Charles I.

1626. Death of Bacon.



Francis Bacon, b. Jan. 1561 ; at Trinity College, Cambridge, with
his brother Anthony, i 573-1 575 ; formally admitted to Gray's
Inn, June 1576 ; went to France on the embassy of Sir Amias
Paulet, 1576 (probably September); his portrait painted by
Milliard in his eighteenth year (possibly when he was on
a visit to England) ; travelled with the Court in France (he
alludes to his being at Poitiers) ; returned to England on the
death of his father, March 1579; first surviving letter dated
from Gray's Inn, iith July 1580. Solicitor-(}eneral, 1607;
Attorney-General, 1613 ; Privy Councillor, 1616 ; Lord Keeper,
1 617; Lord Chancellor, 1618; impeached and sentenced,
1621 ; died 1626.

Sir Nicholas Bacon, i 509-1 579.
William Cecil, Lord Burghley, i 520-1598.
Sir Henry Sidney, i 529-1 586.
.Sir Francis Walsingham, 1530?-! 590.
Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, 1532 ?-i588.
Sir Walter Ralegh, 1552?-! 6 18.
Sir Philip Sidney, 15 54- 1586.

Sir Robert Cecil, Viscount Cranborne, and Earl of Salisbury, i 563 ?-
1612.



DATES RELATING TO THE PERIOD 595

Charles Blount, Lord Mountjoy, and Earl of Devonshire, i 563-1606.
Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, i 567-1601.
Henry Wriothesley, third Earl of Southampton, i 573-1624.
William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, i 580-1630.

George Gascoigne, 1525 ?-i577.

Gabriel Harvey, 1545 ?-l63l.

Edmund Spenser, 1552 ?-i599.

John Lilly (Lyly), i554?-i6o6.

Robert Greene, 1560.^-1592 (date taken from Harvey's account).

William Shakespeare, i 564-16 16. Venus and Adonis published,

1593; returned to Stratford about 1596; first play published

under his name, 1598.
Thomas Nashe, i 567-1601 ?
Ben Jonson, i573?-i637.



INDEX



Allegory, 50, 59, 60, 72 ;/., 121,
123 «., 179, 225, 288, 470, 590

Ambiguities, intentional, 61, 63, 71,
94, 98, 163, 179, 239, 349 «., 391,

470. 477. 504
America, 300, 305, 306, 319 ; and

Ireland, 344-46
Amoretti, The, and Spenser's marriage,

34. 374 SQ-
Anagrams, names in the nature of, 67,
. 70, 94, 96, 487
"Angel," 382-84, 389, 455
Antique words, 5, 6, 7, 28, 58
Apologie for Poetrie, An, 3 ?i., 124 ?i.,

148-51, 185 n., 190 ; and Spenser's

lost English. Poete, 10, 14, 148 n. ;

Sir J. Harington on, 188 n. ; one

of a series, 228
Arcadia, The, j,n., is,n., 147, 185 «.,

230 ; ordered by Sidney to be

burned, 188 ; theory for, 358, 362,

504

Argument of the book, the, shortly
stated, 1-4, 7, 8, 9 ; purpose of, 57

Aristotle, "magnanimity," 60, 591;
theory of the soul, 109 sq. ; Bacon's
quarrel with, 119 «., 156, 364 «.,
582 ; on poetry, 150, 151 ; Bryskett
on, 581, 588

Arte of English Poesie, The, reference
to Shephiards Calender, 5 w. ; con-
temporary " rymers " denounced,
12 n. ; state of poetry described,
48 ; references to the Partheniades,
84 n. ; hints as to rewards to poets,
99; definition of "rascal, " loi ; use
of the term "spirits," 137 ; use of
the term "simple," 142; on the
poet's art, 157, 158 ; nature of the
work, and circumstances of publica-
tion, 157 71. ; Sir J. Harington on,
188 n. ; one of a series, 228 ; the
"old gentlewoman" and the nurse in
Romeo and Juliet, 494-99

Arundel, Philip Howard, Earl of, in
Faerie Qiieene, 93-95, 468



Astrophel, 190, 350 sq.

