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92 ; and Leicester's marriage, 175,
176 ; visit to Kenilworth, 248 sq. ;



INDEX



6oi



descriptions of her habit of delay,
401, 403, 404, 406 ; the outlook on
her death, 395, 434, 439 ; as an
"adventurer," 423, 432, 505; her
apprehension about the play
Richard the Second, 437

Some poetical allusions to : in
Faerie Queeiie, 59, 66, 74, 80, 90, 94,
100; extravagant eulogy of, 84«.,
178, 223, 256 sq. ; deification of,
113 «., 272, 330, 334; addressed
in the language of love, 332, 366,
370, 422, 475-78 ; the practice
discussed, 58, 105, 256, 257,
448 ; various allusions to, 379 f^/. ,

501
Elizabethan Age, simplicity of, 14,
222 ; described as "iron and
malitious," 48 ; severe penalties, 51,
240, 311 ; material prosperity, 164 ;
over- sea adventure, 77 n., 300, 314-
319, 326-27, 462; piratical war-
fare, 303, 431, 505 ; strength of
men's feelings, 11,12 n. ; Civil Service,
31 ; Church controversy, 47, 549 ;
popularity of sermons, 549 ti. ;
Puritans, 72 «., 548 n. ; allusions
to the teaching in the Grammar
Schools, 233, 586

Books and writers in : use of
books, 46 ; difficulties of publica-
tion, 157 n., 220, 329 ; absence of
publicity, 4«., 9, 14, 146, 262 ; press
censorship, 51, 169, 176 n., 329 ;
dangers of writing, 51, 107, 177,
358 n. ; risks of a reputation for
scientific inquiry, 127 ; advantages
of writing under a great name, 188 n. ;
condition of professional writers and
scholars, 3, 119 «., 146, 256, 336,

517

See also under Court, England,
Poetry, and Stage

England, the Church of, 47, 210, 546,
548 ; Bacon on the union of with
Scotland, 318; as "The Lady of
the Sea," 333 n. ; drunkenness in,
286, 289-92 ; fashions of dress in,
290 ; efforts made by for the re-
duction of Ireland, 344-46. See
also under Elizabethan Age

English, the, admiration of gravity
by, 46, 353 ; turbulent early his-
tory of, 47, 537, 538 ; language
monosyllabic, 226 ; reserve of,

387

Epithalamion, 3 4, 223, 386 scf .

Essex, Robert uevereux, second Earl
of, alleged friendship with Spenser,
39-46 ; pays for his funeral, 39, 46 ;



his rivalry with Ralegh, 44-46, 7^,
418 ;/., 438-41 ; literary assistance
rendered to by Bacon, 45, 188 «.,
191, 391, 392 ;/. ; his relations with
Bacon, 46, 69, 90, 199, 395 sq..
412, 552-56 ; his character, 46,
395, 412, 555 ; in Faerie Queeue, 61,

63, 64, 67-74, 95- 96. 488 ; pos-
sibility of his marrying the Queen,

64, 391 ; and of succeeding to the
throne, 64, 395, 439 ; the popularity
of, 64, 395 ; his relations with the
Queen, 44, 68, 403, 404, 422 ;
offends her by marrying, 75, 488 ;
the story of the ring, 88 n. ; his
marriage with Frances Walsingham,
95 «., 488; his "Apology" at-
tributed to Anthony Bacon, 188 w. ;
and the account of Squire's conspiracj'
(by Francis Bacon) to him, 198 ;
alleged reason for the charge against
Lopez, 199 ; and Daniel's Tragedy
of Philotas, 338 ; connection with
Donne, 64 n. , 349 ; allusions to by
Shakespeare, 64 ;/. , 437 ; his Irish
command and Bacon's advice, 438,
550-56 ; Ralegh's reference to as
" Bothwell," 440; his appointment
as Earl Marshal, 552, 553

