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CLAUDIA HYDE. A Norel.

JUAN AND JUANITA. Illustrated by Hbnry
Sandham.

THE LADDER OF FORTUNE. A Novel.

A GEORGIAN BUNGALOW. Illustrated.



HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY
Boston and New York






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"JUAH HAD TO PULL JOANITA BODILY AWAT FROM THE SPRING." (See p. 83.)



JUAN AND JUANITA



BY



FRANCES COURTENAY BAYLOR

AUTHOR OF "on BOTH SIDES," "BEHIND THE BLUE
RIOG^" ETC



WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY HENRY SANDHAM




BOSTON AND NEW YORK

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY

0^z diberj^itie ^xtii Cambcitioe



COPTKIGHT, l886, 1887, 1914 AND ipij, BT THE CENTURY COMPANT

COPYRIOHT, 1887, BY TICKNOR AND COMPANY

COPYRIGHT, I915, BY FRANCES COURTBNAY BARNUM

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED



Sr I



\ I



,^9 1



THIS LITTLE STORY
75 AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED

TO ALL DEAR CHILDREN EVERYWHERB

BT

THE AUTHOR.



PREFACE.

rr^HIS story of two unfortunate fortunates — mice let us say,

seized by a tiger and escaping from under his very claws —

is true in its essential facts. That is, two Mexican children

were really captured some years since on the other side of the

Rio Grande by the Indians, and carried off to the Llanos Esta-

cados. After four years spent in captivity they made their

escape, and safely accomplished the almost impossible and truly

incredible feat of walking three hundred miles and more through

virgin wilds, with only such protection as Una had, and no

friendly bull like Europa's to shorten so much as one weary

mile of all that great distance, led no doubt by guardian

angels who knew enough of mundane geography to bring them

first to the frontier of Texas, and then restore them to their

mother in Mexico.

F. C. B.

Elmwood, May 7, 1887.



CONTENTS.



o>*to



CHAPTER I.
The Tiger Springs 11



CHAPTER n.
By the Waters of Babylon .34

CHAPTER in.
Free Again 54

CHAPTER IV.
Adios, Shaneco! Adios Todos! 78

CHAPTER V.
Juan Makes a Discovery 98

CHAPTER VI.
Mirage 119

CHAPTER VII.
The CaSon op Roses 142



8 CONTENTS.



PAOK

CHAPTER VIII.

ESTEELLA 162



CHAPTER IX.
SeSor Leopaedo 185

CHAPTER X.
Some Good Sport and a Fresh Peril . • • • 210

CHAPTER XI.
Cock-crow and Day Dawns 231

CHAPTER XII.
At LastI 253



ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAQB

"juan" had to pull juanita bodily away from the

Spring ......... fbohtispiecb

A Mexican Hacienda 15

^ - . .

"Don Josh's vicious little Mustang bolted in among

them" ...;.;.... 22

" ' Run ! fly ! run to the Chaparral I hide ! fly ! '

called Don Jose" 27

" Juan did all he could to comfort his Sister " . 43

" ' Do you see that large, beautiful Star ? ' said

Juan " . . . . . . . . . .63

Juan and Juanita are serenaded by Coyotes . . 67

" They knew they were only partly hidden, and
only safe until the indians had turned thb
Bend of the Creek " 73

" NiTA SEIZTED THE TURKEY BY THE NeCK "... 107

" Out, also, rushed a Swarm of angry Bees " . . 113



10 ILLUSTRATIONS.



Tkvm



'In a Frenzy of Hope they hurried on" . . • 125
'He was roused by a Peai. op Thunder" . . .129

'NiTA AND AmIGO "MAKE UP " 143

*Thb Moment had come!" . , 155

'juanita sat down very near it " . . . . 171

'Juan fitted an Arrow and let it drive" . • 179

'Amigo becomes a Beast op Burden" .... 187

'Three successive white Clouds op Pigeons swept

PAST them" 201

Catching Quail 211

" NiTA stumbled and fell in the tall Grass " . . 223

"They had given a terrible fright to a worthy

Teuton" 237

"Both found a new Attraction in the Baby" . • 245

" Amigo felt the Need of Meditation " . . . • 255

"Presented with a Pop-gun" 267

" Madre I MI Madre I " . . • . • . . . 273



JUAN AND JUANITA.



