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blades start at the ground. This is a feature which
makes it excellent for ensilage. The ears are of
good size and well formed.

Mr. Carson has been working on this variety
for five years, weeding out that which did not come
true.

VOTE FOR $2,759,510 BONDS

The Paradise Irrigation District in Oregon has
authorized a bond issue, aggregating $2,759,510. No
attempt will be made to sell the bonds until the
money market, now disturbed by the European war,
becomes more settled. It is proposed to use the
money realized from the sale of the bonds to pay
off present indebtedness and to irrigate additional
land.



IRRIGATION NOTES

(Continued from Page 378)

California

Preliminary work is being done by
the property owners and business men
of the Terra Bella district around
Porteryille, Cal., for the formation of
a new irrigation company, which will
have for its purpose the watering of
the Terra Bella and Deer Creek or-
chard and alfalfa district, the water to
be secured by control of the floods of
the foothills during the spring and
fall.

It is stated by those in charge of
the work, headed by T. M. Gronen, a
banker, that there is ample water in
the foothills upon which no filing has
been made.

Some work has already been done
and it is estimated by those interested
that the system can be constructed
for about $1,000,000.

Settler^s in the Orland Federal
project in California have started a
cheese factory to take care of their
surplus dairy products. The follow-
ing officers have been selected:
President, J. A. Younggreen; vice
president, J. Lundeen; secretary, H.
L. Lundeen; treasurer, G. G. Ladine.
The factory will be run on a co-
operative basis and only dairymen
will be allowed to purchase stock.

The Carmel Cattle company has
purchased the Cox ranch, consisting
of 4,000 acres, situated five miles
southeast of Lost Hills, Cal. The
principal owners of this company are



The CROCODILE WRENCH



THREADING
BLANK BOLT




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BE/ ORE



Six Handy Farm Tools in One

The Crocodile Wrench is drop forged from the finest tool steel and scien-
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long and weighs ten ounces.

A pipe wrench, a nut wrench, a screw driver and three dies for cleaning up
and re-threading rusted and battered threads; also for cutting nejtv threads on
blank bolts. Dies will fit all bolts used on standard farm machinery.

Teeth and dies are case-hardened in bone-black, making thenvhard and keen.

The dies on this wrench are tempered to wear and would be of inestimable
benefit to any farmer or ranchman, as they would often save -Valuable time,
besides an extra trip to town for repairs.

Sent free with each order for Irrigation Age for one year price for both
$l.oo; also sent to old subscribers who renew their subscription fvr'one year.

Address: IRRIGATION AGE, 30 No. Dearborn St., Chicago






380



THE IRRIGATION AGE.



James Ogden and Chandler, Bryant
and Clark of Los Angeles.

"\Ye will employ between 30 an'd
40 men and will plow and ditch and
put into alfalfa the entire 4,000
acres," said Mr. Ogden recently. "We
are principally in the cattle business
and will use our product for feeding-
stock. The Lost Hills district looks
good to me and outside of a few
little spots here and there, most of
the country is suitable for agricul-
tural purposes."



G. W. Pierce will sink a series of
irrigation wells on his ranch property
three miles west of Davis, Cal. Pierce
has 2,000 acres of excellent land in
the Putah district, and the wells will
form a portion of an extensive irriga-
tion system.



Land owners on the west side of
Fall river, in the vicinity of Glenburn
and Fall River Mills, Cal., propose
to irrigate several thousand acres
with water pumped electrically from
Fall river. The lift is a small one,
the supply of water is never failing,
and the power is available, now that
a new power company has completed
its installation and strung wires
through the valley.



A plan is on foot to irrigate a large
tract that is protected by levees
around the shore of Tulare lake in
California, the first to be irrigated
being a tract of 960 acres belonging
to E. E. Bush and J. F. Pryor, in the
Buena Vista reclamation district. A
15-inch pump will be installed to lift
the water from the lake over the
levee to the land adjoining. When
the tract is all irrigated it will be
planted to wheat, the prospects being
that wheat will be a paying crop next
season, even with the added cost of
irrigation.



