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NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES



3 3433 08230269



I



I




FROM INDIA TO THE

WAR ZONE

BY ELBERT FISHER



\A_. AAurf V\flUKX \ ^ OO ,

\



THE BOY GLOBE TROTTERS

By ELBERT FISHER

12mo, Cloth. Many Illustrations. 60c. per Volume



This is a series of four books relating the adventures of two boys, who
make a trip around the world, working their way as they go. They
meet with various peoples having strange habits and customs, and their
adventures form a medium for the introduction of much instructive
matter relative to the character and industries of the cities and countries
through which they pass. A description is given of the native sports
of boys in each of the foreign countries through which they travel. The
books are illustrated by decorative head and end pieces for each chapter,
there being 36 original drawings in each book, all by the author, and four
striking halftones.

1. From New York to the Golden Gate, takes in many of the prin-
cipal points between New York and California, and contains a highly
entertaining narrative of the boys' experiences overland and not a little
useful information.

2. From San Francisco to Japan, relates the experiences of the two
boys at the Panama Exposition, and subsequently their journeyings to
Hawaii, Samoa and Japan. The greater portion of their time is spent
at sea, and a large amount of interesting information appears throughout
the text.

3. From Tokio to Bombay. This book covers their interesting
experiences in Japan, followed by sea voyages to the Philippines, Hong-
kong and finally to India. Their experiences with the natives cover a
field seldom touched upon in juvenile publications, as it relates to the
great Hyderabad region of South India.

4. From India to the War Zone, describes their trip toward the
Persian Gulf. They go by way of the River Euphrates and pass the
supposed site of the Garden of Eden, and manage to connect themselves
with a caravan through the Great Syrian Desert. After traversing
the Holy Land, where they visit the Dead Sea, they arrive at the Med-
iterranean port of Joppa, and their experiences thereafter within the war
zone are fully described.

THE NEW YORK BOOK COMPANY

201 EAST 12th STREET NEW YORK




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How do you do" said Win field gravely.



[Page 54].



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THE BOY GLOBE TROTTERS SERIES



FROM INDIA TO THE
WAR ZONE



BY

ELBERT FISHER



ILLUSTRATED








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THE NEW YORK BOOK COMPANY

NEW YORK



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COPYRIGHT, 1915, BY
THE NEW YORK BOOK COMPANY






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CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE

I UNDER ARREST IN BOMBAY 11

II IN SORE STRAITS. A FRIEND 24

III IN THE PERSIAN GULF 36

IV PERSIA AND ITS CURIOUS PEOPLE 50

V GAMES, CEREMONIES AND CUSTOMS .... 61

VI ON THE SITE OF THE GARDEN OF EDEN ... 74

VII THE ARABIAN SHEIK AND THE CARAVAN ... 88

VIII THE BEDOUINS AND NATIVES OF ARABIA . . . 100

IX THEFT OF WINFIELD'S PURSE, AND THE RESULTS . 113

X CAPTURE OF THE BOYS BY ARABS 125

XI THEIR MYSTERIOUS RELEASE 138

XII REJOINING THE CARAVAN. THE TALISMAN . . 151

XIII ATTACK ON THE CARAVAN 164



XIV IN THE LAND THAT MOSES TROD 176

XV EXCITING EXPERIENCE WITH ROBBERS .... 189

XVI PALESTINE. TRIP TO THE MEDITERRANEAN . . 202

XVII CAPTURED BY SYRIAN BANDITS 215

g

XVIII ESCAPE IN THE NIGHT, CONSTANTINOPLE 228



tNDlfl



Jiomfaiy

Jtidian Ocean




FROM INDIA TO THE
WAR ZONE

CHAPTER I

UNDER ARREST IX BOMBAY

"THE Chief of Police has sent for both of YOU.

V

and I have promised that we will be at his office at
eleven o'clock this morning.'

The speaker was Professor Goodrich, and the
ones addressed were "\Vinfield Merritt and Stan-
wood Bailev, two New York bovs who were mak-

V J \,

ing a tour of the world, and had reached Bom-
bay, India.

"Have they caught the thief?' 1 asked TVinfield.

"No; but I understand they have found some

trace of him. The man who notified me was an

11



12 FEOM INDIA TO THE WAR ZONE

under officer of the Chief, and did not know much
about the case,' replied the Professor.

The boys while making their way through India,
from Madras, had become acquainted with Pro-
fessor Goodrich, a naturalist. Much of the route
was traversed in his company, during which time
they had interesting experiences, and had as-
sisted the Professor in capturing many specimens
of butterflies and other insects.

