Elizabeth A Thurston.

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MOSAICS OF LIFE.



MOSAICS



OF



HUMAN LIFE.



ELIZABETH A. THURSTON.



PHILADELPHIA

J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO.

1866.



Entered according to the Act of Congress, in the j-ear 1866, by

J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO.,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.



INTRODUCTORY.



There is a pleasant old story, that once upon a time, Trutli
went into a library, and burnt all tlie books, save two or three !
The compiler of a book, in his, or her best estate, must be
considered one of the humblest servants of her Majesty,
Nevertheless if there be

"A natural gift,
The lettered grain from lettered chaff to sift,"

such followers and gleaners have their value.
The collection is a motley one ;

"A thing of shreds and patches;"

But such is life — a mingled thread — " An April day ; sunshine
and showers alternate; joy follows close upon the heels of
sorrow. The funeral procession scarcely passes, ere we are
gazing on the wedding pageant."

As it is not yet determined by universal consent of natu-
ralists, whether the egg preceded the hen, or the hen the egg,
could I begin my mosaics better than to follow the order of
one of the most authentic beginnings of life extant ? namely,

that of the " grand old gardener," and his wife ; and introduce
1» 5



6 TNTRODUCTORY.

my characters in Eden ! If an Eden can be to mortals, per-
haps the era of wooing and betrothal approaches it most
nearly.

I would say, in conclusion, to all who read, to all who
receive, and to all who give away this compilation, [may their
number be Legion,] that if I have collected pictures touching
and graphic on many phases of human life; if I have gathered
together quaint and valuable sayings ; if I have been a faithful
and loving step-mother to a pleasant and suggestive book, I
have an abundant reward.

ELIZABETH A. THURSTON.



CONTENTS.



BBTBOTHAL.

PAGE

BETROTHAL SliaJcspeare. 17

THE LONG PATH 0. W.Holmes. 17

EXTRACT FROM "ARTEVELDE." Henry Taylor. 18

A KING'S WOOING SliaJcspeare. 18

THERESA'S ANSWER TO WILHELM Goelke. 19

HESITATION Alfred Tennyson. 19

PROPOSAL Bayard Taylor. 19

NOBODY COULD HAVE SEEN IT From tlie German. 20

BEHAVE YOURSEL' BEFORE FOLK Scotch Song. 21

JUDY McLEARY Irish Ballad. 22

JENNY KISSED ME Leigh Hunt. 23

AN OFFER Bayard Taylor. 23

THE CONFESSION Elizabeth Austin. 24

TAM GLEN Robert Bums. 26

THE IMPROVISATRICE L. E. Landm. 2T

GENEVIEVE S. T. Coleridge. 28

THE GROOMSMAN TO HIS MISTRESS T. W. Parsmis. 30

BRINGING WATER FROM THE WELL 32

THE APPEAL S. W. Brooks. 34

SCHULE— LOVE William Motherwell. 35

LOVE Charles Swain. 36

THE BROOKSIDE R. M. Milnes. 37

7



8 CONTENTS.

PAGE

AN EXPERIENCE Alfred Tennyson. 38

THE PICrrKE AT THE FOUNTAIN Jeremias GoUhelf. 39

TO William R. Spencer. 39

ASSOCIATION J.S.KnowUs. 40

A TALISMAN P. S. Shelley. 40

A WOMAN'S QUESTION Adelaide A. Proctor. 40

CHOICE OF A TTIFE Sir Philip Sydney. 42

MARRIAGE Nathaniel Cotton. 42

LOVE ■RTLL FIND OUT THE WAY Percy's Mdiqws. 44

THE AN'NOTER 2Sr. P. Willis. 45

BRIDAL SONG Henry D. Austin. 46

THE FATHER'S LAMENT n. W. Lcmafdlow. 47

THE BRIDAL. A PICTURE 47



WEDDED LIFE.