Euphuism, 221, 294, 327

Faerie Queene, T/ie, publication of, 43,
44' 579 ; written from the point of
view of the Court, 47, 82, 89 ; length
of the poem, 53 ; purpose of the
work, 55 ; incongruities of, 56 ;
alleged dream-character of, 56 ; in-
terpretations offered, 57 ; character-
istics of the author of, 57-60; sense of
humour in, 58, 494 ; the natiu^e and
method of, 59, 60, 80, 89 ; the
"general" and the "particular,"
59, 60 ; Upton on the characters,
60 ; the personal element in, 60, 61,
470 sq. ; reference to by Nashe, 66 ;
Irish allusions in, 76-82, 468 ; the
" Mutabilitie " cantos, 79-82, 492;
itsaristocraticstandpoint, 103, 507//.;
allusions to the completion of, 385,
579 ; paper explanatory of the alle-
gories, 470 //. ; possible dates of
composition of Books I. and II.,
473, 482 ; the religious motive in,
489 ; use of law terms in, 499 ; im-
partiality, 501 ; Bryskett's reference
to, 579, 582

The characters referred to : Alma,
97 w., 481, 482 ; Amoret. 74, 94,
469. 483; Arthegal, 35//., 36, 46,
62-74, 90. 97. 135. 391. 472:



6o2



SPENSER AND THE BACON IMPERSONATIONS



Arthur, 59, 67, 68, 90, 97, 473-82,
484, 486 ; Belphoebe, 59, 74 «.,
389, 447, 448, 466, 483, 484 ;
Blandamour, 92-94, 440 n. , 468 ;
Blatant Beast, the, 72, 486-88 ;
Braggadochio, 62, 471, 473 ; Brito-
mart, 63, 83, 135, 389, 391, 472,
494, and Amoret, 74 «., 94, and
Scudamore, 469 ; Burbon, 68, 71 ;
Calepine, 96, 487, 488 ; Calidore,
95, 96, 487, 488 ; Cleopolis, 471,
490 ; Continent, the, 83 ; Cupid,
the Maske of, 98 ; Cynthia, 80,
370 ; Despetto, Decetto and Defetto,
486 ; Desyre, 99 ; Detraction, 72 ;
Dragon, the, 61 ; Duessa, 72 ?i.,
90, 92, 480 ; Ease, 99, 100 ; Fans}-,
99; Florimell, 82, 85-89; Flourdelis,
the Lady, 68 ; Fosters, the three,
83 ti. ; Glauce, 494-99 ; Grantorto,
70-72 ; Guyon, 61, 470-73, 481,
482 ; Hope, 100 ; Irena, 70-72 ;
Lady of Delight, the, 472 n. ; Lee,
the river, 97, 98 ; Marinell, 80-90,
505 ; Meliboe, 95, 96 ; Mercilla, 90 ;
Mirabella, 486 n., 500 ; Mona, 65 ;
Oberoii, the mightie, 96 ; Orgoglio,
480 ; Palmer, the, 61, 62 ; Paridell,
92-94, 468; Fastorella, 95, 96, 488 ;
FoUant^ and Lady Munera, 97 ;
Pride, the house of, 501 ; Radi-
gund, 97 ; Redcrosse Knight, the,
60, 66, 68, 470^(7., 474, 477, 489-
492 ; Rich Strond, the, 82, 83, 89 ;
Satyrane, 78 ; Scudamore, 73-76,
94, 468, 469 ; Serena, 96, 486-88 ;
Sergis, 70, 71 ; Spanish Armada,
the, 63, 97 ; Talus, 71, 73, 98, 102 ;
Timias, 46. 73. 74, 84^., 371, 386,
448, 466, 483-88 ; Una, 60. 471,
474. 477. 490 ; Zele, 90

Fleming, Abraham, 279 «.

