Copyright
Ettore Rella.

A history of burlesque (Volume 1939 14) online

. (page 27 of 29)
Online LibraryEttore RellaA history of burlesque (Volume 1939 14) → online text (page 27 of 29)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


was a "''sort of high-class burlesque," and then proceeded to

an interesting resujnes

"It may be remorabered that the action of this
piece is sup^oosed to transpire fifty years hence,
when a mighty food t/rust is developed, and nour-
ishment is taken, even by the rich in homeopath-
ic morsols. In spito of the emulous resomblarice
between the comedy aspects of Food and the pres-
ent tragedy developed by the J.iropean conflict,
the audience, only too glad probably to escape
from gloomy thoughts of war into the cheer of
vaudeville, surrendered itself to the most ap-
preciative enjoyment of the hiimor of the piece.
Handsome stage ap'o ointments, the sumptuoTis cos-
tume of the eating wife, the uniform of the
agent of the Food Tru.st, all are adhered to as
proscribed by the au,thor, v.ho wishes to indicate
that fifty years hence the world is deluged
with wealth and lu;:uj.-y while rviniiing short of
food."

Without inquiring too closely into the precisj.on of such
prophesy, it is clear that de Mille »s travesty was one of the
last throwbacks to an earlier form of trenchant comedy which
had almost vanished.

July 1915 fotmd Al Jolson at the Cort Theatre in a
twelve-scened spectacle called Danc^ing^Around, full of such
magnificence as "we have come to expect in Winter Garden ex-
travaganzas. "'"■ The nature of the splendor is indicated by
the titles of some of the scenes t The Startling Ballet of
Shadows, The Cubist Carnival, A Night on a Venetian Canal,
and The Marvelous Danse Eccentrique. The songs of the



•?s- Argonaut, July 26, 1915.



■, S-J.''.



Burlesque ^^^

production which Jolson made parlor-piano favorites included

"Sister Susie's Sewing Shirts for Soldiers," "V.Taen GrovvTi-up

Ladies Act Like Babies," "I'm Seeking for Siegfried," "I'm

Glad f.ty V'ife's in Europe," and "The Shuffling Shivaree." In

1915, it was Eva Tonguay's turn to achieve an ixndistlnguished

reputation in the outworn, leg-e:cposal tradition of the oarly

burlesque queens. She was not gifted as a comedienne, nor as

a singer.

"You will want to l-cnow if her costumes were
very daring. Well, they seemed to be largely
devoted to the deification of the leg. Her
legs are very pretty, not in the long-limbed,
classic style, but they are of childishly-
romided contour ... .As to the costuraosj one was
a mass of pearl embroideries; another a com-
bination of African and Oriental bizarreriej
another a gorgeous corrv\scation of electric
blue glitter. .. .The 'Salome' travesty hasn-t
much to it, bv;t I found myself enjoying the
good burlesque of Charles J. Ross, the impos-
ing setting, and the thunder and lightning mu-
sic. v^Tien Eva Tanguaj' appeared, however, her
sharp, scratchy voice and difficult enunciation
banished the atmosphere of burlesque. .. .Pre-
ceding Eva Tang-uay's two acts was a complete
vaudeville performance."*

In 1917, the burlesque tradition was split unrecog-
nizably in several directions. At the Orphoum Theatre in Ifey,
Jay Gould and Flo Lev>;i3 appeared in a "delightful travesty"
called Holding the Fort , which the newspapers did not conde-
scend to review. In October, Gus Edwards' version of the Man-
hattan musical. The Bandbox Revue, opened at the Orpheum.



'"■ Argonaut , October 28, 1916.



^.^



awp6oI*Krcf oxict »Viei nl






Burlesque 311

Again at the Orpheum, in Decoraber, the first definite bur-
lesque of the year was presented:

''Charles 'Vithers and corapany in the four-act
travesty melodrama. For Pity's Sake , divide the
headline honors. A traveling theatrical compa-
ny play good old melodrama in a remodeled barn
Imovm as Cy Spliven's Opera House, The crafty
villain, the tearful heroine, and the handsome
hero are all in evidence and they all deliver
the 'ancient goods' in such a perfectly serious
manner that the result is admirable. ''•5^-

