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FREE ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET AND

price list irrigated fruit and farm lands
western Colorado. Also offer interest in good
irrigation project full of merit, close to Delta,
in operation. Welch & Merrill, Delta, Colo.

I AM READY TO BUY ANY TRACT OF
good land in the San Luis Valley for cash.
I buy for cash and can sell at lowest prices.
Walter N. Ickes, Alamosa, Colorado.

FINE RANCH AT DEL NORTE IN SAN
Luis Valley. Close to city, Rio Grande river
flows through. Fine buildings and timber,
splendid stock ranch. Plenty of hay. Price,
$12,000 for 240 acres. E. W. Merritt, 708
17th street, Denver.

FOR LANDS IN THE SAN LUIS VALLEY
with best water rights at prices from $30
to $100 per acre, see me. I have farmed 14
years and sell only good farming land. J. C.
Milyard, Alamosa, Colorado.

I HAVE SOLD LAND AT MOSCA FOR 4

years. I am a practical farmer. Have 1,600
acres which I own and will sell for $30 to
$75 an acre. All cultivated. Good water
right. W. W. Saunders, Mosca, Colorado.

IRRIGATED LANDS IN THE LA JARA

District, $50 to $60 per acre. I specialize in
farm loans, insurance and have San Luis Val-
ley irrigated lands for sale at all times. C. L.
Smith, La Jara, Colo.

IDEAL STOCK RANCH IN THE FAMOUS
San Luis Valley, Colorado. 1,440 acre stock
ranch near Center; 6-room house, barn, cor-
rals; 10 artesian wells. Sacrifice, $35 an acre,
one-third down, balance easy. 100 choice cows
and 50 head horses. Choice San Luis Valley
lands $40 an acre. J. W. Hess, Mayor of
Center, Center, Colorado.

LA JARA'S LAND FIRM NO TROUBLE
to answer inquiries. An active land firm
in La Jara that gives its patrons a square deal
and refers to the La Jara State Bank as to
its financial responsibility. Good land, per-
fect water rights, reasonable terms. Write for
illustrated folder. Seeley & Dougan, La Jara,
Colorado.

IRRIGATED LANDS IN THE PECOS
valley, Texas. 25,000 acres of richest fruit
and alfalfa land in country. Six cuttings of
alfalfa yearly, averaging over ton per acre
each cutting. Every known crop grown. The
Orient Railroad, builder of irrigating system,
runs to tract direct and connects with three
other roads, affording direct lines to markets
and Gulf ports. Ideal climate. Elevation 2,400
feet. Over one-half tract sold, 7,000 acres
being cultivated. Detailed information, Wray
and Trimmer, 410 Ideal Building, Denver,
Colorado.

WE HAVE 20,000 ACRES OF GOOD

ranch land in New Mexico, that we are
dividing into ranches of from 640 acres up.
Running water on most of the tracts with
some timber and abundance of grass. This
land will be divided so that there will be
valleys on all of the tracts susceptible to
irrigation which will produce all kinds of grain,
fruit and 5 tons to the acre of alfalfa. The
winters, are mild and you do not have to
feed. Parties wishing to raise mules, horses,
sheep and cattle should make big money on
their investment. The price ranges from $7.50
to $15.00 per acre, according to size and
location. We also have 15,000 acres of irri-
gable land. Price $50.00 to $100.00 per acre.
Write us at once. The Rayado Colonization
Company, 1646 Tremont Street, Denver, Col-
orado.

COME TO VIRGINIA

Homes for all, health for all, happiness and in-
dependence for all. Ideal climate; no maHria,
no mosquitos. Write for our land bulletin which
will inteiest you.

J. R. Meadows, Appomattox. Va.



FOR SALE AT LESS THAN COST. A
manufacturing plant engaged in the manu-
facture of irrigating machinery. Upwards of
20,000 feet of floor space. Six acres of
ground. Equipment and buildings nearly new.
Write for full particulars to Box 85, Irrigation
Age, Chicago, 111.