Fowre Hymns, The, 44, 88«., 113 «.,

164, 349 «•. 507
Frobisher, Sir Martin, and the North-
West Passage, 295, 297 «. , 300;
alleged poem by, 316 ; capture of
the Madre de Dios, 423, 424, 425

Gascoigne, George, early life, 211 ;
mentioned in Harvey's Letter-book,
221 ; Posies, 212, 2ii)-2^\ "H. W. "
and "G. T.," 213-16 ; Tlie Ad-
ventures of Master F. /. , 212, 218,
223 ; The Fruites of Warre, 220,
242, 247, 282 ; Certayne Notes of
Instruction, 224 ; list of further
works, 228 ; The Glasse of Governe-
tnent, 229 - 41 ; autobiographical
element in his writings, 230, 246 ;



his character and later circumstances,
242, 244-46 ; his church views, 243 ;
The Steele Glas, 242, 244 ; verses
by Ralegh, 243 ; The Grief of loye,

246, 281, 282; The Tale of Henietes,

247, 279 sq. ; The Princely Pleasures
at Kenehvorth, 2\^ sq. ; The Queenes
Maiesties entertainment at Wood-
stock, 280 n. ; A Delicate Diet for
daintiemoi/thde Droonkardes, 282-
292 ; Lewis and John Dyve, 283-
285 ; The Spoyle of Antwerpt, 282,
283 ; The Droomme of Doomsday,
292 ; Prefatory Epistle to Gilbert's
Discourse, 247, 293 sq.

Genius, its instinct for concealment,
53 ; limitations of, 54 ; judicial
control of, 104 ; feminine element
in, 182 ; precocity of, 204 sq.

Geoffrey of Monmouth and Spenser,
67, 144, 494

Gibbon, Edward, class feeling, 52

Gilbert, Sir Humphrey, A Discourse of
a Discoverie, etc., to Cataia, object
of, 294 ; account of publication of,
295 jy. ; contents of, 305, 306, 310-
312 ; his circumstances, 295, 296,
302 ; his initiative in North- Western
discovery, 299-301 ; paper as to
" How her Majesty might annoy
the King of Spain," 302 ; his start
for Newfoundland and fate, 304,
324 ; Camden on his project and
character, 304, 327 n. ; Peckham's
Report on his vo3'age, 312-20, 324 j^. ;
and the Report by Hayes, 320-24

" Golden wyre," 389

Greene, Robert, connection with
Nashe, 5 «. ; employed by Bancroft
in the " Martin Marprelate " contro-
versy, 52 n. ; his Pandosto and the
Winters Tale,q6; and "Euphues,"
167 «. ; Harvey's account of his
death, 168 ; on the authorship of
The Cobler of Canterhurie, 168, 169 ;
the "Panther" parallel, 170; the
"Peacock's feet" parallel, 286;
his motto, 480 n. ; a suggested
allusion to his genius, 480 ;/.

Grey de Wilton, Arthur, Lord, his
Irish appointment, 31, 32 ; reasons
for taking Spenser as his secretary,
32, 34 ; his administration, 35, 70,
559 ; his recall, 35 ; his action at
Smerwick, etc., 35, 72, 371, 559-
563 ; early services under his father,
35 n. , 284 n. ; death, 35, 69 ; sonnet
to in Faerie Queene, 35 ; alluded to
as " Arthegal," 35 n. , 36, 67, 69-73 ;
and Bryskett, 576 sq.



INDEX



603



Grindal, Archbishop, in Faerie Queene,
61 ; Bacon's eulogy of, 62 ; and
Leicester, 173

"G. T.," 213-16, 235, 348

Hakluyt, Richard, and the Gilbert
voyage, 313, 321, 328 ; on the
capture of the Aladre de Dios, 506 ;
and the account of the last fight of
the Kevenge, 506 n.

