Ermina Newton Leonard.

Newton genealogy, genealogical, biographical, historical, being a record of the descendants of Richard Newton of Sudbury and Marlborough, Massachusetts 1638, with genealogies of families descended from the immigrants Rev. Roger Newton of Milford, Connecticut, Thomas Newton of Fairfield, Connecticut, online

. (page 112 of 131)
Online LibraryErmina Newton LeonardNewton genealogy, genealogical, biographical, historical, being a record of the descendants of Richard Newton of Sudbury and Marlborough, Massachusetts 1638, with genealogies of families descended from the immigrants Rev. Roger Newton of Milford, Connecticut, Thomas Newton of Fairfield, Connecticut, → online text (page 112 of 131)
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In this literary work, Dr. Newton throughout his missionary career was emi-
nent. The Panjabi language is indebted to him for the foundation of its
religious literature.

Besides the translation of the New Testament into Punjabi and numerous
tracts in that language, his literary labors, with those of his associate, Rev. L.
Janvier, included a Punjabi grammar and dictionary, a commentary on Ephe-
sians in Urdu, and important tracts in both Urdu and Hindi.

From the Ludhiana Mission, of which Dr. Newton was then the senior mis-
sionary, was issued in 1858 that call to the observance of the week of prayer,
which has since become so widespread and so fixed a custom throughout the
Christian world."

"Punjabi or Sikh Version. The Punjabi belongs to the Indie branch of the
Aryan family of languages, and is spoken in the Province of Punjab, North
India. A translation of the Bible into this language was undertaken by Seram-
pore missionaries at a very early period, and was published in 1811. In 1832
a second edition was undertaken. Of the Old Testament only Genesis to Ezekiel
was translated and published since 1820.

A new translation was undertaken by Kev. J. Newton in connection with
American missionaries, and in 1850 Genesis, Exodus, the Psalms, and the New
Testament were published by the British and Foreign Bible Society at Lodiana,
India." [Same, p. 263.]

It is a pleasure to record an abstract of the life and work of this excellent
family. The children of Kev. John Newton 2 (Jonas 1 ) were born in India.
Their names are:

498. fi. Margaret Janvier', b. 1S30. 501. tiv. Cuarles Beatty 3 , b. 1841.

409. tii. John 3 , Jr.. b. 1838. 502. tv. Francis Janvier 3 , b. 1847.

500. tiii. Emily Moore 3 , b. 1839. 503. tvi. Edward Payson 3 . b. 1850.



498. 1. MARGARET JANVIER 3 NEWTON (dau. of John 2 ), born March
26, 1836, at Ludhiana, India; died May 12, 1878, at Lahore, India; married July
3, 1855, at Ludhiana, Rev. Charles W. Forman, D.D., born March 3, 1821, a
missionary in India, whose life work is really a story of the two missions in
Northern India. Their son

504. i. Henry 4 Forman ("Dr."), b. ; a missionary in India, stationed at

Jhansi — Gwalior — a strategic point, which the mission, after a lapse of
years has again taken over, in one of the strong native states not directly
under the British rule. He m. his cousin, Caroline Sophia Newton (509),
daughter of John Newton 3 , Jr., who was associated with him in the work
of the mission. When the time came for their furlough, Mrs. Newton had



one printing press, and 320 professed Christians. The society spells the name Lodiana. A
mission of the North India School of Medicine for Christian Women, 1805, with, in 1001,
ten women missionaries, six native workers, one Sunday school, one Young Woman's Christian
Association, one female helper's training class, five dispensaries, two hospitals, one medical
class, and one leper's asylum. I Encyclopedia of Missions, Revised Ed., p. 414.]



REV. ROGER NEWTON 731

gone to Lausanne, Switzerland, taking with her their only son, John, aged
10 years, and Dr. Forman was to come as soon as someone could be sent
to occupy his post during his absence. Mrs. Newton contracted pneumonia
in Lausanne, and d. there Dec. 1, 1912, her husband arriving two weeks
before her death. It is stated of her : "Mrs. Forman was one of those
rare spirits to have known whom was a pleasant recollection. She came
of a family with a great missionary history, for she was a Newton." Dr.
Henry Forman arrived in New York with his son, after an absence of
eight years in India, Dec. 29, 1912, his intention being to spend part of his
furlough in writing a biography of his father, Charles W. Forman, D.D.
The son, "aged 10 years," is :
505. 1. John Newton* Forman, b. , 1902.