Following the v/ar, there was a general prevalence
of vatideville in San Francisco until the appearance of Raymond
Hitchcock's production Kitc hy-K oo 1919 at the Columbia Thea-
tre in May 1920, A lesser edition of the Follies, it was
immediately followed by several attempts at ''the big show*' as
created by Ziegfeld, In July 1920, G, M, Anderson's "revue
of revues. The Frivo lities^ of 1920" opened at the Columbia.
In September of the same year Bits and Pieces , a "musical
revue in which song, dance, and satire travesty six of New
York's principal theatrical successes, ""''""'' opened at the
Orpheum. The six successes proved to bo Broalc fast in Bed ,
Mj Lady Friends , East is 'Vest , The Oreenwich Village Follies ,
Scandal , and Tea for Throe .

Nothing new was happening to burlesque. The trend
of this theatrical form was by nov/ clearly indicated. The
decade 1920 to 1930 was to witness the final discard of all



■"^ Argonaut , December 22, 1917.
-JK:-lbid. September 25, 1920.



312
Burlesque



genuinely satirical elements. The leg-shov; nucleus was fi-
nally all that was left of the brilliant development which
had stopped so short with the personal quarrel of the New
York ?5usic Hall partners.

IXV — VISIBLE SIGJiFOgIS
The old,run-dov/n theatres in most Araerican cities —
those former sancturas of le^itiiiiate drama, nov/ off the beaten
path with the shift of cor.iraerce to other streets— dark, musty
heaps of rococo polychrome; firetraps lined v.dth threadbare
red plush s here is the last stand of what is still called the
"American burlesque.'' Life in the city is enervating. The
long hours of work, against the noise of coujitless systems, of
inn-umerable sensations; and, more than anything else, the de-
humanized distance which has developed between people v;ho are
not acquainted; the fundamental sense of competitive enmity
between those people who are alone in those abnormal conges-
tions of modern life called cities; these are the facts which
have patterned the nervous system of so many contemporary
/unericans to receptivity for the completely decadent present-
day conception of bvu^lesque.

As often as not, the contemporary American who goes
to the burlesque show on Saturday night is the uprooted im-
migrant. He has severed his contact v/ith Europe. As yet,
he has found no easy adaptation to the crude, emergent Ameri-
can cultujpe. The strip-tease act provides escape into a



Burlesque ^^



simple internationalism; and the dialogue of the comedy acts
is so monosyllabic, the gestures so obviously vulgar, that
communication over language barriers is established. The
entertainment value of this sort of burlesque is entirely
untheatrical; to the audience, vdiich is chiefly male, the
runway display of the chorus and the consequent strip-tease
of the younger and prettier danseuses, is little more than
the inspection of a commodity in a commercial boudoir.

But the art of social satire, the art of clowning
the errors or hypocrisies of "the great ones" has the strength
of survival of the masses of people themselves. The Commedia
dell' Arte tradition is inherent in the very desire of most
people to better their lives by critically observing and com-
bating the Immediate obstacle. Most of the time this desire
has been an indlvldualistlo thing, and the theatre cannot
reflect Intelligibly the obscure, personal impulse; but the
gradual breakdown of the contemporary method of social being
has -unified the impulses of many people. Criticism of the
pressure, which the social milieu has brought upon most of the
people, has broken out in sharp. Intelligible proposals for
change; and the theatre has recommenced its old function of
vigorous reflection and positive suggestion.

In 1925 the Theatre Guild of New York City pro-
duced John Howard Lawson's "Jazz Symphony of American Life"
entitled Processional . This play v/as the first attempt by a
present day American playwright to rediscover the abandoned






':-'^*^



Burlesque 314

thoughtfulneas of satirical comedy. In his preface to the

printed version of the play the author makes this statement:

"l have endeavored in the present play, to
lay the foundations of some sort of native
teclmlque, to reflect to some extent tho color
and movoment of the American procossional as
it stroam.s about us. The rhythm is staccato,
burlesque carried out by a formalized arrange-
ment of jazz music.''

Unfortunately, a production of Lawson's play has
never been given in San Francisco. But the present decade has
not confined the best of its theatre to Manhattan. In August
1958, the original Now York cast of Pins and Noodles played
at the Geary Theatre in San Francisco. The production, a
brilliantly satirical musical revue, had already set sophis-
ticated Manhattanitos agog. It ^vas called Pins and Need les
because the cast was made up of members of the Garment V/ork-
or's Unions — nonprofessionals who had been startled with
the sell-out success of their show, planned and rehearsed
after hours as a means of stimulating relaxation from the
day's work.