■WEDDED LIFE H. W. Lrngfellow. 51

DOST THOU REJLEMBER? 51

A CAUTION Lord George LyUMon. 52

DARKEY'S COUNSEL TO THE NEWLY MARRIED Edmund Kirke. 53

THE POET'S SONG TO HIS WIFE Allan Cunningham. 54

TO MY AATFE Gerald Massey. 56

A QUESTION Matthew Pryor. 57

TEN YEARS AGO Alaric A. Watts. 58

GOOD AND BAD SPIRITS Frederiha Bremer. 61

MUTUAL FORBEARANCE William Cowper. 62

SUCH A ONE AS HE WOULD LOVE Sir Thomas WyaU. 03

FROM "MANUEL DES PECHES." Wadington. 63

AN ANGEL IN THE HOUSE Leigh Hunt. 64

ART OF PUTTING THINGS Boyd. 64

TO MY BlUDIE Caroline Souihcy. 65

A WARNING Alfred Tennyson. 65

TRIFLES NOT TRIFLES F. Bremer. 66

THE LENT UMBRELLA Vouglas Jerrold. 66

A TAULE OF ERRATA Thomas Bood. 69

THE UNREASONABLE HUSBAND 73

THE WOMAN-LYE MASTERPIECE Jlcywood. 74



CONTENTS. 9

PAGE

THE GOOD WIFE Tlwmas Fuller. 75

MUTUAL FORGIVENESS J.G. Holland. 76

THE RETURN William J. Miclcle. 76

TO MY WIFE Samuel Bishop. 77

ILLUSIONS R. W.Emerson. 78

BREAKFAST TALK. No. 1 Douglas Jerrold. 79

BREAKFAST TALK. No. 2 Douglas Jerrold. 79

THE TRUEST FRIENDSHIP Cotton. 81

A TRUE WIFE George Chapman. 81

"ANGELS UNAWARES." T. PoweU. 82

WOMAN KobeH DodsUy. 82

THE STORY OF KARIN J. G. WhiUier. 83



BABYHOOD.

