Emilie Poulsson.

In the child's world; morning talks and stories for kindergartens, primary schools and homes online

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from the north and fly to Africa, and always carry small birds
like you. I wonder you have never seen them."

"Wo are very young,'' replied the fat, flutfy, little friends.
"AVe have seen little of the world, but we thank you very much
for telling us, and we will wait for the cranes."'

They had not long to wait. In a few minutes they heard a
rushing eound overhead, and looking up saw a flock of great
birds with necks outstretched and wings spread wide, flying low
over the beach.

"Will you carry us over to Africa?" called the little birds all
in a flutter, as the first crane swept by.

" I am full! " replied the crane. " The fourth behind me has
room for you, but you must get on quickly I"

As he flew on, the six friends saw that his back was covered
with small birds, all huddled together and holding on with beaks
and claws.

The second crane passed, and the third, both heavily laden.
Then came the fourth. Hop! skip! flutter! scramble! and the
six fat, fluffy friends were seated on his back, with a dozen or
more little fellows about their own size.

"Are you all right?" said the crane. "Hold on tight! " and
away he flew over the wide, blue sea.

Many other little birds came flying to the shore, to take pas-
sage on the Crane Express. And many a back was covered with
tiny passengers.



10 lif THE CHILD S WOliLD,

"All aboard! all aboard! '' cried the cranes. " Twitter! chirp!
twit-twit!" piped the passengers. And the whole train swept
on, far away over the sea, toward the white shore of Africa.

Now, part of this story may be true, for cranes really do carry
hundreds of small birds over the Mediterranean Sea every year.
But whether the African worms walk into bird's mouths of their
own accord or not, is quite another matter; and if I were you, I
would not believe it till I saw it.

Holmes' Third Reader.

University Publisliing Co., New York.



BIKD THOUGHTS.



I lived first in a little house,

And lived there very well,
I thought the world was small and roun(i;

And made of pale blue shell.

I lived next in a little nest,

Nor needed any other,
I thought the world was made of straw,

And brooded by my mother.

One day I fluttered from the nest

To see what I could find.
I said: " The world is made of leaves,

I have been very blind."

At length I flew beyond the tree.

Quite fit for grown-up labors.
— I don't know how the world is made.

And neither do my neighbors!

Unlcnorni.




WOOD.



To THE Teacher: —

(Having various familiar objects on the table, let the children tell of
•what they are made. Or, if the talks on fruits and seeds have been given,
take the subject from the point of the tree's gifts to us.)



THE TALK.

Let us each name some kind of fruit whicli grows on trees.
(Do not forget the different kinds of nuts^ too.) Besides so
many kinds of fruits, the trees give us the beautiful leaves which
we have had in kindergarten this autumn, the sap of which maple
sugar is made in the spring, and wood — oh! so much wood!
All the wood we have to burn, and all the wood which is used
in building, or in any way, comes from the trees.



18 IX THE Cllll.l/S WOKI,I>.



(Have each child toucli or tell of something made of wood-
Try to have this a lively exereise. Prepare the (diildren whom
you tliiuk Avould nor. be ready to mention anything, by giving
them wooden objects whioli they c.in show and name.

A little forethought for the backward children will often en-
able them to derive benefit which they would otherwise miss
from an exercise.)

Our tables and chaii's do not look much like the trees from
which they are made, do they? 'J'ell me how a tree looks.
What shape is the trunk — the tall, thick part? Is it rough or
smooth as you touch it?

Suppose Ave Avere going to make a table out of a tree, Avhat
woukl be \h(i lirst thing to do?

(Lead the children to trace as much of the work of preparation
as possible, — the selection of a tree of the proper size and kind
[choose tiie kind of Avhich tiie table is reail\' made,] the chopping
down of the tree, and the sawing or chopping otf of the branches,
hauling the logs to the river, floating them to the saAvmill
where ihey are sawed into boards, piling them in the lumber
yard to dry and to wait until some one comes to buy them.

Sing •■ Zish, zish," and let the children play that they are
making a table out of some of the boards whose history they have
traced.)



TEACHER'S READING.

Wood and Its Uses, - - - Ena/clopifdia

Pocket Key of Trees (both wild and cultivate<l) of North-
ern U. S., east of the Kocky Mts., By Austin C. Apgar
Drownes Wooden Ima<;e. - - - Hawthorne

Gaspar Becerra. - - - Lonat'ellow

The Lumbermen, - - - Wliittier

A Winter Evening Hymn to My Fire, - - - Lowell

Backlog Studies, - - - - Charles Ditdleij Warner

FOR TIIE CHILDKEX.

