Copyright
Eugene Waldo Smith.

Trans-Atlantic passenger ships, past and present online

. (page 15 of 22)
Online LibraryEugene Waldo SmithTrans-Atlantic passenger ships, past and present → online text (page 15 of 22)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


nage: 2,605. Dimensions: 320' x 39'. Single-screw. Two
masts and one funnel. Made last voyage to Boston in July,
1892. Broken up by shipbreakers in 1902. Sister ship:
Siberia.

*Samaria (1921) Cunard Line.

Built by Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England.
Tonnage: 19,597. Dimensions: 601' x 73'. Twin-screw,
16^ knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister ships:
Laconia and Scythia.

Samland (1903) Red Star Line.

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N. J.
Tonnage: 9,748. Dimensions: 490' x 58'. Twin-screw, 13
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Belgic, ex-Sam-
land, ex-Mississippi. Scrapped in 1931.

* Denotes ship still in service under same name.

162



San Gennaro (1917) Pierce Bros. Company.

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow-
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 10,917. Dimensions: 518' x
64'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts and two funnels.
Renamed: Colombo.

San Giorgio (1886) Sicula Americana Line.

Built by Oswald & Co., Southampton, England. Tonnage:
2,817. Dimensions: 307' x 41'. Single-screw. Ex-Shakes-
peare. Note: Later was owned by Marittima Italiana.

San Giorgio (1907) Sicula Americana Line.

Built by Sir James Laing and Sons, Ltd., Sunderland,
England. Tonnage: 6,222. Dimensions: 406' x 51'. Twin-
screw, 13^ knots. Two masts and three funnels. Renamed:
Napoli.

San Giovanni (1907) Sicula Americana Line.

Built by Sir James Laing and Sons, Ltd., Sunderland,
England. Tonnage: 6,592. Dimensions: 430' x 52'. Twin-
screw, 13^ knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed:
Palermo.

San Gughelmo (1911) Sicula Americana Line.

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland.
Tonnage: 8,341. Dimensions: 470' x 56'. Twin-screw, 15}^
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Scrapped in 1919.
Made final voyage to New York in 1916.

San Guisto (1890) Cosulich Line.

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 8,874.
Dimensions: 504' x 57'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts
and three funnels. Ex-Gaa, ex-Moskva, ex-Don, ex-Furst
Bismark. Note: The San Guisto was used as an emigrant
carrier for a short time. She was broken up by shipbreakers
in 1924.

Sannio (1899) Navigazione Generale Italiana.

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow-
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,210. Dimensions: 470' x
56'. Twin-screw, 12 ]/% knots. Four masts and one funnel.
Ex-British Prince. Renamed: Napoli.

Sant' Anna (1910) Fabre Line.

Built by Forges & Chantiers de la Mediterranee, La Seyne,
France. Tonnage: 9,350. Dimensions: 470' x 56'. Twin-

* Denotes ship still in service under same name.

163



screw, 16 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Made final
voyage to New York in 1915. Note: Sunk during the first
World War.

Santiago (1890) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line).
British built. Tonnage: 5,206. Dimensions: 410' x 48'.
Single-screw. Ex-Leon XIII, ex-Jelunga. Renamed: (a)
Jelunga, (b) Jehangir.

Santo Domingo (1877) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish
Line).

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage:
2,805. Dimensions: 344' x 39'. Single-screw, 13^ knots.
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Dublin Castle. Note:
Wrecked off the Isle of Pines in July, 1898.

Saragossa (1874) Cunard Line.

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton-
nage: 2,166. Dimensions: 316' x 35'. Single-screw. Carried
few passengers, and employed on the Boston service.

Sardegna (1923) Italia Line.

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage:
11,452. Dimensions: 490' x 61'. Twin-screw, 14 knots.
Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Sierra Ventana. Note:
The Italians obtained her from the North German Lloyd in
1935.

Sardnian (1875) Allan Line.