Although styled a musical revue, there were no
attempts at "beautiful tableaux, ''' no costume build-ups to a
"knock-out effect," The only concerted statement of the pro-
duction was the song by the whole company, lined up very
simply across the stage immediately after the first curtains

"we're not George M. Cohans or Noel Cowards
Or Beatrice Llllies or Willie Howards-
We're plain simple common ordinary
Everyday men and women
Who work for a living- ^^
We're from the shops."*"'



-^- Chronicle , August 10, 1938.



Bvirlosque 315

Songs by Harold J. Rome were a feature of the show.
Their music was patterned after the popular, thirty-two
measure. Tin-pan Alley formula — hut Rome's lyrics lifted
the melodies to incisive statements, way above the crooning
morass of lovelorn sentimentality. These songs together
with a number of sharply conceived blackouts, made up the
show.

The dramatic critic of the San Francisco Chronicle

published the following statement August 10, 1938:

"Everyone will enjoy the show's exuberant jibes
at fascism, such as the 'Mussolini Handi-
cap, ' in which Al Eben presents a ferocious Dues
who violently proscribes 'multiplication for
the Nation' to Italian Womankind, The 'Poior
Little x^n,;ols of Peace' skit is a hilarious
comment on the Berlin-Romo axis, and 'We'd Rath-
er Be Ri.3ht, ' satirizes gayly,but v;ithout acid-
ity, the one hundred por cent brand of red-bait-f
ing Amoricanism."

More inmiodiatoly was the announcement, August 1939,
by the San Francisco Theatre Union of its forthcoming produc-
tion. Marc Blitzstein's The Cradle Will Rock . Perhaps the
first definitely successful attempt at an American opera, this
work has already aroused a storm of pro and con with its New
York production. Blitzstoin not only composed the music, but
also wrote the libretto, which accounts a good deal no doubt
for the fact that here for the first time in the American
theatre, American idioms of speech have boon genuinely welded
with American idioms of music in recitatives, A great many
elements of burlesque enter into this picture of Steoltown,
a typical industrial tov/n in the United States. Mr. Mister,



"■i^-^ -?;.'?" ?:.''-* ,r"\Cr.":'^T: •-.•.le^lxsq bbv oleum iJteifT

,worie
oX.Oi.^O'Y.f/C' 003lCn£.jTL fig 3 c : . ■.■".'Tt) sriT



? X.Ln.: ton nlod-E" y:

-?0A rfoicfv






Burlesque ^-^



owner of the steelmill, dominates the picture. The other
characters include, I&'S, Mister, a patroness of the artist
Dauber and the musician Yasha; Sister and Junior Mister, Mr.
Mister's bored, apathetic children; Reverend Salvation; Gus
and Sadie, Polish immigrants; the Moll, a streetwalker; Ella
Hammer, the wife of a steelworkor; Editor Daily, local news-
paperman; Larry Foreman, union organizer; a number of college
professors, a sun-thug, a private detective, a cop, and, very
centrally, Harry Druggist, a dispossessed businessman who has
become the town's derelict. Out of such representative ele-
ments, the work ascends to real pathos, to hilarious satire,
to profoundly moving climaxes.

The plumage inflicted on burlesque by the nine-
teenth-century extravaganza, and only more deeply dyed by
Ziegfeld and his followers, is at last outworn. The theatre
is again using a thought-process for its excitement. The
signposts in the development of satirical comedy from the
Italian troupes of the sixteenth century to the present day
are again visible above the debris. And as always, it is
not the art-form which has begun to think, but the people
themselves, whose life is the face in the flesh for the theat-
rical refloction.









rl.






317



BURLESQUE



BIBLIOGRAPHY"

Asbiory, Herbert. The Barbary Coast, An Informal History of
the San Francisco Underv/orld (New York: A, A. Knopf, 1933) .

Burnand, Sir Francis C. Records and Reminiscences (London;
Mathuon and Company, 1903) .

Cheney, Sheldon. T he Theatre, Three Th ousa nd Years of Drama ,
Acting and Stagecraft" (Tfer; York; Tudor Publishing Co.,
1936).