CHAPTER I.

THE TIGER SPRINGS.

About twenty years ago there was not a happier family
in all Mexico than one living near the village of Santa Rosa,
province of Coahuila, and consisting of a ranchero, his wife
Anita, and their two children, Juan and Juanita.

They had a great deal to be grateful for and to enjoy; a
comfortable home, large flocks and herds, — which consti-
tute the wealth of that country, — health, work, and, best of
all, a tender love for one another. They had a great deal of
another thing, some of which they could very well have
spared — name.

The father called himself Don Jose Maria Cruz de las
Santas,* prided himself upon his pure Castilian lineage, and
was never tired talking of his " sangre azul^'''' or ^^blue blood,"
and his superiority to "the ordinary Mexicans."

His wife had no aristocratic pretensions whatever, and,
instead of always talking about the past, was content to do

' Pronounced in English : Hosay Mareea Croos day las Santas,



12 JUAN AND JUANITA.

her duty in the present. She was a simple and rather igno-
rant woman, but so well did ^he apply herself to her home
duties, that never had any man a truer, better wife, children a
more passionately devoted, self-sacrificing mother, nor house
a more capable mistress than the Seiiora Anita. If she had a
fault, it was that she was altogether too unselfish, and she
would willingly have worked herself to death for those she
loved.

And there was enough to do; for, although Don Jose
was reckoned a rich man, he lived as simply in most respects
as his poorer neighbors, and never seemed to think of spend-
ing his money on servants, carriages, fine clothes, and the
like luxuries. Fortunately he was not too fine a gentleman to
work, in spite of his excessive vanity about the Cruz de las
Santas, whose renown he honestly thought filled the world.
On the contrary, he diligently herded his own sheep, sheared
them in season, branded his cattle, trained his horses, and did
other out-door work, and he naturally expected the Senora
Anita to be equally industrious, l^ov was he disappointed;
for when she was not making toynales, or tortillas,^ she was
sprinkling and sweeping the floors and court-yard, or bring-
ing in great earthen jars of water, or spreading out the
family linen to bleach in the sun, or training the rebellious
tendrils of the grape-vine that covered o«e side of the house
and supplied them with immense bunches of delicious Paras
grapes at one season of the year, — in short, doing something
for the good of the household.

' Mexican dishes.



THE TIGER SPMINGS. 13

And no matter where she went, she was always fol-
lowed by Juan and Juanita, who trotted after her from
morning until night, yet always felt themselves welcome,
and no more in the way than did the chickens they saw
under this or that hen's wing when they went out to
feed the poultry that swarmed about the place. If his
mother seized Juan when he ran up to her with the crown
of his broad soiribrero heaped full of eggs, it was to draw
him to her side and stroke his hair, and praise him for
having found them. Or, if Juanita tumbled into the brook
near which the Senora was washing in laborious Mexican
fashion, the garment, whatever it was, was dropped, and
soon the dripping little figure was being pressed against
her loving heart, while the tenderest articulate and inar-
ticulate cries of sympathy and affection were poured out
on the unfortunate, and so much love shone in the mother's
soft, brown eyes that it was worth any child's while to
get a wetting in order to see it there and hear the caress-
ing, ''Mi alma! Mi vidaf' ("My soul I My lifel") that
same so musically from the Senora's lips.

Busy as she was, the Senora found time to do a
great deal of " mothering," and her children lived always
n the sunshine, in-doors and out, as joyous and volatile
as the butterflies they chased, as brown as the berries
they sought, forever leaping and dancing like the brook
\q which they were forever wading, the happiest of created
things. They did not deserve much credit for being
J^appy, for, except in the golden age of the world, there



