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6514
comp.-



. t




Southern Branch
of the

University of California

Los Angeles



Form L 1

Gol4
.-.84



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY

Los Angeles
This book is DUE on the last date stamped below.



M 5 1983



315



YALE

Examination Papers.



COLLKCTED AND ARRANGED



F. B. STEVENS.




BOSTON:

PUBLISHED BY GIXN, HEATH, & CO.
1884.



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1882, by

F. B. STEVENS,
in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



J. S. CusuiNo & Co., Printers, Boston.



s2^



CONTENTS.



Algebra 5, 133

Arithmetic 1, 119

Caesar 24, 147

Cicero 32

English Grammar 174

Geography 170

Geometry 11, 125

Greek at Sight 110

Greek Gram^iar and Composition .... 69

Greek History 113

Greek Prose 76

History of United States 166

Homer 97

Latin at Sight 63

Latin Grammar 18

Latin Composition 65, IGl

Roman History 67

Trigonometry 142

Vergil and Ovid 46



NOTE.

This book is published for the convenience of teachers and
pupils in preparatory schools, and may profitably be used as a
text-book for review. It contains a complete set of papers used
at the regular entrance examinations since 1876, when the present
system of written examinations was fully established, together
■with eight consecutive entrance papers of the Sheffield Scientific
School.

The papers used hereafter will be added from year to year.



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMEITT.



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION.

(Academical Depaiitment. )
1883-84.

Higher Arithipetic : Including tlie metric system of weiglits and meas-
ures.

Algebra: So much as is iuclnded in Loomis's Treatise, up to the chapter
on Logarithms.

Geometry : Euclid, book first, and the first 33 exercises thereon in Tod-
hunter's edition; or, the first four books in other geometries, with the
above exercises.



Latin Grammar.

Caesar : Four books of the Gallic war, or two books of the Civil war.

Cicero : Seven Orations.

Vergil : Bucolics, and first six book;; of the ^neid, including Prosody.

Ovid : Metamorphoses, 2500 lines.

The translation, at sight, of passages from Cicero or Csesar.

The translation into Latin of a connected passage of English prose. [As
special importance will be given to this part of the examination, it is
suggested to teachers that they connect exercises in making Latin, both
oral and written, with all the Latin studies of the preparatory course.]

Roman History : Creighton's Primer of Roman History is suggested as
indicating the amount required.



Greek Grammar.

The translation of English into Greek. '

Xenophon : Anabasis, four books.

Homer : Hiad, three books, with Prosody.

The translation, at sight, of a passage from some work of Xenophon.

Greek History.

The rules for pronunciation givcfu in ILadlcy's Grammar are recommended

as a guide. For Greek History, Dr. Wm. Smith's or Fyffe's text-book;

and for Greek Composition, Jones's Exercises or White's Lessons are



ARITHMETIC. 3

2. Divide -i- 1 by/,-.

3. Find, to three decimal places, the value of — ->

V3

4. Find the 4tli term of a proportion of which the first,
second, and third terms are, respectively, 3.81, 0.056, 1.67.

5. Reduce 3 R. 13 sq. rds. 8 sq. ft. to decimal of an acre.

6. (a) In a board 4'" long and Ci"" wide, how many
square decimeters?

(6) Divide 2700'" by 90'='.



1881.

33
1. Divide | of j\ of f by ^r^, and add the quotient to

3 _ 7 ^TTT

4 iT'



2. Find V -gV to three decimal places.

3. Find, to three decimal places, the number which has
to 0.649 the same ratio which 58 has to 634.

4. A man bought a piece of ground containing 0.316 A.
at 53cts. a square foot ; what did he pay for the piece?

5. A grocer buys sugar at 18cts. a kilo, and sells it at
let. per 50° ; how much per cent does he gain ?

1882.

34

1. Find the value of —S- of f of an acre ac $1.36 per

square foot. tt

2. Divide 3.63 by 2.353, and find the square root of the
quotient to three decimal places.

3. Find a fourth proportional to 3.75, 0.23, and 0.16.

4. (a) Multiply the sum of 7""^", 823'", and 125""", by 5.12.
(&) What is the weight in kilograms of 12'"' of water?



AKITHMETIC.
1883.



