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ever have to live in a world as frighten-
ing as George Orwell's world of 1984.

George Orwell

Born in 1903 in India and educated at
Eton, Orwell's career was varied —
Burma service in the Imperial Police,
two years in Paris, and teaching in Eng-
land preceded the war in Spain and
Home Guard membership in World War
II. A frequent contributor to literary re-
views, Orwell's previous books were
Animal Farm, Burmese Days, and
Down and Out in London and Paris.



25



Halloween; Yesterday's

stories, Today's

pictures here at

Elon College.

The Celtic festival of Samhain is
probably the source of the present-
day Halloween celebration. The
Celts lived more than 2,000 years
ago in what is now Great Britain, Ire-
land and northern France. Their new
year began on November 1 . A festival
that began the previous evening hon-
ored Samhain, the Celtic lord of
death. The celebration marked the
beginning of the season to cold,
darkness, and decay. It naturally be-



came associated with human death.
The Celts believed that Samhain al-
lowed the souls of the dead to return
to their earthly homes for this even-
ing.

On the evening of the festival, the
Druids, who were the priests and
teachers of the Celts, ordered the
people to put out their hearth fires.
The Druids built a huge new year's
bonfire of oak branches, which they
considered sacred. They burned ani-
mals, crops, and possibly human be-
ings as sacrifices. Then each family
relit its hearth fire from the new year's
fire. Duhng the celebration, people
sometimes wore costumes made of
animal heads and skins. They told




fortunes about the coming year by
examining the remains of the animals
that had been sacrificed.

Many early American settlers came
from England and other Celtic re-
gions, and they brought various cus-
toms with them. But because of the
strict religious beliefs of other set-
tlers, Halloween celebrations did not
become popular until the 1800's.
During that period, large numbers of
immigrants arrived from Ireland and
Scotland and introduced their Hal-
loween customs. I

Today, Halloween is celebrated
across the country and knows no
age limits. |




y



y^



I With the full-moon, the ghools came out
around Elon. (whether it's Halloween or

? not); College students spend more time
planning and preparing their costumes
than kids do.





y






\



..^v




"Christmas, Christmas time is here, time for
toys and time for cheer. We've been good, but
we can't last, hurry Christmas, hurry fast!"

Many will recognize the lines from that smash
hit by none other than the Chipmunks. Sounds
silly? Think back to Christmas time at Elon Col-
lege, that's all that was on any normal students
mind . . . How many days till we go home? Many
simply sat and counted the days, a few set out
in more creative ways and produced our own
early-Christmas at Elon College.

The administration did their share by decorat-
ing the campus with holly and two live Christ-
mas trees in and on Alamance. Drew Van Horn
and his S.U.B. gang went all out in bringing us
the Snowball Dance, the Greeks had their
dance, and the Music Department brought us
the Masada.

Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority did their best to
brighten the Oaks area. They're pictured here
decorating their tree that was visible from the
road, (until it was stolen — not a very nice thing
to do at Christmas time.)





Holiday Cheer at Elon College




%



30




inii»» *^




31



1



AO



<




Well, It's been nine years since I took my first
yearbook assignment, and this Is my last —
for better or worse It would stand to reason
that I would have something profound to say
after all this time, some knowledge that I've
gained and should now reflect on.

I have learned a lot about words and their

uses, Arthur Kinder summed it all up for me

in a letter to his son . . .

Never fear big words.

Big long words name little things.



All big words have little names,

Such as life and death, peace and war, or

dawn, day, night, hope, love, or home.

Learn to use little words in a big way.

It's hard to do.

But they say what you mean.

When you don't know what you mean, use

big words.

They often fool little people.

Not terribly original, but profound in its own
way. If I can't put my acquired knowledge of



words into a few of my own, maybe I can d(
better in a more important area — people
Working closely with any staff or committee
club or organization is going to teach yoi
something — whether you want it to or not
People are basically pretty wonderful, and
I've met more than my share of that type here
at Elon. Some have been mentors, some
roommates, and others close fnends. Eacf
has taught me something, some withou
even knowing it.



