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"wither away," Bakunin, in his own resume
of his program, advocated: "Abolition of
the State in all its religious, juristic, polit-
ical and social realizations; reorganization
by the free initiative of free individuals in
free groups"; and declared "I abominate
Communism because it is a denial of free-
dom and I cannot understand anything
human without freedom." In 1872 the
Anarchists were expelled and the head-
quarters moved to New York, and four
years later the 1st International expired
completely.



2nd International: After a 13-year
interval, during which there was no Social-
ist International, a Congress at Brussels, in
1889, founded the 2nd Intl. and set up an
Intl. Socialist Bureau composed of three
delegates from each of the Socialist or
Labor Parties of the various countries
represented. Altho Karl Marx had died in
1883, this 2nd Intl. was more purely Marx-
ian than the 1st had ever been owing to
the long educational agitation by his fol-
lowers. By 1893 the 2nd Intl. had become
completely Germanized (according to
Adolphe Smith, Official Interpreter of the
Congresses from the outset). Altho Con-
gresses held in Brussels, 1891, Zurich, 1893,
London, 1896, Paris, 1900, Amsterdam,
1904, Stuttgart, 1907, Copenhagen, 1910,
Basle, 1912, each one developed increasing
Socialist internationalism or "class solidar-
ity" as opposed to patriotism, yet at the
outbreak of the World War temporary
disruption of the 2nd Intl. occurred be-
cause so many of its 12,000,000 members in
27 countries, with the exception of those in
America and Italy, adhered to their coun-
tries instead of to their Socialist principles.
While some in each country hindered and
sabotaged their governments, yet because
of the general weakening of international-
ism, present day Communists refer to the
2nd Intl. as the "Yellow International."

After the war, conferences held Feb. 2,
1919 at Berne, in April, 1919 at Amsterdam,
and at Lucerne, Aug. 2, 1919, revived the
2nd Intl., not however without violent
dissension concerning leadership, tactics,
cooperation with the Bolshevik Socialists,
etc., these points causing splits in some
national parties and a going-over en masse
of others to the 3rd International, then
being formed.

The 2nd Intl. has, in 1933, been crippled
by Hitler's rise to power in Germany,
which was its stronghold, and is looking
to Spain and the U.S.A. as its future hope,
the Rooseveltian regime being considered
the groundwork for Socialism. There is
also considerable agitation among Socialists
for full affiliation with the Communist
Intl. The Socialist and Labor International
(see) is also the name of the 2nd Intl.

3rd (or Communist) International: Rus-
sia, having by its 1917 revolution been the
first to achieve a Socialist government, is
regarded as the "Fatherland" of Socialists
everywhere. In Jan. 1919, the Soviet gov-
ernment, with the avowed purpose of plac-
ing itself at the head of the international
Socialist movement sent out a call to the
revolutionaries of the world to send dele-



174



The Red Network



International Committee

POM AIM HOLLAND

THEODORE DREISER



CHICAGO COMMITTEE FOR



STRUGGLE AGAINST WAR



CHICAGO. 1UL.



American Committee

MALCOLM COWLEV. CHAIRMAN
OAKLEY JOHNSON. SECRETARY
A. A. HELLE



SHERWOOD ANDERSON
NEWTON ARVIN
ROGER BALDWIN
HARRY ELMER BARNES
JOSEPH R BRODSKV
WINIFRED CHAPPELL
JOSEPH COHEN
IDA DAILES
H. w. L. DANA
JOHN Dos PASSOS
W. E. B. Du BOIS
JOSERH FREEMAN
MICHAEL GOLD
DONALD HENDERSON
SIDNEY HOOK
JOSHUA KUNITZ
CORLISS LAMONT
LOLA MAVERICK LLOYD
ROBERT MORSS Lovcrr
PIERRE LOVING
J. C. MCFARLAND
Rev. R.. LESTER MONDALB
FELIX MORROW
ALLA NAZIMOVA
SCOTT HEARING
WILLIAM SIMONS
UPTON SINCLAIR
LINCOLN STEFFENS
LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI
BELLE C. TAUB
THORNTON WILDER
ELLA WINTER