The Walnut Tree that Wanted to Bear Tulips (Kindergarten Stories and
Morning Talks), ^- i^- yViUse



IN THE child's WOHLD. 1 'J



STORIES.

THE LO(JGIN(i C A:\1P.

When my brother Russell w.is a little boy we lived in Maine.
There were great woods near the ^own where our home was, and
the men who lived in that part of the country used to go into
these woods at the beginning of winter and stay there till spring,
cutting down trees and making them ready to ))e sawed into
boards at the sawmill.

As there were several inen who woiit together to the same
place, they l)uilt themselves a house to live in while out in the
woods. This was a square house of one room, and they called it
their camp. As their business was to make logs of the trees
which they cut down, the camp was called a logging camp.

One day my uncle came to our house and said that he was
going to one of his logging camps, and would stay all night.
He had his little boy with him, and asked mother if Russell
might go, too. Mother was willing and Russell was delighted,
so off he started with his uncle and cousin.

They had several miles to go, but it Avas good sleighing, so the
boys enjoyed it very much. When they reached the camp, late
in the afternoon, the men there were delighted to see the chil-
dren; for, being so far from home, none of them had seen a child
for many weeks.

The boys enjoyed the supper of hot biscuit, ])aked ])ork and
beans, and coffee, cooked by one of the men.

After supper they went to bed in the bunk, which was made
of boards along the side of the room. The bunk was filled in
Avith spruce boughs or hay, and covered with quilts or blankets.

The boys' feet were turned toward the fire which burned all
night in the middle of the room, the smoke escaping through a
square hole in the roof. Their feet being so nicely warmed., the



•*^0 IN THE CHILD S WORLD.



boys did not suffer at all from cold; they slept soundly iind were
among the first to wake in the morning. It was very interesting .
to watch the cook get breakfast (which was just the same as the
supper of the evening before) and after breakfast they went out
to see the men at work.

They wei'e never tired of watching the "tree-fellers," as the
men who cut down the trees were called. Two tree-fellers would
begin chopping at the trunk of a tree, standing on opposite sides
and making the chips fly in every direction. As the gap made
by each chopper came nearer and nearer to the middle, the tree
would begin to shake, and, finally, down it would come! But
the men, knowing in what direction it would fall, could jump
out of the way.

The tree did not always fall directly to the ground, for some-
times the men would make it fall on a smaller tree to prevent

the larger one from being splintered, as it might be if the force

of its fall were unbroken.

When this tree was on the ground, other men would come and

cut off its branches, while the two tree-fellers were cutting down

another tree.

By the time the branches were cut off, a second tree would be

felled and the men would pass on to cut off its branches as they

had done to the other, while the tree-fellers would go back to

the first tree and cut it up into different lengths. These lengths

were called logs.

Then the teamsters came and loaded the logs on their sleds

and hauled them to the river, down which they floated to the

sawmill when the ice melted in the spring.

What do you suppose drew the sleds? ''Horses?" No. They

use horses in some places; but in Maine, at that time, they used

oxen to haul the sleds, because oxen can move through the deep

snow better than horses. The oxen were not harnessed like

horses, but each pair wore a yoke* to which a ring was attached.

The pole went through this ring, or a chain was fastened to it.
The visitors stayed till after dinner, and then started for home

in the sleigh, so the Ijoys had another pleasant sleighride



'The yoke can be represented wltli sticks and linjjs.




Floa,tin



WlIKKE THE IjOOS (tO.



21



IN TUE CHILD S WOULD.



Kussell brought with him one of the camp biscuits to show to
Hi other.

*' Hee, mother/' said he eagerly^ "what nice biscuits we had at
the camp. I brought one home i'or you to taste. It is the best
biscuit 1 ever ate."' Mother aud grandmother tasted it, and then
looked at each other. The biscuit was yellow with saleratus,
(then used instead of soda) and of course tasted strongly of it;
but to the little boy, with appetite sharpened by the fresh, cold
air, it was delightful.

JOSEPHIXE JaUA'IS.
Cobden, III.

THE HONEST WOODMAN.

Out in the green, silent Avoods and near a rushing rivi-r tliat
foamed aud sparkled as it hurried along, there lived a good man
whose work was wood-chopping. With his strong, sharp ax
over liiB shoulder, he started out one autumn day, and, selecting
a large oak tree near the river side, was soon swinging his ax
riglit sturdily as lie hewed away at the tree trunk.