32




i seem to learn the most, when we're try-

I the least . . .

sarned about alternators when my car

)ke down in Florida . . .

larned to run a meeting correclty when I

ended one run poorly . . .

iarned the value of not saying anything

en I most desperately wanted to com-

snt . . .

iarned to study while turning homework

a game . . .

arned to hold my temper when everyone



else was losing theirs . . .

I learned to appreciate my family and friends

while they were the furthest away . . .

I learned to be thankful for what I have while

complaining about what I lacked.

I say "I learned" when what I actually mean is
"I was taught." There are many people to
thank for what I have been taught in the past
few years. Don't worry, I won't list them all
here, they know who they are, the fnends
who have stood with me when things were



the toughest. All of us have a lot to learn from
the people around, everyone has something
to give, if we just give them a chance. Often,
it's the people we least care to listen to who
can teach us the most.

Good Luck and Happiness to all in the com-
ing years,

Maureen B. Sweeney, Editor-in-Chief



33



Fun and Games




Scott Vui



The Fun and Games continue well into
the school year as we switch from foot-
ball to basketball to baseball. These are
the three best known sports across the
United States, but. here at Bon we have
many others that deserve as much at-
tention as the big money makers.
Our women's athletic program is often
overlooked as is the case in most small
colleges. The caliber of our female ath-
letes IS the highest in the area. Many of
our women were all-county or all-state
in high school and come to Bon to carry
out this tradition of excellence.
Everyone knows where the football
team holds its games; where does the
wrestling team hold its matches? . . .
East Gym. Our wrestling team is one of
the finest in the nation. We've had men
place All-District, and even Ail-Ameri-
can.

The people behind the scenes are the
ones who don 't receive the credit that is
due them, without the support of
coaches, trainers, managers, adminis-
trators, and secretaries, many of our
achievements would never have
amounted to anything. It's to these peo-
ple that we owe a large debt and to
whom we dedicate this section of the
yearbook . . . Thanks.




""""^^^-ilV^ 1



T-C




36 Sports




N Al A National Champions - 1 983





40





41





42





43



NAIA District 26 Cliamps

A 4-1 win over Wingate clinched tine title
Games were held May 6-8 at Memorial Stadium,




in Krupa



44



NAIA Ail-American


All-District 26


John Krol


All Area — 7


.341 Batting Avg.


signed with


All District 26


4 Home runs


the Houston


All Conference


Frank "Pee Wee" Manship


Astros. Ken


Hit .436 with 12




Comer signed


homeruns & 33 RBI's




with Rocky


Joel Weiss




Mtn. League




took two tries, but
Ion College knocked
Ff Wingate 4-1 Sunday
lay 8 to win the Dis-
ict 26 play off s and a
erth in the NAIA Area
Tournament at Blue-
eld WV.

itcher David Osteen,



winless in his first eight decisions
this season, held Wingate to one
run and eight hits in a strong per-
formance.

Elon began the District 26 Tourna-
ment with a 3-2 win over top-seed-
ed Wingate Friday night behind the
pitching of John Driscoll.

The Christians then advanced to
the second round Saturday, win-
ning a slugfest over Guilford 16-
12. Elon's attack included 17 hits,
including four two-run homers,
two by center fielder Joel Weiss
and one each by Frank Manship
and Marty Gorski.

Guilford went ahead 2-0 in the top
of the first, but the Christians re-



taliated with five runs in the bot-
tom of the same inning. The Quak-
ers knotted the score in the fourth,
but Weiss' second four-bagger
gave Elon the lead.

A six-run gave Elon more breathing
room, keyed by Maurice Morton's
three-run triple. Gorski's two-run
homer and a two-run seventh ac-
counted for the final Elon total.
Guilford managed four runs in the
eighth and one more in the ninth
before the Christians closed the
door.

Randy Enoch started behind the
plate, replacing regular starting
catcher Ken Comer. Comer was in-
jured Friday against Wingate when



An umpires ruling was turning point . .



"The ruling took
the wind out of
Wingate's sails




and the Bulldogs
died quietly."

— Greensboro Daily News



he was hit with a bat.

The Guilford win gave pitcher
Greg Harris his sixth win against
one loss.

The Christians were forced to
play a second Wingate game
Sunday after losing the first
17-8.