499. 2. EEV. JOHN NEWTON 3 , JR., M.J), (s. of John 2 ), born March 4,
1838, in India; died at Sabathn, India, July 29, 1880. He married at Calcutta,
India, October 11, 1861, Sarah Estelle Wigfall.

Mr. Newton was the oldest of the four sons of Rev. John Newton. All of the
sons were born in India and educated in America. Mr. Newton was sent to
the preparatory school at Mt. Holly, N. J., then entered Princeton College,
from which he was graduated in 1856. He took his medical course in the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, and was graduated; after which he
went to India independently of the Board of Missions; became a member of
the Mission in 1860, and was afterward ordained to the ministry, in the Pres-
bytery at Lodiana, India; but from 1866-1880, he was stationed at Sabathn,
where he had a dispensary.

After Dr. Newton was stationed there, the Poor-house at Sabathn — established
forty years before — became the Leper Asylum. As a physician he took special
interest in the lepers and experimented with the view of discovering some medi-
cine that might arrest the progress of the disease.

He built several houses near the mission-house that he might the more effec-
tively minister to the patients, considering them not as medical patients only, but
as the poor who needed the gospel; he had a small building erected, which
served the double purpose of a dispensary and a chapel, where the lepers
assembled daily for worship.

Dr. Newton was an earnest preacher, skillful physician, and an excellent
writer. Though of a scholarly turn, he was much engaged in itineration,
bazaar preaching, and labor among the soldiers of the local garrison. His most
responsible charge was the Leper Asylum, having eighty-nine inmates. A mis-
sionary associate thus speaks of him after his death : "No love in the dark
world has ever seemed to me so much like the Saviour's as that of Dr. Newton
for his lepers."

Dr. Newton died of cancer of the stomach, after a period of great suffering.
The funeral was numerously attended by Europeans and natives. Soldiers who
loved him carried the casket from the house to the cemetery. His father read a
part of the Episcopal service, closing with an address. The Mission say of him :
"His fine endowments, thorough knowledge of the language, great devotion to
the work, make his removal a severe loss to the missionary cause."

His four children were:

506. i. Herbert 4 , b. ; d. in childhood.

507. ii. Mary 4 , b. ; d. in childhood.

508. iii. Charles Rertram 4 , b. ; in 1912 was living in Minneapolis, Minn.;

m., and had five children.

509. tiv. Caroline Sophia 4 , b. ; m. her cousin. Rev. Henry Forman (504) as

above, and d. Dec. 1, 1912, at Lausanne, Switzerland.



732 NEWTON GENEALOGY

500. 3. EMILY MOOKE NEWTON 3 (dau. of John 2 ), born July 2, 1839, at
Sabathn, India ; died January 24, 1862, at Sialkot, India. She married April 4,
1861, at Lahore, India, William Fergerson, a Scotch missionary in India, and
died soon after. She was a volunteer missionary.



501. 4. EEV. CHARLES BEATTY NEWTON 8 , D.D. (s. of John 2 ), born
February 3, 1841, at Lodiana, India, is living, 1915.

He married (1) at Ambala, India, , 1871, Margaret Thompson, who

bore him six children, and died June 20, 1897, at Mussoorie, India. He married
(2) at Saharanpore, India, Jessie Dunlap, who died August 2, 1905, at Chatta-
nooga, Tenn.

Dr. Newton, like the other members of his father's family, became a mission-
ary to India. For his preparatory course, he went through the "Classical and
Commercial High School" at Lawrenceville, N. J.; then entered Washington
College, .at Washington, Pa.; lost a year by entering the army (Civil War) and
returning was graduated in 1S64. From college he entered the Theological Semi-
nary at Allegheny, Pa., "The Western Theological Seminary" — and was graduated
in the spring of 1867. He went to India as a missionary in October of the
same yeai* — 1867. He received the degree of D.D. from his college.