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Ton-
nage: 4,376. Dimensions: 400' x 42'. Single-screw, 13 Y^
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Note: She caught fire
from an explosion on board ship while bound to Quebec from
Liverpool on May 10, 1878. Many lives were lost.

Sarmatian (1871) Allan Line.

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage:
3,920. Dimensions: 370' x 42'. Single-screw, 13 H knots.
Three masts and one funnel. Broken up at Rotterdam by
shipbreakers in 1908.

Sarnia (1882) Dominion Line.

Built by C. Connell Company, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage:
3,726. Dimensions: 360' x 40'. Single-screw, 13 knots.
Four masts and one funnel. Had accommodations for 80
first-class, 60 second-class and 1,200 steerage. Sister ship:
Oregon.

* Denotes ship still in service under same name.

164



Saturnia (1910) Anchor-Donaldson Line.

Built by C. Connell & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 8,611.
Dimensions: 456' x 55'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two masts
and one funnel. Note: She was quite similar in appearance
to the Letitia of 1912. The Saturnia was broken up by
shipbreakers in 1929.

*Saturnia (1927) Cosulich Line.

Built by Cantieri Riuniti Dell' Adriatico, Monfalcone, Italy.
Tonnage: 23,940. Dimensions: 601' x 79'. Twin-screw, 21
knots. Motorship. Two masts and one funnel. Note: She
was later transferred to the newly formed Italia Line. In
1935 was fitted with new Diesel engines which increased her
speed to 21 knots. During the second World War was taken
over by the United States Government and converted into
a hospital ship and name changed to Francis Y. Slanger.
Sister ship: Vulcania. These two ships are to be returned
to the Italians in 1947.

Savoia (1897) La Veloce Line.

Built by Navali Odero & Co., Foce, Genoa, Italy. Tonnage:
4,429. Dimensions: 462' x 45'. Twin-screw, 15 H knots.
Two masts and one funnel. Note: At one time her tonnage
was listed as 5,082 tons gross.

Saxonia (1857) Hamburg-American Line.

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage:
2,404. Dimensions: 317' x 40'. Single-screw. Note: One
of the very few failures built by Caird & Co. The builders
replaced her original engines with ones of the compound
type. In 1877 was sold to the Russian Volunteer Fleet and
renamed Nijni Novgorod.

Saxonia (1900) Cunard Line.

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow.
Tonnage: 14,197. Dimensions: 580' x 64'. Twin-screw, 16
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Note: Built for the
Liverpool-Boston service. She had accommodations for 160
first-class, 200 second-class and 1,600 third -class passengers.
Reported to have cost about $1,600,000 to build. Broken
up by shipbreakers in 1926. Sister ship: Ivernia. Their
huge single funnels measured 106 feet high from deck level
and gave them the distinction of having the tallest funnel
ever fitted to a steamship.

Scandia (1889) Hamburg-American Line.

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 4,243.
Dimensions: 370' x 44'. Single-screw, 13>6 knots. Two

* Denotes ship still in service under same name.

165



masts and one funnel. Had accommodations for 30 first-
class and 1,400 steerage passengers.

Scandinavian (1898) Allan Line.

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage:
12,116. Dimensions: 550' x 59'. Twin-screw, 14^ knots.
Two masts and one funnel. Ex- Romanic, ex-New Eng-
land. Scrapped in 1923.

Scharnhorst (1904) North German Lloyd.

Built by J. C. Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany.
Tonnage: 8,131. Dimensions: 453' x 55'. Twin-screw, 13^
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: La Bourdon-
nais. Sister ships: Roon and Gneisenau.

Schiller (1872) Eagle Line. (Hamburg, Germany).

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage:
3,408. Dimensions: 375' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots.
Two masts and two funnels. Wrecked on Sicily Islands on
the evening of May 7, 1875, while bound on voyage from
New York to Hamburg. There was a loss of 200 lives.

Schleswig (1903) North German Lloyd.

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 6,955.
Dimensions: 450' x 52'. Twin-screw, 13^ knots. Two
masts and one funnel. Renamed: General Duchesne.

Scotia (1862) Cunard Line.