Ken Comer, back in the starting
lineup after receiving eight
stitches in the head knocked
four runs with a grand slam in the
second inning of the first con-
test. Wiles added to the Eton to>
tal in the seventh, but a five-run
fifth for the Bulldogs iced the
victory.




Ron Krupa









:^.^



District 26 Champs, . , Sitting — Jeff Neufang,
Keithi Harrelson, Alex Long, Jofin Driscoll, Tim
Patton, Kneeling — Maurice Morton, Joel
Weiss, Jofin Krafie, Greg Harns, Asst, Coacfi
Denny Mayer, Head Coach Bob McBee, Scott
Hall, William Alexander, Mike Scott, Leonard
Tate, Standing — Co-Capt, Nathan Wiles, Ran-
dy Enoch, Capt. Ken Comer, Barry Culberson,
Dan Thompson, Co-Capt, John Krol, Dave
Osteen, Dave Donahue, Robby Schooner, Ber-
nie Crump, Brad Comer, Marty Gorski, Frank
Manship



OPPONENT


WETHEY


NO State


2-7,2-3


UNO Cfiarlotte


1-11


Susquehanna Univ.


3-4,10-0


Atlantic Cfiristian


2-4,8-7


Pembroke State


21-12


Guilford


3-5


N C A&T


1-10,9-0


Lenoir-Rtiyne


8-4,6-5


Wake Forest


6-9


Guilford


4-2


Pembroke


4-5


Mars Hill


6-2,5-2


Catawba


9-1,1-5


Higti Point (CO Tour )


0-12


Pfeiffer


4-17


Gardner-Webb


6-1,6-0


Sliaw


8-7,11-12


St, Augustine


3-2,4-6


High Point


2-1,2-4


Wingate (Districts)


3-2


Guilford (Districts)


16-13


Wingate (Districts)


8-17,4-1


W V State (Areas)


7-18


Geo Town, KY (Areas


2-6


Won-18, Lost-8







John Krol, a Winston Salem native signed with the Houston
Astros and spent the summer at camp in Florida.

Osteen scattered eight hits in the second game. Enoch and
Wiles put Eion up with two-out singles in the first, but the
Bulldogs fought back in the second frame to tie the score.

Weiss put Elon back up to stay later with a two-run homer,
his third home run of the tournament. Wiles iced the game
by singling, stealing second, and scoring on two Wingate
throwing errors.

it was the second time in as many years that Wingate had
lost the Championship game.

— Reprinted with permission from The Pendulum; Written
by Joel Maness 47



Ron Kryoa




Conference Record — 2-5
Dist. 26 Record — 6-10
Overall Record — 14-17



Vo(


3^


^b<


a


Roster






1983




Name


No


Pos


HI


Yr


Hometown


Katanja Clapp


45


Hiller


5-7


Fr


Eton College, NC


Ahcia Gaddy


25


Hitter


5-5


Jr


Winston-Salem, NC


Lelia Gentry


35


Hitter


5-6%


So


Roxboro, NC


Darci Leach


31


Setter


5-5'.4


So


Gibsonville, NC


Susan Overbey


15


Setter


5-7


Sr


Durtiam, NC


Failh Pitts


53


Hitter


60


So


Winston Salem, NC


Kimberly Punctles


33


Hitler


5-6


Fr


Vero Beactl, FL


Yolanda Stockton


41


Hitter


55


Fr


Reidsville, NC


Dee Dee Wardlaw


23


Hitter


5-9


Sr


Higfi Point, NC


Doreen Williams


11


Setter


53


So


Higti Point, NC


Diannati Curry, Manager










Belli Gardner. Scorekeeper









48





1 983 Golden

Girls - Elon

Volleyball

Elon vs.

8-15, 5-15 Guilford

15-10, 9-15, 3-15 Greensboro College

3-15, 13-15, 15-13, 3-15 Wake Forest

3-15, 15-3, 15-10 N.C. Central U.