14 JUAN AND JUANITA.

were never two children who had more to interest and
amuse them, and less to vex them. Their few tasks
came properly under the head of pleasures; they had no
lessons to learn, only a few simple rules to obey; no fine
clothes to soil or spoil; and as for playfellows, they had
each other, the pigeons, chickens, lambs, kids, ducks, pup-
pies, and other young things about the place, not to
mention the birds, frogs, squirrels, and one especially sa-
gacious and long-suffering shepherd-dog, Amigo, their
most faithful friend and constant companion. They were
so happy and so busy that it did not often occur to thera
to be naughty; bat if they did get into trouble, it was
always Don eJose avIio punished them and the Seiiora who
made them sorry for what they had done. As soon as she
dared do so, she would go to them, take them in her anns,
murmur, softly, ^^ Pobre desgraciado ! ^^ ("Poor disgraced
one I ") or " I^ina mia ! " (" My little girl ! ") pour balm
into all their wounds, take all the sting and the bitterness
out of their sore hearts, and so lead them out, chastened
and mild, to kneel at their father's feet and beg forgive-
ness; and then she sent them out to play, and smiled as
she heard their shouts and laughter.

Their home, or hacienda, was not in the least like
any house that you have ever seen, most likely. It was
roughly but strongly built of stout pickets driven firmly
into the earth near enough together to allow the space
between to be daubed with clay and thatched with tule^
a long reed that grows in the Mexican country wherever



th:3 tiger springs.



15



there is standing water. Inside there were no carpets,
curtains, mirrors, pictures, or books, and only a little fur-
niture of the simplest kind; but, though homely, it was
home-like, which is not always the case with far finer houses.
The floor was only the earth inclosed, but much tramp-
ing and the Senora's endless sweepings, and brisk use




•0 ^^^i$^^^>^^^^&^¥^^^^^^^^^S^S^§ ^"^




A MEXICAN HACIENDA.



of a watering-pot with which she laid the dust twice a
day had made it quite smooth and hard. The ceiling was
festooned with long strings of jerked beef and onions,
and red peppers, — the latter a prominent ingredient in
everything the Senora cooked, and so much relished by
Don Jose that it was his habit to pull off a handful at
odd times and eat them as we would grapes or figs, al-



10 JUAIT AND JUANJTA.

though they would certainly have choked any one who
was unaccustomed to the luxury.

Perhaps, among other distinguished iDcculiarities, the
Maria Cruz de las Santas family had heen made fire-proof,
and so could indulge in dainties that would have proved fatal
to ordinary people; perhaps Don Jose had carried his insensi-
bility to burning liquids and vegetables by a long course of
Spartan banquets, and would himself have been blown up
early in his career by one of the dozen peppers with which he
now seasoned every meal. However that may be, it really
seemed as though he could swallow molten lead without
winking. A spoonful of those tiny live-coals called chillis
disappeared down his throat without bringing the least addi-
tional tinge of color into his sallow cheek or the suspicion of
tears to his eyes; he always took his coffee boiling; and as
for the catsups and sauces that we call hot and serve with
soup or fish, it is my belief that he would have mistaken them
for ices if they had come in his way.

Everything within the hacienda was kept in a tidy state
by the Senora, the few cooking-utensils bright and clean, the
family effects disposed in an orderly fashion about the room,
the walls of which were whitewashed regularly twice a year.
So good a housewife was sure to have some place to store
precious things, and accordingly in one corner there were
some rude shelves where small packages of coffee and sugar,
dried fruit, and what not were kept; and it was a spot that
interested Juan and his sister more than any other, for here
were always to be seen one or more tall pyramids of a confec*



THE TIGER SPRINGS. 17

tion called peloncillos^ wrapped in golden straw. How their
eyes did glisten, to be sure, and their mouths water when the
Seuora got one down, slowly unpacked it, and then broke off
a piece and divided it between them ! This was almost sure
to happen on Sundays, the days of their saints, the festas of
the Annunciation and Assumption and all the great festivals,
on San Miguel's day, San Antonio's day, and whenever they
were supposed to deserve the treat. There was nothing they
liked better, not even loaves of the fine Mexican bread known
as 'pan de gloria, which they enjoyed equally in the baking
and the eating. It was a blissful performance to watch the
Senora get out her materials, deftly fashion each little cake in
turn, make the sign of the cross on it, and pop it into the
oven; it was still more delightful to see them taken out, so
hot, brown, delicious! and to be given as many as two hands
could hold, and to run off to the garden "svith them ! So good
a woman as the Senora could hardly be lacking in piety;
every morning and evening she was wont to kneel in humble,
fervent prayer, with little Juan on one side and Juanita on
the other, repeating after her their pater-nosier s. And if the
children were not made to study history and geography and
arithmetic, like most young Americans, they at least had
before them constantly the example of their sweet mother, and
so got by heart, in the best way possible, the first and great-
est of all lessons — love to God and man.