A plan for the formation of the
most extensive irrigation district that
has ever been proposed in Los An-
geles county has been submitted to
the board of supervisors of that
county by land owners of San Fer-
nando valley. The district, if estab-
lished, will take in virtually the entire
valley and the estimated cost of the
work is more than $2,500,000.

More than 75 persons representing
vast property interests in the valley
have signed the petition.

The proposition is to build a large
system of conduits and pipes to con-
nect with the Los Angeles city sys-
tem and take Owens river water to
the valley.



O. M. Enslow has filed on 37,500
miners' inches of water in the Feather
river in California to irrigate lands
on the east side of the river west of
Palmero and Honcut. It is proposed
to divert the water at a point near
Hazelbush, and to carry it in a gen-
eral southerly and easterly direction
through Butte and into Yuba county.



GOOD ENOUGH

Heavy Deep Furrow

Sulky Plow




Save Moisture Increase Yield



Plow deep form deep moisture reservoirs increase
the feeding area of the plant roots liberate more plant
food. Do these things and your crops will be greatly
increased. The Good Enough Heavy Deep Furrow Sulky
is the most efficient plow for deep plowing on the
market.

The Good Enough Heavy Deep Furrow Sulky is a
tremendously strong and powerful plow. It will plow
any soil that is capable of being plowed and will turn a
furrow from 6 to 15 inches deep.

The landing lever controls both the front furrow
wheel and the hitch. The dial hitch can be adjusted to
either side and up or down. The draft is applied directly
to the beam through the heavy draft rod. The rear
wheel is locked in place, but can be instantly released by
means of. the foot trip at the ends of the rows.

Regularly furnished with five-horse evener, rolling
coulter and extra shares.

See Your Flying Dutchman Dealer

or Write for Information



Moliiie Plow Co.




Dept. 3



MOLINE, ILL.




THE IRRIGATION AGE.



381



ADAM AND EVE'S FARM WAS IRRIGATED



ADAM and Eve were irrigation farmers. Sir Wil-
liam ^"ilcocks, the eminent English engineer,
whom Secretary of the Interior Lane sent recently
on an inspection tour of the United States reclama-
tion projects, is the authority for this statement. He
also declares the original garden of Eden had an
irrigation system just as scientific and correct from
an engineering point of view as any now in the
West.

Sir William, whose fame rests upon the build-
ing of the great Assouan dam, in Egypt, where he
has turned the land of the Pharaohs back to their
original fertility, has been recently engaged by the
Turkish government in reclaiming ancient Meso-
potamia. The success of the English engineer in
Egypt caused the Turkish government to loosen
its purse strings to the extent of $75,000,000, and
the work is now under way in sections. The Eng-
lish irrigation expert and his engineers have made
a careful survey of Mesopotamia and have discov-
ered parts of an ancient system of irrigation so well
preserved that some of the canals are to be used
in the new project after the mud of centuries is
taken out.

It was while on this survey that Sir William
found what he believes to be the location of the
traditional garden of Eden, with full equipment of
irrigation canals. He says the garden of Eden could
not have been a garden at all without the irrigation
system.

The supposed location of the garden is sur-
rounded by a wall or dike two feet high, with open-
ings for the canals. The English engineer said
that during high water in the rivers Euphrates and
Tigris the dike kept the water from flooding the
garden and in the dry season the gates were open
and the water entered the canals.



USE NORTHWEST BY-PRODUCTS

To provide a "safety valve" for the fruit in-
dustry of the Pacific Northwest a by-products con-
gress will be held in Spokane, Wash, Nov. 19, in
connection with the seventh National Apple Show,
out of which is expected to develop a big organiza-
tion designed to handle the low grade fruit problem
in a systematic way. Concerning the meeting Man-



ager Gordon C. Corbaley, of the apple show, says:
"When we recall that 60 per cent of our fruit
is marketed as extra fancy or fancy and that the
bulk of the remaining 40 per cent is wasted we can
clearly see the vital importance of immediate con-
structive action. The by-product side is the most
important feature of California's apple business, and
the men who have made a painstaking investiga-
tion of our situation in the northwest declare that
this business can be developed in a very large way
here."