15-11, 3-15, 15-10 Wingate

18-16, 5-15, 9-15 High Point

15-2, 15-5 Shaw

10-15, 15-8, 15-5 Christopher Newport

15-9, 15-13 Wesleyan College

2-15, 9-15 St. Augustine

13-15, 7-15 UNC-Wilmington

1-15, 13-15 Atlantic Christian

6-15, 8-15 Lenoir-Rhyne

3-15, 11-15 UNC-Greensboro

15-17, 8-15 Liberty Baptist

8-15, 2-15 UNC-Asheville

15-12, 15-11 Carson-Newman

15-13, 15-5, 15-6 Gardner-Webb

15-4, 15-9 Reiffer

15-4, 15-9 Greensboro College

15-6, 15-6, 15-11 North Carolina

Central Univ.
15-1, 15-8 Gallaudet Col.
15-12, 15-11 Kean College
15-11, 15-8, 8-15 UNC-Greensboro
15-11, 15-12 Salisbury State
15-13, 13-15, 15-13 Catholic
7-15, 9-15 Messiah

15-13, 9-15, 8-15 Pembroke State Univ.
15-11, 12, 15, 14-16 A & T Univ.
9-15, 6-15 Mars Hill
10-15, 9-15 Catawba







Ron Krupa



49



Led by two All-District
and one All-Tournament
player, the Golden Girls
will be coming on
strong this year.





T f



Above Gen McCarry. a sophomore from
NC makes a quick play on second: Above
Right Susan Wilson, a senior from Burl-
ington, NC earned District honors in 83 for
her pitching talents; Carolyn Pryor, a se-
nior from Reidsville, NC is pictured at
Right



50 Softball




Ron Krupa



Pictured Below: Kristen Wolter and Susan Overby





— Ron Krupa




Ron Krupa



Kim Smith, Geri McGarry, Leiia Gentry, Alicia Gaddy,
Diana Curry Back — Susan Wilson, Kristin Wolter. Me-
linda Brown, Susan Overby, Renate Costner.




OPPONENT


WE-THEY


Wingate


3-5, 2-9


Catawba


6-7,2-9


Guilford


5-0,5-15


Campbell


2-4,5-4


UNCGreensboro


5-4,3-4


Atlantic Christian


9-5,7-3


Pfeiffer


1-3,17-4


Pembroke


4-2,1-2


Guilford (CC Tourn)


2-9


Wingate (CC Tourn.)


11-7


Guilford (CC Tourn )


3-5


Appalachian (State)


2-19


Pembroke (State)


7-6


N C. AST (State)


7-1


Campbell (Stale)


2-7


Overall Record: 10-13




4th in Conference





Led by two All-District, and one All-Tournament
players, the Elon College "Golden Girls" exper-
ienced one of those up and down seasons that
plays with your nerves as well as tires your body.

Susan Wilson led the team from the pitching
mound and earned All-District honors, Alicia
Gaddy a three-sport player moved from the volley-
ball court, to the basketball court, to the softball
field with out so much as a minutes breath. The
work seemed to be the best thing for her, she also
earned All-Tournament honors for her play that
moved them into fourth place in the area. Jackie
Edwards was the third recipient of athletic honors,
along with Wilson, she was named to the All-
District team.



51



Compliments of

The Best Western

• 140 rooms & parlors

• Restaurant

• Lounge

• Covered Pool & Courtyard

• Convenient Access

• Major Credit Cards Honored

770 Huffman Mill Rd.
584-0151



Support Campus Media

Keeping Elon informed and pro-
viding "hands-on" experience




"The Pendulum" Student Run




m P ^f fi^ 2 ^^



WSOE — Student Run



GOLDEN CORRAL

Family Steak House
2408 S. Church St., Burlington

Famous ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT




SALAD BAR



Congratulations Grads!



The Ramada Inn

40 Rooms

Banquets — Meetings

Restaurant

Free Reservations

Tavern

ABC Permits

Major Credit Cards



RUMOURS LOUNGE



1-85



227-5541



Compliments of

Family
Drug Store

584-4257



Hours: 9:00 AM-11:00 PM




Community
- Federal



Savings and Loan Association
BURLINGTON □ GRAHAM

NORTH CAROLINA



Compliments of

WESTERN

CHARCOAL

STEAK HOUSE

142 Graham-Hopedale Rd. — Burlington, N.C.
Phone 227-7438



BAKATSIAS
RESTAURANT

1-85 & Haw River Exit At T.C.A.
Phone 578-3700



BAKATSIAS CUISINE

Crossdale Shopping Center

Durham, North Carolina

1-383-8502



Beset by injuries, the
Figlnting Christians still
managed a 7-3 record.

