Copyright
Elizabeth Watts.

True stories related online

. (page 1 of 1)
Online LibraryElizabeth WattsTrue stories related → online text (page 1 of 1)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


TRUE STORIES

RELATED.




Windsor *Vi>

Printed & S

JSSSh CC



j CHILDREN'S BOOK *

COLLECTION

I *

$ LIBRARY OF THE

; UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
LOS ANGELES




TRUE STORIES

RELATED

BV

A FRIEND TO
LITTLE CHILDREN.



WINDSOR, (vr.)

PKINTED B*

JESSE COCHRAtf,
ic/J, wholesale and retail t at ktt'
BOOK-STORE.

1815,"



TRUE STORIES RELATE!*.

Wkked and unmannerly Children*



ALONG time ago, long
before Old Columbus crqi-
fed the tracklefa deep, in
queftof a new Continent,
or Weft ern World 4 we
read, there were -naughty
children, as there are but
too many in thefe days ;
children are generally bad



because their parents have
negleftcd to give them a
proper education, teach-
ing them the difference be-
tween virtue and vice.

We find it recorded in an-
cient hiftory, that in thofe
days there was a company
ot wicked children, that
faw a pious man, who, it
appears, by reafon of age,
had grown bald, pals by ;
they made a mock of him,
and in derifion faid, "Go
up, thou bald head. 5 ' By
what followed, we mayjee,
how very wicked it is for



Children to make a mock
of others; for, the pious
Old Man noticed; and
highly difapproved their
conduit; and there came
two Bears out of the Wood
and deftroyed 42? of them.
What a dreadful judg-
ment on thofewickedChil-
dren ; and what a fore af-
flidlion it muft be to their
Parents, thus to be depriv-
ed of their Children, in
fuch a fudden and violent
manner ! efpecially, when
they had to refledt, that



their death was the price of
their lolly & wickednefs ;
an admonition to allParents
who read the ftory, to train
i-r heir Children in the
Sear of the Lord, which
would preferve them from
evil : and to Children to
be dutiful to their pious
Parents, and to behave in a
mannerly and becoming
manner to all mankind.
For the truth of this ftory,
I would refer my little rea-
ders to a very ancient rec-
ord, in a book that is too



miuch negleded, though
the beft book in the World,
I mean, the Bible. See
the 3d Book of Kings.,
chap. 2, verfes23 and 24,.



When children in their wanton phy

Serv 'd old Elilha lb,
And bid the prophet go his way,

"Go up, thou bald.head, go,"

God quickly ftopt their wicked breath
And fcnt two raging bears,
t tore them limb from limb to
death,

^h blood, r.A p v op k ns,& tears*



10



The Fatberlefs Boy.

A certain Little Boy,
when a little more than two
years of ae,was deprived
of a fond Father. and thus
left to ftrule through iifc
without a Father's care &
advice. This little Boy
was particularly fond of
learning, and ipent many
an hour while other Chil-
dren were bufy at play,
with his book and his ilate
and his improvement was



n

of courfe rapid ; though
he greatly lacked the ad-
vantages many now a days
enjoy, of good and regular
ichools, and a variety of
well chofen books. His
love tor his ftudies was fo
great, that there was no
need to urge him to go to
fchool, but he would fre-
quently be the firft there,
although he lived at the
diftanc of about two miles
and ufed to have to trudge
with his dinner basket in
his hand, over the fences



acrots the fields and thro* a
wood; and many a time
have his little bare feet
been badly hurt in pa/ling
thro* the flubbk, or a-
Tnong the briers ; yet thefe
were no difcouragcment to
his induftry, in thepurfuit
^f learning, which truly is
of more valye than iilver
or gold. However, al-
though this little Boy was
very attentive to his ftudies
at fealons, as wellas others
he was delighted With the
ifRuvlrccreation&of children



one of which he was very
fond that of going into
the water; and there being
a pond in the field, not ve-
ry far from the fchool-
houfe, he, with others, u-
fed frequently to retire to
ipend their noon (pell ia
bathing and learning to
fwirruand being fo delight-
ed therewith, in his wm-
plicity he mentioned it to
his Mother at home, xvho
being a very timid woman
and very fearful of the wa-
ter, told him to go there IIQ
snore, left he get drowned.



The Mother's advice,
though I truft it made a
ferious impreffion on the
chiM, yet, through his love
ot the water and little ap-
prehcniion of danger, it did
r<ot prevent him from pur-
filing the practice of going
into the water ; and at one
lime, when School was out
earlier than ufual, he with
another Boy, went to fwim
in a pond where he was
unacquainted with the
depth of '* ater 2nd bold-
tc -f the fhoirs, He had



not yet pra&iced enough
to venture to fwim where
the water was deep, with-
out fomething to fupport
him, iuch as a rail, flake,
or the like . In this Pond
theie 5oys vverc Driving
to fee who could fwim the
faftett ; our little Boy, with
a ftick under him, and the
other vvichout j and the
other boy flopping & put-
ting his feet downward,
appeared to fUnd on the
bottom, when this little
Boy leaped oft" his ftick,
bu-: fouiid hirnielfplunged



in wafer over his head.
Alarmed, indeed, and with
the water gufhing into his
lungs as fail as his mouth
and note could receive it,
he here expected to end
his days ; and at this aw-
lul moment, alnoft the
firfl thing that entered his
mind, and that with
weight, was the command
ei fais mother ; but by his
own efforts, and that of his
' companion* he was in mer-
cy iaved from a wat'ry
grave* In this time



of diftrefs and afright; his ,
exertions feemed to be pret-
ty much that of leaping up
and down ; and atoneleap,
his eyes were raifed above
the fhore and leaving him$
however, when his com-
panion got foothold, he
ventured as near this fuff-
eringlad as he dared, and
extending his arm, caught
him by the hand and pull-
ed him out. With a greate-
ful heart and joyful mkid,
he quickly put his clothes
on, and tafted home to his
iear Mother,



i8

This little (lory will ferve
to prove, that, although
Children may net ieem to
attend to the advice of a
fond parent, whofe only
aim is the good of the child,
yet often like bread caft on
the waters, it is found after
many days ; and efpecial-
ly when a trying time ar-
rives, theic things are of-
ten brought impre {lively
into view.