1. Divide 82.1 by 41, 8.21 by 0.41, aud 0.821 by 410.
Carry the result iu each case to four decimal places.

2. Fiud the value to three decimal places of



V(0.146)-+(0.0G3)2.

3. Divide g ^ 12 X - by — - •

I of 5-1 4 "^141

4. Some sugar is adulterated as follows : -^^ is worth 8
cents per pound, ^ is worth 10 cents per pound, -^ is worth
12 cents per pound, and the remainder, 33 pounds, is sand.
What is the mixture worth per pound?

V 5. Bank stock which sells at 170 pays an annual dividend
of 12J^ per cent. AVhat rate of interest does a buj'er receive?

• 6. Find the depth iu meters of a cubical cistern which has
a capacity of 30,000'. Give the result to three decimal
places.



ALGEBRA.

1879.

1. Divide (3 a — Z>) by a-{-b-\ j, and simplify.

a-\-b



2. (a) Find the sum and difference of Vl«a'6^ and

(b) Multiply 2V3-V"^ by 4V3-2V"^.

3. Solve the equation,

a; — 1 23 — x _ ^ _ 4 +x
7 5""" ' 4

4. Solve the equation,

a; — 3 a* — 4 _ 7
x-2 ~ x-l ~ 20'

5. The sum of an arithmetical progression, whose first
term is 2 and last term 42, is 198 ; find the common differ-
ence and the number of terms.

6. Expand to four terms, by the binomial theorem, (cr— 6)K



1880.

1. (a) Divide — ■ 1 by — ■ , and reduce

a — I a 4-1 a —1 a+l

the quotient to its simplest form.

(b) Find the greatest common divisor of
x^-Qx'-Sx-d and 4ar^-12a;-8.

2. (a) Find the sum of GV4a^, 2V2a, and VSa'.

(&) Reduce to its simplest form the product,
(a;-l-V^)(a;-l-f-V^)(x-2-HV^)(x-2-V^).



8 ALGEBRA.

3. Solve the equations,

(b) .r-l4-_A_=0;
^ ^ x-4.

, . X x^ +1

X' — 1 X

4. Four numbers are in arithmetical progression : the
product of the first and third is 27, and the product of the
second and fourth is 72 ; what are the numbers ?

5. By the binomial theorem, expand to four terms,

(a) (l-&)-^ (6) ix^-f)K

1881.

1. Free from negative exponents {icr'^b^x'^)'*.

2. Reduce to lowest terms — — .

cc2+10a- + 21

3. Factor n^-2n- + n, .r''-l, x''-n^y\ a-^ + Z.

2

4. Make denominator rational of -■

V5-V2

5. Multiply ViK-2+V^^ by Va; + 2-V-3.

n a ^ 5 3a;+l 1

6. Solve ^ = -.

x X' 4

r — .T?/ = 153.



7. Solve {^•'-•^•^ = 1'
(a; +?/ =1.



8. By the binomial theorem, expand to four terms



2 J Vw—a?

9. Sum the infinite series l-\ 1 h •••

2 4



1882.
1 . Factor a'' — 4 a- 6 + 4 aZ>-, 4 x* y* — Ox^ y".



2. Solve ar = 21 + ^x- — 9.



ALGEBRA. »

3. Find the continued product of

a - (2 + Va)^ x-{2-VS)^
a;-(3-V-l), a;-(3 + V-l).

4. Divide 50 into two parts, such that the greater, in-
creased by 3, shall be to the less, diminished by 3, as 3 to 2.

5. Given J ^ + ^ ~" ^ t; fjuti x and y.

i 2 xy = 24 )

G. Sum the infinite series 1, ^, ^, •••

5 ^. J 9

7. Resolve into i^artial fractions.

a; - 8a;+l5

8. Expand by the binomial theorem, to 3 terms, - ->/i(f— a'^.

9 . Revert the series y = x-\-or + x^-{- a;*.

1883.