At the beginning of the Civil War, being then in college and about twenty
years old, Mr. Newton enlisted for three years in the Fifteenth regiment of the
Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry. The regiment went to Harrisburg, Pa., and
thence to Carlisle to be drilled, in August, 1862. While there, Gen. R. E. Lee
invaded Maryland, and the regiment was hurried to the front and took part in
the battle of Antietam. After Lee was driven back into Virginia, the regiment
was sent to join Rosecrans' army of the Cumberland at Nashville, Tenn. At
Nashville, Mr. Newton was taken ill with typhoid fever, and through the aid
of Rev. Mr. Scott of the Christian Commission, was discharged and taken home
to Steubenville, Ohio. After a long and nearly fatal illness of two months he
regained his health, taught school in West Virginia, and in the fall (of 1862)
again entered the college from which he had enlisted, having served about six
months.

Returning to his native India in 1868, a missionary, he has now been in that
service over forty-five years.

He married, and for a time was stationed at Lahore; four of his children
were born there. Later, he has been stationed at Jullundur (Jalandhar), India,
where he now, 1915, resides. This is a town in the Punjab, with a population
in 1901 of 67,735; a Presbyterian mission station of 1846; with (in 1903), one
missionary and his wife ; two women missionaries ; forty-one native workers ;
six day schools; and one boarding school. Of his seven children, all except
one were born in India. They are:

510. i. Benjamin Thompson 4 , b. Jan. 9, 1872, at Lahore, India; d. there Nov. — ,

1872, aged 9 months.

511. ii. John Charles 4 , b. June 24, 1S74, at Lahore, India ; a missionary at Jul-

lundur City, India ; unm. : living in 1912.

512. iii. Frederic Janvier 4 , b. May 27, 187[5 or 6], at Lahore. India; a missionary

living in Jullundur City. Punjab, in 1912 ; not married.

513. iv. Edward Thompson 4 , b. Oct. 19, 1877. at Williamsport, Lycoming County, Pa.

514. v. Francis Herbert 4 (Rev.), b. Oct. 22, 1881, at Lahore, India; unm. in 1912;

resides at Thornton. Washington, — is pastor of a church there.

515. vi. Caroline Louise 4 , b. June 14, 1883, at Murree. Himalaya Mountains, Punjab,

India : unm. ; resides at Jullundur City, India. — a missionary.

516. vii. George Yanderveer 4 , b. Oct. 27, 1881, at Mussoorie, Himalaya Mountains ;

d. at Mussoorie. Aug. 15, 1898.



REV. ROGER NEWTON 733

502. 5. REV. FRANCIS JANVIER NEWTON 3 , M.D. (s. of John 2 ), born
July 24, 1847, at Sabathn, India; died April 28, 1911, aged nearly 64, at Jul-
hmdur City, India. He married at Ludhiana, India, November 28, 1870, Helen
Reed, or Frances Reed of Chambersburg, Pa.

Mr. Newton, a clergyman, a physician and a missionary, had his preparatory
education in Taunton, England, and entered Washington College, at Washing-
ton, Pa., in the fall of 1863, with his brother (who was reentering after his six
months war service). He left Washington College and went to Jefferson Col-
lege, finally going back, and was graduated from ''Washington and Jefferson,"
when the two colleges were united into one. He went to the "Western Theologi-
cal Seminary," at Allegheny, Pa., and thence went to India as a missionary.
After ten years there, he returned to America and studied medicine in the
Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia, Pa., receiving the degree of M.D. (as
had also his brother, John, the same).

Going to India in 1870, he had completed at the time of his death more than
forty years of missionary service. Speaking the language like the natives,
knowing the mind and heart of the people thoroughly, loving India as his own
land, Dr. F. J. Newton was a missionary of the truest type. To bring sufferers
to his own house and care for them with his own hands by day and by night,
was such service as it was his delight to render.

Firozpur (Ferozepore), India, is a city in the Punjab, situated on the old high
bank of the Sutlej River, three and one-half miles from its present bed, and
forty-seven miles S.S.E. of Lahore. The capital of a populous district, the
climate is regarded as exceptionally healthful. The population in 1891 was
50,000. A missionary station of the Presbyterian Church, 1882, had in 1902
four missionaries men and women, one of them a physician ; two dispensaries
and two hospitals. In this city he was doing the work that he loved when he
was obliged to lay it down forever.