The 1983 Fightin' Christian Football team finished the year 7-3
overall as Coach Wright Anderson completed his second year at
Elon College. The Fightin' Christians, beset by numerous injuries,
were ranked No. 1 8 in the final NAIA national poll. For the third time
in the past four years, a South Atlantic Conference team, Carson
Newman, captured the NAIA national title. To go along with Elon's
national championships in 1980 and 1981 , it is apparent the South
Atlantic Conference is the premier conference in the NAIA.

Several Fightin' Christians garnered post-season honors. Named
to the All-District First Team were offensive guard Clay Hassard,
offensive tackle Eddie Hernandez, defensive end Jeff Cooper, line-
backer Royce Fentress, and strong safety Kenny Angel. Second
Team honorees were tight end Kelly Stanley, running-back Jimmy
Smith and noseguard Grady Williams. Garnering All-South Atlantic
Conference honors were Jeff Cooper, Royce Fentress, Kelly Stan-
ley and center Thomas Kilcrease. Being named to the second team
from Elon were Grady Williams, quarterback Sam Fromhart, Jimmy
Smith and Clay Hassard.





<r "








— '(.■Im ^Si





Elon


38


Elon


6


Elon


20


Elon


19


Elon


10


Elon


17


Elon


15


Elon


21



Guilford


7


Carson-Newman


15


Lenolr-Rhyne


14


Wofford


14


Presbyterian


6


Catawba





Gardner-Webb


17


Newberry


21



The 1983 Fightin Christians — Jeff Majewski. Royce Fentress. Keith Stallings. Chris Skeeter, Sam Fromhart. Craig Taylor. I^ike Brodowicz,
Jessie Jones. FredApplin. I^ike Ferrell. Rodney Anderson, Johnny Jacobs. Jay Simmons. Eddie Isley Garry Pierce. Darryl Brown. Bill Jessup,
Jonas Davis. Ricky Ross. Mitch Ryan. Jeff Knox, Kenny Angel. Derek Cross. Larry Rhodes. Tim Bines. Fred Jordan. Aubrey Patterson. Albert
Hendricks. Terry Patterson. Jimmy Smith. TimFerrell. Russell Evans. BobLeBlanc. Corlette Bay lock. Henry Tootoo. Tony Settles. Harvey Holt,
Stanley Haley Roger Brown. Ricky Graves. David Moats. Randy Long, John Murray Thomas Kilcrease, Danny Hopper. Terry Hill. Alphonso
Morrison. Mark Summers. Chris Jesse. John Thome. Jeff Cooper. Jay Perdue. Kyle Dunn. Steve Pickett. Jake Kale. Perry Himsl, Grady Williams,
Joe Ford. Ricky Sigmond. Mike Henley Buzzy Gilbert. Pratt Little. Glenn Haisley Lewin Bullock. Eddie Hernandez. Jonathon Allen, Clay
Hassard. Ken Tatko. John Keeton. Dean Jones. Ben Meisel. Mack Moore, Mike Schmids, Leon Jones, Berkley Gore, Stanley Hairston, Kelly
Stanley Mark Dennis. Raymond Ryals. Kelvin Reed




r\-M





Anderson resigns
as coach





^ r.'k?f:




Assistant Coach Lonnie Mack Garden, Jr. has
been named as Elon's fifteenth head football
coach to succeed Wright Anderson, who re-
signed January 13,

Dr. Alan White, Director of Athletics at Elon,
made the announcement, saying, "We're ex-
tremely proud to elevate Macky Garden to the
position of Head Football Goach at Elon Col-
lege. His dedication, loyalty, and coaching
performance have been exemplary during his
coaching tenure with us. We all have every
confidence that Goach Garden has the char-
acteristics and qualities necessary to maintain
the traditional level of excellence we've growri
to enjoy in our program."

"I'm happy to be Elon's head coach," Garden
said. "I've enjoyed my first seven years with
Elon and I look forward to my continued rela-
tionship with the college, most importantly the
players and staff."