Astrophel and Stella sonnets, the, 3 n. ,
185 «. ; genius and character of the
author, 190, 362 sq. ; first publica-
tion of, 336 ; discussed, 356 sq. ;
on "wit" and "will," 491 ; legal
metaphor, 500 «. ; absence in love,
501 ; theory for, 502-504

Aubrey, Brief Lives, value of, 418 «. ;
on Ralegh, 419, 459 ; on Bacon,
509, 510, 517, 520, 524 .u/.; on
Hobbes, 517

Bacon, Ann, Lady, burial-place of,
161 ; her religious influence, 209,
210 ; works for the Reformed Church,
210 ; correspondence with her sons,
398-401, 409, 525 ; with Burghley,
402 ; her character, 399, 400 ; latter
years and death, 401 ; her dislike of
the revels at Gray's Inn, 405, 409

Bacon, Anthony, in the household of
Essex, 46 ; correspondence with his
mother, 398 sq. ; death of, 401 ; his
relations with his brother, 401, 523,

553
Bacon, Francis, his claim to immor-
tality for his Essays, 5 n. ; his style
and that of " E. K." compared, 17,
18, 20, 22, 25 ; on Homer, 26 ;
conflict between the active and con-
templative, 47, 53, 129, 232, 239,
491 ; supposed allusion to in The
Silent Woman, 48 ; early ambition,
50, 129, 181, 239, 259 ; his sanguine
temperament, 50, 518 ; impulse for
self-expression, 50 ; methods of
secrecy, 50, 53 ; absence of personal
feeling. 51 [cf. 196] ; slendemess of
hisemotions, 51, 104, 146; detach-
ment from individuals, 51, 104, 146 ;
connection with Whifgift, 51, 52,
61 ; writes in the " Martin Mar-
prelate" controversy, 52, 549; and
for Walsingham, 52 «., 185; his
ambition to shine in the world, 53,



597



598



SPENSER AND THE BACON IMPERSONATIONS



119 «., 157 ; his admiration of
Grindal, 61, 62 ; loss of prospects
on the death of his father, 62, 173 ;
his ' ' Discourse in Praise of the
Queen," 67, 381, 390 ; advice to
King James as to Irish colonisa-
tion, 81, 531 ; connection with the
Earl of Cumberland, 87 ; his ideas
as to the nature of the soul, 99, 107-

120 ; his attitude towards the people,
103, 104, 127; a portrait of him-
self, 103 ; universality, 104, 146,
413, 522 ; his passion for order,
104 ; the phenomenal character of
his imagination, 104, 118, 199, in
combination with philosophic judg-
ment, 104 ; the defects of his
character examined, 104, 146, 199,
413 ; his habit of idealising the
sovereign, 105, 448, 449 ; his
spiritual feelings primitive, 105, 113 ;
his attitude towards the Christian
revelation, 107-13, 120, 127, 128 ;
dexterity in writing, 108 ; on atheism,
108, 114; his philosophic attitude
and purpose, 108, iii, 112, 119,
120 ; his dislike of the Copernican
theory, no, 309 n. ; the extent of
his familiarity with Aristotle, 109,
119 ; the charge against him of
materialism, iii, 120 ; his quarrel
with Aristotle, in «., 119 «., 156;
on metaphysics, 112 ; on man, 114,
331 ; his theory of " spirits," 1141^.,
135, 136 ; his passion for scientific
inquiry, 119, 120 ; his dislike of
philosophers, 119, 582 [cf. 238];
on Socrates, 119 «., 387 «. ; claims
a natural familiarity with truth, 120 ;
first appointment under the Crown,
121, 409, 520 ; period of greatest
literary activity, 121 ; on the use of
allegory, 123//. ; rivalry with Robert
Cecil, 129, 413, 439 ; time spent in
study, 129 ; admits abstraction in
affairs, 129 ; on the masque, 133 ;
his claim to "simplicity," 138-40;
defends himself on a charge of pride,
138 ; expresses himself as out of
harmony with his surroundings, 140 ;
his "inaccuracy," 142, 143, 145.?^.;
draft for a pardon, 145 ; his aim to
supersede antiquity, 146 ; lack of
"personality," 147; his views on
poetry, 152-55 ; disclaims envy of
dead thinkers, 156; "a tired, sea-
sick suitor," 163, 167 «., 407; his
practice at the Bar, 167 «. , 411 ;
practice of writingunder ' ' impersona-
tions," 169, 221 [cf. 8, 9]; methods



for " advertising " and " reviewing "
his works, 169, 222 ; habit of prais-
ing his own work, 169 [cf. 7] ;
devices for controversial satire, 169 ;
his financial embarrassments, 169,