Cibber, Colley. An Apology , for the Life of Colley Gibber,
comedian, and late patentee of the Theatre-Royal, written
by himself, (London: Golden Cockerel Press, 1925).

Dunlap, I'/illlam. History of the American Th e atre (New York;
1832 ) .

Hart, Jerome. In Our Second Century (San Francisco; The
Pioneer Press, 1931).

Hutton, Laurence. Curiosities of the ABie rican Stage (New

York; Harper Brothers^ 1891) .

Isman, Felix. Weber and Fields (New York; Boni and Live-
right, 1924).

Lawson, John Howard. Processional (New York: Thomas Seltzer,
1925).

Leavitt, M.B. Fifty Years in Theatrical Management (New York;
Broadway Publishing Company, 1912) .

Leman, Walter. Memories of an Old Actor ( San Francisco; A.
Roman Company, 1886 ) .

Odell, George C. D. Annals of the New Yor k Stage (New York;
Columbia University Press, 1927-1939). Vols.I-XI.

Shakespeare Henry IV , Act II.

Sharp, William • The Life and Let ters of Joseph Severn (New
York; C, Scribher's Sons, 189*2)"."'"

Theatre Research Project, Stephen C. Massett , Joseph A. Rowe
(San Francisco: 1938). Vol. I.



*" ."C<5oeX ^YfTsqmoO .beta noirrfd-sM






eriT ^ooiicfifs^i'!? ra>2 ) •yixrJ ncS bnoo9g n'j'^ -i'rl . . .'jraoT.oI. tS-iBK
weH) s^ .A eAi It



■-avhi f:r.':! • I'oF ^.f-f-;"'' -c") zbls'i.'^ bciB- lecie^ .xll6'5 .xt'smtl



4«xasJio'' EGifi^riT :>£ioY wetl)' iBnoiesr






.8) ■ ioiD,\



r^ - -r. ^»



■ . ■ . ... ... .0 :3lio .

.1 '.loV ^ :. nfiS )



318



BIBLIOGRAPPIY (Cont.)

Theatre Research Project. Lola Montez (San Francisco; 1938)
Vol. V,

Theatre Research Project. Minstrelsy (San Francisco-. 1939)
Vol. XIII.

H EV/3PAPSRS A N D PgRIODICALS

Arponaut (San Francisco) Jan, 25, Feb. 9, Mar. 30, Apr. 13,
S O, Ma y 4, Nov. 2 9, 23, 30, Dec. 28, 1878; Aug. 16, Nov, 8,
22, Doc. 13, 1879; Au^. 28, 1880; Jan. 1, 1881; Jan. 14,
1832; Mar. 29, Apr, 5, July 19, Aug. 9, 1884; Jan. 23, 1886;
Nov. 26, Dec. 24, 1887; Jan. 1, Sept. 17, 24, 1888; Jan. 7,
Feb. ^^, Nov. 18, 1889; Oct. 5, 1891; Jan. 2, 1893; Dec. 24,
1894; Apr. 2, Oct, 28, Dec. 10, 16, 1895; Oct. 5, Oct. 28,
Nov. 9," Dec. 7, 1896; May 17, June 21, Nov. 22, 1897; June
20, Oct, 24, 1898; Oct. 30, Nov. 6, 1899; Apr. 7,1902;Nov.
30, 1903; Jan. 11, Aug. 22, 1904; Aug. 28, 1905; ^'^^^S- ?2,
1908; May 15, Aug. 21, 1909; Mar. 12, 1910; July 5, 12,1913;
May 9, Nov. 7, 1914; Feb. 20, Mar. 27, July 26, 1915; May
20, Oct. 28, 1916; Dec. 22, 1917; Sept. 25, 1920.

Brooklyn Eagle (Brooklyn, N. Y. ) Feb. 8, 1847. Article by

Walt ''.hitman.