Chicago Committee
ROBT. MORSS LOVETT. CHAIRMAN
R. LESTER MONDALE. VICE.-CHAIRM
EDITH M. LLOYD. SECRETARY



MIRON A. MORRILL, PUBLICITY

EUGENE BECHTOLD
JEISIE 3I.NFORD
KARL BORDERS



PERCY H. BOYNTON
SOPHANISBA BRECKENRIDCI
EDWIN R. EMEREE
JULIA FELSTENTHAL



DR. S. B. FREEHOF
CHARLES w. GILKEY
MRS. ALFRED HAMBURGER
CARL HAESSLER
MRS. ALFRED KOHM
BLANCHE LOWENTHAL
DR. LOUIS L. MANN
HARRIET MONROE
CURTIS W. REESE
DR. H. M. RICHTER
DONALD SLESIMGCM
T. v. SMITH
LORADO TAFT
GRAHAM TAYLOR
JAN WITTE.NBER

JAMES M. YARD



HENRI BAR8USSE TO SPEAK
AGAINST WAR AND FASCISM !



Henri Barbusse, the noted French author, who is in
America to attend the U.S. Congress Against War,
now being held in New York, will speak at a mass meet-
ing against War and Fascism at the Chicago Coliseum
on Monday evening, October 23rd,

M. Barbusse is one of the organizers of the Internat-
ional Committee to Aid the Victims of German Fascism,.
His work' against war, both in his novels, such as
Under Fire, and his public activities, is internation-
ally known. Last year he was Chairman of tti2 Amsterdam
Congress Against War.

A preliminary meeting is being called at the CITY CLUB,
315 Plymouth Court, on Thursday, October 5th at 4 p.m..
to make plans for supporting the Barbusse mass meeting.
All peace societies, and organizations interested in
fighting German *ascism, are urged to send represent-
atives. Individuals are also invited to attend. Mem-
bers of the Chicago Committee for Struggle Against War
should by all means be present.

The visit of Henrt Barbusse is a tremendously important
event. To make the mass meeting a "success it is necess-
ary that every organization send delegates to this
preliminary meeting.

Sincerely yours,



Robert Morss Lovett
Chai rman

Or, S. B. Freehof

Edith M, Ltoyd

Secretary
7921 S.LaSaHe

Facsimile of notice urging support of Communist Barbusse meeting, which was jointly sponsored by the
Chicago Committee for Struggle Against War and the Chicago Committee of the communist National
Committee to Aid Victims of German Fascism, Communist Barbusse being an international officer of
both organizations. This Chicago Committee for S.A.W. was called to the platform to occupy seats of
honor. John Fitzpatrick, president of the Chicago Federation of Labor, although a member, sidestepped
an invitation to speak as a representative of the A.F. of L., according to "Anti-Fascist Action" (maga-
zine of the Chgo. Com. of Nat. Com. to Aid Victims of German Fascism), which was sold at the meeting.



Organizations, Etc.



175



gates to Moscow, where, as a result, Mar.
2-6, 1919, 32 delegates representing 12
countries founded the 3rd International, or
Komintern as it is sometimes called (from
a combination of Russian words Kom-
munistitcheski Internazional) . The plat-
form proposed in the call (quoted in full
in Lusk Report) included: "taking pos-
session at once of the governmental power
... in order to replace it by the apparatus
of proletarian power. (4) The dictator-
ship of the proletariat should aim at the
immediate expropriation of capitalism and
the suppression of private property and its
transfer to the proletarian state under
Socialist administration of the working
class. (5) In order to make the Socialist
revolution secure, the disarming of the
bourgeoisie and of its agents and the gen-
eral arming of the proletariat are neces-
sary." (Naturally, disarmament is backed
by Communists everywhere for this pur-
pose.) "(6) The fundamental condition of
the state is the mass action of the pro-
letariat going as far as open conflict with
arms in hand against the governmental
power of capitalism," etc. Sept. 8, 1919,
a Manifesto was sent out urging all revo-
lutionaries, whether I.W.W., Anarchist, or 1
Socialist, to unite in forming a united
Communist Party.

As a result of the formation and call
of the 3rd International a division occurred
in other Socialist revolutionary ranks. As
parties the Norwegian Labour Party, Swed-
ish Left Socialist Party, Hungarian Com-
munist Party, Swiss Social Democratic
Party, Italian Socialist Party, went over
en masse to the 3rd International, while
the American Socialist Party' split, the Left
wing forming the Communist Party on
Sept. 1, 1919, in Chicago. The British,
French, Belgian, Dutch and Swedish Par-
ties and the German majority Socialists
retained their allegiance to the 2nd Inter-
national. Communist Parties were, how-
ever, then formed in all of these countries
and the 3rd International or Comintern
now controls parties operating in 57
countries.