173 n-> 398. 400. 409 [cf. 486];
early relations with Burghley and
Leicester, 173 ; self-esteem, i8i,
232 ; his precocity as a child, 181,
209, 211, 232, 586; his portrait as
a boy, 181 ; his attitude towards
the religious controversies, 193, 196,
548, 549 ; in "Tower" employ-
ment, 195,404; Squire's conspiracy,
198 ; the affair of Lopez, 199 ; his
longingfor power, 199 ; unscrupulous
methods, 146, 200 ; his want of
"common sense," 200, 408 [cf.
196] ; suggested early mastery of
the poetic art, 227 ; his interest in
education, 229 ; his Court "devices,"
45 w. , 230, 427 ; his Essays self-
regarding, 238, 387 «. ; probable
early acquaintance with Ralegh, 244 ;
probable visit to Kenilworth, 248 ;
his essay on "Gardens," 273 ; his
motto, 274 n. ; impetuous sequence
of ideas, 287, 463 ; early interest in
"divinity," 293; on the tides and sea-
cuiTents, 307-10 ; intercourse with
Galileo, 307 n. ; his imperialism,
318 ; on "magnanimity," 318 ; on
the pretensions of Spain, 319 ; on
"the universal frame of nature,"
331 ; " concealed poets " and ' ' con-
cealed philosophers," 348 ; poem
by, 367; his essay on "Deformity"
and Robert Cecil, 387 n. ; on
imagination in youth, 388 ; early
sense of age, 388, 397, 454, 516 ;
his relations with Ralegh and Cecil
at the end of Elizabeth's reign, 395-
397, 439 ; his views on friendship,
69 n. , 396 ; his attitude towards his
mother, 399 ; his retainers, 399 ;
offends the Queen, 398 ; her opinion
of him, 403 ; "a withered branch,"
404 ; " Promus of Formularies and
Elegancies," 405, 522; "the Waters
of Parnassus," 405 ; at Twicken-
ham, 405, 406 ; the revels at Gray's
Inn, 405, 409 ; his reliance on
written statements, 408, 513 ; his
mercurial temperament, 408, 518 ;
and disciplined mind, 408 ; his
interest in public affairs, 410 ;
describes himself as a "common,"
412 ; his independence of friends,
412, 523 ; his conduct towards
Essex considered, 412, 413, 438,



INDEX



599



555 [cf. 90] ; on Elizabeth's " lighter
qualities," 422 ; on piracy, 432 ;
his attitude towards the Sovereign,
448, 449, 458 ; claims credit for
"care" in the King's service, 451 ;
Queen Elizabeth's "watch candle,"
238 «., 452 ; his habit of idealisa-
tion, 458, 510, 511, 520; his latter
relations with Ralegh, 458, 459 ; his
relations with Buckingham, 199 «.,
458 ; his weakness in the face of
power, 458 ; fanciful beliefs, 464 ;
his patriotism, 481, 560; states he
is naturally bashful, 482 n. ; early
acquaintance with Queen Elizabeth,
484 ; " The Writer's Prayer," 493 ;
his marriage, 504, 509 ; Verulam
House, 509 ; his gardens, 509-11 ;
Gorhambury, 510; his burial, 161,
510 ; ineffective in business relations,
511-13 ; Tobie Matthew on, 511 «. ;
plays a part, 140, 200, 512 ; as a
speaker in Parliament, 513 sq. ;
Ben Jonson on, 513-16, 518 ; his
relations with Ben Jonson, 516-18 ;
and with Thomas Hobbes, 517 ;
account of by A. Wilson, 516 ; his
fall and state of mind after, 518 ;
his imprudence, 519 ; the subject of
scandalous rumour, 519 ; charged
with pride, 520 ; his extravagance,
520 ; self-idealisation, 520 [cf. 503] ;
his phenomenal memory, 521, 522 ;
rapidity as a writer, 522 ; his
character as a philosopher, 59 «. ,

