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167.
Athletics, see Gymnastics.

BAPTISM, preparation for, 154.

Books, should be collected, 134;
different classes of, 184; injurious,
to be excluded from schools, 191;
good, to be provided, 192; exces-
sive devotion to, 220; sources of
wisdom and piety, 277.

CATECHUMENS, instruction of, 153.

Censors, in Jesuit schools, 200.

Charlemagne, sketch of, 155; efforts
in behalf of education, 155; "Ca-
pitulary of 787," 156; study of let-
ters in monasteries, 156; who
should teach, 157.

Children, nature of, 28; early train-
ing of, 41; protected from evil
influences, 42, 43; quick to learn,
104; should be accustomed to cor-
rect speech, 105; to be taught
early, 108, 109; to be cared for
by mothers, 127; easily molded,
127; fond of learning, 180; pre-
cocious, 232; ready to learn, 237;
not to be broken, 282; dispositions
to be studied, 282; to be reasoned
with, 283; seldom need whipping,
284; desirous of instruction, 299;
easily impressed, 300; characters to
be weighed, 306, 307; authority
over, to be assumed, 308; fear and
love to be called forth, 309; cor-
rection of, 310; appeal to reason,



42O



INDEX



313; trained in truthfulness, 314;
in good habits, 315; should have
recreation, 317; trained in virtue,
319; should be loved, 327; indul-
gence of, 327; not to be com-
manded, 328; how to be trained,
329; the only moral lesson suited
to, 330; should be respected, 331;
memory of, 332; not to be taught
many things, 334; taught to love
all men, 337; trained in morals,
349; their confidence to be won,
360; eagerness to learn, 361; not
to be repelled, 377.

Christianity, relation to education,
319; the Christian teacher, 320.

Church, the, attitude of, to pagan
literature, 151.

Cicero, sketch of, 83; ideal of ora-
tor, 84; orator and poet, 86;
studies for the orator, 88; rhetori-
cal study, 89; nature of eloquence,
90; five parts of oratory, 91; ele-
ments of discourse, 92; writing as
aid to speaking, 93; utility of
declamation and translation, 95;
the orator's knowledge, 96.

Clergy, education of, 159.

Comenius, John Amos, sketch of,
255; "Gate of Tongues Un-
locked," 256; " Orbis Pictus," 257;
"Great Didactic," 257; end of
education, 258; woman to be edu-
cated, 258; classes of objects, 259;
purpose of schools, 259; office of
teachers, 260; nature observes a
suitable time, 262; common errors,
265; examples before rules, 266;
premature instruction, 267; too
many studies, 268; comprehension
before memorizing, 270; the gen-
eral before the particular, 272;
gradual progress, 273, 274; educa-
tion should be continuous, 276;
on books, 277.

Compulsory education, 23.

Cornelia, learning of, 106.

Culture, nature of, 348.

Cyrus, character of, 62.

DECORATION precedes dress, 400.



Dialectic, defined and explained, 164.

Discipline, nature of, 342; subduing
brutality, 348.

Discipline and knowledge, 412.

Disputations, how conducted in Jesuit
schools, 192; emulation encour-
aged, 201.

Dittes, quoted on Luther, 170.

Drawing, to be taught, 333.

EDUCATION, two branches of, 9;
gymnastics, n; of woman, 23, 24;
scope and periods of, 28; order of,
41; a civic duty, 44; should be
public, 44; diverse aims of, 45;
utilitarian, 45; liberal arts, 45;
branches of, 46; three principles
of, 60; in Persia, 62, 67; a diffi-
cult task, 98; certain moral vir-
tues, 99; utility, 100; moral aims
of, 101; should begin early, 107,
108; in public schools, 113; in-
ferior ability helped by, 126; im-
portance of, 130; universal, 135,
memory in, 136; religious, 144;
manual, 148; catechetical, 153;
Charlemagne's efforts for, 155;
clerical, 159; the world concerned
in, 173; shame of neglecting, 174;
relation to civic welfare, 175; liber-
al studies in, 176; relation to civil
government, 178; necessity of, 179;
united with work, 181; aim of,
193; emulation in, 201; purpose of,
204; bookish learning, 208; uses
of travel in, 208; physical, 209;
right use of, 210; what the scholar
should know, 214; age for, 219;
nature of, 222; should be made
pleasant, 222; excessive language
study in, 223; harsh methods, 231;
end of, 242; Spartan, criticised,
251; traveling in, 253; purpose
aimed at, 258; time for, 2613; to
be continuous, 276; ideal of, 280;
virtue as the end of, 282; fourfold
aim of, 283; of girls, neglected,
294; for woman, 301; source of
happiness, 305; object of, 306;
definition of, 306; fear and love
in, 309; to be made agreeable, 316;