1. Reduce the following expression to its simplest form :

1 +,, L_^+ 1



x{x — a){x — b) a{a — x){a — b) b{b—x){b — a)

2. Resolve y^ — b^ into three factors.

3. Change a:?/~-— 2a;^?/~^2~j + 2"^ to an expression which
will contain no negative exponents.

, r~ a + b + c + d a — b A- c— d , . ,

4. If ^ ^ — ^!-— = — , prove by the prmci-

a-\-b — c — d a — b — c-\-d

a c
ciples of proportion that r = -•



5. Find the value of 2aVl + ^^ when

6. Given (7 - 4 V3) x^ + (2 - V3) a; = 2, to find x.



10 ALGEBRA.

7. The sum of two numbers is IG, aud the sum of their
reciprocals is |-. What are the numbers ?

8. Compute the value of the continued fraction,

1

2+-'



1+-1



^4



9. Convert — =:=rzr into an infinite series by the Method

Vl + a-2
of Indeterminate Coefficients, or by the Binomial Theorem.

10. Insert three geometrical means between ^ and 128.



GEuM::Tr.Y.



1878.



13



(Euclid.)

1. If a strfiight line falling on two other straight lines,
make the exterior angle equal to the interior and opposite
angle on the same side of the line, or make the interior angles
on the same side together equal to two right angles, the two
straight lines shall be parallel to one another.

2. To describe a parallelogram that shall be equal to a
given triangle, and have one of its angles ec^ual to a given
rectilineal angle.

3. If a straight line he divided into any two parts, the
squares on the whole line, and on one of the parts, are equal
to twice the rectangle contained by the whole and that part,
together with the scjuare on the other part.

(Legendrk.)

1. If two sides of a (quadrilateral are equal and parallel,
the figure is a parallelogram.

2. («) To erect a perpendicular to a given straight line,
at a given point of that line.

(b) At a point on a given straight line, to construct an
angle equal to a given angle.

3. In any triangle, the square of a side opposite an acute
angle is equal to the sum of the squares of the base and the
other side, diminished b^- twice the rectangle of the base and
the distance from the vertex of the acute angle to the foot
of the perpendicular drawn from the vertex of the opposite
angle to the base, or to the base produced.

(LOOMIS.)

1. If two triangles have two sides of the one equal to
two sides of the other, eacli to each, but the included angles
unequal, the; base oi (lint which h:is the greater angle will 1)0
greater than tlie base of the other.



14 GEOMETUY.

2. Through any three points not in the same straight line,
one circumference msxy be made to pass, and but one.

3. The rectangle contained by the sum and difference of
two lines is equivalent to the difference of the squares of
those lines.

1879.

[Candidates for examination in Euclid may take questions 2, 3, and 5.
Candidates for examination in Loomis may take questions 1, 4, and 5.
Candidates for examination in Legendre may take questions 2{b), 3, and 6.
Candidates for examination in otlier Geometries may demonstrate as many
of the theorems as they can, and do the problem (3) by the methods to which
they are accustomed.]

1. The opposite sides and angles of a parallelogram are
equal to each other.

2. If a straight line, meeting two other straight lines,

(a) Make an exterior angle equal to an interior and oppo-
site (or remote) angle on the same side ; or

(b) Make the interior angles on the same side together
equal to two right angles, the two lines are parallel.

3. To draw a perpendicular to a given straight line, from
a given point without that line.

4. Parallelograms which have equal bases and equal alti-
tudes are equivalent.

5. If a straight line be divided into any two parts, the
square of the whole line is equal (or equivalent) to the
squares of the two parts, together with twice the rectangle
contained by the parts.

6. The rectangle contained by the sum and difference of
two lines is equivalent to the difference of the squares of
those lines.

1880.

[Candidates wlio offer Euclid may take 1 and 3. Candidates who offer
Loomis's Geometry or Davies's Legendre may take 1 and 4. Candidates
who offer Chauvenet's Geometry may take 2 and 5. Other candidates
may prove theorem 1 or 2, and do one of the problems (3, 4, and 5) by the
methods to which they are accustomed.]



GEOMETRY.



15



1. If a straight line fall on two parallel straight lines, it
makes the alternate angles equal to one another, and the
exterior angle equal to the interior and opposite (or remote)
angle on the same side ; and also the two interior angles on
the same side together equal to two right angles.

2. If two i)arallel lines are cut by a third straight line, the
alternate interior angles are equal.

Cor. I. The alternate-exterior angles are also equal to
each other.

Cor. II. Any one of the eight angles is equal to its corre-
sponding angle.

Cor. III. The sum of the two interior angles on the same
side of the secant line is equal to two right angles.

3. To divide a straight Line into two parts, so that the
rectangle contained by the whole and one of the parts may
be equal to the square on the other part.