FOR SALE AT A SACRIFICE, 320 ACRES

near Alamosa, San Luis Valley, Colorado.
320-acre relinquishment near Rocky Ford com-
ing under irrigation, $1,000. We have all
kinds of ranch and farm and city property to
exchange. Tell us what you have and we will
get you what you' want. If you are coming
west, write us, we have some fine irrigated
land and large ranches to trade for eastern
property.

L. J. MOUNTZ & CO.,
Real Estate and Mining Investments,
1743 Champa Street, Denver, Colo.



160 acres fine land in famous Yellowstone Val-
ley, E. Mont. Near R. R. Very level. Under
Gov't Irrigation. Good for grain. Alfalfa, Vege-
tables, etc. Only $25 an acre. Will be worth $50
soon. Owner a non-resident and not a farmer.
W. B. OVERSON, Owner, Williston, N. D.



LA PLATA
COUNTY



COLORADO LANDS

Bayfield, the center of one of Colorado's richest
and most fertile irrigated sections, was less than 10
years ago a sagebrush wilderness. Today it is a
populous and thriving town. I am a practical farm-
er, have farmed around Bayfield 12 years; I have
some fine irrigated land to sell on easy terms as low
as $30 an acre. I will locate you on government
land or sell you a relinquishment. Write me today.
W. R. MALOY, P. 0. Box 56 BAYFIELD, COLO.

IRRIGATED LANDS

IN THE ROMEO DISTRICT OF THE

Famous San Luis Valley

No Alkali, Good Drainage,

Guaranteed Water Rights.

Handsomely Illustrated Booklet for the Asking.

ZEPH. CHAS. FELT, President

501 Boston Bldg., DENVER, COLO. or ROMEO COLO.



|%|L||\f ll |\ Attachment with Corn Harvester cuts
U I mM 1 1 L U and throws in piles on harvester or win-
il rows. Man and horse cuts and shocks
" equal with a Corn Binder. Sold in
every state. Price $20.00. W.H. BUXTON, of Johnstown,
Ohio, writes: "The harvester has proven all you claim for it:
the harvester saved me over $25 in labor last year's corn
cutting. I cut over 500 shocks; will make 4 bushels corn to
a shock." Testimonials and catalog free showing pictures
of harvester.
Address Now Process Mfg. Co , Salina Kansas



ATENTS

VALUABLE INFORMATION FREE

If you have an invention or any
patent matter, write immediately to
W. W. WRIGHT, registered attorney.

Loan;& Trust Bldg., WASHINGTON. I.C.




L G. 4 R.C. CARPENTER

Consulting Engineers

Investigations, Examinations, Reports.



Denver, Fort Collins, Colorado; Ithaca,
New York; Denver, Col., Equitable Bldg.



L. G. CARPENTER

Former State Engineer

Colorado

Member Irrigation Com-
misson, British Columbia



P. J. PRESTON

Deputy State Engineer
Colorado
19031906



When writing to advertisers nlease mention The Irrigation Age.



THE IKRIGAT10N AGE.



95



THE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL CAR

A PROFITABLE INVESTMENT

Careful tests made by men in all lines of business, including farming, fruit growing, truck raising
and kindred industries, prove conclusively that motor delivery and motor hauling are paying propo-
sitions. It is only a question of getting the car best adapted to the work you have to do.

In the International Commercial Car we offer the best machine for hauling produce over country
roads, for doing light hauling of all kinds, for quick deliveries in cities or towns, for running errands
and for pleasure driving. It is designed to meet the needs of men living in the country. The wheels
give plenty of road clearance, the engine is powerful enough to carry the car anywhere that horses can
go, the solid tires eliminate delays due to pneumatic tire troubles- in every way the car is designed to
protect the user against delays.