The chips flew fast at every stroke, and the sound of the ax
ringing against the wood was echoed so clearly that joxi would
have thought another wood chopper was at work not far away.

By and by the woodman thought he would rest awhile. He
leaned his ax against the oak tree and turned to sit down, but
tripped against his ax; and before he could catch it, it had slid
down the bank and into the stream just where the water was
very deep! The poor woodman gazed into the stream, which
flowed on over his lost treasure as merrily as before, and then he
spoke aloud in his distress. '*0h, what shall I do? My good
axl The only ax I had! I can never get it again. Even had
I money to get another, I should still lament for this one, — t^o
strong it was, and so sharp, and the stout handle worn so smooth
to my hands.''

The nymph or waterfairy who lived in this river (for this all
happened in fairy days) heard the sad words of the woodman,
and, rising to the surface, spoke to him in a voice that was like
the sweet, tuneful tinkle of dropping water.

"What is your sorrow'-"' said she kindly. 'J'he Avoodman told



IN TiiK child's world. 23

her of his misfortune, wondering much at the sudden appearance
of this lovely creature.

"Cease your sad words," said the nymph in the same tinkling
accents. "Far, far down below the reach of any mortal eyes or
hands lies your lost ax; but wait and hope. Fairy eyes and
fairy hands have power even in the watery depths of the sireuni."

"She sank: — almost as quick as thought
She rose again, and with lier brought
An ax of silver. The rich prize
She held before the woodman's eyes;
And smiling, as in happy glee,
'Is this the ax you lost?' said she.
'Oh, no!' said he and shook his head.
' Well then,' the smiling naiad said,
'Here on the bank let this remain,
And I'll go down and try again.'
She sank; and, instantly, behold!
Up came she, with an ax of gold !
Pare, solid gold — the helve, the head—
'Is this the ax you lost?' she said.
'Oh, no, no, no !' the man replied.
This is not my old ax,' and sighed.
' This is of very different ore,
And worth, no doubt, a great deal more,
And much more brightly does it shine.
But 'tis not mine — no, 'tis not mine."

'^ Indeed I" said the fairy — "Then this golden ax may lie on
the bank beside the silver one, while I seek again for yours."
The blue waters closed yet once more over the fairy. The wood-
man looked at the gold ax aud at the silver ax, glittering in the
grass.

'• They are beautiful," said he, "and far costlier than my ax,
which, though as good a one as ever hewed a tree, is naught but
hardy steel ; nevertheless I will not lay claim to that which is
not mine, nor will I say anything but the truth."

By this time the water-nymph had again appeared above the
shining waves and was holding another ax high in the air. The
woodman reached forward with a shout of joy. " That is mine !''
he cried. " That is surely my own old ax."



24 IN THE child's WORLD.

" Yes," said the fairy as she put it into his hands. "This is
jour ax, but it is only a plain steel one. Did you not like the
silver ax and the gold ax?" '* Indeed 1 did," answered the
Avoodman ; " but the silver ax was not mine and the gold ax was
not mine. Not for them or for any other treasure will I say
what is not true." "'Eight, honest woodman," said the fairy
with a radiant smile of approval. " Truth, is better than silver
or gold. Truth can make you strong-hearted and happy though
you lose your all. And now,, farewell," she continued ; " but take
as a gift from me the ax of silver and the ax of gold."

So saying, she waved her white hand and disappeared. The
astonished woodman gazed at the river, but it only sparkled and
rippled on quite in its usual fashion ; and at last with his heart
full of gratitude to the fairy for her great kindness, the honest
woodman gathered up the three gleaming axes and hastened hom^
to tell of his wonderful adventure.

Retold by Emilie Poulssoi^.



THE CARPENTER.



To THE Teaciiep. : —

For this talk the teacher will find pieces of wood (rough and smooth
short and long, thick and thin) very useful in demonstrating the changes
which the carpenter makes in his material. The carpenter's tools, too,
should be shown and used when possible. A visit to a carpenter's shop
is an excellent preparation for the teacher. If she can take the children
with her or have a carpenter visit the kindergarten and show how he
uses his tools, so much the better.



THE TALK.

(Question the children with regard to the origin and uses of
wood as brought out in the previous talk. Let them mention
again things that are made of wood, — in the schoolroom, at home,
or in the street.)

Who cuts down the trees? Who makes barrels, pails, etc.,
out of wood? Who builds houses? What else does the carpenter
build? Perhaps there are some children here whose fathers are
carpenters. Let us see how many.