Prior to reaching India they had made excur-
sions into and through Siam and Burma, and be-
fore reaching those places had become acquainted
with a Mr. Winthrop, a wealthy American, who
employed them to take care of him. He was a
great traveler, and became greatly attached to
the boys.

In early days Mr. Winthrop had been a hunter,
but his age, and a severe accident, some years
previous made him an invalid, and when he became
acquainted with the boys and found them very
entertaining, it produced such a change in his
previous morbid condition, that he planned a tour
through Siam and Burma, the scenes of many of
his former exploits.

Unfortunately, after a week's trip through the
southern part of Siam, he was suddenly taken ill,
and expired the following day. After the first
severe attack he made a will, devising a certain
legacy to the boys, who were to receive its benefits
a year from that day, but the amount was kept
a secret. In addition thereto the U. S. Consul at
Bangkok was provided with a certain amount of



UNDER ARREST IN BOMBAY 13

funds to be sent to the boys, in case of dire ex-
tremity, while on their travels.

The peculiar conditions surrounding this be-
quest will be better understood if the provision
regarding the boys' tour is explained. As the re-
sult of a banter the boys, alluded to, had under-
taken to make a tour around the world, agreeing
to start with only twenty dollars in money; to
stay not more than two weeks at any point; not
to accumulate more than twentv dollars at any

^

one place; and not to accept any money as a favor
or by way of charity.

They were permitted to work their way from
place to place, by any honorable means and, be-
fore leaving the United States, were fortunate
enough to serve as detectives in behalf of the gov-
ernment in a very important case, which required
their services from Salt Lake City to Reno,
Nevada. From that source they had obtained a
neat little sum of money.

.

Then they were fortunate enough to secure
employment on board an ocean liner to Tokio ; and
after making a tour of Japan, had the pleasure
of reengaging on the same ship on its way from
Nagasaki to Hong Kong. After reaching India
they still had over eighty dollars, which would
take them, as they hoped, as far as the Mediter-
ranean Sea. There they expected to get employ-
ment which would safely assure them passage to
Europe.

While traveling through India they met a young
man, named Robert Wenn, who had known the



FROM IXDIA TO THE WAR ZONE

Professor in Arabia. He was very attractive,
and made himself agreeable to all. Together they
journeyed over the mountains and through the
jungles in search of specimens.

Just ten days previous to the conversation re-
ferred to in the opening paragraphs, their new
acquaintance disappeared, and with him the two
purses belonging to the boys, which contained all
their money, as well as their papers, including
the contract which was made with their friend
Mr. Castleton in Xew York and a letter written
by their deceased friend, Mr. Winthrop.

The police were immediately notified of the
theft, which had occurred in the interior of India,
about three hundred miles from Bombav. and the

/

notice to the Professor was the first indication
that any steps had been taken to find the thief.

"I hope they will catch the fellow/ said Stan-
wood. "He can have the money if he will only let
us have the papers. '

"Yes: I can now understand whv thev would be

*

important to you,' ' remarked the Professor, after
the boys had explained the situation.

At eleven o'clock, therefore, they were at the
office of the Police Administration and were im-
mediately ushered in. The official was very
courteous, but at the same time he exhibited a
peculiar attitude, and began to question them in
a curious way.

"Your names are, '

"TVinfield Merritt and Stanwood Bailey,' said
Stanwood.



UNDER ARREST IX BOMBAY 15
"Ah. ves: and vou are from Xew York.' he



volunteered, glancing at a document before him.

"Yes," answered Winfield, eagerly.

4 ' How long have you been in India ! '

"About three weeks. 7

"Where did you come from?'

"From Burma.'

"Where did you land?'

"At Madras!' 7

"What documents have you to establish your
identities ? '

"We have nothing, whatever. Everything was
taken in the two purses which were stolen.'

The officer looked at them in a questioning way
as Winfield said this.

"You were in Bangkok, I believe!' ' he inquired,
looking at them searchingly.

"Yes,' said Stanwood.

"Did you know a Mr. Walker there?'

"He is the IT. S. Consul."

"Did you expect any money from him?'

The boys glanced at each other, and each hesi-
tated to reply. The Chief noticed the indecision,
and immediately continued: "Did he promise ta
pay you any money?'

"No," said Winfield.

The official smiled. "Who was Mr. Win-
throp?'' he asked.

"He was our friend, but he died, and then told
Mr. Walker to send us money if we needed it.'

"Did you ever ask him for money before?'