Harriot, Thomas, mathematician,
127 «., 459

Harvey, Gabriel, letters between and
"Immerito," 2, 3, 8, 22, 26, 76,
211, 236, 473 n., 503, 591 ; intro-
duction of Spenser by to Sidney, 2 ;
address by " E. K." to, 6 ; allusions
by " E. K." to unpublished works
by, 8, II, 23; andby Webbe, 10; his
two brothers, 10, 23 71. ; his Latin
works, 10, II, 23; his patron, Sir
Thomas Smith, 11 ; the Harvey-
Nashe controversy, ir, 329 ; sudden
cessation of publications by, 11,
479 n. ; his Letter-book, 12, 15, 19,
22, 23, 221, 277 n., 296, 329;
his intimacy with " Immerito," 15,
28 ; as Hobbinol, 15, 28, 332 ; on
sizars, 102 ; his account of Greene's
death, 168 ; controversial satire,
169 «. ; on Mother Hubberds Tale,
176 ; on poetry and St. John's
Revelation, 211 ; compared by
Nashe to a peacock, 286 ; the sonnet
addressed to him by Spenser, 369,
579; on "Immerito" and " Rosa-
linde," 503 ; Spenser mentioned in
a note in one of his books, 572.
See also under Nashe

Harvey, Richard, 23 n.

Hatton, Sir Christopher, as a favourite
of the Queen, 47 ; offends her by
marrying, 176 n. ; perhaps in
Mother Hubberds Tale, 177 ; in the
" Bothwell " letter, 440

Hawkins, Sir John, alleged poem by,

315
Hobbes, Thomas, Aubrey on, 517 ;

his relations with Bacon, 517

Holinshcd, use of by Spenser, 67 ti.,

77 > 77 n-' 558 «•
Howard of Effingham, Lord, 88,91, 552

" lago," age of, 3 ; villainy of, 465

" Ignoto," 367-69

Imagination, limitations of, 54 ; self-
expression in, 230, 231 ; in youth,
Bacon on, 388 ; and judgment, 104,
387 ; spontaneous period of, 387,
388



"Imitation" (dramatic), effect on
character of, 146, 147

"Immerito," The Shepheards Calender
published under the name of, 6 ;
denounces contemporary "rymers,"
8 ; verses by, and by " E. K.," 22 ;
intimacy with Harvey, 15, 28 ; his
self-esteem, 28 ; no mention by of
Irish experience, 33, 34 ; early con-
nection with Sidney and Leicester,
2, 3, 19, 25, 27, 31 ; Holinshed
used by, yj ; his motto, 89 n., 202 ;
compared with " G. T. ," 216 ; and
with Gascoigne, 227 ; alleged pub-
lication of Harvey's poems without
his consent, 296 ; his correspondence
with Harvey, 329, 503. See also
under Harvey

Impersonation, 9, 9 «.

Ireland, Elizabeth's policy in, 32, 35 ;
sheriff's post in, 38 ; episode in
Faerie Queene, 69 sg. ; local allusions
to in Faerie Queene, 76-82 ; the
harp of, 81, 531 ; Bacon's views on
the reduction of, 319, 529-32 ; also
Daniel's, 344 ; and the English, 572

James, King, possible reference to in
Faerie Queene, 64 ; position of the
leading men before and on his
accession, 395, 396, 439 ; Bacon's
habit of addressing, 448, 449, 520 ;
Bacon's relations to, 458 ; his hatred
of Ralegh, 465

Jonson, Ben, his account of Spenser's
death, 38; "Sir John Daw," 48;
narrow escape from mutilation, 51 ;
on the allegories in Faerie Queene,
72 «., 470 n. ; on Daniel, 339 n. ;
on Ralegh as a writer, 460 ; on
Bacon, 513-16, 518; and on Shake-
speare, 515 ; in Bacon's establish-
ment, 516-18

Keats, John, letters of, 362

Kilcolman, Spenser at, 36-38 ; de-
scription of, 36 «. ; poem dated
from, 43, 332, 349 ; allusions to
district of in Faerie Queene, 78, 79.
98 ; Ralegh's supposed visit to, 38.
332 sq. , 350, 373

Kirke, Edward, and " E. K.," 3, 14.

479 «•
Knollys, Lettice, Countess of Essex
and Countess of Leicester, perhaps
referred to in Faerie Queene, 63 ;
her marriage with Leicester, 175 ;
Queen's visit to at Chartley, 356

Laneham, Robert. 248, 249. 255.
260 n., 261 sq., 479 n.