Bulletin (San Francisco) Fob. 10, Sopt. 17, 1859; Feb. 6,8,
■ 9. $7," 28, April 5, 6, 12, 13, Doc. 4, 21, 1860; Jan. 10,
Mar. 6, Apr. 8, 16, 20, 24, 27, June 8, July 5, Aug. 24,
1861; Hov". 15, 16, 27, 1865; Aug. 6, 7, 16, Sopt. 8, 11,
Nov. 5, 22, 23, Doc. 1, 11, 24^ 1866; Jan. 7, 18, PQ^. 1,
Ma - . 1. Apr. 23, May 2, Nov. 25, Dec. 9, 1867; Nov. 17,
Doc. 4, 1868; Juno 21, 22, July 20, Doc. 8, 1869; Jan.ll,.18,
24, Fob. 15, May 17, Juno 17, 23, 1870; May 7, 11, Aug. 16,
17, 1872; Mar. 11, 19, 1873; Aug. 10, 11, 13, 25, Sopt. 1,
1874; Jan. 2, Nov. 8, 15, 16, 19, 24, Dec. 1, 27, 28, 1875;
Mar. 28, Apr. 3, 11, Sopt. 5, 6, 19, 20, 21, 1876; Jan. 16,
Apr. 13, 30, AUg. 13, 14, Doc. 26, 1877; Jan. 22, 30, Feb,
2b, Mar. 25, Apr. 4, 1878; Doc. 27, 1880; Sept, 18, 1884;
Jan. 11, Aug. 2; Nov. 22, 1887; Jxily 17, Sopt. 18, Oct. 6,
23, 1888; Jan. 28, Fob. 12, 1889; Sept. 22, 23, 1890; Feb.
17, Sept. 29, 1891; Nov. 28, Dec. 3, 5, 1892; Jan. 7, Nov, 25,
1893;Dec. 18, 27, 1894; May 11, Doc. 10, 1395; Fob, 1, 1896;
Mar, 13, Doc. 18, 1897; Jan. 7, Feb. 6, 1900; ;.ug, 4, 1917.

Gall (San Francisco) Feb, 20, 1873.

Chr-onicle (San Francisco) Oct, 29, 1899; Dec. 23, 1902; Mar.

— 22, Dec. 1, 1903; Fob, 9, Apr, 5, 18, May 30, Oct. 4, Doc,

20, 1904; Feb. 6, Dec, 3, 17, 24, 1905; Aug, 10, 1938.






95C'I .'ooa



,SI .•












,0X ^fiiil



.'•''Z~ (■■ '^A''









d .






■ • »5 ,q6(i_ ,.






-a) 11-^0



,os



319



BIBLIOGRAPHY (Concluded)

Daily Alt a California (San Francisco) Feb. 14, 15, 1863;

— 1^,"27, 1865; Aug. 13, 1865;Mar. 22, 1867;Dec. 3, 4, 1368;

Jan. 1, 4, 11, 25, Mar. 30, Dec. 26, 1880; May 3, 15, 1881.

D aily Dramatic Chronicle (San Francisco) Aug, 6, 7, 9, 1866;
— Mar, 15, 22, 23, Ipr. 16, 17, 20, 25, 29, May 13, 1867.

Daily Herald (San Francisco) July 1,7, Aug. 11, 1855; July 1856,

Evening Picayujie (San Francisco) Aug. 30, Nov, 14, 1850,

Figaro (San Francisco) Aug. 27, 1869; June 27,29,1870; Jan, 4,
TTISIar. 28, Apr. 1, 2, 6, 7, 1871; Feb. 11, 25, 1879.

Golden Era (San Francisco) Feb, 6, 1853.

News Letter (San Francisco) July 17, 24, Aug. 7, 1869; July
— 2, 23, 1870; Feb, 22, 1873; Feb, 22, 1879; Sept, 25, 1880;

Jan, 1, Apr, 30, 1881; Apr. 5, 26, June 7, 1884; Sept, 5,

1885; Jan. 15, Aug. 6, Dec, 10, 31, 1887; Jan, 14, Sept.

22, 1888; Jan. 19, Feb* 9, 1889; Jan. 12, 1907; Apr. 11,

May 23, July 4, 1908.

New York Times Sept. 3, 1866,

New York Tribune Sept. 17, 1866.

San Francisco Examiner Oct, 30, 1899.

Spirit of the Times (New York) May 15, Aug, 21, 1869.

Theatre (London) Feb. 1, 1882, Article on "The Decline of
Pantomime,"



< I-



i ' y ' - —

■ '- t ** ^ t ' "" ■ — • ■ ^^ _



«x tSi



■■,^C . . . -^^

• » .-_ ,IS ,3j:/A ,3': -.r" (ifaoY well) 5-



320



ACMOWLFDGMENTS



To Dr. James B. Sharp, former State Sixper-
visor of Research and Records Projects,
for technical planning on all the volumes
in this series; and to Miss M. P. Hagan,
Supervisor of the Division of Profession-
al and Service Projects for operations
procedure .