WOMAN'S RIGHTS Pundt. 91

SEASONS OF PRAYER Senri/ Ware. 92

THE BABY 92

MY BIRD Emily Judson. 93

A GRAPHIC DESCRIPTION OF A BABY Knickerbocker. 94

THE INVALID WIFE Fanny Eem. 96

BABY Knickerbocker. 99

AVERSE FOR THE YOUNG MOTHER TO PARODY Thomas Moore. 100

A NURSERY SONG 100

THOUGHTS WHILE SHE ROCKS THE CRADLE J.G.Holland. 103

PHILIP, BIY KING Miss Muloch. 104

OUR BABY Mrs. Gage. 106

NOT AN EVERY-DAY BABY? Mansjield. 107

CHILDREN Jean Paul. 107

LETTER TO A NEW BORN CHILD Catlmrine Talbot. 108

THE RETURN 110

THE CHILD POET J.R.Lowell. 110

SIJIPLE PLEASURES Jean Paul. Ill

A PICTURE James Ballantyne. Ill

DOMESTIC BLISS 112

THE MOTHER'S COMPLAINT William Miller. 113

THE CHARGE OF INFANTRY Knickerbocker. 113



10 CONTENTS.

FAOE

SOME ACCOUNT OF A REMARKABLE BABY C. Diclccns. 116

TWO YEARS OLD 116

A PARENTAL ODE TO MY SON TJumas Jffood. 118

FOUR YEARS OLD Leigh Hunt. 120

THE RIDE IN A WIIEEL-BARROW Boyd. 123

AMANTIUM IRSE AMORIS REDINTEGRATIO EST Richard Edwards. 124

FATUER IS COMING! Mary HmoiU. 124

A MOTHER'S MORNING PRAYER 125

THRENODIA J. K. Loivell. 126

CASA WAPPY D. M. Mair. 127

TESPERS 129

CUILDREN'S PRAYERS 130

CHILD-SLEEP Thomas Hood. 130

EMULEMATICAL Byron. 131

THE BIRDWATCHER Laman Blanchard. 131

LITTLE WILLIE WAKING UP E. H. Sears. 132

CHRIST AND THE LITTLE ONES Julia GUI. 134

THE FISHERMEN Charles Kingsley. 136

SO^nNG IN TEARS 137

GOOD LIFE, LONG LIFE BenJonson. 139

LITTLE CHILDREN Mary Homtt. 139

WHAT THE CHRIST-SPIRIT SAID TO CHILDREN 140

THE HALLOWED DRAWER H. B. Stowe. 141

A PICTURE rhamas BurUdge. 141

CinLDREN W.S.Landor. 142

TO A CHILD EMBRACING HIS MOTHER Thomas Hood. 143

MOTHER'S LOVE W. J. Fox. 144

MY SERMON Boyd. 144

IN JIEMORIAM KniclccrbocJcer. 145

A SUNBEAM AND A SHADOW Monthly Religious Maganne. ' li6

A MOTHEH'S joys WHUam Ferguson. 146

THE CHILDREN n. W. Longfellow. 147

ANTIPODES ET.B. Stowe. 148

THE DEAD BOY William Alien Butler. 149

THE PRATTLE OF CHILDREN Jeremy Taylor. 149

ILLUSIONS Emerson. 150

THE CONTRAST Plummer. 151

THE MOTHKK, even IN DEATH John Broum. 162



CONTENTS. 11

PAGE

THE CHILDREN'S HOUR H. W. Longfellow. 153

MOTHER'S TRUST Charles Didcens. 155

MOTHER'S TENDERNESS Washington Irving. 155

"I LIVE FOR THEE." Alfred Tennyson. 156

THE SEA R. B. Stoddard. 156

LITTLE CHARLIE F. B. Aldrich. 167

KITTIE IS GONE Williavi B. Bradbury. 158

HOW'S MY BOY? Sydney Dobell. 159

THE BAREFOOT BOY J. G. Whitlier. 161

HARRY'S LETTER Thomas Hood. 164

A QUESTION John Gay. 165

THE BOY'S APPEAL 165

THE FATHER'S ADVICE Richard Hildreth. 166

AGAINST BOYS Chamber^ Journal. 166

WHICH IS THE HAPPIEST? PauldeKock. 167

EXTRACT FROM A LETTER Henry Sydney. 167

THE BOY AT FIFTEEN! H. B. Slowe. 168

WHAT THE FATHER SAID TO THE SCHOOL-BOY Thomas Hughes. 169

WHAT THE FATHER SAID TO HIS DAUGHTER Lard CoUingwood. 169

WHAT THE POET SAID TO THE YOUNG MAIDEN CharUs KingsUy. 169

WHAT THE POET MIGHT SAY TO THE YOUNG MAIDEN'S MOTHER...GoeWie. 170

BOY LOST! 171



YOUTH.

YOUTH KL.Bulwer. 177

EMILY IS MARRIED! Cliarles Lamb. 178

TO FANNIE IN A BALL DRESS John Everett. 179

MAIDENHOOD H. W. LongfelUm. 180

LIFE IS BEFORE YE! Ihnny KembU. 180

IDEALS OP WOMAN. No. 1 AUxander Pope. 181

IDEALS OF WOMAN. No. 2 George LyttMon. 182

MY KATE. Ideal No. 3 E.B.Browning. 183

IDEAL. No. 4 ^yiUiam Wordstvorth. 184

FROM "COMUS." A MASK John Milton. 185

EXTRACT ridor Hugo. 187

THE BRIDGE OF SIGHS T.Hood. 187



12 CONTENTS.

PAGE

VIRGINIA T. B. Macaulay. 191

SHE'S GANE TO DWALL IN DEATEX Nithsdale and Gallomay Songs. 192

A MOSAIC FOR FRIENDS 197

A MOSAIC FOR YOUNG MEN 203

A MOSAIC FOR HOUSEWITEP 209

A MOSAIC FOR US ALL 215



SINGLE LIFE.

THE OLD MAID'S PRATER TO DIANA Mrs. Tighe. 221

BROTHER AND SISTER atarles Lamb. 223

EPITAPH ON AN OLD MAID Englishwoman's Journal. 224

COUSIN JANE 2-25

FROM AN "EXTRA LEAF ON DAUGHTER-FULL HOUSES." Jean Paul. 227

IF THOU COULDST KNOW 228

SOLITUDE OF SINGLE WOMEN Dinah ilidoch. 228

MIDDLE LIFE S. Osgood. 230

EXl'ECTATION L. E.Landcn. 230

IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN J. G. Wldttier. 231

THE UNLOVED O. W. Holmes. 232

FROM "ENDVanON." Longfellow. 233

REFLECTED HAPPINESS Charles Lamb. 233

FROM "MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING." Sliakspeare. 234

