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Peace with empire: the problem online

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\PERS FOR WAR TIME. No. 33



Peace With Empire
The Problem



By
EDWYN BEVAN, M.A.



Price Twopence



HUMPHREY MILFORD
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS
fDON EDINBURGH GLASGOW NEW YORK
TORONTO MELBOURNE BOMBAY






PAPERS FOR WAR TIME



FmsT Series. Already published.

1. CHRISTIANITY AND WAR. By the Rev. W.

Temple, M.A.

2. ARE WE WORTH FIGHTING FOR ? By the
Rev. Richard Roberts.

3. THE WOMAN'S PART. By Mrs. Luke Paget.

4. BROTHERS ALL: THE WAR AND THE
RACE QUESTION. By Edwyn Bevan, M.A.

5. THE DECISIVE HOUR : IS IT LOST ? By J. H.
Oldham, M.A.

6. ACTIVE SERVICE : THE SHARE OF THE
NON-COMBATANT. By the Rev. W. R. Maltby.

7. THE WAR SPIRIT IN OUR NATIONAL LIFE.
By the Rev. A. Herbert Gray, M.A.

8. CHRISTIAN CONDUCT IN WAR TIME. By

W. H. MOBERLY, M.A.

9. THE WITNESS OF THE CHURCH IN THE
PRESENT CRISIS. By X.

10. THE REAL VV^AR. By the Rev. W. E. Orchard,
D.D.

11. LOVE CAME DOWN AT CHRISTMAS. By

Professor G. Hare Leonard, M.A.

12. AN ANSWER TO BERNHARDI. By the Rev.
Professor D. S. Cairns, D.D.



Third Series

PAPERS FOR WAR TIME. No. 33

PEACE WITH EMPIRE:
THE PROBLEM



BY

EDWYN BEVAN, M.A.

HON. TELLOW OF NEW COLLEGE, OXFORD



HUMPHREY MILFORD ;;'
OXFORD UNIVERSITY ' PRESS *

LONDON EDINBUEGH GLASGOW NLIW YOEK

TORONTO MELBOURNE BOMBAY

1915



^



50^



BASIS OF PUBLICATION

This series of Papers is issued under the auspices of a Com-
mittee drawn from various Christian bodies and political
parties, and is based on the following convictions :

1. That Great Britain was in August morally bound to

declare war and is no less bound to carry the war to
a decisive issue ;

2. That the war is none the less an outcome and a revela-

tion of the un-Christian principles which have dominated
the life of Western Christendom and of which both the
Church and the nations have need to repent ;

3. That followers of Christ, as members of the Church, are

linked to one another in a fellowship which transcends
all divisions of nationality or race ;

4. That the Christian duties of love and forgiveness are as

binding in time of war as in time of peace ;

5. That Christians are bound to recognize the insufficiency

of mere compulsion for overcoming evil, and to place
supreme reliance upon spiritual forces and in particular
upon the power and method of the Cross ;

6. That only in proportion as Christian principles dictate

the terms of settlement will a real and lasting peace
be secured ;

7. That it is the duty of the Church to make an altogether

new effort to realize and apply to all the relations
of life its own positive ideal of brotherhood and
fellowship ;

8. That, with God all things- are possible.



PEACE WITH EiMpmE :v5'Bti i A
PEOBLEM

' Germany must be crushed.' ' To humiliate Germany
would prevent any lasting peace,' So the war of phrases
goes on in our ears to-day. And it is largely a war of
phrases. For if one gets the people on either side to
describe what sort of resettlement of Europe they would
like to see after the war, one does not find mucli difference,
so far as recasting the European system goes. No
responsible person in England has suggested that Germany
should be dismembered in the sense that regions genuinely
German in race and sympathies should be torn away
from the Empire. No one on the other side can suppose
that a settlement involving the loss of Alsace and the
Polish provinces would be contemplated for a moment
by Germany, except after a defeat so signal as to constitute
in itself a pretty considerable humiliation.

What is overlooked in most of this controversy is
that the question of resettlement is much more than
a European question. When Germans say that they are
fighting for their ' place in the sun ', it is not Europe that
they are thinking of, but Africa and Asia Minor and the
Islands of the Pacific. Seeley pointed out long ago that
rivalry between European nations for the acquisition of
extra-European dominion was a main motive behind the
wars, of the last three centuries. It is well known that
up to the eighties of the last century Germany had
developed no ambition of extra-European empire. Bis-
marck, as we are constantly reminded nowadays, looked
unfavourably upon a movement which would complicate
Germany's huge European task by rivalries in the
colonial field. He was, however, induced to sanction in

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PEACE WITH EMPIRE : THE PROBLEM

April 1884 the appropriation by Germany of a region in
South-West Africa ; and then the process began. In the
same year the Ger^nan flag was hoisted in the Cameroons,
in Togoland, and in East Africa. In 1885 Germany
aoquif'ed


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Online LibraryEdwyn Robert BevanPeace with empire: the problem → online text (page 1 of 2)