4. To divide a given line into two parts, sucli that the
greater part ma}' be a mean proportional between the whole
line and the other part.

5. (a) At a given point in a given circumference, to draw
a tangent to the circumference.

(b) Through a given point without a given circle, to
draw a tangent to the circle.

1881.

[Candidates who offer Euclid may take 1, 2, and 3. Candidates who offer
any other Geometry may take any four propositions of 3 to 7 inchisive.
The Candidate icill please state in ivritinf/ the Geometry ichicJi he offers.']

1. To describe a parallelogram that shall be equal to a
given triangle, and have one of its angles equal to a given
rectilineal angle.

2. If a straight line be bisected, and produced to any
point, the square on the whole line thus produced and the
square on the part of it produced are together double of the



16 GEOMETRY.

square on half the line bisected and of the square on the line
made up of the half and the part produced.

3. A given angle BAC is bisected ; if CA is produced to
O, and the angle BAG is bisected, prove that the two
bisecting lines are at right angles to each other.

4. If two opposite sides of a quadrilateral are equal and
parallel, the other two sides are equal and parallel, and the
figure is a parallelogram.

5. The rectangle contained by the sum and difference of two
lines is equivalent to the difference of the squares of those lines.

6. To construct a square equivalent to a given triangle.

7. The area of a parallelogram is equal to the product of
its base and altitude.

1882.

[Candidates may take either 1, 2, 3, aud 4, or 1, 2, 3, and 5.]

1 . To draw a straight line at right angles to a given straight
line from a given point in the same.'

2. In every triangle, the square on the side subtending an
acute angle is less than the squares on the sides containing
that angle by twice the rectangle contained by either of
these sides, and the straight line intercepted between the
perpendicular let fall on it from the opposite angle and the
acute angle.

3. The opposite sides of a parallelogram are equal to each
other.

4. Trisect a right angle.

5. From the extremities of the base of an isosceles triangle
straight lines are drawn perpendicular to the sides : show
that the angles made bj' these lines with the base are each
equal to half the vertical angle.

1 Make and explain the construction as well as prove it.



LATIN GRAMMAR. 19

2. Decline avibo, opus, domus, tile.

3. Compare felix, similis, liarvus, primus, vetus.
AViitc the ordiual numerals from one to ten.

4. The principal parts of the verbs from which the follow-
ing forms are derived : vivite, cedentia, ejiceram, jussits, vestit.

5. Give the imperfect and perfect subjunctive active, and
the present and perfect participle of /ero, renio, ixmo.

G. Inflect the present indicative and subjunctive of eo,
fero, 2^ossuvi.

7. The s3-nopsis of loquor in the third person plural, in-
dicative and subjunctive.

8. Give the different waj's of expressing a purpose in
Latin.

1878.

[In ^v^iting Latin words, mark the quantity of the penult in each.]

1. "Write the genitive singular of frights, virus, nemus,
linien; and the nominative singular of salutem, sitim, litore,
silicis, vuluera, aethere, sulcis.

2. Give the gender of the same nouns.

3. Write out in full the declension of cdiquis, ingens,
exsul, hie.

4. Compare magnus, tristis, malus, nequam, proximus.

5. The principal parts of the verbs from which the follow-
ing forms are derived : tenebat, audebat, cernimus, bibet,
labatur, haerent.

G. Inflect the future indicative active of nosco and debeo,
and the present and perfect subjunctive of morior iind2'ossu7n.

7. "Write out in full the conjugation of fei'o in the active
voice.

8. "What parts of the verb are formed from the perfect stem ?



20 LATIN GRAMMAR.

1879.

[In writing Latin words, mark the quantity of the penult in forms of more
than two syllables.]

1. Decline iu full princeps^ major ^ nidlus.
What other words are decliued like mdhis ?

2. Give the ablative singular and genitive plural of animal,
lex, vir, nox, currus, frigus ; and the genitive singular of
caro, mos, ordo, cor, juventus, ctistos.

3. The gender of manus, sermo, pes, compes, fraus.
What is the gender of nouns of the third declension

ending in Z? in a;? in os?

4. Compare fortis, difficilis, piarvus, miser.
Form and compare the corresponding adverbs.

5. The principal parts of the verbs from which the follow-
ing forms are derived : peteretur, ulunt, praehent, j)erculsum,
abjectum, canit.