BACHELOR'S FARE ITorace Smith. 235

OUR IDEALS Victor Hugo. 236

EXACTIONS OF MARRIED PEOPLE Willcie CoUins. 236

A BACHELOR'S IGNORANCE Manafidd. 237

A BACHELOR'S QUESTION Euffmi. 237

SONG OF ANTICIPATION ElizabeOi Austin. 237

KIZZY IIRINGLE Fanny Fern. 239

THE FORSAKEN Auld Sang. 240

THE WOUNDED HEART E.B.Browning. 241

A PICTURE Eclectic Review. 243

NOT A MISTAKE G. W. Curtis. 244

JEAN PAUL'S QUESTIONS 244

OLD MAIDS Unilfd States Gazette. 245

BONG OF CASSANDRA From the Spanish. 246



CONTENTS. 13



PAOB



SOLILOQUY OF A BACIIELOR Shakspeare. 247

A REMONSTRANCE Alat-ic A. WdUs. 248



OLD AGE.

AULD AGE. A Treaty Elizabdh Hamilton. 253

GOLDEN WORDS 0. W. Holmes. 256

THE FLIGHT OF YOUTH Richard M. MUnes. 256

THE LAST LEAF 0. W. Holm^. 259

SONG John SUrling. 261

EXTRACT FROM "DIVINE POEMS." Edmund WaUer. 261

JOYS OF OLD AGE FraUrica Bremer. 262

BOYS AND GIRLS FOREVER J.G.Holland. 263

ONE GOOD OLD MAN G. W.Curtis. 263

BEAUTY OF AGE H. B. Stowe. 263

THE HOUSE IN THE MEADOW Louisa 0. Moidtm. 265

COmNG HOME Alice Gary. 268

THE PLEASURE VOYAGE O. P. R.James. 270

A PETITION TO TIME B. W. Proctor. 272

THE GOOD OLD FRIEND Mary Hcnixitt. 272

THE ONE GRAY HAIR WaUer S. Landor. 273

TEMPERANCE Richard Orashaw. 277

USE OF EXPERIENCE 277

THE SAFE SIDE John Denham. 278

SIR MARMADUKE George Caiman. 279

TO A GRANDMOTHER Bernard Barton. 280

BEHIND THE MASK Atlantic Monthly. 282

THE SPARK DIVINE Johann C. Lavater. 283

A RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW Thomas Hood. 283

OLD AGE R. W. Emerson. 287

ANOTHER CHANCE E. S. Turner. 288

THE OLD MAN'S FUNERAL W.C.Bryant. 288

MY FIFTIETH BIRTHDAY F.D.Gage. 290

IT NEVER COJIES AGAIN R.H.Stoddard. 294

FROM "HALL OF FANTASY."' Hawthorne. 295

THE GRANDMOTHER'S APOLOGY Alfred Tennyson. 295

ACROSS THE RIVER Lucy Larcom. 800

2



14 CONTENTS.



PAGE

FLIGHT OF TIJIE 302

TRAVELING IN FOREIGN LANDS 302

PRAYER OF ALEXANDER PEDEN 303

A SUMMARY SUMMING UP OF DIFFICULT SUMS 303

LIFE Antia Lelitia Barbauld. 303

NIGHT AND DEATH Blanco White. 304

OUR BIRTH IS YET TO COME F. H. Hedge. 305



BETROTHAL.



15



Mosaics of Life.



BETROTHAL.



Miranda. Do you love me ?

Perdinand. I,

Beyond all limit of what else i' the world,

Do love, prize, honor you.
Miranda. I am a fool.

To weep at what I am glad of.
Ferdinand. Here's my hand,

Miranda. And mine, with my heart in't.

Tempest — Act III., Scene I.

THE LONG PATH.

T FELT very weak, indeed, (tliougli of a tolerably robust
habit,) as we came opposite the head of this path on that
morning. I think I tried to speak twice without making
myself distinctly audible. At last I got out the question :
" Will you take the long path with me ?" " Certainly," said the
school-mistress, " with much pleasure." " Think," I said, " be-
fore you answer ; if you take the long path with me now, I shall
interpret it that we are to part no more I" The school-mistress
stepped back with a sudden movement, as if an arrow had
struck her. *

2* 17



18 MOSAICS OF LIFE.

One of the long granite blocks, used as seats, was hard by.
" Pray, sit down," I said. " No — no," she answered, softly; " I
will walk the long j^atlt- with you !"