The many special features of the International Commercial Car are the result of six years' actual
experience under all sorts and kinds of conditions. The car has been tested in cities, in small towns,
and in the country, and has been improved and redesigned until it is practically perfect.

The International Commercial Car will now give satisfactory service wherever a car is needed for
the hauling of loads up to 1,000 or 1,200 pounds.

The efficiency of the complete car depends largely upon the motor. We know now that the motor
in this car is correct in design and will give the purchaser the best possible service. It is a two-cylinder
opposed, four-cycle motor a type that has been used for heavy duty service for years.

It will take the driver less time to master the control of the International Commercial Car than
any other car on the market. The control is exceedingly simple. There arc no levers to confuse, and
a simple locking device makes it impossible for the operator to shift from one speed to another without
disengaging the clutch. Also, there is no possibility of engaging two sets of transmission gears at the
same time. The ignition apparatus is unusually complete. Most cars have a dual system; the Inter-
national has a triple system of ignition. The ordinary single system consists of batteries working
through a vibrating coil and timer; the dual system consists of batteries and a magneto with its own
distributor. In the International system if the magneto gives out the batteries work through their
own coil and timer. If the vibrating coil gives out the batteries will work through the magneto dis-
tributor, while if the batteries give out the magneto current travels through the vibrating coil and
timer. It is necessary for the ignition apparatus to be all out of order before this car is disabled.

The general usefulness and simplicity of the International Commercial Car commend it to every
man who has work that the car can do. It more than takes the place of horses at a maintenance cost
far less than that of the horses necessary to do the same amount of work. It has many other desirable
features which will be fully explained to you on request.

For a catalogue and full information Write

International Harvester Company of America

(Incorporated)

705 Harvester Building CHICAGO USA



When writing to advertisers please mention The Irrigation Age.



96 THEIRKIGAT10NAGE.

<>* <! *a * <



UNION MACHINES

WITH PUQ MILLS COMBINED




FIVE SIZES ALL CAPACITIES



Outfits for Drain Tile, Hollow Ware, Building
and Paving Brick and other Clay Products



If interested write us for particulars and estimates.

E. M. FREESE & CO,

QALION, OHIO



When writing to advertisers please mention The Irrigation Age.



THE IRRIGATION AGE.



97



Hollow Core Wall for Hydraulic Fill Dams



In a Hydraulic Fill dam the prob-
lem of the drainage of the shiic : ng
water is of controlling importance. The
sluiced material should be such that
it will not retain the sluicing water
for an undue time. If the material
is such that it will not deliver tlie
water with reasonable rapidity a de-
cided settlement with consequent cracks
is bound to ensue when the fill ulti-
mately dries out.

The sluicing water on the fill is
maintained in a summit pool by hand-
made levees. It is found that in
depths downwards to 5', the material
in suspension becomes comparatively
solidified and it will then hold its shape
and consistency. The sluicing water,
however, must necessarily be under con-
stant drainage if rapid construction and
solid banks are expected.

A Hydraulic Fill dam during con-
struction generally lias water in the
impounding reservoir above it wh cii
rises at substantially the same rate ;i^
the increasing height of the dam. but
a little below its level, thereby reducing
the drainage head in that direction.
Assuming that there is no core wail,
the sluicing water is forced to pass
largely through the down stream fill
unless drainage tubes in some form
are provided. The passage of the
drainage water through such a mass of
material is slow, and hence full ad-
vantage cannot be taken of the other-
wise rapid method of hydraulic con-
struction.

Again, the material of the fill will
not take its final set until the fill is
complete. The fill is therefore saturated during construction, and
saturated material is always of greater bulk than dry material.
This fact accounts in a measure for the excessive settlement in
hydraulic fills.

All this is controlled by building a Hollow Core Wall through
the center of the embankment, and providing it with numerous
drainage gates of simple construction. A facing of broken stone
or gravel should be placed next to the upstream face of the
core wall.