FEDERAL PROJECT WORK

The Reclamation Service is asking for pro-
posals for the reconstruction of Dodson South Canal
at Dodson bridge, in connection with the Milk
River Irrigation Project, Mont. The work involves
about 71,000 cubic yards of excavation, 12,000 cubic
yards of puddled filling, 5,200 cubic yards of rip-
rap, 40 cubic yards of concrete, and the moving of
two steel bridge spans, abutments and pier. The
work is situated on the south side of Milk River,
about one and one-quarter miles south of Dodson.
The bids will be opened at Malta, Mont., on Oc-
tober 28.

The International Portland Cement Company,
of Irving, Wash., has obtained a contract for 10,000
barrels of Portland cement for use in connection
with the Umatilla Federal Irrigation Project in
Oregon. The contract price is $1.15 per. barrel,
F. O. B. cars at Irving.

The Reclamation Service has awarded con-
tracts for the construction of the Cave Creek cut-
off, Arizona Canal, Salt River Irrigation Project,
Arizona, as follows:

Schedules 1 and 2, involving 131,000 cubic
yards of excavation, to Martin & Gillis, of Phoenix,
Arizona. Contract price, $15,643.80.

Schedule 3, involving 300 cubic yards of con-
crete, most of which contains steel reinforcements,
and 107 square yards of grouted paving, Haney
Bros. & Company, of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
Contract price, $2,956.



GALVANIZED METAL IRRIGATION FLUME inss"

Made entirely of rust -proof, galvanized iron. No bolts or rivets used in construction. This flume is

considered by experts to be the most service-
able equipment for the purpose on the market.
A careful examination of the construction as
shown herewith will convince those who are
acquainted with irrigation conditions of its
lasting quality and the ease with which it may
be put together. Complete information, with
prices, will be jfurnished on application to the

KLAUER MFG. COMPANY, Du , b u w r-




Section of Flume



When writing to advertisers please mention The Irrigation Age.



382



THE IRRIGATION AGE.



The Reclamation Service is asking for proposals for
the construction of divisions 1. 2, and 3 of the High Line
Canal and structures, Strawberry Valley Irrigation Proj-
ect, Utah.

The work involves approximately 384,000 cubic yards
of canal excavation, 2,300 cubic yards of excavation for
structures, 3,300 cubic yards of reinforced concrete, 167,000
square feet of canal lining, 230 lineal feet of tunnel com-
plete with concrete lining, laying approximately 1,700
feet of vitrified pipe of miscellaneous sizes; also 1,400
cubic yards of back filling and small quantities of rock
filling and stone paving and
the placing of sluice gates
and miscellaneous structural
steel.

The Canal will extend in
a southwesterly direction
from the power plant of the
U. S. Reclamation Service
near the mouth of Spanish
Fork Canyon, to a point near
Payson City, Utah. The bids
will be opened on November
15, at Provo, Utah.

The Secretary of the In-
terior has authorized the
Reclamation Service to exe-
cute the following contracts
for furnishing gates and gate
stands for irrigation projects
in Montana and Wyoming:

The Minneapolis Steel
and Machinery Company, of
Minneapolis, Minnesota,
Schedules 1, 2, and 3. Con-
tract price $12,589.00, f. o. b.
cars at shipping point.

The Hinman Hydraulic
Manufacturing Company, of
Denver, Colorado, Schedules
4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. Contracts
price, $11,350.00 f. o. b. cars
at shipping point.

These contracts call for
structural steel and cast iron
sluices and regulator gates,
gate frames, gate stands and
accessories.

The Portland Cement
Company of Utah has the
contract for furnishing 3,000
barrels of portland cement
for use in connection with
the Strawberry Valley irri-
gation project in Utah. The
contract price is $1.28 per
barrel, f. o. b. cars, Salt
Lake City.