The old gentleman who sits opposite, met us walking, arm
in arm, about the middle of the long path, and said, very
charmingly, " Good morning, my dears !"

0. W. Holmes.



Extract from " ARTEVELDE."

Adriaxa. Nay, said I not —

And if I said it not, I say it now;

I'll follow thee through sunshine, and through storm ;

I will be with thee in thy weal and woe,

In thy afflictions, should they fall upon thee ;

In thy temptations, when bad men beset thee ;

In all the perils which must now press round thee,

And should they crush thee, in the hour of death.

Let but thy love be with me to the last.
Artevelde.

My love is with thee ever ; that thou knowest.

Henry Taylor.



A KING'S WOOING.

/^ AXRT thou love me, Kate ? A good leg will fall ; a straight
^ back will stoop; a black beard will turn white; a curled
pate will griiw bald; a fair liico will witlicr; a I'ull eye will
wax lioUow; but a (jood hairf, Kate, is the sun and moon, or
rather the sun and not the moon ; for it shines ])right and
never changes, but keeps its course truly. If thou wouldst
liave such an one, have me. If thou canst love me for this,
take me ; if not, to say to thee, that I shall die, is true ; but,
fur tliy love, liy the Lord, no; yet I love thee too.

King IFknuv V. — Act V., Scene II.



BETROTHAL. 19



TKE]RESA'S ANSWER TO WILHELM.

T AM yours, as I am, and as you know me ; I call you mine,
-*- as you are, and as I know you. What in ourselves, wed-
lock changes, we shall study to adjust by reason, cheerfulness,
and mutual good-will.

Goethe.



ly/TARRIAGES are best of dissimilar material, as iron runs
^^ not so well upon iron as upon brass ; only the dissimilarity
must not be too great, else it is all wear and tear.

Theodore Parker.



HESITATION.

"OUT when at last I dared to speak,

-*-^ The lanes, you know, were white with May,

Your ripe lips moved not, but your cheek

Flushed like the coming of the day ;
And so it was, half shy, half sly,

You would, and would not, little one !
Although I pleaded tenderly,

And you and I were all alone !

Alfred Tennyson.



PROPOSAL.

rpHE violet loves a sunny bank,
-*- The cowslip loves the lea,
The scarlet-creeper loves the elm ;
But I love — thee.



20 MOSAICS OF LIFE.

The sunshine kisses mount and vale,

The stars they kiss the sea,
The west winds kiss the clover bloom,

But I kiss — thee.

The oriole weds his mottled mate,

The lily's bride o' the bee ;
Heaven's marriage-ring is round the earth ;

Shall I wed thee?

Bayard Taylor.



'N buying horses, and taking a wife, shut your eyes and
- commend yourself to God !

Italian.



NOBODY COULD HAVE SEEN IT.

"f7AST down the staircase swinging,
-*- With flying feet I passed ;
Quick up the staircase springing,

lie came and held me fast;
And the stairs are dark and dim —
Many a kiss I had from him,

And nobody could have seen it.

Down into the hall demurely,

The guests were assembled there ;

My cheeks flushed hot, and surely
My lips did their tale declare.

I thought they looked at me every one.

And saw what we together had done.
Yet nobody could have seen it.



BETROTHAL. 21

The garden its sweets displaying,

Beckoned me out of doors ;
The welcome call obeying,

I hastened to look at the flowers j
There blushed the roses all around.
There sang the birds with merry sound.

As if they all had seen it.

From the German.



BEHAVE YOURSEL' BErOKE TOLX.

T)EHAVE yoursel' before folk,
-^ And dinna be sae rude to me,
As kiss me sae before folk.

It's no through hatred o' a kiss,

That I sae plainly tell you this ;

But ah ! I tak' it sair amiss.
To be sae teazed before folk.
Behave yourself before folk.

When we're alane, ye may tak' ane.
But nent a ane before folk.

Ye tell me that my face is fair ;
It may be sae — I dinna care —
But ne'er again gar't blush sae sair

As ye hae dune before folk.
Ye tell me that my lips are sweet ;
Sic tales, I doubt are a deceit ;
At ony rate, it's hardly meet

To prie their sweets before folk.

But, gin you really do insist
That I should suffer to be kissed,
Gae, get a license frae the priest,



MOSAICS OF LIFE.