6o4



SPEA'SER AND THE BACON IMPERSONATIONS



"Lee," the river, in Ireland and
England, 97, 98

Leicester, Robert Dudley, Earl of, as
Spenser's patron, 2, 25, 27, 31,
163, 172-74. 477 [cf- 260, 275];
intended originally as the hero of
Faerie Queene, 24, 62 ; allusions to
his death, 63, 163, 174 ; offence
given by Spenser to, 164, 172, 173,
177, 179. 180 ; poetical advocacy of
his marriage to the Queen, 172, 259,
275, 280 n. ; his relations with i
Burghley, 173, 177, 180 ; an allusion
to his marriage with the Countess
of Essex, 175 ; and Sidney's letter
to the Queen, 186 ; his ambitious
projects and character, 67 «. , 194,
197 ; entertains the Queen at Kenil-
worth, 248 ; relations with Ralegh,
373, 417 ; allusions to in Faerie
Queene, 62-64, 66, 68, 473-77, 481

Leicester s Comtnoiiwealth, 192 sq.

Leicester's Ghost, 6'jn., 192, 196

Lilly (Lyly) John, a parallel, 170 ;
character as a writer, 230, 478 n. ;
eulogy of the Queen, 257, 477, 478 «.

London, descriptions of, 174, 490

Love and the passions, 8, 18, 99,
131. 277. 362, 387, 491, 507

Lucretius on the nature of deity, 112

"Magnanimity," 60, 113, 154, 318,

591
Man, Bacon on, 114; "the kingdom

of," 120 ; Shakespeare on, 331 ;

habit of attributing his faults to the

influence of the stars, 535, 536, 590
Marot, Clement, 15, 16, 27, 203, 208,

209
"Martin Marprelate" controversy, the,

52, 487, 548
Mary, Queen of Scots, in Faerie Queene,

72 «. , 90-92, 97, 472 «., 480; and

Queen Elizabeth, 91, 92
Masque, the. Bacon and Daniel on,

133

Meres, Francis, 371 n., 479 n.

Milton, John, and the tradition as
to Spenser's Irish service, 33 ; an
autobiographical element in his
poems, 54 ; connection with Spenser's
"Amaryllis," 65 n. ; the precocity
of, 204 n. ; price received by for
Paradise Lost, 220 ; correspondence
in style between his poems and other
writings, 416 ; Aubrey's life of,
418 n.

Mother Ilubberds Tale, date of com-
position, 43, 160, 175, 176, 178 ;
the attack on Burghley in, 41, 50-



52, 174, 196 ; and the censorship,
51, 52, 176 n. ; description of the
suitor in, 162 ; alluded to in a
Catholic pamphlet, 174 n. ; and by
Harvey, 176; suppressed, 177;
reference to the state of the clergy,
548

Mountjoy, Charles Blount, Lord, the
Queen's attachment for, 75 «., 421 ;
reduction of Ireland by, 75 //., 343-
346, 420, 438 ; a dedication to "oy
Bacon, 156 ; patron of Daniel, 335,
337 ; Daniel's funeral poem on, 343 ;
his relations with Lady Rich, 75,
346, 356 ; death of, 357 ; his dislike
of Ralegh, 420

Muiopotmos, 44, 179 sq.