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow, Scotland. Ton-
nage: 3,871. Dimensions: 379' x 47'. Paddle-wheels, 13
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note : The last Cunard
iron paddle steamer. She had the greatest power indicated
by paddle-wheel engines of transatlantic steamers. Her
4,000 indicated horse-power engines were capable of driving
the ship at 14 knots. Sailed on last voyage for Cunard Line
in September, 1875. She was afterwards sold to the Tele-
graph Construction and Maintenance Company for telegraph
cable purposes. They converted her into a twin-screw
steamer.

Scotia (1889) Anchor Line.

British built. Tonnage: 2,846. Dimensions: 310' x 40'.
Single-screw.

Scotian (1898) Allan Line.

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage:
10,417. Dimensions: 505' x 59'. Twin-screw, 14 knots.
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Statendam. Renamed:
Marglen.

* Denotes ship still in service under same name.

166



Scotland (1865) National Line.

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow-
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 3,803. Dimensions: 371' x
41'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Note: She was in collision with
ship named Kate Dyer off Fire Island, New York, on De-
cember 1, 1866, and driven ashore where she subsequently
broke up.

Scotstoun (1925) British Admiralty.

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas-
gow. Tonnage: 17,046. Dimensions: 553' x 70.' Twin-
screw, 15 ]/2 knots. Two masts and three funnels. Ex-
Caledonia (former Anchor liner). Torpedoed and sunk on
January 13, 1940 while serving as a British auxiliary cruiser.

Scythia (1875) Cunard Line.

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton-
nage: 4,556. Dimensions: 420' x 42'. Single-screw, 15
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1900.
Sister ship: Bothnia.

*Scythia (1920) Cunard Line.

Built by Vickers, Armstrong, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace,
England. Tonnage: 19,761. Dimensions: 600' x 73'. Twin-
screw, 16^2 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister ships:
Laconia and Samaria.

Semiramis (1895) Lloyd Austriaco.

Built by Wm. Denny & Brothers, Ltd., Dumbarton, Scot-
land. Tonnage: 4,165. Dimensions: 377' x 44'. Single-
screw, 16 knots. Two masts and one funnel.

Sepione (1877) Navigazione Generale Italiana.

Built by Wm. Denny & Brothers, Ltd., Dumbarton, Scot-
land. Tonnage: 3,149. Dimensions: 350' x 39'. Single-
screw. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-German. Note:
She was converted into a hulk in October, 1902.

Servia (1881) Cunard Line.

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton-
nage: 7,391. Dimensions: 515' x 52'. Single-screw, 17
knots. Three masts and two funnels. Note: Attained a
speed of 18 knots on her trials. She was the first Cunarder
to be built of steel. Her main dining saloon measured 74 feet
by 49 feet wide, with a height of 8^ feet, and could seat 350
passengers. She was broken up by shipbreakers in 1901.

* Denotes ship still in service under same name.

167



Seydlitz (1903) North German Lloyd.

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 7,942.
Dimensions: 442' x 55'. Twin-screw, 14^ knots. Two
masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1933. Sister ship:
Zieten.

Siberia (1867) Cunard Line.

Built by John Elder & Co., Go van, Glasgow. Tonnage:
2,498. Dimensions: 320' x 39'. Single-screw. Three masts
and one funnel. Note: She was regularly employed on the
Liverpool-Boston route. She made her last voyage to Boston
as a Cunarder in September, 1878. Later sold and renamed
Manila. Sister ship: Samaria.

Siberian (1884) Allan Line.

British built. Tonnage: 3,846. Dimensions: 372' x 45'.
Single-screw, 12 knots. Made final voyage to the United
States in 1906.

Sicilian (1899) Allan Line.

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Ltd., Belfast, Ireland.
Tonnage: 6,224. Dimensions: 430' x 54'. Single-screw, 12^
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Bruton.
Scrapped in 1925. Sister ship: Corinthian.

Sicilian Prince (1889) Prince Line.