And inak' mc yours before folk;
Behave yoursel' before folk,
And when we're ane, baith flesh and bane,
Ye may tak' ten — before folk !



Scotch Song.



JUDY MLEARY.

n~^WAS Judy McLeary so fresh and so merry,

Was milking the cow at her own cabin door,
And thinking of nothing at all in the world.

But the flowers that were blooming the cabin roof o'er.
The steps that she heard at her side the same minute.

The Toice that so musical broke on her ear,
The sigh that came warm on her rosy red cheek,

All spoke to her heart then of Terry McLeare.

" Oh, Judy McLeary, you beautiful soul,

It's yourself I am thinking of three days and more.
But I crooshed down my heart till I felt it was breaking.

And then, you persave, I could bear it no more.
Then tell me, dear Judy, at once if you're willing

To lave your own cabin so lovely and dear,
To gladden my life with your smile and your singing,

The Guardian Angel of Terry INIcLearc."

The tear-drop in Judy's bright eye was fast gathering.

And deep was the sorrow that sjwke in her tone;
" Oh, Terry, me darlint, how can I go wid you,

'I'll l.ivo mo poor mother, an (irdii, alone?
AVduld yim lave your own fatlier, and sisters, and brothers i

Thty're dozens and dozens, they'd never miss you,
And welcome yc'd be to our own little cabin.

It's plenty convanieiit fur us and you too."



BETROTHAL. 23

Then Judy stopped quickly, and looked on tlie ground,

For she feared she was speaking of more than was right;
But Terry, he blessed her with warm Irish feeling,

And gained the consent of her mother that night.
The bells they were ringing, and glad voices singing,

A welcome to Judy's own cabin so dear,
And never the cow was suspecting the change

From Judy McLeary to Judy McLeare.



JENNY KISSED ME!

TENNY kissed me when we met.

Jumping from the chair she sat in ;
Twice, you thief, who love to get

Sweets into your list, put that in !
Say I'm weary, say I'm sad :

Say that health and wealth have missed me :
Say I'm growing old, but add
Jenny kissed me !

Leigh Hunt.



AN orrEK

T WANT you, Carrie, for my wife. You may hunt far and
wide, but you'll find nobody that'll keer for you as I will.
Every man, Carrie, that's wuth his salt must find a woman to
work for, and when he's nigh on to thirty as I am, he wants to
see a youngster growing up to take his place when he gits old :
otherwise, no matter how lucky he is, there's not much comfort
in livin'. Perhaps I don't talk quite as fine as some, but
talking's like the froth on the creek, maybe it's shallow, and



24 3I0SAICS OF LIFE.

maybe it's deep — you can't tell. The heart's the main thing,
and thank God, I'm right there. Carrie, don't trifle with me.

Bayard Taylor.



THE CONrESSION.

[What the Maiden said to her Lover.]
Vcrsiclcs for Lovers only.

I.

A ND must I tell thee, dearest, that I trembled, when thy name
-^^ Was uttered in our household, in honor, or in blame ;
And when thy manliness and worth all voices echoed loud,
I coined some trifling error, my secret to enshroud ;
Some dust upon the blossom, on the peerless gem a stain,
A cloud in the cerulean, a shadow on the main.

II.

Though gallant youths full many might throng the festive hall,
One noble form my partial eye could see amidst them all ;
Though suitors clustered round me, and worshiped at my shrine,
A cold abstracted notice, and changeless cheek were mine ;
A mist, a cloud, o'ershadowed the view of all save thee —
Oh, if the wise ones listened, what would they think of me ?

III.

A (lull, dull weight was at my heart, how sad the eve flew by,
If vainly, midst the motley crew, I sought thy speaking eye ;
But mine the merry, merry heart, and thrill of maiden glee.
If haply, in a far-off" group, I caught one glimpse of thee.
Did I mark thy hastening footstep, oh, how I strove to hide
'J'lic 1cl]-l;i](! blushes on my cheek, fretting my maiden pride.



BETROTHAL. 25

IV.

I dare not own, Confessor, tliougli I remember well.

When, from a distant city, arrived a brilliant belle;

Her manners so bewitching, so exquisite her brow,

Her eyes, the winning hazel hue, I think I see them now.

How much I feared those eyes would come between my love

and me !
I felt that she was fair and good, and almost worthy thee !