Among volunteer consultants at libraries
thanks are due to the following author-
ities who have lent their assistance to
this v/ork from the beginning: Mr. Robert
Rea, Librarian of the San Francisco Pub-
lic Library, and the following' members
of his staff J Miss Eleanor J, Struges
of the Reference Department and Miss
Jessica M. Fredrlcks of the Music De-
partment; and to Miss Helen Bruner of the
Sutro Branch of the State Library.

For rare and valtiable photographs: Miss
Jessie L. Hooke and the ¥,. H. de Young
Museum; Mr, George Poultney, retired ac-
tor and musical comedy star; Mr, Max
Dill, formerly of the famous Kolb and
Dill team; and Mr. Donn Huberty,

For Invaluable contributions to this
volume through historical advice and
critical reading of MSS . — Prof. Frank
Fenton of San Francisco State College,
and Dr, Margery Bailey of Stanford Uni-
versity.

Lawrence Estavan
Supervisor



321



SAN FRANCISCO THEATRE RESEARCH
BURLESQUE
INDEX



A bon Ha S3 an, o r Hunt after

Happiness , " 20 , 21, 22
Academy of Music (Magu.lre's)

38, 57, 64, 70, 77, 90, 91
Acosta, Mile. Caroline, 61
"Acting Plays" 227
''Actors in a Quandry, or

Noisy and Barbarous Amuse-
ments" (epilogue) 16
Adams, Maude, 276, 308
Adar.is, Nick, 282
Adelaide (ballet dancer) 298
Adelphl (London) 34
Adelphi Saloon, 30
Adelphi Theatre, 11, 15, 24,

26, 29, 186
Adoni s (burlesque) 217, 218
Adrienne Lccouvr eur , 145
African Ballet, a'2
After Dark, a Tale of L ondon

Life , 91, '¥3, 94, 95"""
After Dark Brought to Light

(burlesque) 95
Aladdin, Jr ., 238, 245, 290
Aladdin, or the V/onderful

Lamp , 244, 248
Aladdin or the Vifonderful

Scam p, 143, 154, T^3
Alcazar Theatre, 214
Alcazar Theatre Company, 264
Alhambra Theatre, 38, 91,

118, 120, 290
Alhambra I, 94, 95
Alhambra II, 294
Alias, Charles (London

costumier) 243, 259
All Baba; or Cassim and the

Forty Thieves , 238, 241,"

242, 243, 248, 2 50
All Baba Up-to-Date , 245
Allegory of the Union, An, 69
Allen, J., 49
Allen Sisters, 150
Althea Twins, 281, 283
Araazons, 229, 232, 236



Amazons' March, 85, 87, 228
Amber, Maude, 276,277,281,283
American Fireman , The , 24
American Theatre, 25, 28, 50
American Travesty Stars, 281,

282, 283
An Affair of Honor (pantomime)

290
Anderson, G. M., 311
Anderson, Professor, 37, 78
Androv;s, Miss Lillian, 194
Anheuser Push, The . 282, 285
Animatoscope , 292
A n Inc i de nt in a Dormitory

Tiki tT 307
''Annals of the New York

Stage," 117, 123, 140,

142, 153
Ant lope (burlesque) 234
Anton:/ and Cleopatra , 276
Apfel, Oscar, 306
"Arabian Nights" 21
Architecture of the Jesuits,

199
Arline, Miss S,, 195
A round the V/orld in Eighty

Days , 209, 221, 222, 223,

291
Arrah-na-Pop^ue , 63,64,65,69
Arrah-no-P o ke, or Arrah of

Cold _Pomm e de Terre , 64 ,

65, 68,' 69
A rtists and Models , 303
Ashcroft, Mr., 95
As You Like It . 144
At Gay Coney Island . 251
Athenaeum, 10, 186
Atherton, Alice, 173, 179,

181, 197, 206
Auber, Daniel Francois

Esprit, 16
Auden, W, K. , 8
Aug, Edna, 283
Aurelius, Marcus, 33
Azilla, 239, 240



KDhAJ^^S.;^ aHTAS?iT 0D!^invlA5I'=I !1A?^



OjS -^s; ?,*^ ' i^

(oralmo^rfj^q) lOfioH Ho ix^iiii nA



r'Ho'i- wen s



^ejX.-;3t^X. srio to owi/cfpsa irlcTii^



...i^ys ^



.65^:






lo






•;^^


COS .»e^..






i'H


•t'^.


les ,• ■ •




..5VI^,i,.






aioprLi


8 ..