Suppose each one of the carpenters' children tells us of some
tool his father uses in his work. Do the other children know of
anymore tools which the carpenter uses? (Lee the children
examine the tools provided, and see how many they know the
name and use of. Show pieces of wood and ask for the tool by
which the rough can be made smooth, the long short, holes bored,
pieces fastened together, etc., etc., bringing out mention of each
tool in this way. )



26



IN THE CHILI' S WOULD.



A man has to learu how to use all these tools and to do all
these things and many more before he can be a good carpenter.
Can you find places in the room where the plane must have been

used? the hammer? the saw?
Who has been at work here,
then, to make our pleasant,
comfortable room?

And who made the wood
ready for the carpenter?
The wood-chopper in the for-
est, and the men at the saw-
mill. Besides all these men,
the mason and the paiiiter
and the glazier helped in
building the house. The
mason made the cellar and
the walls, the painter painted
the house, and the glazier
put the glass in the win-
dows. Think how many
people we have to thank for
our houses I Should we be
very comfortable if wc had
no houses to live in? Now
suppose you had a good
house, nicely built, — would
you like to live there alone, without mamma, and papa, and
brothers and sisters ? No, I am sure you would not. It is
not enouah to have a house, — the house needs to have a family
in it — father, mother, cliildren — those who belong to eacli other.
Then a house, or even a part of a house, becomes a home.




IN THE child's WORLD. 27



TEACHER'S READING.

Frccbel's Explanations of

The Carpenter, )

Tlie Bridge, > Mother's^ Songn, Plnyn and Stories

Tlie Joiner, )
Adam Bede, - - ... Oeunje Eliot

Annals of a (fillet Neighborhood, - - - Geor;/e Mac Donald

Whittling, - - - - Pierpont

The Ship Builders, - .... Whittier

The Building of the Ship, - . . . . Lonyfellow

FOR THE CHILDREN".

The Carj^euter (" Kindergarten Stories and

Morning Talks"), - - .. S. E. Wiltse
Gutta Percha Willie, - - - . . George MacDonnld



STORIES.

LITTLE DEEDS OF KINDNESS.

A bright red wagon with four wheels, and a long handle to p-nll
it by, is a delightful plaything, and little Howard, who had found
just such a wagon at his bedside when he awoke one morning,
could scarcely wait for the time to come when he could play with
it. After breakfast he liurried out as soon as he could. At first
it was fun enough just to run up and down on the broad side-
walk and hear the wheels rattle on the bricks. It was interesting
to practice turning, too ; for the front wheels turned under the
body of the w^agon, just as those of a larger wagon do.

By and by his Aunt Kate came down the street, and Howard
ran joyfully to meet her and to show her his new wagon.

" See the tires on the wheels. Auntie, how bright they are!
And the front wheels turn, and the board at the back will come
out. tool"

Auut Kate admired everything, and, seeing the gilt letters on



28 IS THE child's world.

the side of the wagon, asked, "Is 'Star' the name of this
wonderful wagon?"

" Yes," said Howard, " this is the * Star Express.' ''

''Then I will send this book to your mamma by the Star
Express, for my arms are tired/' said Aunt Kate. So she put
the big book into the cart and Howard took it to his mamma.

After a while, Howard played that he was a milkman. He
went along the walk, stopping in front of every house as if to
leave the milk. By and by he came to the corner, and then
turned to go back.

But something was the matter with the little wagon. Howard
looked around and saw that a wheel had come off. He picked it
up and then stood looking at the wagon in great distress. He
felt as if he should cry. He had thought he should have such fun
all day, and now his wagon was broken.

*' Perhaps papa can mend it,'" thought Howard: ''but even
if he can, he will not be at home until to-night; papa is so busy,
too, that he may not get time to mend it for two or three days."

Poor Howard felt very unhappy as these thoughts passed
through his mind. Just then some one spoke to him. A kind
voice said ; " Let me take the wheel, little boy."

A man whose face was as kind as the voice stood near. He
was lifting down a wooden box which he had been carrying on his
shoulders.

Wondering wluit was going to happen, and with a sudden feel-
ing of hope, Howard handed him the wheel. The man took
some carpenter's tools from his box and went to work. Howard
watched him with great interest. He saw tliat the man was a
carpenter and knew exactly what to do.

In a very little time the wheel was on, and the gay little wagon
was as good as ever.

" There !" said the carjienter, '' that is strong now. I do not
think it will come off again."

" Oh, thank you I Thank you I'' said Howard ; ''I am so glad
it is mended. It is a new wagon and I have such fun with it."

"Good-by," said the carpenter, as he took up liis box and put
it on his shoulder.