INDEX



421



relation of Christianity to, 319;
what it gives, 323; sense, percep-
tion in, 326; authority in, 334; re-
ligious, to be deferred, 338; what
it includes, 341; develops manhood,
343; as development, 345; progres-
sive, 346; an art, 346; adapted to
the idea of humanity, 347; moral
training in, 349; experiments in,
349; private and public, 350; a
problem of, 350; Pestalozzian prin-
ciples of, 353; hurry to be avoided
in, 354; study of nature in, 354;
exercising faculties in, 355; study
of words in, 356; value of work
in, 358; domestic, 359; moral, 362;
solid foundation for, 363 ; element-
ary, 364; complete, 364; the senses
in, 366; fundamental elements in,
367; essential work of, 368; de-
fined, 372; theory and practice of,
373; results of good instruction,
374; as giving and taking, 375;
material and spiritual ends in, 376;
uninterrupted, 378; precept and
example in, 379; of the body, 386;
of the intellect, 388; and plu-
tocracy, 389; an equalizer, 390; a
source of power, 391; moral side
of, 392; religious, 395; a controll-
ing principle of, 403; present rude
character of, 404; preparation for
complete living, 407; symmetrical,
411; esthetic, 413; error of, 414;
science in, 416.

Egypt, dancing and music in, 15.

Eloquence, see Orator.

Emulation, recommended, 145; in
Jesuit schools, 201.

English, importance of, 288.

Epicurus, quoted on philosophy, 220.

Example; influence of, 142.

FAMILY, the, relation to the state,

409.
Fenelon, sketch of, 291; as tutor,

292; " Education of Girls," 293;

neglect of girls' education, 294;

sphere and influence of woman,

295; defects in her education, 296;

frivolity and idleness of, 297; her



reading, 298; children fond of in-
struction, 299; easily impressed,
300; studies for woman, 301.
Froebel, Frederick, sketch of, 369;
with Pestalozzi, 370; fundamental
thought of, 370; tribute to, 371;
the divine unity, 372; definition of
education, 372, 379; theory and
practice of education, 373; effects
of good education, 374; education
as giving and taking, 375; su-
premacy of right, 375; material and
spiritual ends, 376; play, 376, 380;
children not to be repelled, 378;
nature of schools, 378; example
and precept, 379; craving for tales,
381; man not bad by nature, 381.

GEOGRAPHY, starting points of, 334.

Geometry, defined, 165.

God, as worthy object of endeavor,
20; man's greatest need, 357; the
unity of all things, 372; a knowl-
edge of necessary, 396.

Grammar, the study of, 123; defined,
162; relation to the Scriptures, 162.

Greek, a language for scholars, 289.
(See Languages, The ancient.)

Gymnastics, two parts, n; should be
employed, 49; should not be ex-
cessive, 50; nor neglected, 134.

HARRIS, Dr. W. T., quoted on Froe-
bel, 370.

Health, laws of, 280.

History, proper study of, 212; con-
ventional value of, 412.

Housekeeper, a model, described, 81.

Humboldt, referred to, 400.

Hunting, a preparation for war, 65.

JEROME, sketch of, 143; letter to
Laeta, 143; religious education,
144; learning the alphabet, 144;
writing, 143; emulation, 143; teach-
er to be moral and learned, 145;
early impressions, 146; dress and
ornament, 146; study of the Scrip-
tures, 146; religious exercises, 147;
manual training, 148; monastic
education, 149.

Jesuits, the, sketch of, 187; Con-



422



INDEX



Etitutions of, 187; Ratio Studi-
orum, 1 88; selection of teachers,
1 88; study of the Scriptures, 189;
innovating opinions discouraged,
189; examinations, 189, 199; dif-
ferent schools or grades, 190; life-
long teachers, 190; injurious books
to be excluded, 191; use of Latin
language, 191; prizes, 191; dispu-
tations, 192, 198; useful books,
192; the teacher's aim, 193; rules
for quoting authorities, 194; direc-
tions for the teacher, 195; the Vul-
gate to be defended, 195; Thomas
Aquinas to be followed, 196;
rules for various studies, 197; re-
ligious study of the sciences, 199;
appointment of censors, 200; re-
ligious lectures, 201; emulation,
201.