The Midland Bridge
Company of Kansas City,
has been awarded the con-
tract for furnishing and
erecting a steel bridge at
Arrowrock Dam, Boise irri-
gation project, Idaho. Under
this contract, the total cost
of the bridge, including
freight and erecting, will be
$2,333.83.

The Hinman Hydraulic
Manufacturing Company of
Denver, Colo., has been
given the contract for fur-
nishing steel flumes for the
Xorth Platte irrigation proj-
ect, Nebraska. The contract
price is $6,772.92, f. o. b.
cars, Denver, Colo.



GROWS COTTON IN MONTANA

A. T. Thompson has succeeded in growing
cotton on his homestead on the Huntley project in
Montana. He raised enough this year to pad a
quilt, which will be made up by the children on
the project and exhibited at the San Francisco ex-
position. Thompson formerly lived in Texas and is
well acquainted with cotton cultivation.



AN EXTRAORDINARY OPPORTUNITY


Good for Thirty Days Only

(This offer terminates November 10)

<I IRRIGATION AGE has arranged with the important magazines mentioned below for
a series of special Discounts in Magazine Subscriptions, good until Nov. 10th only.
The volume of subscription' business has grown enormously within the last few years.
Most people arrange their year's subscription in November and December. The conges-
tion resulting from the necessity of handling almost a year's business in a month or two
is a very serious problem. A remedy has suggested itself. Why not induce the public to
subscribe early, and thus eliminate many causes for complaints and inevitable delays? It
is worth something to accomplish this, and the following money-saving offers are made
with this end in view. Here are a number of the worth-while magazine combinations.
By subscribing now, an actual saving of from 25 to 100 per cent is possible. This is your
opportunity. Why not take advantage of it by sending your order TODAY?


Irrigation Age $1.00>


Our Special Pi ice
Until Nov. 10th
$1.50
Thereafter $1.85






Everybody's Magazine. . 1.50 / Until Nov. 10th
Delineator 1.40 1 $2.75


McCall's Magazine 50


Total regular price .. $2.00


Total regular price. .. $4.00 ) Thereafter S3. 40




Our Special Price
Until Nov. 10th
$1.55
Thereafter S2.00




Irrigation Age 1 . 00 \ Our Special Price




Woman's Home Companion . 1 .50 / Until Nov. 10th


Total regular price. . S2.75


Total regular price. . . $5760 .' Thereafter $3.40




Our Special Price
Until Nov. 10th

$1.60

Thereafter $1.85


Little Folks Magazine. . . 1.00 j
or Boy's Life '
or American Boy (






Modern Priacilla 1.00 I. . ,,
Pictorial Review l.OOf z ' 75


Total regular price.. $2.00.


Irrigation Age $1.00 ^


Our Special Price
Until Nov. 10th
$1.75
Thereafter $2.25


Total regular price . . $4.00 ) Thereafter S3. 60


McCall's Magazine 50 ,


Irrigation Age $1 .00 \ Our Special Price


Total regular price. . $2.50


McClure's Magazine l.oOf $2.75




Our Special Price
Uutil Nov. 10th
$2.00
Thereafter $2.60


Total regular price. . . $4.00 ) Thereafter $3.30


Ladies' World 1.00 1
Modern Priscilla 1 . 00 ,


Irrigation Age $1.00 \ Our Special Price


Suburban Life / Until Nov. 10th
The Countryside Magazine 3.00 f $3.00
Total regular price . . $4.00 ' Thereafter S3. 50


Total regular price . . $3.00




Our Special Price
Until Nov. 10th
$2.25
Thereafter $3.15


Mother's Magazine 1.50


Irrigation Age $1.00 \ Our Special Price


Total regular price ... $3 . 50


Review of Reviews 3.00 / Until Nov. 10th


Irrigation Age $1.00"