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd.,
Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,784. Dimensions: 363' x
42'. Single-screw. Ex-Alvares Cabral, ex-Mocambique.
Renamed: Abbassick.

Sierra Nevada (1922) North German Lloyd.

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 8,753.
Dimensions: 439' x 56'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two masts
and two funnels. Renamed: *Madrid.

Sierra Ventana (1923) North German Lloyd.

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage:
11,392. Dimensions: 490' x 61'. Twin-screw, 14 knots.
Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Sardegna. Note:
She was used mostly on the Bremen-South American route,
as also were her sister ships the Sierra Morena and Sierra
Cordoba.

Silesia (1869) Hamburg-American Line.

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage:
3,156. Dimensions: 340' x 40'. Single-screw.

* Denotes ship still in service under same name.

168



*Sinaia (1924) Fabre Line.

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage:
8,567. Dimensions: 439' x 56'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two
masts and two funnels. Sister ship: De La Salle.

Sirio (1883) Navigazione Generale Italiana.

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow, Scotland. Ton-
nage: 4,141. Dimensions: 380' x 42'. Single-screw, 16 knots.
Note: This Italian emigrant carrier was wrecked off Cape
Palos on August 4, 1906, with the loss of 350 lives.

Siiius (1838) British and American Steam Navigation Co.
Built at Leith, England. Tonnage: 703. Dimensions: 178'
x 25'. Paddle-wheels, 8 knots. Two masts and one funnel.
She had a side lever type of engine. The first British steam-
ship to cross the Atlantic. She was wrecked in 1847.

Slavonia (1903) Cunard Line.

Built by Sir James Laing & Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, England.
Tonnage: 10,606. Dimensions: 510' x 59'. Twin-screw, 15^
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex- Yamuna. Note:
She was wrecked in June, 1909, off Flores Island.

Smolensk (1898) Russian Volunteer Fleet.

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton-
nage: 7,270. Dimensions: 487' x 58'. Twin-screw, 20 knots.
Three masts and three funnels. Ex-Rion (Russian Navy),
ex-Smolensk.

*Sobieski (1939) Gydnia-American Line.

Built at Nakskov, Denmark. Tonnage: 11,030. Dimensions:
493' x 67'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts and one
funnel. Motorship. Sister ship: Chrobry.

Sofia (1905) Cosulich Line.

Built by Lloyd Austriaco, Trieste. Tonnage: 5,527. Di-
mensions: 360' x 48'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Ex-Sofia
Hohenberg. Made final voyage to New York in 1921.

Sofia Hohenberg (1905) Unione Austriaca (Austro-American
Line).

Built by Lloyd Austriaco, Trieste. Tonnage: 5,491. Di-
mensions: 360' x 48'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Renamed:
Sofia.

South wark (1893) American Line.

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland.
Tonnage: 8,607. Dimensions: 480' x 57'. Twin-screw, 16
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Note: She was named
after a Philadelphia suburb. Sister ship: Kensington.

* Denotes ship still in service under same name.

169



Spaarndam (1881) Holland-American Line.

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage:
4,539. Dimensions: 427' x 41'. Single-screw, 14 knots.
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Arabic. Made final voyage
to New York in 1900.

Spaarndam (1922) Holland- American Line.

Built by New Waterway Shipbuilding Co., Schiedam,
Netherlands. Tonnage: 8,857. Dimensions: 450' x 58'.
Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sunk
by a magnetic mine off England on November 27, 1939, while
bound for Antwerp and Rotterdam from New Orleans.
Sister ships: Edam, Leerdam and Maasdam.

Spain (1871) National Line.

Built by Laird Bros., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. Tonnage:
4,512. Dimensions: 440' x 43'. Single-screw, 14 knots.
Four masts and two funnels. Note: Tonnage increased later
to 5,089 tons gross. Broken up by French shipbreakers in
1896. Note: Her running mate was the Egypt.

Spree (1890) North German Lloyd.