Dr. Newton returned to the United States much broken in health in the spring
of 1910, but recovered sufficiently to go back to India in the fall. He was coun-
selled to lay aside all active work, but he thought he felt better when busy.
During the winter he had violent attacks of fever and ague and collapsed, and
went to his brother in Jullundur only to lie down and die. He was taken to
Ferozepore and buried there the same day. An immense concourse of the city
people attended the funeral, both Hindus and Mohammedans. It is said "There
is not and never has been a man in -our Mission who has been so enshrined in
the hearts of the natives as he was."

His four children were:

517. i. William 4 , b. ; d. when about to enter Princeton College.

518. ii. Helex 4 , b. : living in 1912 ; m. Aylmer B. Gould, a missionary at

Jullundur, India. They had five children.

519. iii. Emma 4 , b. ; m. Judge Harcourt of the Civil Service, India; went to

England and d. there, leaving four children.

520. iv. Mary 4 , b. ; m. Major Halleran, a physician of the Indian Army. They

have four children.



503. 6. REV. EDWARD PAYSON NEWTON 3 (s. of John 2 ), born July 8,
1850, at Lahore, India; died May 14, 1912, aged 62, at Kasauli, India.

He married November 30, 1875, at Ludhiana, India, Sarah Ann Higgs.

Mr. Newton, a clergyman of the Presbyterian Church, U. S. A., was a mis-
sionary of the Board of Foreign Missions of that church, stationed at Khanna,
India. In addition to the regular work of the mission, he translated the Bible
into Punjabi (the Gurhukhi character), 1894-1899. His son,



734



NEWTON GENEALOGY



521. i. Henry Martin Newton 4 (Dr.), b.

Scotland Mission at Jalalpur, India,
children.



, is a missionary of the Church of
He m. in Scotland and has three



The following from "The Encyclopedia of Missions," 1904, 2d edition, p.
535, I set down here, not that the gentleman was one of the family of the fore-
going, to my knowledge, but that he is a Newton and a missionary.

522. EEV. C. C. NEWTON (not traced). Missionary of the Southern
Baptist Missionary Convention to the Tombas, Africa; born 1844; died July 20,
1894. His body was buried in the ocean about 240 miles from Lagos. He was
a laborious, deeply pious, and successful missionary. His wife preceded him to
her heavenly home only by a few months. Both died from exposure to the terri-
ble climate. These two have a special claim to remembrance by the church to
which they belonged, in that they helped greatly in the reestablishment of South-
ern Baptist Missions in Africa, after the interruption caused by the Civil War
in America.



INDEX TO REV. ROGER NEWTON OF MILFORD, CONN.

Reference is to Numbers.



Aaron, 217, 222.
Abigail, 3. 14, 99, 193.
Abner, 150, 154, 157, 202,

218.
Adeline, 3GG.
Adna, 11.
Adolphus K., 90.
Albert, 230.
Alice, 8.
Alice M., 83.
Alice G., 88.
Alfred H., 389.
Alonzo, 363.
Althea, 356.
Alvin, 201.
Amanda. 327, 355.
Amos, 441.
Anna E., 53.
Anna M., 20. 24, 91.
Annette, 297.
Anthony, 311.
Arthur D., 465.
Asa, 318.

Augustus. 438, 445, 449.
Avelin, 303.

Benjamin F., 293.
Benjamin T., 510.
Bessie, 72.
Betsey, 333.
Bettee, 319.
Burwell, 151, 187.

C. C, 522.
Calvin, 247, 252.
Camp, 81.
Carl, 37.

Caroline, 320, 401.
Caroline B., 271.
Caroline E., 428.
Caroline L., 515.
Caroline S., 504, 509.



Carlos, 462.
Cassius W., 213.
Catherine, 312.
Champion, 448.
Charles, 298.
Charles B., 462, 508.
Charles G., 30.
Charles M., 71.
Charles S., 31, 250.
Charles V., 464.
Charles N., 147.
Charlotte, 256.
Chauncey, 209.
Chloe, 439.
Chloe A., 438.
Christopher, 182.
Clara A., 408.
Clara S., 64.
Clarinda E., 70.
Clay, 38.

Comfort, 122, 124.
Content, 162.
Cordean, 450.
Curtis, 177.
Cynthia, 343.
Cynthia M., 345.
Cyrus, 175.