Our Price Until
Nov. 10th. only
$2.50
SPECIAL


Total regular price.. . $5 . 50 ) Thereafter $3.90


Lippincott's Magazine... 3.00


Irrigation Age $1.00 ) Our Special Price


Total regular price. .. $4.00


Scribner's Magazine 3.001 Until Nov. 10th
or House and Garden \. . -


Irrigation Age $1.00"


Special Price
Until Nov. 10th
Only
$2.75
Thereafter $3.50


Harper's Weekly for 6mos. 2.50
Authentic comprehen-
sive, illustrated news of
the European war. As
a weekly record of cur-
rent history brilliant,


Total regular mice... $4.00 ) Thereafter S3.<o


Irrigation Age $1 . 00 \ Our Special Price


Review of Reviews 3.00 / Until Nov. 10th


Woman's Home Companion . 1 . 50 f $3.25


Total regular price. . . $5.50 ) Thereafter $4.00


forceful, authoritative
you will want Harper's
Weekly for the next few mos.
Rand-McNally War Map
of Europe $1 00




Youth's Companion with 2.00 1 Our Special Price
Tarbell's Life of Lincoln. I Until Nov. 10th
in two volumes, 991 / $3.75
pages, cloth binding 2.50 I SPECIAL
Total regular price. . $5.50'


A special war map, size
about 2x3 feet, printed
in colors, giving full in-
formation regarding the
fighting strength and
resourcesof the contend-
ing forces.

Total regular price . . $4.50 ,




Delineator . . 1 . 50 1 Our Special Price


Pictorial Review .... 1 00 V Until Nov. 10th


Woman's Home Companion . 1 . 50 ( $3.90


Total regular price. . $5.00'


f| Subscriptions can begin with any month. If you are already a subscriber, your subscription will extend
one year from the present date of expiration. The magazines may be sent to one address or each to a dif-
ferent address. This affords an opportunity for friends to subscribe together, and makes it possible to use
the magazine subscriptions as gifts to friends or relatives. Here is a rare opportunity to provide for
Christmas gifts while these low-priced offers are available.

fl Address all orders and send remittances by check, postal or express money order, to

IRRIGATION AGE, 30 North Dearborn St., Chicago, 111.



THE IRE IG ATI OX AGE.



383




What Will You Look For When
You Buy an Engine?



Power?



Then the "INGECO "will suit
you, for in every size its perform-
ance "on duty" exceeds the factory rating.
And it's always reliable.



Long



The sturdy construction of
the " INGECO " assures



you unusual service.



Simplicity ?



The "INGECO "has few
parts and its mechanism

is remarkably simple. All parts are accurate

and interchangeable.



Safety?



Fuel

r UCl



The "INGECO

works perfectly
on kerosene, distillates and light oils at about
half current cost of gasoline.



The "INGECO" leaves no
flame exposed. It's as near

accident and fool proof as an engine can be

made.

Mechanical Excellence?

is an internal combustion engine of the throt-
tling governor type, which is recognized every-
where as the highest standard of engine design.



In short,
"INGECO"

Oil Engines
represent the
highest degree
of engine effi-
ciency. Judged
by cost per
year of service,
they are in the
long run an un-
usually profit-
able invest-
ment.



"INGECO" Oil Engines are made in all sizes from Y^. to
350 H. P., vertical and horizontal; portable, semi-portable and
stationary types air or water cooled. Uniform speed under
variable loads.

We are prepared to supply Complete Equipment for Ir-
rigation Plants, including both engines and pumps to meet
all requirements. Write us for suggestions and estimates of cost.




Do You Need
a New
FEED MILL?




Write for full information about the "New
Holland" for which we are General North-
western Distributors. It's a big capacity
mill of light weight and light draft that
handles all sorts of feed in first class shape
at low fuel cost. You can easily do your
grinding with a 1H to 3 H. P. Engine.
Get better posted about It.



INTERNATIONAL GAS
ENGINE COMPANY



General Sales Offices and Factory
Holthoff Place, Cudahy, Wis.












When writing to advertisers please mention The Irrigation Age.



384



THE IRRIGATION AGE.