"No."



16 FROM INDIA TO THE WAR ZONE

"Are you sure of that!"

"Yes; but why do you ask that?' said Stan-
wood, now visibly irritated at the course of the
questionings.

"Why I ask that is not material now," replied
the official. "It is sufficient that you should know
that you are at present detained for further ex-
amination. '

"Does that mean they are under arrest!"
asked the Professor in amazement.

"It means that we have sufficient evidence to
detain them, pending a full investigation of this
matter. I have before me a cablegram from the
U. S. Consul at Bangkok, which states that these
young men wrote a letter from Madras, the day
before one was written, or purporting to have
been written, at Bombay, ' he said, as he scrutin-
ized the boys closely.

"We never wrote a letter to Mr. Walker from
Madras, but we did send one from this place/
said Stanton, vehemently.

"My warrant for detaining you will be ex-
plained by this message,' he said, as he handed
it to the Professor. It read as follows :

"To the Chief of Police, Bombay.

"Two days ago received letter from two boys,
from New York, Stanwood Bailey and Winfield
Merritt, dated at Madras, together with proper
letter, authorizing me to transmit funds to them
in accordance with a trust agreement Today re-
ceived a letter from supposedly the same per-



UNDER AEREST IN BOMBAY 17

sons, asking that funds be transmitted to Bom-
bay. Think the boys in your city must be im-
postors. Kindly investigate and report.

"R. A. WALKER, U. S. Consul,

1 'Bangkok.' 7

The boys read it over and over, and their in-
dignation knew no bounds.

4 'That fellow took our papers and sent them to
Mr. Walker," said Winfield.

"But that is not any evidence to me,' said
the official . "If you had something to establish
your identity, it would be different. Have you
anything with you?' ' he asked.

"Nothing that I can think of,' said Stanwood,
quietly, for he now saw the seriousness of the
situation.

"Haven't you some mark on your clothing, or
a letter, or something to show that you are really
the two bovs named?' '

*/

"Allow me to say that I met these boys on a
train, after leaving Madras. They told me the
conditions under which thev were making a tour

.

of the world, and I know they had funds, and I
also saw the purses which they carried. I also
know about the young man Wenn, who met us
near Sholopur, and attached himself to our party,
and who disappeared three days thereafter. I
suppose it has already occurred to you that it
might be^well for you to telegraph to the police
at Madras to detain anv one calling for mail or

t/

telegrams at Madras, as it is quite likely that Mr.

50



18 FROM INDIA TO THE WAR ZONE

Walker has already sent funds to the boys ad-
dressed to that place.'

The official listened attentively to the Profes-
sor while talking, and answered: "I have al-
ready wired to Mr. Walker to inform me whether

*/

he has sent any funds to Madras, '

While thus speaking, an attendant laid a tele-
gram before him, and seizing it quickly, he read as
follows: "I mailed funds to Madras yesterday,
to be paid to the persons mentioned in my dis-
patch to you."

"This is from the U. S. Consul, and the one
calling for the funds at Madras will be detained,
pending a further investigation. Meanwhile I am
in doubt about you.'

"I will stand sponsor for them," said the Pro-
fessor. "I cannot believe these boys are deceiv-
ing me. I am sure that the young man referred
to is the thief.'

"With those assurances you may go, but you
must not change your hotel, without giving us due
notice," remarked the official, "and I shall hold
you responsible for their appearance here when
required,' he continued, as he cast a glance at
the Professor.

The boys returned to the hotel with the Pro-
fessor. "That was a shrewd scheme on the part
of Robert. I had no idea he was a scamp,' said
the Professor, "but I think the plans which have
been laid will catch him.'

Two days after, the Professor was advised to
bring the boys to the Administration office and



UNDER ARREST IN BOMBAY 19

they could scarcely restrain themselves, when
they received this information. The official
greeted them less reservedly than before, an in-
cident which they both noticed.

"The police have detained two young men in
Madras who claim that you are impostors and
they demand the payment of the transmitted
funds. Tomorrow their photographs will reach
this office. If your identification agrees, so far
as the man Wenn is concerned it may help to solve
the matter/ he said, addressing the Professor.

"I am glad of that/ said the Professor. "I
know the individual well enough to point him out. ' '

The following day the boys paced the streets
anxiously, waiting for the time to visit the offi-
cial and promptly at ten o'clock entered the office
with the Professor.

"Have you received the photographs V 9 asked
the Professor.

"They came the first mail this morning. Step
into the next room," said the Chief, addressing the
boys. They did so.