Daniel L., 172.
Daniel T., 281.
Darius, 357.
David G., 255.
Deborah, 16a.
Dollv, 245.
Dwight, 199.
Dwight L., 272.

Earl B., 416.
Eben, 335, 344.
Ebenezer, 261.
Eddie C, 33.
Edward, 141.



Edward C, 411.

Edward P., 503.

Edward T., 513.

Edith L.. 214, 400.

Edith, 77.

Egbert J., 86.

Eliza N., 87.

Elizabeth, 114. 127, 286, 321.

Elizabeth A., 223.

Elizabeth M., 397.

Elam, 265.

Elisha. 155.

Ellen, 204.

Ellen M., 390.

Emily, 459.

Emily A., 468.

Emily M., 500.

Emma, 342, 519.

Enoch, 19, 334.

Ensign, 437.

Erastus, 438, 443.

Esther, 129, 220.

Eunice. 10, 123, 329, 370,

381.
Eunice E., 85.
Eugene M., 282.
Eva, 401.
Evelyn, 66.
Ezekiel, 6, 103, 296.

Florence, 266.
Florence R., 42.
Fowler, 133.
Francis H., 249, 514.
Francis .T.. 502.
Francis M., 67, 52.
Francis R.. 65.
Francis W., 65.
Frank E., 419.
Franklin, 301.
Franklin B., 314.
Frederick J., 512.



REV. ROGER NEWTON



735



Gaylor, 159.
George E., 43.
George L., 313.
George V., 516.
Gertrude E., 417.
Geneva C, 432.
Gilbert E., 471.
Gladys M., 420.
Gurdon, 315.

Hannah, 122, 288, 436.
Harriet, 134, 227, 453.
Harry, 34.
Hattie, 279.
Harvey C, 181.
Henry, 212.
Henry L., 61, 62.
Henry M., 51, 482, 521.
Henly G., 160.
Helen, 483, 518.
Herbert, 471, 506.
Hester, 174.
Hiram, 200.
Hiram B., 275.
Hollister, 307.
Homer E., 418.
Horace, 158, 224.

Ida, 267.

Iretus, 451.

Isaac, 20, 167, 170, 191, 192,
198, 203, 205, 211, 285,
290, 295, 326, 327, 357,
383, 458.

Isaac E., 142.

Isaac L., 280.

Isabel, 438, 440.

Israel, 277.

Israel C., 156.

.Tames, 331.

Jay T., 413, 415.

Jane E., 44.

Jennette, 228.

Jerome, 148.

Jerusha, 14, 96.

Jesse, 178.

Joel, 216, 239.

John, 5, 15, 113. 115, 116,
121, 132, 152, 165, 168,
176, 241, 283, 284, 291,
305, 324, 6*2, 374, 442,
457, 470, 499.

John B., 35.

John C., 511.

John K., 412.

John S., 184.

John T., 263, 380, 410.

Jonah, 20, 84, 85.

Jonas, 455.

Jotham, 292.

Joseph, 15. 112, 215, 239,
240, 323.

Joseph S., 69.



Julia, 73, 322, 446.
Julia A., 49, 256.
Julia M., 144, 276.
Julia E., 269.
Julius A., 50.
Joanna G., 469.

Keziah, 324a.

Laura, 309, 382.
Laura A., 422.
Lawrence B., 68.
Lester M.. 136.
Levi L., 173.
Lewis B., 146.
Lucinda, 438, 440, 444.
Lucetta M., 139.
Lucius, 376, 423.
Lucius M., 138.
Lucius S., 137.
Lucv, 325a.
Lucy P., 206.
Luke V., 456.
Linnetta G., 248.
Louisa M., 278, 424.
Louise, 434.
Lydia, 5, 243.
Lyman, 244.
Lynn V., 470.

Mabel D., 62.

Malvina R., 29.

Margaret, 498.

Marget, 189.

Marcia E., 377.

Marcus, 375.

Maria, 208.

Martha, 9, 21, 119, 299, 336.

Mary, 8a, 14, 98, 120, 166,

207, 294, 300, 360, 364,

460, 507, 520.
Mary A., 39.
Mary E., 143, 392, 474.
Mary P., 54.
Mary J., 274.
Mary L., 316, 317, 407.
Matilda, 475.
Melissa, 260.
Merriman, 219.
Merta, 36.
Miles, 122, 131.
Mills, 308.
Minerva, 325.
Minot L.. 421.
Morris, 353.
Moses, 253.