INTL., AMERICAN AND CHICAGO
COMMITTEES FOR STRUGGLE

AGAINST WAR
Intl., Am., Chgo.,
Com. for S.A.W.

The communist Intl. League Against
Imperialism's agencies for agitating against
national defense in various countries and
advocating sabotage, revolutionary defense



of the Soviet Union, and the turning of
"imperialist war into civil war" or Red
revolution.

A letter sent out July 19, 1932 signed
by Theodore Dreiser asking for funds to
aid the communist-called World Congress
Against War at Amsterdam, Aug. 20, 1932,
listed on its letterhead as the Intl. Com-
mittee for the World Congress, the same
committee now listed as the Intl. Com-
mittee for Struggle Against War on the
letterhead (see facsimile) of the Chgo. Com.
for Struggle Against War, which sent out a
letter calling a meeting at the Chicago
City Club, Oct. 5, 1933, to "make plans
for supporting the Barbusse mass meeting,"
which was sponsored jointly with the Chi-
cago Committee to Aid Victims of German
Fascism (of the Communist W.I.R.).

At this Communist mass meeting at the
Coliseum, called to honor Communist
Henri Barbusse, only the Red flag was
displayed and the International, song of
Red revolution, sung. The Chicago Com-
mittee were called to the platform to
occupy seats on the stage. Clayton C.
Morrisson, editor of the "Christian (?)
Century," presided and was cheered when
he said that he was proud to stand shoulder
to shoulder with Barbusse and that we
would never have peace until our capital-
istic system was abolished! Jos. Gardner
of the Workers Ex-Service Men's League,
Robt. Brown of the Metal Wkrs. Industrial
Union (Communist), Jos. Freeman of com-
munist "New Masses," and a representa-
tive of the Young Communist League
spoke. Prof. H. W. L. Dana of Harvard,
who greeted the audience as "Comrades"
and said he was traveling around with
Barbusse to translate his French speeches,
collected money from the Communist
organizations for the "cause." Mrs. J.
Louis Engdahl, a Chicago Public School
teacher, widow of the head of the commu-
nist I.L.D., donated $20.00. Communist
resolutions were passed with thunderous
unanimity and Barbusse was ushered in
by a delegation of the Wkrs. Ex-Service
Men's League, a Negro bearing the velvet
banner. Barbusse is the founder of this
organization, which teaches soldiers of all
nations to turn their country's war into a
bloody Red revolution.

INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR

STRUGGLE AGAINST WAR:
(Same as Intl. Com. for World Congress
Against War.)

Remain Rolland, Henri Barbusse (the honored
Communist from France), Theodore Dreiser, Albert



176



The Red Network



Einstein, Maxim Gorky, Heinrich Mann, Bernard
Shaw, Mme. Sun Yat Sen.

American Committee jor Struggle Against

War:

Theo. Dreiser, hon chmn.; Malcolm Cowley,
chmn.; Oakley Johnson, sec.; A. A. Heller, treas. ;
Sherwood Anderson, Newton Arvin, Roger Bald-
win, Harry Elmer Barnes, Jos. R. Brodsky, Wini-
fred Cbappell, Jos. Cohen, Ida Dailes, H. W. L.
Dana, John Dos Passes, W. E. B. Du Bois, Jos.
Freeman, Michael Gold, Donald Henderson, Sid-
ney Hook, Joshua Kunitz, Corliss Lamont, Lola
Maverick Lloyd, Robt. Morss Lovett, Pierre Lov-
ing, J. C. McFarland, Rev. R. Lester Mondale,
Felix Morrow, Alia Nazimova, Scott Nearing, Wm.
Simons, Upton Sinclair, Lincoln Steffens, Leopold
Stokowski, Belle G. Taub, Thornton Wilder, Ella
Winter.