Munster, settlement of, 36, 38, 42, 81 ;
rising in, 38, 565 ; remoteness of,
52 ; Sir Henry Sidney's description
of, 549 n., 557, 558; Spenser's
account of in the liezv, 556, 558 ;
in the petition, 570

" Mutability," the sense of in Spenser,
19, 104, 133 «., 163, 174, 184,
208, 330, 492 ; Shakespeare on,
104, 132, 331 ; Bacon on, 331,
493

Nashe, Thomas, first mention of
Spenser as a poet, 5 n. ; the soul
in the body, 18 t/. ; his style com-
pared with that of others, 8, 12,
279 «., 288, 291, 361 ; the Harvey-
Nashe controversy, 11, 329; em-
ployed by Bancroft in the "Martin
Marprelate" controversy, 52 «. ; on
" Amyntas " and Faerie Queene, 65,
66 ; his complaints, 102, 360 ;
suggested as the author of Tarleton's
Newes, 168 ; compares Harvey to
a peacock, 286 ; unauthorised publi-
cation by of Astrophel atid Stella
and of Daniel's sonnets, 336, 358-
362 ; suggests that Harvey himself
wrote the sonnet addressed to him
by Spenser, 369

Nature, philosophical conception of in
Faerie Queene, 80, 492 ; Bacon's
reverence for, 11 1 ; his insight into,
116, 118; his "Interpretation of,"
120

Norris, Sir John, in Faerie Queene,
68 ; dissensions with Russell in
Ireland, 570

Northampton, Henry Howard, Earl
of, his intrigues against Ralegh, 465

Northumberland, Henry Percy, eighth
Earl of, in Faerie Queene, 93, 94 ;
440 n.



INDEX



605



Northumberland, Henry Percy, ninth

E^rl of, 127 «., 440, 459
' ' Northumberland " MS. , 45 n. , 93 11. ,

185, 197, 523 «•

Observations on a Libel, Bacon's, 185,

187, 209
Ormonde, Earl of, 32, 70, 558, 563

Palladis Tantia, 370

Partheniades, the, 84 ;/.

Pedaniiiis, 277 n.

Pelham, Sir William, 32, 558 ; alleged

poem by, 314
Pembroke, Henry Herbert, Earl of,

186, 503

Pembroke, Mary, Countess of, relations
with Spenser, 160, 349, 351, 502-
504 ; with Daniel, 335, 342. 343,
347, 360, 361 ; and with Nashe,
360 ; perhaps at Kenilworth, 276 «. ;
her translation of Antonius, 342 ;
paraphrase of the Psalms, 343 ;
marriage, 503 ; the additions to the
Arcadia, ■>,b'2, 504 ; epitaph on, 504

Perrot, Sir John, in Faerie Queene, 78,
82 ; in the View, 571 n., 578 n. ;
in Bryskett's Discourse, 578

Plato, the soul, 109; poets, 119;
effect on character of dramatic work,

146 ; his ideal and the modern State,

147 ; " Atlantis," 305 ; Bryskett on,
581, 588, 589

Poetry — I. In the age of Elizabeth :
publication of by people in good
position not well regarded, 9, 48,
49 ; complaints of the contempt for,
13, 24 ; prejudice against, 160 ; the
"new," 7, 47, 255, 340, 347;
English metres, 226 ; strictures on
contemporary " rymers " : " E. K.,"
7, "Immerito," 8, Webbe, 11, 12,
Puttenham, 12 «. , Gascoigne, 225-
227, Br)'skett, 589 ; allusions to
popular tales and ballads, 12 n.,
266, 267

II. General : imagination and
experience, 54 ; French criticism
of English, 105; "invention" in,
105; "feigned history," 105 «. ,
149, 152-54 ; Sidney on, 148 sq. ;
Bacon on, 152 sq. ; Puttenham on
the "artificial" and the "natural"
in, 157, 158 ; Gascoigne on,
225 sq. ; the sonnet and blank
verse, 347 ; new metres, 354, 447,
454 ; imagination and reason, 387 ;
as a feature of Court life, 388, 442 ;
correspondency between an author's
poetry and his other writings, 415 ;



the difficult art of, 433 ; myths
and the poetry of antiquity : Bacon
on, 123 n., Sidney on, 124 «. ,
Gascoigne on, 288, Bryskett on,
590

Poets, the inspiration of: "E. K. ," 13,
Puttenham, 137, 157, Sidney, 149 jy..
Bacon, 388 ; honour and rewards
for, 25, 26, 99; Plato on, 119,
147; "right," 105 «. , 147, 150;
effect on character of "imitation"
(dramatic), 146 ; Sidney on the
historian and the poet, 151

Pope, Alexander, precocity of, 204,
206

Pope, the, and rebellion in Ireland,
32, 559 ; excommunication of
Elizabeth by, 559

" Prosopopoia, " impersonation, 9 n.