522 ; his dislike of detail, 522,

523 ; his friendship with Bettenhain,
523 ; and George Herbert, 524 ;
his health, 524 sq., also 116, 121,
129, 398, 402, 409 [cf. 586] ; the
activity of his imagination, 525 ;
his ideas for the prolongation of
life, 526 ; his taste in music, 526 ;
"irrigation in the spring showres,"
527 ; his views on Ireland, 528-32 ;
his mind formed on Roman models,
113, 532; his working relations with
his brother, 553 ; his account of the
affair of Smerwick, 560, 562 ; per-
haps an account of his early educa-
tion, 585-87

Bacon, Sir Nicholas, 181 ; as an ally
of Burghley, 210 ; visit of the Queen
to, 484

Bancroft, Bishop, and the "Martin
Marprelate " controversy, 52 n.

Bettenham, Jeremiah, 412 «., 523

Bingham, Sir Richard, 81, 567; al-
leged poem by, 316

" Bothwell," 438-40



Boyle, Elizabeth, 374, 375, 569

Eiryskett, Lodowick, with Spenser in
Ireland, 36, 574, 577, 582 ; his
elegies on Sidney, 352, 573, 590 ;
sonnet by Spenser to, 385, 579 ;
said to be an Italian, but expresses
himself as an Englishman, 573, 575,
579, 581, 591 ; on Plato and Aris-
totle, 581, 588; his early education,
585-87 ; on the soul, 588 ; on self-
knowledge, 590 ; denounces con-
temporary "rymers, " 589; on the
myths, 589 ; on men attributing the
faults of their nature to the stars,
590 ; use of the term " spirits," 591 ;
on "magnanimity," 591; on the
human understanding, 592

Buckingham, Charles Villiers, Duke
of, and Bacon, 199 «. , 458

Burghley, Mildred, Lady, her work for
the Reformed Church, 210

Burghley, William Cecil, Lord, objects
to Spenser's pension, 40, 41 ;
attacks on by Spenser, 41, 50-52,
161, 173, 174, 177, 180 ; his
position at the Court, 47 ; sonnet
addressed to by Spenser, 50 ; in
Faerie Qiieene, 90 ; secures Walsing-
ham's papers, 95 n. ; petitioned by
Bacon for office, 129, 163, 167 ».,
407, 408 ; censures him for pride,
138 ; employs him, 195, 404 ; his
relations with Leicester, 172, 173,
177, 180, 194 ; Catholic attack on,
174 «., 209 ; his work for the Re-
formed Church, 210 ; letter to Lady
Anne Bacon as to her two sons, 402 ;
alleges want of power to help his
friends, 402 ; his official memoranda,

572
Burns, Robert, the limitations of his
genius, 54, 230, 231

Caesar, Bacon's admiration of, 364 n.

Carey, Elizabeth, Lady, 184, 349

Carey, Robert, 75

Cecil, Sir Robert, his relations with
Bacon, 129, 162, 396 ; Catholic
attack on, 174 «. ; scurrilous epi-
taph on, 332 M, ; reputed reference
to in Bacon's Essays, 387 n. ; his
position and prospects on the death
of the Queen, 395, 396 ; corresponds
with Bacon, 398 sq. ; interview with
Lady Bacon, 400 ; his character and
methods, 413, 432, 435 ; corresponds
with Ralegh, 423^4^. ; his diplomacy
on the accession of James, 439 ;
his intrigues against Ralegh, 465

Chatterton, Thomas, his use of antique



6oo



SPENSEI? AND THE BACON IMPERSONATIONS



words, 29 ; limitations of his genius,
54 ; his precocity, 204-6

Church, the, and the State, 47 ; the
attitude of Bacon towards, 108, 549 ;
and of the author of Leicester's Com-
monwealth, 193, 196; of Gascoigne,
229, 243 ; and of Spenser, 489, 548

Cobler of Canterburic, T/ie, 168-70

"Colin," as the author, 14, 19, 23,
167, 330, 332, 365 ; Leicester the
early patron of, 163