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 6,963.
Dimensions: 463' x 51'. Single-screw, 19 knots. Three
masts and two funnels. In 1898 this ship was rebuilt and her
name changed to Kaiserin Maria Theresa. The alterations
extended her length to 528 feet and tonnage increased to
7,840 tons gross. She was speeded up to 20 knots and her
outward appearance greatly changed for she reappeared with
three funnels and two masts. She was given new engines
and converted to twin-screw propulsion. Renamed: (a)
Kaiserin Maria Theresa, (b) Ural, (c) Russ. Sister ship:
Havel.

S turn pal ia (1909) La Veloce Line.

Built by Cantiere Navali Riuniti, Spezia, Italy. Tonnage:
9,000. Dimensions: 476' x 55'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two
masts and two funnels. Ex-Oceania. Torpedoed and sunk
in 1916.

State of Alabama (1873) State Line.

Built by Wingate & Co., Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage:
2,313. Dimensions: 321' x 36'. Single-screw. Ex-Ala-
bama. Made final voyage to New York in 1890.

State of California (1891) State Line.

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 4,275. Dimensions:
385' x 46'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one

* Denotes ship still in seryice under same name.

170



funnel. Renamed: (a) Calif ornian, (b) Coamo. Note:
The State of California was taken over and operated by
the Allan Line until she was sold.

State of Florida (1881) State Line.

British built. Tonnage: 4,000. Dimensions: 400' x 42'.
Single-screw, 13 ^ knots. Three masts and one funnel.
Sunk by collision at sea on April 18, 1884, with a loss of 108
lives.

State of Georgia (1873) State Line.

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow.
Tonnage: 2,490. Dimensions: 330' x 36'. Single-screw, 13
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Ex-Georgia. Note:
She disappeared on December 23, 1896, with 32 on board and
was never heard of again.

State of Indiana (1874) State Line.

Built by Wingate Co., Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,528.
Dimensions: 329' x 36'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Three
masts and one funnel. Note: She was sold to the Turkish
Navy in 1893 and renamed Isnir.

State of Louisiana (1872) State Line.

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 1,869. Dimensions:
300' x 35'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Three masts and one
funnel. Note: She was wrecked at Lough Larne, Ireland, on
December 24, 1878, while on voyage from Glasgow to New
York. All on board were saved.

State of Nebraska (1880) State Line.

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow.
Tonnage: 3,986. Dimensions: 385' x 43'. Single-screw, 13 1 A
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Note: In 1891 she was
sold to the Allan Line, who later resold her in 1902.

State of Nevada (1874) State Line.

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow.
Tonnage: 2,488. Dimensions: 332' x 36'. Single-screw, 13
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Note: She was taken
over by the Allan Line in 1891. Renamed: Mecca. Sister
ship: State of Pennsylvania.

State of Pennsylvania (1873) State Line.

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow,
Scotland. Tonnage: 2,488. Dimensions: 332' x 36'. Single-
screw, 13 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Ex-Pennsyl-

* Denotes ship still in service under same name.

171



vania. Note: She was sold to the Allan Line and then resold
to Turkish owners in 1895, who renamed her Medina. Sister
ship: State of Nevada.

State of Virginia (1873) State Line.

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow,
Scotland. Tonnage: 2,472. Dimensions: 331' x 34'. Single-
screw, 13 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Note: She
was wrecked on Sable Island on July 15, 1879, with the loss
of 9 lives.

Statendam (1898) Holland-American Line.

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage:
10,491. Dimensions: 515' x 59'. Twin-screw, 15 knots.
Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Scotian, (b)
Mar glen.

Statendam (1917) Holland-American Line.

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage:
32,234. Dimensions: 740' x 86'. Triple-screw. Two masts
and three funnels. Renamed: Justiciax. Note: This large
liner was never used as a passenger ship for she was taken
over by the British government during the first World War
and converted into a troopship. She was torpedoed and sunk
on July 19, 1918, with the loss of ten lives.

Statendam (1929) Holland -American Line.