KANT, Immanuel, sketch of, 340; his
" Pedagogy," 341 ; nature of edu-
cation, 341; office of discipline, 342,
348; love of freedom, 343; culture,
343. 348; theory of education, 344;
development of latent powers, 345;
education progressive, 346; as an
art, 346; a mistake of parents, 347;
moral training, 349; experimental
schools, 349; private and public ed-
ucation, 350; an educational prob-
lem, 350.

Knowledge, relative worth of, 405;
intrinsic and conventional value of,
411; and discipline, 412.

LANGUAGES, the ancient, 176, 177;
excessive study of, 223; too dearly
bought, 225; how learned by Mon-
taigne, 225, 226; why studied, 242;
studied too long, 286; of no prac-
tical utility, 401 ; quasi-intrinsic
value of, 411.

Latin, in Jesuit schools, 191.

Liberal Arts, 45; not to be pursued
for profit, 100; enumerated, 162.

Libraries, to be established, 183; dif-
ferent kinds of books for, 184.

Life, divided into two parts, 37; its
nature, 324.



Locke, John, sketch of, 278;
" Thoughts Concerning Educa-
tion," 2y#; ideal of education, 280;
rules for health, 280; mistakes of
parents, 281; self-control, 281;
children not to be broken, 282;
their aptitudes studied, 282; rea-
soning with, 283; whipping to be
avoided, 284; character of teacher,
284; four ends in education, 285;
ancient languages, 286; gaining the
attention, 287; pre-eminence of
English, 288.

Luther, Martin, sketch of, 169; prin-
cipal educational writings, 170;
fundamental conception of educa-
tion, 170; Letter to Mayors and
Aldermen, 171; decline of schools,
171; the devil's purpose, 172; im-
portance of education, 173; shame
of neglecting, 174; civic welfare
dependent on education, 175; lib-
eral studies, 176; the languages
and the gospel, 177; schools re-
quired for civil government, 178;
necessity of education, 179; chil-
dren delight in learning, 180;
music, 1 80; work and study, 181;
appeal to city authorities, 182; on
libraries, 183; defects of schools,
183, 184; different classes of
books, 184.

MANN, Horace, sketch of, 383; sec-
retary of Board of Education, 384;
last Annual Report, 385; schools a
civilizing force, 385; physical edu-
cation, 386; intellectual, 388; edu-
cation and plutocracy, 389;
education an equalizer, 390; a
source of power, 391; moral edu-
cation, 392; effect of right train-
ing, 393; religious education, 395.

Manual training, inculcated, 148;
honest trades to be learned, 152.

Marriage, effects of, 141.

Mathematics, influence of, 233.

Maurus, Rhabanus, sketch of, 158;
principal works, 159; education of
the clergy, 159; character of the
Scriptures, 160; how to be read,



INDEX



423



161; liberal arts, 162; grammar de-
fined, 162; rhetorjp defined, 163;
dialectic explained, 164; arith-
metic, 164; geometry, 165; music,
166; astronomy, 167.

Memory, a sign of ability, 119;
should be cultivated, 136.

Method, the developing, 205; truth
to be assimilated, 206; nothing to
be imparted by mere authority, 206;
teaching by rote, 208; right meth-
od of instruction, 215; Aristotle's

, 219; severe sweetness in, 222; As-
cham's, in Latin, 229; harsh, in
English, 231, 235; order of studies,
243; with languages, 245, 246;
traveling, 253; basis of, 261; sub-
jects suited, to pupil's age, 263;
errors of, 265; examples before
rules, 266; premature instruction,
267; too many studies, 268; com-
prehension should precede memo-
rizing, 270; the general should pre-
cede the particular, 272; gradual
progress, 273, 274; holding the at-
tention, 287; with Latin, 287; suc-
cession of studies, 290; instruction
to be made pleasant, 300; studies
for women, 301 ; in domestic edu-
cation, 359.

Milton, John, sketch of, 240; school
in London, 241; "Tractate on Edu-
cation," 241; end of learning, 242
purpose of language study, 242
too difficult tasks exacted, 243
professional pursuits, 244; school
arrangements, 245; method with
Latin and Greek, 245, 246; range
of studies, 247; moral training,
248; on poetry, 250; physical cul-
ture, 251; travel, 253.

Mimicry, an unfavorable sign, 120.

Monasteries, urged to give instruc-
tion, 156.