Colin Clout's Coyne Home Again, dale
of composition, 43, 66, 178, 350 ;
eulogies in, inconsistent with the
Complaints, 44, 178, 349 ; "The
Ladie of the Sea," 333 ; '' The
Shepheard of the Ocean," 333 ;
" Action," 334 ; " Corydon," 348 ;
the Queen and the ladies of the
Court, 349; "Amaryllis," 65, 349;
" Amyntas," 65, 66, 349

Complaints, The, publication of, 43,
159, 160

Congreve, William, class feeling, 52 ;
precocity, 204, 207

Court, the, conditions of under Eliza-
beth, 47, 177, 501 ; suitors at, 47,
162 ; competition for power at, 395,
420, 438, 445

Crowds, Bacon's opinion that men are
more open to impressions in, 154

Cumberland, George Clifford, Earl of,
in Faerie Queene, 87, 505, 506 ; his
character, 87 ; dispute with the
Crown as to share in the capture of the
Madre de Dios, 423, 431, 432, 505

Cumberland, Margaret, Countess of,
in Faerie Queene, 87 ; her character,
88 ; allusions to, 164, 349 «.

Daniel, Samuel, his claim to immor-
tality, 5 n. ; pleads "necessity" for
writing for the stage, 9 «. ; on the
masque, 133 «. ; A Defence of
Ryme, 228, 338, 342 ; " impersona-
tion " of, 334 sq. ; his life and
circumstances, 335, 337 ; Mountjoy
his patron, 335, 337, 343 sq. ; his
relations with the Countess of Pem-
broke, 335, 342, 343, 347, 360 ;
tutor to Lady Anne Clifford, 88,
335 ; the "Delia" sonnets, 336,
347. 360; " M. P.," 337, 347; his
character as a poet, 338, 343, 344,
347 ; the " Letter from Octavia,"
224. 342

Dante, autobiographical element in
his poetry, 54 ; the imagination of,

Daphnaida, 133 »•, 330



Davison, Secretaiy, his part in the
execution of Mary, Queen of Scots,
91, 92 ; letter on travel, 191 ;
official form used by, 572

Declaration of the True Causes, etc. , A,
174 n. , 209

Defence of Poesie. See Apologie for

Desmond, Earl of, the rebellion of,
32, 36, 71, 81, 558, 563

Devonshire, Earl of. See Mountjoy

Dickens, Charles, the limitations of his
invention, 54, 230, 231

Discourse of English Poetrie, A,
reference to the authorship of the
Shepheards Calender, 5 ; compared
with .the " E. K." Glosse, 9 ; con-
temporary " rymers " denounced,
II ; Platonic love, 16 n. ; use of
the term "simple," 142

Donne, John, his character as a poet,
49, 348 ; regrets publishing verse,
49 ; allusion to, and connection
with, Essex, 64 n., 349; on private
practice at the Bar, 167 n. ; on the
accession of King James, 439 n.

Dorset, Anne, Countess of, erects a
monument to Spenser, 34, 88

Drake, Sir Francis, alleged poem by,

315
Du Bellay, 203, 392

" E. K. ," and Edward Kirke, 3, 14;
explains his undertaking the
"Glosse," 5, 13, 14; denounces
contemporary " rymers," 7 ; manner
of writing about love, 8, 18 ; on
"Platonic" love, 15; on old age,
16; on " Elfes and Goblins," 22;
on Homer, 25 ; his commentary on
the Dreames, 14, 26 ; on the Queen,
20; no mention by of "Immerito"
in Ireland, 33; and " G. T. ," 216.
See also under Harvey

Elizabeth, Queen, Irish policy of, 32,
35, 69-71 ; parsimony of, 32, 96,
189, 506, 549, 554, 558; her Court
and government, 47 ; the Alen9on
marriage, 62, 84 «., 172, 176, 177,
185, 19s ; references to marriage
with Leicester, 62, 172, 194, 256,
259, 275, 280 w., 474, 477; admira-
tion of the Turk for, 67 ; letter to
Henry of Navarre, 68 ; her relations
with her favourites, 74, 75, 421-23
\see also under Essex and Ralegh] ;
two letters to Mountjoy, 75 «. , 421 ;
her position in regard to the execu-
tion of Mary, Queen of Scots, 90-



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