Disobedience, punijhment t
and Repentance.



Nearly 3000 years ago,
there was a v ery large city,
in which, it was faid, there
were i20,OoO perfons who .
did not know their right
hand from their left; this
muft be underftood to be
very young Children j of
courfe, the whole number
of inhabitants muft have
been very great. Now, the



20

fins and wickednefs of this
people had become fo reat
that the Lord of the Uni-
verfe ordered one of his
prophets to go aad cry a-
gainft it : but r he, through
fear of rnan, or fome the?
caufe, difobeyed the corr>
mand of his God ; for, he
xole up to flee to another
place from the p re fence
of the Lord, and went on
board a fhip for that pur-
pofc : but the Lord catiled
a tempeft to ariie,in which
the fhip was like to be bio-



21

ken, and the failors were
in great fear and called on
their God for help in the
time of trouble. But the
Prophet at that time lay
afleep ; and they awoke
him, and advifed him alfo
tacall on his God for help.
How natural it is, howev-
er unthoughtful people
may live, when all goes
well, in the time of great
ditfreis, to cry out, O God
help us ; make hafte to
deliver us, or we perifh.
Now it appears they dis-



covered on waking the
Prophet that he had dilb-
beyed the voice of his God,
and he being fenfible this
had been fent for his tranf-
greffion, advifed them to
throw him into the fea, &
they took him up and caft
him overboard. And the
ftorm was hufhed and the
lea became calm. Then
the men feared the Lord
exceedingly, and offered
iacrifices to the Lord, and
made vovvsr And a great
filh, prepared of the Lord,



f wallowed up the difobe-
dient Prophet : and he was
in the belly of the fifli three
days and three nights. In
his diftrefs, he remember-
ed his God, whom he had
difobeyed, and cried unto
the Lord, and prayed to
the Almighty God, \vho
created the uniteiie and
every living thing, and the
Lord (pake unto the fifli,
& it vomited the Prophet
out on dry land.

He was humbled, no
doubt, and with a grateful



heart, exprcffed himfelf in
thefe words : " I cried by
reafon of miae affliction
unto the Lord, & he heard
me ; out of the belly of
hell cried I, & thou heard-
eft my voice. For thou
hadft cift me into the deep
in the midft of the feas :
and the floods compaffed
me about : all thy billows
and thy waves paffed over
me. Then I faid, I am caft
out of thy fight ; yet I will
look again toward thy ho-
ly temple. The water



compacted fine about, even
to the foul : the deep clof-
ed me round about, the
weeds were wrapped about
my head, I went down to
the bottoms of the moun-
tains ; the earth with her
bars was about me forever:
yet haft thou brought up
my life from corruption,
OLord my God. When
my foul fainted within me.
I rembered the Lord : and
my prayer came in unto
thee, into thine holy tern-
pit. They that obferv*



26

lying vanities forfake their
own mercy, But I will
facrifice unto thee with a
voice of thanksgiving ; I
will pay that 1 have vow-
ed. Salvation is of the
Lord."

The Prophet being again
fet at liberty, and recei ving
a fecond command from
the Lord, to go and preach
unto this great and wicked
city having learned from
the things which he had
iuffered, the nereffity, of
obedience, he arofe & went



into it, and he cried againft
it, and told them that with-
in 40 days it fhould be des-
troyed. And the people
repented at the preaching
of the Prophet, and hum-
bled themielves, and wid*
fafting and prayer, cover-
ed with fackcloth ; & the
Lord wasgracioufly pleas-
ed to accept their prayers
and pardon them, and the
city was fpared.

Such little Children as
would be defirous to know
the name of the City, the



Prophet, and more of the
particulars of this intereft-
ing and remarkable Story,
may turn to the Book of
Jonah, in the Bible.

Ikefadeffects of Wreft .g.



There are many ways
whereby chidren recreate
and exercife themfelves ;
and it is a matter well wor-
thy, not only their own but
their friends confideration,



29

that their choice in the
inodcof amufement fhould
be fuch as is the moft in-
nocent, healthful, & pleas-
ant, and leaft liable to dan-
ger and accident of this
kind, Wreftling does not
clals ; but it is a violent &
dangerous ,exercife, fre-
quentl y exciting the paffion
of the antagonifts,ii not en-
ding with blows : &fome-
times broken or diflocated
bone, and other injuries
are the confequence, to fay
nothing of torn and dirty



30

clothes. In the courfe of
my acquaintance, I knew
a couple of little lads about
ten or twelve years of age t
who by the inftigation of
fome inconfiderate men,
were induced to try their
itrength and agility in this
way, the confequenoe was
a broken arm to the lead
of the two, and thatin fuch
a (hocking manner, that a
part of the bone pierced
the fkin, and was taken
out: it was a long time be-
fore it got well again, of



courfc, the poor little fel-
low mu ft have fuffe red ve-
ry much wit K it.

And the arm to this day
has never fully recovered
its natural ftate ; I believe
it was near 40 years ago.





1

Online LibraryElizabeth WattsTrue stories related → online text (page 1 of 1)