Prothalamion , 44, 98, 163, 173

Publication without consent, instances
of alleged, 6, 14, 216, 295 sq., 336,
360

Puttenham, George. See Arte of
English Poesie

Ralegh, Sir Walter, his estates in
Munster, 38, 374, 565 ; his retreat
from the Court and visit to Ireland
in 1589, and his denial of loss of
favour, 38, 333, 350, 418, 445 ;
consulted by the Queen in Irish
matters, 38, 420, 564 ; denounced
to the Queen by Essex, 44 \see further
under Essex] ; his position at Court,
47 ; his relations with the Queen, 73,
74, 421-27, 443 ; exploration of the
Orinoco, tj n., 460 sq. ; verses in
Gascoigne's Steele Glas, 243 ; his
early life, 244, 304 n. , 372, 416 ;
an "adventurer" in Gilbert's New-
foundland voyage, 304, 323 ; con-
nection with Hakluyt, 321, 506 n. ;
and Colin Clout, 332-35, 350;
scurrilous epitaph on Cecil attributed
to, 332 «. ; eleg}' on Sidney attributed
to, 355 ; his verses to Spenser in
Faerie Queene, 367, 459 ; and
"Ignoto," 367-69; his "Cynthia,"
369, 370, 442 sq. ; Spenser's inti-
macy with considered, 371-74 ; at
Smerwick, 371,560; differences with
Lord Grey, 373, 419, 420 ; as a
retainer of Leicester, 373. 417 ;
Devonshire antiquaries on his lineage,
376, 378 n. ; jealousy at his rise,
378 ; his marriage and loss of favour,
392, 414 ; his prospects on the
death of the Queen, 395, 435 ; his
attitude towards tho succession of



6o6



SPENSER AND THE BACON IMPERSONATIONS



James, 396, 439, 465 ; his influence
on Bacon, 396 ; charged with
atheism, 414, 487 ; his style of
writing, 416, 433 ; the spelling of
his name, 416 ; descriptions of, 419 ;
his unpopularity, 419, 420, 432 ; his
arrogance, 419, 420, 445; charged
with unscrupulous ambition, 420,
428 ; the Queen's respect for his
opinion, 420 ; grants to by the
Queen, 423 ; and the Madre de Dios,
423, 431, 432, 505, 506 71. ; reports
of his marriage, 424 ; committed to
the Tower, 425 ; gross flattery of
the Queen, 426, 435 ; his relations
with his wife, 427-29 ; on piracy,
431 ; his respect for Cecil, 432, 437 ;
as a man of action, 432, 433 ; allusion
by to Richard the Second, 436 ; the
"Bothwell" letter, 438-41; his
imprisonment under James, 439,
465 ; the verse petition to Queen
Anne, 454 ; his epitaph, 457, 458 ;
assistance rendered by others in his
History of the World, 458-60 ; his
exaggerations, 463; intrigues against
him by Northampton and Cecil, 465 ;
paper explaining Faerie Qi/eene
allegories given to, 470 n. ; his
proposals for garrisoning Ireland,
563, 564 ; suggested poetical allusions
to in Faerie Queene, 73-76, 94, 468
\see also wider Timias], and in
Shakespeare, 378, 397, 465
Rich, Penelope, Lady, her relations
with Mountjoy, 75, 346, 356 ; and
"Stella," 190, 349, 351-64, 502-