Montaigne, sketch of, 203; "Es-
says," 204; purpose of education,
204;, developing method, 205; truth
to be assimilated, 206; nothing by
mere authority, 206; bookish learn-
ing, 208; uses of travel, 208;
physical training, 209; how to use



learning, 210; sincerity, 211; ac-
quisitive disposition, 212; study of
history, 212; the world a great
book, 213; what the scholar should
know, 214; various studies, 215;
effects of philosophy, 216; Aris-
totle's teaching, 219; book-worm
study, 220; times and places of
study, 220, 221; best style of ex-
pression, 224; learning Latin and
Greek, 225, 226; at the College of
Guienne, 227.

Music, conformed to right models,
17; how regulated, 19; for men
and women, 20; in education, 46;
why taught, 50, 51; for social en-

joyment, 53; different kinds, 54;
should be taught to children, 54;
instruments of, 56; why studied,
58; nature and utility of, i66 : *
should be taught, 180.

ORATOR, Cicero's ideal of, 84; defi-
nition of, 85; and poet, 86;
studies of, 88; five parts of his
art, 91; should write speeches, 93;
various exercises, 94, 95; compre-
hensive knowledge, 96; should
make preparation, 131; his style,
132.

Order, utility of, 7679; in the
household, 79.

PARENTS, should be educated, 105;
conduct of, 141; should set good
example, 142; should be models,
147; should bring up children in
religion, 152; mistakes of, 281; in-
fluence of, 302; their obligations,
325; an error of, 347; aim of, 377.

Paroz, quoted on Fenelon, 293.

Pedagogues. See Teachers.

Pestalozzi, John Henry, sketch of,
351; at Stanz, 352, 360; at Yver-
dun, 352; summary of principles,
353; avoid hurry, 354; study of
nature, 354; development by ex-
ercise, 355; study of words, 356;
truth a source of strength, 356;
man's need of God, 357; work, 358;
domestic education, 359; winning



424



INDEX



confidence, 360; eagerness of chil-
dren to learn, 361; moral educa-
tion, 362; solid foundation, 363;
complete development, 364; im-
pulse of development, 365; sense-
perception, 366; fundamental ele-
ments, 367; essential work of edu-
cation, 368.

Philosophy, nature of, 100; impor-
tance of, 133; utility of, 197; value
of, 214; effects of, 216; early in-
culcated, 219; suited to all occa-
sions, 221.

Physiology, to be taught, 387.

Plato, sketch of, 7; principal works,
8; early training of children, 9;
training both hands, 10; two.
branches of education, 1 1 ; influ-
ence of play, 13; dancing in Egypt,
15; music, 17; poetry, 18; God as
object of endeavor, 21; right way
to live, 22; gymnasia, 23; compul-
sory education, 23; female educa-
tion, 23, 34; life of virtue, 26;
boys insubordinate, 28; scope and
periods of education, 29; different
kinds of poets, 31; teachers, 32.

Play, influence of, 13; significance
of, 376; relation to inner life, 380.

Plutarch, sketch of, 125; three
needs in development, 126; in-
ferior ability helped by training,
126; care of children, 127; teach-
ers of blameless life, 128; phil-
osophy, 133; universal education,
135; children to be encouraged,
135; memory to be cultivated, 136;
self-control, 137; anger to be
avoided, 138; faults of young
men, 138; evil associations, 140;
conduct of parents, 141 ; marriage,
141.

Poets, should be heedful, 18; dif-
ferent kinds, 31; allied to orators,
86; study of, 250.

Punishment, corporal, condemned,
122; inculcated, 132; to be avoid-
ed, 284; use of rod in, 310; re-
proof, 311; should come as a nat-
ural result, 330; bodily chastise-
ment, 362.



Pythagoras, enigmatical precepts of,
140.

QUINTILIAN, sketch of, 103; his "In-
stitutes," 103; children quick to
learn, 104; trained to correct
speech, 105; parents should be edu-
cated, 105; character of teachers,
1 06; Greek should precede Latin,
107; education should begin early,
108; should be made pleasant, 109;
the alphabet, no; learning to
write, no; reading, in; kind of
copies, 112; public schools, 113;
evil influences, 114; emulation,
117; pupil's disposition to be as-
certained, 119; mimicry, 120;
school management,' 120; recrea-
tion, 121 ; corporal punishment,
122; study of grammar, 123.

READING, how to be taught, in.

Recreation, to be allowed, 121, 317.

Refinement, nature of, 348.

Rhetoric, study of, 89, 90; defined,
i6>3; its utility, 163.

Rollin, Charles, sketch of, 303;
" Treatise on Studies," 304; edu-
cation a source of happiness, 305;
purpose of teaching, 306; defini-
tion of education, 306; children's
character to be studied, 307; au-
thority in teaching, 308; fear and
love, 309; punishment, 310; re-
proof, 311; reasoning with chil-
dren, 313; truthfulness, 314; good
habits, 315; study to be made
agreeable, 316; rest and recrea-
tion, 317; training in virtue, 319;
Christianity, 319.