Chicago Committee for Struggle Against
War (which sponsored the Henri Barbusse
Communist mass meeting and which lists
on its letterhead these International, Amer-
ican, and Chicago Committees for Struggle
Against War see facsimile):

Robt. Morss Lovett, chmn.; R. Lester Mondale,
vice chmn.; Edith M. Lloyd, sec.; Edw. M. Win-
ston, treas.; Miron A. Morrill, publicity; Eugene
Bechtold, Jessie Binford, Karl Borders, Alice
Boynton, Percy H. Boynton, Sophonisba Brecken-
ridge, Edwin R. Embree, Julia Felstenthal, John
Fitzpatrick (Chgo. Fed. of Lab.), Dr. S. B. Free-
hof, Rev. Chas. W. Gilkey, Mrs. Alfred Ham-
burger, Carl Haessler, Mrs. Alfred Kohn, Blanche
Lowenthal, Dr. Louis L. Mann, Harriet Monroe,
Curtis W. Reese, Dr. H. M. Richter, Donald Sles-
inger, T. V. Smith, Lorado Taft, Graham Taylor,
Jan Wittenber, James M. Yard.

The full memberships of the Inter-
national and American Committees for
Struggle Against War as listed by their
Report and Manifesto may be found under
"World Congress Against War."

INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR
POLITICAL PRISONERS

Intl. Com. for Pol. Pris.

Formed by A.C.L.U. members to aid
and raise money for "political prisoners,"
the term used by radicals to designate
those jailed for seditious activities; reed,
money from Garland Fund; sent an appeal
in 1933 to the Chinese government in
behalf of the Communist Chen Du Hsui
which was signed by John Haynes Holmes,
Oswald Garrison Villard, Arthur Garfield
Hays, Roger N. Baldwin, Upton Sinclair,
Lewis S. Gannett, Sherwood Anderson,
Theodore Dreiser, Floyd Dell, Waldo
Frank, Malcolm Cowley.

INTERNATIONAL LABOR DEFENSE

The American section of the Moscow-
controlled communist International Red
Aid, the Russian section being called M.O.
P.R.; formed in Chicago, 1925; legally



aids and propagandizes in behalf of Com-
munist criminals arrested for revolutionary
activities; has sections in 67 countries, 37
existing illegally; claims 9,000,000 members
and an additional 1,600,000 in affiliated
organizations (Am. Labor Year Book) ;
continually cooperates with the American
Civil Liberties Union on cases; now agitat-
ing race hatred with its money-making
Scottsboro campaign (see under article
"News").

INTERNATIONAL LADIES GARMENT

WORKERS UNION
Intl. Ladies Garm. Wkrs. Un.

"The Amalgamated Clothing Workers,
the International Ladies Garment Workers
Union and the Cloth Hat, Cap and Milli-
nery Workers Union. . . . And the Knit
Goods Union. . . All of these organizations
are in the control of leaders who are either
open Socialists or open Communists. . . .
The membership of these organizations is
fully 90 per cent Socialist or Communist.
Fully 75 per cent of the membership is
foreign born, only a small proportion of
this element having gained citizenship
papers or even applied for such papers.
Being firmly of the belief that through
'general strike' they can and will bring
about the 'revolution' they expect soon to
control and direct the government of the
United States just as their brothers now
control and direct the government of Rus-
sia. . . . They join with their communist
brothers in the celebration of a 'red' May
Day. . . . The Intl. Ladies Garm. Wkrs.
recently (1927) called a strike in the city
of New York. It was followed by rioting
and general disorder. . . . The committee
directing this strike was in the hands of
open Communists" (Marvin Data Sheets,
28-18) ; The Lusk Report says of the Intl.
Ladies Garm. Wkrs.: "The preamble of
the constitution indicates that it is
founded upon the principles of the class
struggle; that it adopts the One Big Union
idea and seeks to bring about the over-
throw of the present system of society. . . .
It is affiliated with the Workers Defense
Union of which Eliz. Gurley Flynn is the
leader, and with which F. G. Biedenkapp
of the Metal Workers' Union is secretary.
. . . This Union recognizes the need of edu-
cating its members in Economics, Sociology
and other cultural subjects so that they
may prepare to conduct and manage the
industry if their program of seizure is car-
ried out . . . began its educational work
in 1914 in conjunction with the Rand



Organizations, Etc.



177



School. About ISO members of the Union
were sent to the school. ... It is closely
affiliated with the Socialist Party of Amer-
ica"; its hdqts., 3 W. 16th St., New York
City, David Dubinsky.

INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE

AGAINST IMPERIALISM
See under All-America Anti-Imperialist
League, its American branch.

INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR
WORKERS EDUCATION

Moscow's Communist organization con-
trolling subsidiary societies such as the
Russian Educational Society, etc. in var-
ious countries.

INTERNATIONAL LITERATURE

Organ of International Union of Revo-
lutionary Writers (see).

INTERNATIONAL OF THE GODLESS

Communist anti-religious organization
formed at Moscow 1931; the American
section is the Proletarian Anti-Religious
League (SO E. 13th St., N.Y. City). It is
affiliated also with the World Union of
Atheists and its American section, Union
of Militant Atheists, which was organized
by the American Association for the Ad-
vancement of Atheism.

INTERNATIONAL OF SEAMEN

AND HARBOR WORKERS
Section of the Red International of Labor
Unions (R.I.L.U.).

INTERNATIONAL OF
TRANSPORTATION WORKERS
Section of Red International of Labor
Unions (R.I.L.U.).

INTERNATIONAL PAMPHLETS

Series of official Communist propaganda
pamphlets selling at Sc and lOc each;
especially compiled for International Pam-
phlets (799 Broadway, New York), by
Party authorities and published by the
communist International Publishers; for-
merly aided by the Garland Fund; "On
the Chain Gang," by John L. Spivak
(printed serially also in the Daily Worker)
is, for example, number 32; "The Church
and the Workers" by Bennett Stevens
(which sets forth the militant atheistic
standpoint of Communism) is No. IS;
"The Injunction Menace" by Charlotte
Todes is No. 22, etc., etc. Among other
writers are:

J. S. Allen, B. D. Amis, George Anstrom, Louis



Berg, Grace Burnham, James Barnett, Donald
Cameron, Elliot E. Cohen, Whittaker Chambers,
Robt. L. Cruden, Robt. W. Dunn, R. Doonping,
Bert Grant, Harry Cannes, Harold Ware, Maxim
Gorki, Henry Hall, Grace Hutchins, Harry Hay-
wood, Milton Howard, A. B. Magil, Felix Morrow,
Joseph North, Vern Smith, Anna Louise Strong,
N. Sparks, Ray Stewart, Wm. Siegel, Alexander
Trachtenberg.

INTERNATIONAL PRESS
CORRESPONDENCE

See under Inprecorr.

INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHERS

Official Soviet publishing house in the
U.S. headed by Alexander Trachtenberg,
long an active Communist executive; 381
Fourth Ave., N.Y.C.

INTERNATIONAL RED AID

World Moscow-directed organization of
which M.O.P.R. is the Russian section, and
International Labor Defense, the Amer-
ican section; gives legal aid and relief to
Communist revolutionaries.

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S CLUBS
Affiliated with the Intl. of Seamen and
Harbor Workers and the communist
Marine Workers Industrial Union.

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THE
REVOLUTIONARY THEATRE

Moscow's Communist organization, a
Section of Agit-Prop, which controls Mid-
European, Anglo-American, Latin-Europ-
ean, East Asiatic theatre commissions
headed by Soviet propaganda theatre
leaders who study the "problems of the
revolutionary theatre"; has 419 affiliated
Czecho-Slovakian groups with 10,000 mem-
bers, an English section, Holland section
and 232 groups in Germany; American
sections are the League of Workers
Theatres (see), the Proletarian Dramatic
League, and affiliated groups; formerly
called the International Workers Dramatic
Union of Moscow; directs activities of
Communist propaganda theatres, dance
leagues and production of motion pictures.

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF
REVOLUTIONARY WRITERS

(of the International Bureau of
Revolutionary Literature) .

Moscow's international Communist or-
ganization ; the Revolutionary Writers
Federation is the American branch (see) ;
its 2nd World Conference, held Nov. 15,
1930 at Kharkov, Russia, commissioned
the John Reed Club American delegation



178



The Red Network



of writers to organize the Workers Cul-
tural Federation (see) ; its official organ
is "International Literature," which adver-
tises itself as: "Literature of the World
Revolution devoted to the proletarian and
revolutionary literature of all countries
the central organ of the International Union
of Revolutionary Writers"; published
every two months in Moscow in English,
French, German, and Russian. Yearly
subscription $1. "Send all subscriptions:
Moscow, Central Post Office, Box 850."
The Oct. 1933 issue, No. 4, gave as its
International Advisory Board:

M. Anderson-Nexo, Henri Barbusse, J. R.
Becher, Michael Gold, Maxim Gorki, A. Lun-
acharsky, A. Magil, Go Ma-jo. John Dos Passes,
Ludwig Renn, Rornain Rolland, A. Serafimovich,
Upton Sinclair, Tokunaga Naossi, E. Weinert;
Permanent Contributors (many countries listed):
United States: Emjo Basshe, Walt Carmon, Jack



Conroy, John Dos Passos, Theodore Dreiser, Fred
Ellis, Ed. Falkowski, Joseph Freeman, Michael
Gold, Horace Gregory, John Herrmann, Josephine



Herbst, Langston Hughes, Joseph Kalar, Joshua
Kunitz, Louis Lozowick, Norman Macleod, A. B.
Magil, Myra Page, Upton Sinclair, Agnes Smedley,
Herman Spector, Mary Heaton Vorse; Germany:
Oskar Bauer, J. R. Becher, O. Biha, B. Brecht,
W. Bredel, E. Ginkel, E. Glaeser, O. M. Graf,
K. Gruenberg, A. Hotopp, E. E. Kosch, K.
Klaeber, A. Kurella, H. Marchwitza, K. Neukranz,
L. Renn, G. Ring, F. Rubiner, B. Scharrer, A.
Seghers, L. Turek, E. Weinert, F. Weisskopf, K.
Wittvogel; France: L. Aragon 5 H. Barbusse, J.
Duclos, J. Freville, F. Tourdam, L. Moussinac,
Remain Rolland, P. Vaillant-Couturier; England:
Ch. Ashleigh, Bob Ellis, Harold Heslop; (staff
changed but slightly from 1932).

INTERNATIONAL WORKERS AID

Communist; changed name about 1929
to Workers International Relief (see).

INTERNATIONAL WORKERS ORDER
I.W.O.

Communist fraternal and agitational
insurance society formed in 1930 by 7,000,
mainly Jewish, members of the left wing
of the Workmen's Circle. Now, after
three years, it claims 34,000 members
including branches of Hungarians, Slovaks,
Ukrainians, Italians, Polish, Russians,
Armenians, Spanish, Bulgarians, Greeks,
Negroes and Americans; conducts Russian,
Slovak, Ukrainian, and Jewish Communist
language schools and about 130 elementary
and high schools for children in order to
counteract "capitalistic" and "nationalistic"
public school influences. To quote: "In
these schools the children are taught the
various languages and are told about the
struggle of the workers against their
bosses. The children learn not only about
the workers and their struggle but actually
participate in demonstrations, mass meet-



ings, etc. People send their children to
these schools in order that they may learn
the language taught there. Some parents,
when they learn what is taught at the
schools, are drawn into the branches of
the "International Workers Order." (From
2nd I.W.O. Convention Program.) "Many
workers from basic industries have been
introduced to the revolutionary movement
through the I.W.O.," said the Chgo.
Workers Voice (Feb. 15, 1933).

I attended the I.W.O. Second Annual
Convention held at the Chicago Coliseum,
June 17, 1933. Fully 12,000 people were
there. A children's chorus of 500, a mass
pageant of 1,000, 700 delegates, and
speakers Max Bedacht, Ben Gold, M. Olgin
had been advertised. The usual printed
signs about the Scottsboro boys, Mooney,
disarmament (for America) and many Red
flags were in evidence. Children were
dressed in red. The Internationale was
sung, holding right arms upraised with
clenched fists. Loud applause greeted
speakers when they referred to the coming
Red revolution. Barefooted girl dancers
dressed in red, representing the Commu-
nists, at the left of the stage pageant, were
backed by grim bare-armed, shirt-sleeved
"working" men with clenched fists. In the
center a group of girls dressed in yellow
represented the Socialists. At the right,
"capitalist" girls in black decorated with
silver dollar signs and backed by a priest
with a cross, two plug-hatted "capitalists,"
and police, danced about until the Reds
were joined by the Yellows and finally
surged forward, struck the cross out of
the priest's hands, drove out all the "Cap-
italists" and took possession of the stage
sets representing banks, factories, hos-
pitals, etc. This pageant was in four epi-
sodes. Wild applause greeted the riotous
Red triumphs. When at the opening of
one scene the priest was seen seated alone
on a park bench, a mighty "boo" arose
from the audience.

INTERNATIONAL WORKING
MENS ASSOCIATION

Anarcho - syndicalist association with



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