6. Inflect in the future indicative and in the present and
imperfect subjunctive, cano, tueor, eo.

7. Write the synopsis in the indicative and subjunctive of
volo in the first person singular, and loquor iu the second
person singular.

8. What classes of verbs take the genitive?



1880.

[In writing Latin words, mark the quantity of the penult in forms of more
than two syllables.]

1, Decline in full doinus, dens, 2^l"^i duo.

2. The gender of ))nh('s, honor, dies, aetas, ratio. Ablative
singular and genitive plural of navis, j^ars, princeps.



LATIN GRAMMAR. 21

3. Compare the adverbs prudenter^ foj-titer, acriter, 2^arum.
From what adjectives are they derived ?

4. Give the nominative singular in full of quisqiie., cjuis-
piam, quisquiti ; give the meaning of each. AVhen is the
interrogative quis used, and when qui?

5. The principal parts of nanciscor, pasco^ pario, reor.

6. Write the synopsis of capio in the second person
singular indicative and subjunctive active. Give the pres-
ent of jeci, cessi, novi. From what two verbs can tentum
come ?

7. "Write out in full the present indicative of mala, the im-
perative of fero (both voices), the nominative and genitive
singular of the present participle of eo.

8. Explain the subjunctives in the following sentences : —

(a) Facerem, si juberes.

(b) Utinam mortuus essem.

(c) Ne quis dixerit.

(d) Quis est quin videat.

(e) Laudavit quia hoc facerent.

(/) Petit, ut iis qui adfuerint credamus.

1881.

[lu writing Latin words of more than two syllables, mark the quantity of
the penult.]

1. Decline homo, dies, domus.

2. Decline qui, hie.

3. Give the synopsis in the first person singular indicative
and subjunctive active of moneo, capio.

4. Give in full the present indicative active of possum, few.

5. Principal parts of volo, do,Jio, nosco, curro.



oo



LATIN GRAMMAR.



6. What are the different uses of the ablative case?

7. Explain the use of the modes in indirect discourse.

8. What is the stem of a noun? What kinds of stem?-
belong to the third declension?

1882

[In writing Latin words of more than one syllable, mark the quantity of
the penult.]

1. Give the synopsis in the third person singular indica-
tive of habeo, capio.

2. What is the final letter of the stem in each of the four
regular conjugations ?

3. Decline a neuter noun of each of the three declensions
to which neuters ma}' belong.

4. Give the nominative and genitive singular and the
gender of the sulistantives in the following sentences ; the
nominative and genitive singular of all genders of the adjec-
tives and pronouns ; the principal parts of the verbs and
participles. If a noun or verb is defective, or has different
meanings in different forms, call attention to the fact : —

(rt) Postquam consulatum perfecit, domum rediit.

(&) Milites in agrum Gallicum longo itinere duxit.

- (c) Miror te haec tulisse.

(cZ) Quod potuimus, egimus.

5. Name and illustrate b}' short Latin sentences the uses
of the dative case.

G. In what ways does the Latin express purpose?

7. Use of the modes and tenses in conditional sentences.

8. Explain the use of the gerundive.



LATIN GRAMIVIAR. 23

1883.

[In writing Latin words, mark the quantity of the penult in those of
more than two syllables.]

1. Decline 2>ars, corpus, doimis.

2. Decline idem, qui.

3. Give the synopsis of the third person singular indica-
tive and subjunctive active of a verb of each of the four
regular conjugations.

4. What are the tenses in common use of the verbs
memini and aio respectively?

5. Under what circumstances can the dative be used to
express the agent? When can relative clauses take the
subjunctive?

In the following sentences tell where each word is made,
with its consti'uction or agreement ; give the nominative and
genitive singular and gender of each noun ; the nominative
and genitive singular in full of each adjective or pronoun ;
the comparison of any word whirh is in the couipaiative
t_ degree; tlie principal parts of each verb; and the reason
for eu^.ph instance of the subjunctive mode.
a. Seni,?x ille plus quain voluit perdidit.
h. In fines ijt^i'uni mittebantur, nt auxilium ferrent.

c. Odi ' f jug jUi vulgus et arceo.

d. Non, ,tium^ perfecisset.

What m^ Yc\ ^^ meaning would be made by the sub-
stitution of \ ^xiii"'^it in the last sentence? By the substi-
tution of pei-y yi/

\ S

■ i



CAESAB.
24



CABSAR-

1870.