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage:
28,291. Dimensions: 670' x 81'. Twin-screw, 19 knots.
Two masts and three funnels. Note: The terrible bombing
of Rotterdam by German planes occurred on May 14, 1940.
The Statendam was among the several vessels that were in
the port at the time. Some of the bitterest fighting took
place in the vicinity of the piers where the ships were tied.
The Statendam was repeatedly hit by the crossfire from
both sides of the river and caught fire. She continued to
blaze for five days and became a total loss.

*Stavangerfjord (1918) Norwegian-American Line.

Built by Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England.
Tonnage: 13,156. Dimensions: 532' x 64'. Twin-screw, 153^
knots. Two masts and two funnels.

Steuben (1922) North German Lloyd.

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 14,690.
Dimensions: 526' x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts
and two funnels. Ex-General Von Steuben, ex-Muen-
chen.



* Denotes ship still in service under same name.

172



Stockholm (1900) Swedish- American Line.

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage:
12,835. Dimensions: 547' x 62'. Twin-screw, 15 knots.
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Potsdam. Note: The
Swedish-American Line sold her to new owners, who had the
ship converted into a whaling factory vessel and renamed
her Solglimt.

Stockholm (1941) Swedish-American Line.

Built at Monfalcone, Italy. Tonnage: 28,000. Dimensions:
642' x 83'. Triple-screw, 19 knots. Two masts and two
funnels. Motorship. Note: Never used as a passenger ship
for she was taken over by the Italian government before com-
pletion. The Italians renamed her Sabaudia and converted
her into a troopship. This very beautiful ship capsized at
Trieste in May, 1945.

*Stockholm (1947) Swedish- American Line.

Built at Gothenburg, Sweden. Tonnage: 11,000. Single
mast and one funnel. Motorship. Note: Launched on
September 9, 1946, and is the largest ship built in Sweden
to date. She will have excellent accommodations for 360
passengers. Should be ready for transatlantic service by
December, 1947.

Strassburg (1872) North German Lloyd.

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage:
3,025. Dimensions: 351' x 39'. Single-screw, 14 knots.
Made final voyage to New York in 1893.

Stuttgart (1889) North German Lloyd.

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd.,
Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,048. Dimensions: 415' x 48'. Single-
screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Made final
voyage to New York in 1909. Sister ships: Darmstadt,
Gera, Karlesruhe and Oldenburg.

Stuttgart (1923) North German Lloyd.

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 13,387.
Dimensions: 526' x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts
and two funnels. Sister ship: Muenchen.

Sud America (1868) La Veloce Line.

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage:
3,185. Dimensions: 339' x 40'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Ex-
Mentana, ex-Provincia di San Paolo, ex-Atlantica,
ex-Westphalia.

* Denotes ship still in service under same name.

173



Suevia (1874) Hamburg- American Line.

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage:
3,624. Dimensions: 360' x 41'. Single-screw, 14 knots.
Two masts and one funnel. Made final voyage to New York
in 1894.

Suffren (1901) French Line.

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage:
10,622. Dimensions: 525' x 62'. Twin-screw, 16 knots.
Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Leopoldina, ex-Bluecher.
Scrapped in 1929.

Susquehanna (1899) United States Lines.

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage:
9,959. Dimensions: 501' x 58'. Twin-screw, 13^ knots.
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Rhein.

Swakopmund (1903) Hamburg- American Line.

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage:
5,631. Dimensions: 403' x 49'. Single-screw, 12^ knots.
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Professor Woermann,
ex-Florida. Renamed: Arafura. Note: She was formerly
employed on the South African trade of the Woermann Line.

Switzerland (1874) Red Star Line.

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow-
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 2,957. Dimensions: 345' x
39'. Single-screw, 13}/ knots. Two masts and one funnel.
Made final voyage to New York in 1904.

Sylvania (1895) Cunard Line.

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow.
Tonnage: 5,598. Dimensions: 445' x 49'. Twin-screw, 14
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Broken up by ship-


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 17 18 19 20 21 22

Online LibraryEugene Waldo SmithTrans-Atlantic passenger ships, past and present → online text (page 15 of 22)