Rousseau, Jean Jacques, sketch of,
321; "Confessions," 321; " fimile,"
322; two fundamental principles,
323; what education is, 323; the
best educated man, 324; mothers
should nourish children, 324; a
father's obligation, 325; the teach-
er, 325, 3 2 6; use of the senses, 32(7;
love for childhood, 327; indulgence
of children, 327; not to be com-



INDEX



425



manded, 328; right training, 329;
punishment, 330; injuring others,
330; respect for children, 331;
right teaching, 331; words and
ideas, 331; memory, 332; drawing,
333; geography, 334; nothing by
authority, 334; " Robinson Cru-
soe," 336; results of fimile's train-
ing, 336; rural surroundings, 337;
religion, 338; woman's education to
be relative to man, 339.
Rulers, character of, 36.

SCHOOLS, buildings for, 23; public
and private, 113: management of,
120; cathedral and cloister, 181;
size and arrangement of, 245; forg-
ing-place of men, 259; location of,
276; experimental, 349; explained,
378; as civilizing force, 385.

Science, value of, 416.

Scriptures, the, to be studied, 147;
order of study, 148; superior to pa-
gan literature, -151; character of,
1 60; require learning, 161; rela-
tion of grammar to, 162; the Vul-
gate to be defended, 195; studied in
the original tongues, 249.

Self-control, instance of, 137; im-
portance of, 281.

Seneca, sketch of, 97; education diffi-
cult, 98; recreation moderate, 99;
virtues to be inculcated, 99; na-
ture of philosophy, too; morality
the end of education, 101.

Sense-perception, 326, 366.

Socrates, instance of self-control,
137-

Sparta, education in, 38; brutalizing,
49; defects of, 251.

Spencer, Herbert, sketch of, 399; his
" Education," 399; what knowl-
edge is of most worth, 400; dec-
oration and dress, 400; ornamen-
tal studies, 401 ; feminine accomp-
lishments, 402; determining prin-
ciple of education, 403; rude char-
acter of, 404; relative worth of
knowledge, 405; limited time of ac-
quisition, 406; measure of value,
406; education a preparation for



life, 407; leading activities of life,
408; self-preservation, 409; sym-
metrical training, 411; esthetic edu-
cation, 413; vice of current educa-
tion, 414; worth of science, 416.

State, the, how rendered virtuous, 34;
what its virtues should be, 39, 40.

Studies, liberal and utilitarian, 45,
48; not to be pursued for money,
100; moral side of, 101; Milton's
list of, 247; in morals, 248; how
determine course of, 412.

Style, in discourse, 132; Montaigne
on, 224.

TEACHERS, qualifications of, 32; char-
acter of Persian, 63; even-tem-
pered, 100; learned, 106; influence
of numbers on, 119; blameless,
128; desirable traits of, 145; office
of, 260; character of, 284; Chris-
tian, .320; qualifications of, 325.

Travel, in education, 208.

Truth, a source of strength, 356; su-
premacy of, 375.

UNIVERSITIES, criticised, 243.

VIRTUE, on what dependent, 35; po-
litical virtues, 39, 40; in what it
consists, 53; relation of music to,
S3-

WOMAN, to be educated as man is,
23 ; her domestic sphere, 71 ; dis-
tinctive virtues of, 72; should be
educated, 258; sphere and influ-
ence of, 295; defects in her educa-
tion, 296; idleness and frivolity of,
297; what she should study, 301;
educated relatively to man, 339.

Words, without ideas, 331; study of,
356.

Work, value of, 358.

Writing, how to be taught, no, 144.

XENOPHON, sketch of, 61; " Cyropae-
dia " " Economics," 61 ; character
of Cyrus, 62; Persian education,
62; its methods, 63; study of jus-



426



INDEX



tice, 64; hunting, 65; practice of
abstinence, 66; duties of husband
and wife, 70; different duties of,
71; virtues of each, 72; utility of
order, 7679; household arrange-



ment, 79, 80; model housekecpi r,
81.

YOUTH, to be guarded against temp-
tation, 139.



EDUCATION IN THE
UNITED STATES

Edited by NICHOLAS MURRAY BUTLER, President
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Online LibraryF. V. N. (Franklin Verzelius Newton) PainterGreat pedagogical essays; Plato to Spencer → online text (page 32 of 33)