Mr. Newton, 251.
Nancy, 231, 254, 257.
Naomi, 130.
Nathan, 125, 135, 295.
Nathan PL, 145.

Obed, 179.



Olive, 239, 242, 246.
Oliver, 262.
Orlando L., 447, 452.
Ozias, 195.

Parnell, 163.
Persis, 180.
Phebe, 149.
Philip, 287.
Priestly, 188.
Proctor, 270.
Prudence, 101.

Rachel, 117.

Ransom, 280.

Rebecca, 328.

Rebecca P., 384.

Rhoda, 258.

Rejoice, 171.

Riley, 238.

Roger, 1, 3, 14, 20, 93, 96,

153, 190.
Roger W., 161.
Robert, 463.
Rufus, 221.
Ruth E., 472.

S. P., 183.

Sally, 94.

Samuel, 2, 12, 14, 19, 28, 85,

164, 169.
Samuel P., 82.
Sarah, 7, 104. 126, 186, 264,

268, 291, 330, 438.
Sarah C, 148, 181.
Sarah J., 473.
Semantha, 273.
Seymour, 354.
Sibvl, 115.
Sybella, 14.

Silas, 302, 362, 438, 440.
Sophia A., 185.
Stella, 361.
Susan, 225, 306.
Susanna, 1, 4, 14, 18, 97,

128, 194, 196.
Sybella, 96.

Thaliah, 435.

Thomas, 12, 102, 438, 439.

Truman, 229.

Virgil L., 425.
Virginia A., 414.
Virginia C, 426.
Virginia E., 58.

Walter K., 41.

West C. 454.

Wilbur F., 204.

William, 210, 226, 310, 458a,

517.
William F., 40.
William Ma, 466.
Willie, 32.



Adams, 410.
Allaban, 453.
Allen, 317, 400.
Alley, 317.



Surnames other than Newton.



Arnold, 373.
Auger, 82.

Babbit, 328.



Bacon, 252.

Baldwin, 2, 14, 19. 21, 24,

28. 85, 91, 9-1, 102, 283,

380.



730



NEWTON GENEALOGY



Bancroft, 284, 285.
Barton, 3!)2.
Becker, 39.
Bell, 394.
Booth, 294, 398.
Bovie, G5.
Bradley, 320.
Briscoe, 103.
Bristol, 30.
Brockway, 370.
Bronson, 322, 325, 340.
Brown, 390, 407.
Bryan, 14, 99.
Buck, 309.
Buckingham, 127.
Bull, 101.
Bullock, 44.
Bump, 447.
Bur well, 150.
Bushnell, 441, 442.

Camp, 19.

Carey, 484.

Carver, 297.

Chase, 446.

Cheney, 285.

Church, 335.

Clark, 209, 321, 304, 451.

Clawson, 450.

Colbraith, 110.

Cochran, 28.

Coe, 331, 338.

Cole, 387, 416.

Collins, 61, 325a, 345, 413.

Cones, 297.

Coonrad, 408, 425.

Conover, 458.

Dale, 418.
Deck, 412.
Denio, 107, note.
Devendean, 276.
Dewey, 274.
Dickinson, 263, 264.
Douglas, 456.
Dunlap, 501.
DuBois, 449.
Dwight, 224.

Early, 397.
Elliott, 470.
Ellis, 421.

Farnham, 336.
Fenn, 2, 129.
Fitzwater, 419.
Fletcher, 375.
Foote, 337, 370.
Forman, 498, 504.
Ford, 107.
Frost, 319, 401.

Gargeth, 405.
Green, 315.
Grimes, 425.
Gould, 518.

Hall, 153.
Halleran, 520.
Hamilton, 466.
Hancock, 426, 432.



Harcourt, 519.
Hart, 410, 497.
Harter, 388.
Hayden, 353.
Henderson, 371.
Hewett, 252.
Higgs, 502.
Higgins, 224.
Hine, 130.
Hill, 207.

Hollister, 209, 295.
Hollopeter, 402.
Hopkins, 1, 1G7 note.
Hornbuckle, 457.
Howe, 487.
Ilulburt, 391.
Hull, 215.