A native of Durham, NG Garden came to Elon
after several brief stints in the North Carolina
public school system. He coached at Graham
High School 1967-68 and High Point Andrews
from 1968-70. He coached football, basket-
ball, and track while at the schools.

In 1970-72, he coached football and basket-
ball at Orange High School in Hillsborough,
NG. Garden coached at High Point Central
from 1972-75 in football and baseball. His last
stop before Elon was Kannapolis High School
where he served as football coach.

In 1977, Garden became Elon's offensive line
coach, a position he's held since. He has con-
verted the offensive line, once a major weak-
ness, into one of the strongest annually in the
SAG-8 Conference and that played a major
factor in two NAIA National Championships.




V /




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58




'■^X V





59



Elon Lacrosse worked its way
to a 7-3 record with big wins
over Clemson, USC, and Davidson.




U"



60 Lacrosse




V.



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— ^^>^^1



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63







■ m 'wjf






64





ilon averaged 74.3 points per game while
leir opponents averaged only 71 .3. Benji
ate proved to be a key player with a 1 3.8 avg.



t year the Elon College basketball team
ggled and had a season that saw them
r the bottom of the league. Vowing to
ce major improvements, coach Bill Morn-
;tar made many changes, including the
uitment of several new players. Most of
;e newcomers were around 6' 4" — 6' 9"
je and the 1 983-84 season looked bright,
season polls ranked Elon at the top of
league, and Coach Morningstar was
rd to comment that there was more tal-
on the team this year than any other
n he has ever coached.



The Christians proved that statement to be
true many times during the year. They
stayed in first place through the first part of
the season, but injuries and academic prob-
lems forced several players to the sidelines
for the rest of the year. Elon finished the reg-
ular season with a 17-10 record and headed
into the tournament with no one injured and
high hopes. However, a hot High Point team
shattered those hopes and the Elon season
came to an abrupt halt.

In spite of all the problems, Elon's 1983-84



season can still be considered a good one.
They tremendously improved last year's re-
cord and had many good games and excit-
ing moments. This year was better than last
year and with nearly everyone from this
year's team returning for next season, next
year should be better than ever!

Jay Lee up and over for two helped Elon clinch a
69-77 win over Atlantic Christian.



r





"I





#^'0



Sap'



• 4




V



iwbiitfK'



I





Elon




Opponent


62


61


Wingate


71


76


W. Va. Tech


62


61


St. Paul's


88


97


Lenoir-Rhyne


108


64


UNC-Greensboro


77


69


Atlantic Christian


72


94


Belmont Abbey


62


59


USC-Spartanburg


89


64


Guilford


96


68


UNC-Greensboro


74


72


Catawba


71


92


Pfeiffer


53


54


High Point


67


69


Wingate


102


67


Greensboro Col.


65


75


Catawba


80


69


Lynchburg


40


52


Belmont Abbey


75


88


Pembroke



67



1 983 NAI A Ail-American Golfers . . .



Daniel Thore
1983 All-American





mm



Barry Pilson - 1983 All-American

69

Danny Graham - 1983 All-American




Ranked number
two in pre-season
polls - looks good,



Coach Mary Jackson has high expectations
that Elon can again return to the top in the
Carolinas Conference in District 26 women's
basl<;etball competition.

Leading the Golden Girls will be All-District,
All-Conference performer Donna Trollinger.
Last year Trollinger averaged nearly 17
points and seven rebounds for the Golden



70



Girls. Also returning to the Golden Girls'
cause will be Renate Costner, Cathy Jones,
who averaged nearly 15 points a game, Ali-
cia Gaddy, Jamie McNeely, Susan Overbey,
Faith Pitts, and Susan Wilson.

Top newcomer to the Golden Girls will be
Lisa Briggs who should immediately start for
the Golden Girls from the point guard posi-
tion, where Jackson feels she will be a tre-
mendous asset to Elon. Also joining the
cause will be Katanja Clapp and Yolanda
Stockton.

With a lot of talent joining a strong nucleus of
veterans, Jackson feels that Elon again will
be right in the running for both District and
Conference championships in 1984.




Lisa Briggs, Katanja Clapp, Renate Costner, Alicia Gaddy, Erika Gunter, Cathy Jones,


2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

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