5".




55 ,






.,;^i: ,,o^ ^LL ^i






no/iao- flA



z^-


s^e




.66 .,aA ,^..'


jf




■^'A


061


'"A


figs .,i8S ,,. .,.


<i-


.662 'tS6S ,rii2 t



INDEX (Cont.)



322



Babes in the Wood , 179,

T82, 183, 190, 248
Bab 11 and Bijou, 3
Backus, Charles, 39, 40, 82
Backus Minstrels, 63
Bageard, Jeanette, 258
Baker farally, 25
Baker, Lewis, 23, 50
Baldwin burlesque troupe, 206
Baldwin stock company, 194
Baldwin Theatre, 192, 195,
203, 208, 217, 225, 228,
240, 244, 2G6, 267
Balfe, Michael William, 6,15
Ballet (Contrabandista,

The ) 104
Ballet (Cubist Carnival,

The) 309
Ballet (Demons' Revels,

The) 161
Ballet (Festival of the

Mandarins) 290
Ballet (Heartsease) 291
Ballet (Kiralfy Troupe)

164, 199, 234
Ballet (L'Art Nouveau) 291
Ballet of All Nations, The,

161
Ballet of Drinks, 265
Ballet of Plies, 265
Ballet of Humpty Du.mpties,

265
Ballet of Precious Stones

and Metals, 265
Ballet of Shadows, 309
Ballet (Oriental) 291
Ballet (The Land of Frost

and Ice) 291
Bgjidbox Revue, The , 310
Bank of California, 131
"Banks of the Guadalquiver,

The," 9
Barbara Fidgety (burlesque)

275, 278
Barbara Frietchie , 275
Barbary Coast, 25, 30, 118,

212
Barbour, Charles T., 202
Barnes, George E., 70



Bar net t, Zoe, 307
Barnum, P. T., 16
Barras, Charles M. , 230
Barrett, Lawrence, 22, 110,

113, 172
Barry, W., 73, 74
Bates, Blanche, 308
Bates, Louise, 301
Bates, Mr., 93
Battle of Ao;incourt (tableau)

157
Battle of Bunker Hill

(tableau) 157, 164
B ayadere, The, or The Maid

of _ Cas hmer e, 4
Bayes, Nora, 283
Beauclerc Sisters, 159
Be auty and the Beast , 248
"Bea uty a nd t he Brigands , 143
3o"a uty S ho"^ , The, 282, "284
Beckett, Tiarry, 123, 125, 126
Be g;gar ' s Op era , The , 74, 75
Belasco and Mayor stock

company, 294
Bolasco, David, 276
Bolasco's Theatre, 299
Bell, Digby, 206, 207
Bella Union, 9, 19, 20, 30,

59, 48, 49, 63, 91, 95,

113, 120, 135, 136,137,212
Be lle's Stratagem, The , 50
Belles in the Kitch en," 159
Bellini, Vincenzo, 2, 112
"Ben Bolt" 258
Bergland, Mile., 210
Bernard, Barney, 82, 275,

275, 281
Bernhardt, Sarah, 198, 295
Bernini, Giovanni Lorenzo,

199
Bert, Mabel, 210
Bibb and Bob (Vaudeville

team) 224
Big Bertha, 211,212, 215
Big Bonanza, 131
Big Four French Folly

Dancers, 264
Bijou Company, 203, 206
Birch, Billy, 51, 58, 82






( , :ti-ioO ) xaai :



INDEX (Cont.)



323



Birth of Venus (trans-
forraation) 161

Bishop, Madame Ann.a, 9

Bishop, Mr., 160

Bishop, Mr. A. B., 193

Bits and Pi eces, 311

Bl ack CrbokT^e , 78, 79,80,

~81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86,88,



Online LibraryEttore RellaA history of burlesque (Volume 1939 14) → online text (page 27 of 29)