The official handed a photograph to the Pro-
fessor. "At my suggestion they have included a
number of other inmates of the detention station.
Please point out the man called Wenn."

The Professor adjusted his glasses, and exam-
ined the group. ' ' That is the man, somewhat dis-
guised, or, rather, with a different suit than he
had when with us/ he answered.

"Call in one of the boys," he said. Winfield
appeared, and the official said:



20 FROM INDIA TO THE WAR ZONE

"See if you can detect the man called Wenn.'

"This is the man," said Winfield, as he pointed
to the identical individual indicated by the Pro-
fessor.

Stanwood 's identification was as direct and
positive, when called in. "This seems to be con-
clusive. But who is the other fellow ?' he asked.
"I cannot recognize any one in the group, that I
know/ 1 said Stanwood.

"That seems to establish your statements as to
meeting Wenn and his disappearance between
night and morning. Now state what the purses
contained, and whether they had any identify-
ing marks on them.'

The boys gave a complete inventory of their
possessions, and the official notified the boys that
they should report two days afterwards.

"But we must leave tomorrow, and cannot wait
until that time,' said Winfield.

"And whv not?' 7 asked the official with some

V

vehemence.

"Because our contract says we shall not stay
longer than two weeks at any place, and tomorrow
is the last day,' answered Winfield.

"Bather a peculiar contract, I should say.'

"That is just what the contract says, and we
can't wait,' said Stanwood.

"I have nothing to do with the contract. You
must remain,' he answered, and the Professor
also nodded his head in confirmation of the edict
uttered by the official.

The boys returned to the hotel in an unhappy



UNDER ARREST IN BOMBAY 21

state of mind. They were determined to go, but
going presented another obstacle. They had no
funds, and hesitated about explaining the full situ-
ation to the Professor. They sat in their room,
the pictures of despair, for an hour or more, and
then picked up their hats and sauntered out to
the street.

"Well, if we wanted to go where could we go?"
said Stanwood.

"To the Suez Canal, I suppose. That is the
quickest way to get to the Mediterranean," an-
swered Winfield.

"Suppose we look it up," said Stanwood.

The director gave them the addresses of the
steamship companies, and they were soon in one
of the offices. There, to their surprise, the in-
formation was given that the regular weekly sail-
ings of the line had been cancelled, owing to the
reported raiding of the canal by Turkish troops.

"But isn't there some way to reach Greece, or
Italy?" asked Stanwood.

"Not at present/ ' was the reply.

The boys left the offices with heavy hearts, and
wandered along the streets. Notwithstanding
their sad plight they had some things to anticipate
in the future, but that would not help them now.
While debating the question of their departure
a sign loomed up before them: "Regular sailing
of the SS. Oman, Wednesdays at 2 P. M.'

"Where does that go? come on,' ' said Winfield.

In a few minutes they were at the little office,
near the dock.



22 FEOM INDIA TO THE WAR ZONE

"Does the Oman go to the Suez Canal V 9 asked
Stanwood.

"Oh, no! Our ships all go to the Gulf of
Oman."

"Where is the Gulf of Oman!" asked Win-
field.

"Well, the Straits of Oman lead directly into
the Persian Gulf, and that is northwest of this
point. ' '

"How far is it?" asked Stanwood.

"The Oman goes about 1200 miles, but from
Ormuz a small line runs to the head of the Persian
Gulf, a distance of 600 miles further.

The boys consulted the maps. "Why, the head
of the Persian Gulf can't be more than eight or
nine hundred miles from the Mediterranean," said
Stanwood.

"Oh, yes ; it is fully a thousand miles," said the
man.

"Is there any way to get across?" asked Win-
field.

"If you are not particular in the way you
travel,' he answered.

"What kind of traveling do they have there?"
asked Stanwood.

"Principally by camels. There are several
caravan routes from Persia.'

Stanwood 's eyes fairly bulged. "That is the
route for me, by all means. I'm in for the
camels,' he said.

"But the first thing is to get where the camels
are," said Winfield. "Sixteen hundred miles be-



UNDER ARREST IX BOMBAY



23



fore there's a cainel in sight, and not a cent in our
pocket. I wonder if there would be a chance to
work our way there?' And "Winfield turned to
the man. "Do you ever employ any one but the
regular force on your boats?' he asked.

The man looked at them for a moment, and
slowly said : ' ' No ; we have a full equipment, and
I do not think there is any chance on the Oman.''

The boys explained their peculiar position, and
it seemed to have some effect on him, for he ad-
vised them to call at two o'clock in the afternoon.
"Possibly, I might have some news for you,' he
said.