The Carpenter.



30 IX THK CIIII.U'S WDKl.I;.



'' Oh I" said Howard, " I wisli you would let me take your box
of tools for you. This is the Star Express."

" That would be a good plan," said the carpenter. " How far
does this express run?''

"As far as the corner," answered Howard.

The carpenter put his box of tools into the wagon, and away
went the Star Express rattling down the street.

After this Howard used to watch for li is carpenter, as he called
him, and run to meet him whenever he saw him in the distance;
and if, as sometimes happened, the carpenter had his box of
tools or a package of nails-to carry, Howard always put it into
the wagon and took it as far as he could.

Emilie Poulsson.



AN OLD-FASHIONED liriYME.

This is the Tree of the forest.

This is the Ax whose steady blows,
Cut down the Tree of tlie forest.

This is the Woodman, who, everyone knows.
Wielded the Ax whose steady bh)ws
Cut down the Tree of the forest.

This is the Log — to the river's side

KoUed by the Woodman, who, every one knows.

Wielded the Ax whose steady blows

(.'ut down the Tree of tlie forest.

This is the River whose flowing tide
Carried the Log that was rolled to its side, —
Rolled by the Woodman, who, everyone knows,
Wielded the Ax whose steady blows
Cut down the Tree of the forest.

This is the Wheel that went whirring round.
Turned by the River whose flowing tide
Carried the Log that was rolled to its side, —
Rolled by the Woodman, who, every one knows,
Wielded the Ax whose steady blows
<'r.t down the Tree of the forest.



IN^ THE CUIl.l/s WOULD. 31



These are the Saws which, with buzzing sound,
Were moved by tlie Wheel that went whirring round,
Turned by the River whose flowing tide
Carried the Log that was rolled to its side, —
Rolled by the Woodman, who, every one knows,
Wielded the Ax whose heavy blows
Cut down the Tree of the forest.



These are the Boards, so straight and long.
Cut by the Saws which, with buzzing sound,
Were moved .by the Wheel that w^ent wiiirring round,
Turned by the River whose flowing tide
Carried the Log that was rolled to its side, —
Rolled by the Woodman, who, every one knows.
Wielded the Ax whose heavy blows
Cut down the Tree of the forest.



This is the Carpenter, skillful and strong,

Who planed all the Boards so straight and long.

Cut by the Saw^s which, with buzzing sound.

Were moved by the Wheel that went whirring round.

Turned by the River whose flo^ving tide

Carried the Log that was rolled to its side, —

Rolled by the Woodm.an, who, every one knows,

Wielded the Ax whose steady blows

Cut down the Tree of the forest.



This is the House with its windows and doors
With timbers and rafters and roofs and floors.
Which was built by the Carpenter skillful and strong
Who planed all the Boards so straight and long.
Cut by the Saws which, with buzzing sound,
AVere moved by the Wheel that went whii-ring round,
Turned by the River whose flowing tide
Carried the Log that was rolled to its side, —
Rolled by the Woodman, who, every one knows.
Wielded the Ax whose steady blows
Cut down the Tree of the forest.



32 IN THE child's WOKl.l).

Tliis is the Family — All are here —

Father, and mother and children dear,

Who live in the House with windows and doors,

With timbers and rafters and roofs and floors.

Which was built by the Carpenter, skillful and strong.

Who planed all the Boards so straight and long,

Cut by the Saws which, with buzzing sound.

Were moved by the Wheel that went whirring round,

Turned by the River whose flowing tide

Carried the Log that was rolled to its side, —

Rolled by the Woodman, who, every one knows.

Wielded the Ax whose steady blows

Cut down the Tree of the forest.

Emilie Poulsson.



THE CLOCK.



To THE Teacher :-



At the beginning of the year, when there is danger that the chiklrem
may be homesick, it is better to talk of something which will take their
thoughts away from home and mother, and also away from the strange-
ness of their kindergarten surroundings. Later, however, the kinder-
garten room should be consciously observed, and its useful and pretty
things rejoiced in. When the children are ready for this, tiie subject of
the clock is to be introduced, since by it the important matter of
punctuality can be brought forward, and this should be done as soon as-
other considerations will allow.



THE TALK.

(Sing one of the clock songs at the end of the morning exer-
cises and so lead directly to the subject.)

Where is the clock? Do you hear it ticking? Let us listen.
We must be very quiet or we shall not hear it. What does it say?

All the whole day, while we are singing and playing and work-
ing, and all the whole night, while we are sleeping, the clock
keeps on saying, " tic-tac, tic-tac."'



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