American Ingot Iron

ARMCO CULVERTS




Purity



Permanence



'"T V HE great irrigation companies have many places where corrugated
iron pipe, gates and bulkheads can be used to advantage, the only
difficulty being that the ordinary material in this form has a rather
limited service life. This objection is overcome by the use of high-
purity iron. See Engineering News, Jan. 22nd, 1914, Corrugated Iron
Construction on the Sacramento Valley Irrigation Project, by
E. C. Mills, Engineer. (Copy mailed on request.)

The illustration shows part of a shipment of 26 cars of American
Ingot Iron Culverts, made to the South San Joaquin Irrigation District,
San Joaquin County, California.

Write the nearest manufacturer for particulars and prices on American Ingot Iron Armco Culverts
Siphons, Flumes, Plates, Sheets, Roofing and Formed Products:



Arkansas, Little Rock

Dixie Culvert & Metal Co.
California. Los Angeles

California Corrugated Cul-
vert Co.
California, West Berkeley

California Corrugated Cul-
vert Co.
Colorado, Denver

K. Hardeety Mfg. Co.
Delaware, Clayton

Delaware Metal Culvert Co.
Florida, Jacksonville

Dixie Culvert & Metal Co.
Georgia, Atlanta

Dixie Culvert & Metal Co.
Illinois, Bloomington

Illinois Corrugated Metal Co.
Indiana, Crawfordsville

W. Q. O'Neal 1 Co.
Iowa, Des Moi nrs

Iowa Pure Iron Culvert Co.
Iowa, Independence

Independence Corr. Cul. Co.



Kansas, Topeka

The Road Sup. & Metal Co.
Kentucky, Xouisville

Kentucky Culvert Co.
Louisiana, New Orleans

Dixie Culvert & Metal Co.
Maryland, Havre de Grace

J. N. Spencer.
Massachusetts, Palmer

New England Metal Cul. Co.
Michigan, Bark River

Bark River Bridge & Cul. Co.
Michigan, Lansing;

Michigan Bridge & Pipe Co.
Minnesota, Minneapolis

Lyle Corrugated Cul. Co.

Minnesota, I. vie

Lyle Corrugated Cul. Co.

Missouri, Moberly

Corrugated Culvert Co.

Montana, MiNNoula

Montana . 'vil \vi-t Co.



Nebraska, Lincoln

Lee-Arnett Co.
Nebraska, Wahoo

Nebraska Cul. & Mfg. Co.
Nevada, Reno

Nevada Metal Mfg. Co.
New Hampshire, Nashua

North-East Metal Cul. Co.
New Jersey, Flemington

Pennsylvania Metal Cul. Co.
New York, Auburn

Pennsylvania Metal Cul. Co.
North Carolina, Greensboro

Dixie Culvert & Metal Co.
North Dakota, Wahpeton

Northwestern Sheet &. Iron

Works.
Ohio, Middletown

The Ohio Corrugated Cul. Co.
Oklahoma, Shawnee

Dixie Culvert & Metal Co.
Oregon, Portland

Coast Culvert & Flume Co.



Pennsylvania, Warren

Pennsylvania Metal Cul. Co.
South Dakota, Sioux Falls

Sioux Falls Metal Cul. Co.
Tennessee, Nashville

Tennessee Metal Culvert Co.
Texas, Dallas

American Rolling Mill Co.
, Atlas Metal Works.
Texas, El Paso

Western Metal Mfg. Co.
Texas, Houston

Lone Star Culvert Co.
Utah, Woods Cross

Utah Culvert Co.
Virginia, Roanoke

Virginia Metal & Cul. Co.
\\usbiiiKtoii. Spokaiif

Spokane Corr. Culvi-rt &

Tank CO,
Wisconsin, Eau Claire

Bark River Bridge & Cul. Co.



When writing to advertisers please mention The Irrigation Age.






Online LibraryFederation of Tree Growing Clubs of AmericaThe Irrigation age (Volume 29) → online text (page 69 of 69)