It is evident at a glance that with this construction we have
accomplished two things:

First, we have provided an effectual water-barrier whereby when
the lower prism of the dam is once drained it is forever protected
against re-saturation.

Second, the problem of drainage is entirely under control and
can be hastened or retarded at will. Drainage head is secure-.!
in two directions, namely, towards the core and towards the toe.
The material more quickly receives its final set and unexpected
settlement is thereby avoided. The time of construction is greatly
hastened.

Moreover, in the usual form of construction the levees on the
outside edge of the pond frequently give way and permit a
localized washout on the slope of the fill. The central drainage
into the Hollow Core Wall permits of instant relief of excessive
water and makes a washout impossible.

Again, if the sluicing material is such that it settles rapidly, the
surface water can be quickly drawn off into the Core Wall.

Once the fill is completed the drainage gates into the Core Wall
from the lower prism are permanently opened. This insures an
absolutely dry prism; a result never before reached.

The above is a mere outline of the functions of the Hollow
Core Wall in relation particularly to the Hydraulic Fill during
construction. Tjie advantages named in a previous advertisement
in connection with an ordinary rolled earth dam apply in full to
the Hydraulic Fill when the same is completed and in permanent
service.

The above notes are fairly illustrated by the sectional drawing
herewith presented which roughly represents a Hydraulic Fill
Dam in process of construction. The Hollow Core Wall is car-
ried up to and a little above the ultimate embankment and pro-
vides interior inspection through the heart of the fill.

This topic is more fully treated in our Circular on EARTH
DAMS. The introduction of the Hollow Core Wall entirely changes
the basic problem of an earth dam, whether of rolled earth or
hydraulicked into place. These points will not admit of discussion
in an advertisement.

Respectfully submitted,

AMBURSEN HYDRAULIC CONSTRUCTION CO.

ENGINEER-CONSTRUCTORS, 88 Pearl St., Boston, Mass.

All inquiries from Canada should be addressed to

Ambursen Hydraulic Construction Co.,

405 Dorchester St., West, Montreal, P. Q.




HYDRAULIC FILL DAM WITH~HOLLOW CORE: WALL JN PROCESS OF CONSTRUCTION



SPECIAL NOTICE



We take pleasure in announcing
that we have perfected an arrange-
ment whereby Messrs. Lewis &
Wiley of Seattle, Washington, be-
come associated with us in all work
involving the sluicing of earth for the
construction of dams or for any
other purpose. The reputation of
the above concern was made in the
famous re-grade of Seattle, where-
by the hills of that city were cut
down and used for fill on the water
front. A similar contract has been
carried out by this company in Port-
land, Oregon, and a third one is now
in progress in Seattle.

Messrs. Lewis & Wiley are un-
doubtedly the foremost concern in
the world in this special line of
work, and we deem ourselves for-
tunate in securing their association
with us.

AMBURSEN HYDRAULIC
CONSTRUCTION CO.



When writing to advertisers please mention The Irrigation Age.



98



THE IKRIGATION AGE.



Unless the

Sides of a

Drainage Ditch

are Sloped

They will

Wash and Cave

into the

Channel




Nature Will

Slope the

Sides of a

Drainage Ditch

But She Will

Spoil the

Ditch
in Doing It



Austin Drainage Excavator



Thirty- Two Thousand Cubic Yards of
Excavation in One Month

Ranks in output with the world's largest out-
puts of machine excavators for example, with the steam
shovel records at Panama.



If We specialize in ditch-
ing machinery both for
open ditches and pipe line
work. These various ma-
chines are known to con-
tractors as the "AUSTIN
LINE," comprising the
following :

Drainage Excavator Type A
Drainage Excavator Type B
Drainage Excavator Type R
Levee Builder
Drag Line Excavator
Special Wheel Ditcher
Side Hill Ditcher
Highway Ditcher
Orange Peel Ditcher
Pipe Line Excavator
Farm Tile Ditcher
Austin Sewer and Waterworks

Excavator

Austin Combination Sloping or
Vertical Bank Excavator



This is exactly the record of an Austin Drain-
age Excavator constructing a drainage ditch in a middle
western state we can show the contractor's signed state-
ment.