The boys were there at the appointed time, but
their hearts sank when he stated that there was
no possibility of a place on the ship.

"What is the fare?" asked Winfield.

"Four pounds, eighteen shilling, first class, and
three pounds six, second,' was the answer.





CHAPTER II

IX SORE STRAITS. A FRIEXD

WHEX the bovs returned to the hotel thev sought

* *

out the Professor onlv to learn that he had con-

M

tracted a fever since the morning visit at the
Police office. They went in, however, and ex-
plained that they had determined on sailing to
the Persian Gulf on the boat the following day,
but that it was impossible to get work on the ship
to pay for their passage.

He listened attentively, and said : "It had been
my purpose for some time to make a trip along
the gulf, and since the interview yesterday it oc-
curred to me that a good business arrangement
might be effected between us that would carry
you along without any difficulty.'

"And how can that be done?" asked Stanwood.

"By making it a business en route to gather
samples," he replied.

The boys were delighted at the proposal.
"That will suit us/ said Winfield enthusiasti-
cally. "But we must get away at once/ he con-

^



IN SORE STRAITS. A FRIEND 25

tinned. TThile tlius conversing a messenger ap-
peared from the police official. The Professor
opened the missive. "We are to be at the office
at ten in the moraine." he said.

c_/ /

"Oh, that's good,' said Winfiekl. with a sigh
of relief. "I am sure they have that fixed all
rio'ht now."

^.s

"Then we shall try to sail on that boat; what
do you say the name is ? ' inquired the Professor.

"The Oman."

"Go down and reserve two rooms at once.
Simply give them your name and the pay will be
arranged for in the morning.'

The boys were not slow in complying. "That
is a good business arrangement.' said Stanwood.
"I wonder how much there is in it?" he remarked,
referring to the offer to take such specimens as
the bovs niio-ht gather.

*

After returning to the hotel the Professor said :
"It had entirely escaped me. and I am ashamed of
myself; but you have no funds. Here is a sover-
eign. That was very stupid of me to forget it.'

The boys accepted the coin with many thanks.
Their room and board were being paid for by
the Professor so they had no reason to complain
on that score, but it was a verv Irvine thine to

*

walk past the picture shows day after day with-
out enough funds to take them in.

When they left the hotel that afternoon there
was no inquiry on the part of either concerning
the way in which the afternoon should be spent.
They entered the first moving picture show that



26 FROM INDIA TO THE WAR ZONE

was in their path, and forgot, for the time being,
all their woes.

During the night the Professor's fever in-
creased, and the physician who was called in stated
that the condition was not at all grave, but it
would be necessary to have absolute rest for sev-
eral days. This statement did not assure the
boys as they felt they must leave Bombay before
twelve o'clock that night.

In the morning they were compelled to go to
the police office without the Professor and found,
to their delight that the officials at Madras had
learned the identity of their late friend, Robert
Wenn. The funds transmitted to Madras had
been ordered sent to Bombay, and were then in
charge of the officer.

The Consul, Mr. Walker, after his cablegram
had suspected that the Madras claimants were
spurious so he sent a cable warning to Madras,
after he had sent a cable to Madras asking cer-
tain questions which he knew only the genuine
boys would know. Wenn was a confidence man,
with a record, whose last exploits at Singapore
caused him to flee to India.

"How much money did he send?' asked Win-
field.

"Ten pounds," answered the official

"That is about fifty dollars,' said Stanwood.

It was nearly twelve o'clock before all the
formalities were complied with, and the boys re-
ceived the funds. They were eager to reach the
hotel and inform the Professor, but on returning



IN SORE STRAITS. A FRIEND 27

were told that he was in a serious condition. This
was, indeed, disappointing. The situation was
plain, however. The contract called for them to
leave within two weeks. That time expired at
midnight. There was no other course open but
to take the Oman, which sailed at two o'clock, or
to start out on foot.

''Let us write a letter to the Professor, tell him
the situation, and inform him where we are going.
He may follow us later, when he gets better,' ' said
Winfield.

"Somehow it doesn't seem right to leave him
here in this way, but what can we do ? " responded
Stanwood.

It was, indeed, a difficult matter to settle. Just
imagine the condition yourself. What would you
have done under the circumstances?

"I can see only one thing to do; and that is to
write the letter, and sail. I am sure the Profes-
sor would not have advised otherwise.'

The letter was written, the hotel bill of $16.30
paid, and they left the hotel with their knapsacks,


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