V.

And must I own. Confessor, how oft I strolled alone.

And mused upon thy flattering speech, and most persuasive

tone.
And marveled that thou didst not say the words I wished yet

feared.
Full many a castle, fiiir and grand, my frolic fancy reared.
And spite of bitter, rankling words, good-natured friends

might say.
My trusting heart forever found some cause for thy delay?

VI.

And yet full oft would I resolve, that never, never more

One thought of thee should haunt my mind, and conned it

o'er and o'er,

A hopeless task indeed it was, such mandate to obey,

I counsel each young maiden such trial to essay ;

But when thy deep devotion no longer was concealed,

And jealous doubts and earnest hopes thy changeless heart

revealed j

VII.

The depth of joy which thrilled my soul, forbade my lips to

speak.
But could a lover's searching glance distrust my mantling

cheek ;

3 B



2n MOSAICS OF LIFE.

I hoped my life might prove for thee one long self-sacrifice,
And prayed that I thy fondest dreams might ever realize ;
And now are told, Confessor, my whims and follies, all.
And censure from the wise, I think, most powerless will fall !

Elizabeth Austin.



TAM GLEN.

"jl/TY heart is a' breaking, dear Tittie,
Some counsel unto me come len' ;
To anger them a' is a pity,

But what will I do wi' Tarn Glen ?



I'm thinking, wi' sic a braw fellow,
In poortith I might mak' a fen ;

What care I in riches to wallow.
If I mauna marry Tarn Glen ?

There's Lowry, the laird of Dumeller,
Gude day to you, brute, he comes ben ;

He brags and he blaws o' his siller,

But when will he dance like Tam Glen ?

My Minnie does constantly deave me.
And bids me beware o' young men ;

They flatter, she says, to deceive me.
But wha can think sae o' Tam Glen ?

My daddie says, gin I'll forsake him.
He'll gie me gude hunder marks ten;

But if it's ordained I maun take him,
wha will I get but Tam Clen?



BETROTHAL.

Yestreen at the valentine's dealing,
My heart to my mou gied a sten;

For thrice I drew ane without failing,
And thrice it was written Tarn Glen !

The last Halloween I was wanking,
My droukit sark-sleeve as ye ken ;

His likeness cam up the house staukin,
And the very grey breeks o' Tarn Glen !

Come counsel, dear Tittie, don't tarry,
I'll gie you my bonnie black hen,
Gif ye will advise me to marry
' The lad I lo'e dearly, Tam Glen !



Robert Burns,



Women see through Claude Lorraines.

R. W. Emerson.



THE IMPKOVISATKICE.

T LOVED him as young Genius loves,

When its own wild and radiant heaven
Of starry thought burns with the light,

The love, the life, by Genius given.
I loved him, too, as woman loves —

Reckless of sorrow, blame, or scorn :
Life had no evil destiny

That, with him, I would not have borne !
I would have rather been a slave.

In tears, in bondage, by his side.
Than shared in all, that, wanting him.

The world had power to give beside !



L. E. Landon.



MOSAICS OF LIFE.







NE Clairvoyance on cartli is certain, and that is the Clair-
voyance of true love.



GENEVIEVE.

A LL thoughts, all passions, all delights,

Whatever stirs this mortal frame;
All are but ministers of Love,
And feed his sacred flame.

Oft in my waking dreams do I,
Live o'er again that happy hour.
When midway on the mount I lay,
Beside the ruined tower.

The moonshine stealing o'er the scene,
Had blended with the lights of eve;
And she was there, my hope, my joy,
My own dear Genevieve !

Few sorrows hath she of her own,
My hope, my joy, my Genevieve 1
She loves me best when'er I sing,
The songs that make her grieve.

I played a soft and doleful air,
I sang an old and moving story;
An old rude song, that fitted well
The ruin wild and hoary.

She listened with a flitting blush.
With down-cast eyes and modest grace.
For well she knew, I could not choose
But gaze upon her face.



BETROTHAL. 29

All impulses of soul and sense.
Had tlirilled my guileless Genevieve;
The music and the doleful tale,
The rich and balmy eve.

And hopes, and fears that kindle hope,
An unextinguishable throng;
And gentle wishes, long subdued,
Subdued and cherished long.

She Tvept with pity and delight;
She blushed with love and maiden shame;


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