Irwin, 459.

Jackson, 77.
Jamison, 294.
Janvier, 457.
Johnson, 53, 200.
Jones, 31.
Joslin, 28.

Kellogg, 367, 375.
Kendall, 40.
Kent, 359.
Keyes, 354.
Kilbourne, 529.
Kilbum, 411.
King, 40.
Kipp, 448.

Lambert, 193.
Lane, 159, 246.
Larnerd, 270.
Leavensworth, 310, 325.
Lee, 357.
Leet, 102.
Lewis, 223.
Lincoln, 171.
Lord, 107 note.

Mallory, 417.
Manning, 289.
McCarthy, 28.
McDonald, 407.
McKinstry, 424.
McMaster, 470, 489, 490.
McNiece, 496.
Merwin, 159.
Mettler, 275.
Miles, 116.
Millard, 222.
Minot, 326.
Morris, 123, 217.
Mors, 223, 233.
Morse, 217.
Moss, 280.
Morgan, 297.
Murphy, 54.

Northrup, 296.

Olin, 233.
Osborne, 284.
Osterhant, 246.
Oviatt, 329.



Patterson, 58.
Peck, 81.
rhelps, 268.
Pierce, 196, 197.
Piatt, 13.
Price, 73.
Prince, 100.

Reed, 502.
Reid, 277.
Roberts, 215, 234.
Root, 147, 203.

Sanborn, 116.

Sanford, 112.

Scholes, 475.

Scott, 131.

Seeley, 28.

Sharp, 206.

Sibert, 52.

Silver, 224.

Simons, 290.

Simonds, 357.

Skinner, 410.

Slavton, 297.

Smit, 207.

Smith, 104, 113, 222, 232,

375, 437.
Sprague, 185.
Sperry, 215.
Springall, 72.
Southmaid, 198.
Starr, 297.
Steinle, G9.
Stevenson, 467.
Street, 83.
Stone, 4. 108.
Strong, 488.
Swan, 391.
Sykes, 428.

Tarkington, 294.
Tibball, 110.
Thomas, 31.
Thompson, 332, 501.
Thurston, 221.
Treat, 108.
Turner, 200.
Truesdale, 469.

Van der Veer, 455.

Wadsworth, 324a.
Ward, 338.
Warfield, 271.
Warner, 142.
Webb, 408.
Webster, 272.
Westervelt, 476.
Weld, 384.
Weed, 302.
Wetherell, 174.
Wilcox, 208.
Wilson, 50.
Williams, 356.
W r hitmore, 366.
Whitworth, 64.
Winter, 452.
Wigfall, 499.
Wright, 39, 335.
Woodward, 280.



PART III. THOMAS OF FAIRFIELD

WITH ITS INDEX



1. "THOMAS NEWTON 1 of Fairfield, Conn.," came from England dur-
ing the summer or early autumn of 1639 and settled at Fairfield, Conn., in New
Haven County. He was a carpenter. The date of his birth has not been dis-
covered. He died prior to May 28, 1683.

The late Mr. Newton Lull of Chicago, 111., gathered (and had printed) from
the early archives of Connecticut many facts in regard to this Thomas Newton,
who was his ancestor, giving the authority for each statement. It is a valuable
compilation and is easily accessible. I shall quote from it here only enough for
"a setting of the stage," as it were, and to show the descent from him of those
I have gathered.

"The tract of land purchased by Roger Ludlow for the town of Fairfield
embraced within its boundaries the Uncoway and Sasqua rivers, the fine harbors
of Pequonnock and Black Rock, and a good harbor at Sasqua." — From History
of Fairfield.

John Green testified November 28, 1672, "that about the first settling of the
town of Fairfield, Thomas Staples, Thomas Newton, Edward Jessop, and
Edmund Strickland, having home-lots in y e rear of y e lots that M r Ludlow's lot
lay in/' The Town Book of Deeds would indicate that Thomas Newton was



Online LibraryErmina Newton LeonardNewton genealogy, genealogical, biographical, historical, being a record of the descendants of Richard Newton of Sudbury and Marlborough, Massachusetts 1638, with genealogies of families descended from the immigrants Rev. Roger Newton of Milford, Connecticut, Thomas Newton of Fairfield, Connecticut, → online text (page 112 of 131)