As an earth moving machine alone an Austin

Drainage Excavator is in the same class as the dredge or
the steam shovel.

As a ditch building machine it is in a class

entirely by itself, since it digs a ditch to templet with slop-
ing banks complete in one operation.

It being impracticable to dredge the banks to

slope, extra material is removed from the sides so that when
the banks cave to slope the ditch will not be choked, and
this extra digging, while adding to the yardage removed,
does not add to the mileage of .ditch completed. On the
other hand with an Austin Drainage Excavator, which slopes
the banks by the same motion that removes the earth, and
also cuts to templet to exact dimensions, every yard exca-
vated counts towards mileage of ditch dug.



I



Send for Records and Catalog " S"



F. C. AUSTIN DRAINAGE EXCAVATOR CO.



Agent* Wanted in Open Territory



RAILWAY EXCHANGE, CHICAGO



When writing to advertisers please mention The Irrigation Age.



Secretary President and Chief Engineer Treasurer

K. L. WALKER EDMUND T. PERKINS, M. A. C. E. WILLIAM W. VERNON

Member American Society of Civil Engineers
Member Western Society of Civil Engineers



Ctonunti C jerkins! engineering

Company



Irrigation and Agricultural
Engineers




1110 First National Bank Building

Telephone Randolph 5321

CHICAGO



100



THE IRRIGATION AGE.



>ng the Santa He are five Great Valleys. Every one of them will soon be supporting an '^^ immense popu-

,.ion. Land can be bought today at reasonable rates and on liberal terms. In five years it will double

or triple in value. Two million and a half acres are now, or soon will be, irrigated. Irrigation insures crops. No drouth ; no wah-

out; no uncertainty. Turn on the water; when you have enough to fulfill your requirements, turn it off. The seasons are long, the

variety of crops almost limitless. Read this page carefully.




San Joaquin Valley

The San Joaquin Valley of Califor-
nia embraces the eight counties be-
tween Bakersfield and Stockton.

It is a country for a man of limited
means. Ten acres will support the
average family, while twenty acres
means a bank account in three or four
years.

Fruit, vines, vegetables, cereals, all
do well. While waiting for his or-
chards and vineyards to begin bearing,
the settler can earn a good living with
alfalfa, dairying and poultry.

Crops follow one another through-
out the year so that the farmer who
will attend to his business can always
have something on hand to* sell.

Large returns are received from
peaches, apricots, wine, raisins and
table grapes, figs, small fruits of all
kinds, sweet potatoes, and alfalfa,
while oranges are yielding big returns
along the foot-hills.

Land is still to be had at reasonable
prices. Terms are liberal and easily
met. The expenses for improvements
are slight.



Arkansas Valley



There are .500,000 acres of land under irrigation in the Arkansas Valley of Kansas and Colorado.
The tt.OOO miles of canals and laterals cost SI 0,000, 000. 00. More sugar-beets are grown in this valley
than in any other part of the United States. Six large beet-sugar factories are now in operation.
.Beets grown in this section have a high percentage of sugar, and the crop is a very profitable one.

Another staple is alfalfa, which yields a heavy tonnage and allows three or more cuttings a year.
There is a strong demand for every ton grown, and prices are good.

The famous Rocky Ford cantaloupe is grown in this valley and is a big money maker. Fruits of all

kinds do well. The climate is all but ideal; the altitude about _

3,600 feet; the air invigorating; and the sun shining almost
every day, makes the valley a delightful place to live in.

Lands are still to be had at very reasonable prices.



Rio Grande Valley



In the Rio Grande Valley of Xew Mexico, the Reclamation
Service has projected a system of irrigation that will cost
$10,000,000 and will reclaim 200,000 acres of land. It is pro-
posed to dam the river near Engle, Xew Mexico, one hundred
and twenty miles above El Paso.