1 Translate (B. O. H- 23) ' ^■^„„^ „d d^trom coiliu

Lsav ab deeimae leg.oms^»ho,t; _^^^__^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^..^

pvofectus, ubi s„os urgon -g»W ^^. .^^^^ ,„ p„„„„„

duodedmae l^i»"'%on>-

eohortiu.n omnibas fern centm ^^.^ ^^^^^^^ j^,,,,,,„„

oeciste, in his P™°'* .^^^ribus confeeto, ut jam se s«s-
vircmultis g'='vibnsc,ueM.lnenb ^^ _^^_^_^„„„^ 1,

tine e non posset •, -Uq"- ^^^^ J^ ,, tela vitave', Uoste.
„ovissimis desevto pvoeV » - de ^_^^^ ^^^.^ittere et al
ueqne a froute c. »*.- ° « ^^^ ,, ,„g„.to vid.t, neq
utroqne latere instare , » '^"' ,.. sonto ab nov s-

d:ts;: - ;:Snu.ossen,, -p-

o ^.A Fxnlain the subjunctives. )d

2. (a) Lxpi^" eo-ordiuate conjunti

(_;>) Poiut out tlie CO oiu J j^g^



1877.



Translate (B. (?."!• 20)- . , ., .

modern fere tempor Publ - ^^,, Aqn.taman,

pervenisset, quae V^^'^'^'J^m ex tertia ^'^'g^^"^"^ '^t'"
lullne et -ultitudme bom nun ex ^^^.^^ ^^^

..stimanda, cum ^-^^^^^^^"^ V Ludus Val^^^l"- geren-
dma ubl panels auto anms Lucms ^.,.^,,^,,;,,,,,



Los Angeies, Ci!,
CAESAR. 25

logatus exercitn pulso interfectus csset, atque undo Lucius
Manlius proconsul impodimcntis amissis profugissot, non
mc'diocreni sibi diligeutiain adliihcndani intcHigobat. Itaquo
re fnunentaria provisa, auxiliis equitatuquc coniparato,
multis praeterea viris fortibus Tolosa et Narbone, quae sunt
civitates Galliae provinoiae linitimae his regiouibus, nomina-
tim evocatis, in Sontiatum fines cxercituin iutroduxit. Cujus
adventu cognito, Sontiates niagnis copiis coactis equitatuque,
quo plmimuui valebant, in itinere agmen nostrum adorti pri-
mum equestrc procliuni commiserunt : deinde equitatu sue
pulso atque insequentibus nostris, subito pedestres copias,
quas in eonvalle in insidiis colloeaverant, ostenderunt. Hi
nostros disjeetos adorti proelium reuovaruat.

1878.

Translate (B. G. III. 26) : —

Crassus equitum praefectos cohortatus ut magnis praeraiis
poUicitatiouibusque sues excitarent, quid fieri vellet ostendit.
lUi, ut erat imperatum, eductis mi cohortibus, quae prae-
sidio castris relictae intritae ab labore eraut, et longiore
itinere cii'cumductis ne ex hostium castris conspici possent,
omuiuni oculis mentibusque ad pugnam intontis, celeriter ad
eas quas diximus munitiones pervenerunt, atque his perrup-
tis prius in iiostium castris constitcrunt quani plane ab his
videri aut (piid rei gercretur eognosci posset. Turn vero
claniore ab ea parte audito nostri rediutogratis viril)us, quod
pleruiiKine in spe victoriae accidere consuevit, acrius im})ug-
nare coeperuut. Ilostes undique eiroumventi desjicratis
onniil)us rebus se per munitiones dejieere et fuga salutem
l)etere intenderunt. Quos equitatus apertissimis campis
consectatus ex milium i. numero, quae ex Aquitania Canta-
brisque convenisse constaljat, vix quarta parte relicta multa
uocte se in castra recepit.



26 CAESAK.



1879.



1. Translate (B. G. I. 38) : —

Cum triclui viam processisset, nuiitiatnm est ei Ariovis-
tiim cum suis omnibus copiis ad oceupanduni Vesontioneni,
quod est oppidum maximum Sequanorum, contendere tri-
duique viam a suis finibus profecisse. Id ne accideret,
magnopere sibi praecavendum Caesar existimabat. Nam-


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