504
" Rosalind," 2, 15, 19, 27, 28, 216,

364-66, 385, 486 «., 502-4
Roydon, Matthew, 317, 352, 422
Ruines of Time, The, 43, 160-64 ; the

attack on Burghley in, 51, 52, 161

Scott, Sir Walter, autobiographical
element in, 230

Shakespeare, William, claim to im-
mortality, 5 n. ; the play Sir Thomas
Afore, 49 ; absence of manuscripts,
53 ; the alleged " unconscious " order
of his work, 55 ; on Essex, 64 «. ,
437 ; some characters in the Winter's
Tale, 96 ; his attitude towards the
people, loi, 106 ; sense of muta-
bility, 104, 132, 331; his "invention,"
105 ; Tolstoi's hatred of, 106 ; the
Tempest examined, 121-33 '> his use
of the term "spirits," 121 S(/., 134-
137 ; and of the term "simple," 141 ;
his "inaccuracy," 142, 587; his



"anachronisms," 143-45 ; the "im-
personality " of, 147 ; the complaints
of Hamlet, 148, 163, 331 ; his plays
and Bacon's remarks on the drama,
15s ; a description applicable to his
genius and art, 157, 158 ; theallusions
in the Teares of the Muses, 164 ;
"Yorick," 171; early Shakespearian
humour, 224, 269; the "autobio-
graphical" element in, 230, 231;
Midsummer Night's Dream and the
Queen's entertainment at Kenilworth,
248, 255, 268, 273 ; the impetuous
sequence of his ideas, 287, 463 ; on
drunkenness, 291, 292 ; the style of
Lucrece, 341; the "argument" of
Antony and Cleopatra, 342 ; his
prose, 415 ; The Phoenix and
Turtle, 422 ; an allusion by Ralegh
to Richard the Second, 436 ; Othello,
465 ; some parallels with Spenser,
494-99 ; his way of using law terms,
500 ; absence in love, 501 ; and the
Countess of Pembroke, 502 ; the
sonnets of, 502, 503 ; Ben Jonson
on, 515

Passages quoted from, or refer-
ences to: Othello (lago's age), 3;
King Lear (the gods and old age),
\^\ Richard II I. (and "E. K."), 21 ;
Measure for Measui-e (the people),
106 ; T roil us (reference to), 106 ;
//(7;«/f/(" the groundlings"), 106 «. ;
Tempest (" spirits "), 124-33 '< ^I<i^-
beth ("mutability "), 132 n. ; L.L.L. ,
Lear, Troilus, Merchant of Venice,
Hamlet, Sonnetcxydx. ( ' 'spirits"), 134,
135 ; Antony and Cleopatra (trans-
mission of impressions), 136 ; L.L.L. ,
Troilus and Cressida ("simple"),
141, 142 ; King I^ar, Antony
and Cleopatra, Cymbeline (" ana-
chronisms"), 144, 145; Hamlet
("Yorick"), Merry Wives (refer-
ence to), 171 ; Hamlet (" mighty op-
posites"), i8o«. ; .l/(7<iJ<r/^ (ambition),
200 ; Hamlet (man and nature),
238 «., 331 ; Midsummer Night's
Dream (acting), 255 n., 268 ; ibid.
(moonlight), 273 n. ; Hamlet,
Othello (drunkenness), 291 ; Romeo
a//<//////V/(" beauty's ensign"), 341 ;
Othello ("feminism"), 342; ibid.
(his ancestry), 378 ; Hamlet (on
Horatio), 397 ; Much ado (reference
to), 403 ; Coriolanus (the child and
the butterfly), 407 n. ; Macbeth
(prose letter), 415 ; Henry V. (Essex),
437 ; Sonnet Ixxiii. (reference to), 454 ;
Othello ("Anthropophagi"), 464;



INDEX



607



ibid. (Othello and his courtship),
465-67 ; Othello, King Lear, Vemts
and Adonis, Romeo and Juliet,
(parallels), 494 ; Romeo and Juliet,
L.L.L. (legal metaphors), 500 //. ;
As you like it, Antony and Cleopatra,
(absence in love), 501 ; Timon (last



Online LibraryEdward George HarmanEdmund Spenser and the impersonations of Francis Bacon → online text (page 54 of 55)