It will be three years or so before the Engle Dam is complet-
ed. In the meantime a diversion dam has been put in to irrigate
about 85,000 acres in the Messila Valley.

Now is a good time to get in "on the ground floor," as the
irrigated land in this fertile valley, with an assured water supply,
will command big prices.

With a beautiful climate and rich soil, a great variety of
crops are grown.

The population in this valley is made up of a good class of
eastern people, the towns are progressive and up-to-date.



The Salt River Valley



Pecos Valley



The Roosevelt Uam, in the Salt River Valley, Arizona, is complete, and the impounded waters are
being carried to the 240.000 fertile acres, included in the project, through a complicated network of
perfectly constructed canals and laterals. In coming from the dam to the floor of the Valley, the
waters are passed through a number of turbines, which generate several thousand electrical horsepower
that is used for light and power all over the Valley. Eventually this electrical power will more than
pay the upkeep of the system and the farmer's water will cost him practically nothing. The climate of
the Salt River Valley is well suited to all crops commonly grown in the temperate and semi-tropic zones.

The great development of Arizona's mineral wealth insures a profitable market for all produce grown.
If you are looking for a sure thing you cannot do better than to investigate this Valley.



In the Pecos Valley of Xew Mexico
irrigation has worked wonders. The
Government irrigation project and
private gravity canals, now complet-
ed, together with more than 400 arte-
sian wells, every one of which will
irrigate 160 acres of land and a large
number of pumping plants, will insure
the development of upwards of 100,-
000 acres of the rich land.

Crop yields are very large, and the
climatic conditions are all that could
be desired. Apples and peaches grow
to perfection, the fruit being of un-
usual size, without blemish of any
kind, and of a distinct flavor.

Ten acres in apples insures a good
income, while twenty acres means in-
dependence.

Alfalfa will yield six, tons to the
acre and finds a ready market at $10
a ton. By feeding stock, the value of
this crop is easily raised 50 per cent.

The Valley enjoys the best of
schools and churches, and in the prin-
cipal towns, public library, water
works, electric lights, etc.



We have published booklets descriptive of each of the Valleys mentioned above. Which inter-
ests you most? Let me know and 1 will send you copies.

We have a man in this office who is hired to answer questions and tell the truth. Use him.

C. L. SEAGRAVES



Genera/ Colonization Agent
A. T. & S. F. Ky



1115 Railway Exchange
CHICAGO, ILL.



When writing to advertisers please mention The Irrigation Age.



THE IRRIGATION AGE.



101



SAMSON TURBINE




When the PUMP cannot be direct connected to
the turbine shaft, the power is usually trans-
mitted by gears, shafting, etc. On account of
the HIGH SPEED of the SAMSON, for a given
power, lighter and consequently CHEAPER
transmission machinery can be used.



JAMES LEFFEL & CO,

Springfield, Ohio, U. S. A.

316 1, agenda Street



BALL BAND



If a boot doesn't keep all the
water outside it is worse than
no boot at all.



BALLS BAND



RUBBER FOOTWEAR

If it doesn't keep the water out
for a long time even under hard
wear, it is a poor boot. Now,
we want you to prove for your-
self that boots marked with the
Red Ball, the trade-mark of "Ball-Band" Quality, are a satls-
fac^ory result of the honest determination to build perfect boots.
Ask your dealer what is the best rubber boot he sells. If the
dealer doesn't say "Ball-Band," the chances are he doesn't sell
"Ball-Band" Rubber Footwear. Over eight million men who
wear our boots believe them to be the best boots they can get for
their money. If your dealer doesn't sell "Ball-Band" Boots or
hasn't your size, write us.

Look for the "Ball- Band" mark in the store win-
dows and on the twots. II the Red Ball is not
there you are not buying the boots we make*



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