^ear the house, on one side, was the corral, or pen
for the sheep, with the shepherd-dogs guarding it like

' Pronounced pay-lone-cilyos.



18 JUAN AND JUANITA.

SO many trusty sentinels. On the other was the Senora's
garden, where she had lovely flowers growing or bloom-
ing always, great bushes studded with oleander blossoms,
clambering vines of jessamine or morning-glory, cacti,
aloes, and dwarf palms. Some of the children's most
delightful hours were passed in this sunny, fragrant spot,
rolling about on the ground with Amigo, caressing their
mother's tiny Chihuahua dogs Chula and Preciosa, making
wreaths to fling about their necks, or playing hide-and-
seek behind the oleanders, while the Seiiora industriously
clipped, watered, shaded or smoked the plants, planted or
gathered seeds, or daily plucked immense bouquets which
a prodigal nature daily replaced. Her work done, she
would often sit down on the steps of a rickety porch
attached to that end of the house where shade and a
breeze were nearly always to be found; the children and
the little dogs would swarm somehow into her lap; and
there she would fondle and caress them all with that
wealth of soft labials which the Spanish language pos-
sesses, or sing in a high, sweet, but, it must be confessed,
very nasal, voice, song after song; in some of which, such
as " El Sueno" " Mananitas Allegras,^^ " Si yo te amo^'' ^
the children would join.

And now I come to the one cloud in the beautiful blue
of that heaven on earth, — a cloud that sometimes appeared
a mere speck for months together, and so far away that it
was almost lost sight of, and then suddenly grew black

» "The dream," "Happy monungs," "If I love thee."



THE TIGER SPRINGS. 19

and terrible, and threatened to overspread the whole sky
and work the most dreadful ruin and desolation. It needed
but a look at the hacienda to tell the whole story; for
all along its walls at regular intervals were holes through
which to fire upon an attacking party, and the house and,
outlying buildings were inclosed in a picket-fence, witL\
gaps here and there, intended to serve the same good end.
The haunting terroi*, the curse of the country, was that
it was liable to be overrun at any time by the Indians, who
would sweep down upon it from their distant strongholds
in the mountains, steal all the cattle and sheep they could
find, and murder the peaceful inhabitants, men, women,
and children, or else carry them off into a captivity so
horrible that it was dreaded more than death. The Mex-
icans, when they had any warning of the approach of the
savages, would hastily drive their flocks and herds into
the corrals, the poorer neighbors seeking shelter and protec-
tion from the richer; but it often happened that they were
taken wholly by surprise, and then terrible scenes ensued.
Every hacienda was for the time converted into a fortress,
always well provisioned, in ex^^ectation of these forays, and
so well defended that the Indians, who were not prepared to
lay regular siege to it with artillery, scaling-ladders, batter-
ing-rams, or any of the appliances of civilized warfare, and
who could not wait to starve the garrison out, were generally
repulsed after a few fierce assaults.

At the time of which I write there had been no Indian
raids for fully eighteen months, and a feeling of perfect



20 JUAN AND JUANITA.

security had gradually grown up. The flocks were growing
larger and larger, and were every day driven farther and
farther from the jacals^ and haciendas in search of fresh
pasture. Don Jose heard in Santa Rosa that all the Indians
had been chased out of Mexico, never to return, and he
spread the good news far and wide. Even the timid Seilora
Anita breathed freely at last; she no longer made herself
unhappy when her children (as children will) strayed out
into the surrounding country and did not come back until
late, and she even formed the habit of sending them every day
to carry their father's dinner to him wherever he might be.
It was a great weight lifted from her mind and heart, and
never had she been busier or happier. It was true that they
sometimes heard vaguely of Indian dej^redations in Texas ;
but that was not Mexico ; and was not everybody quite sure
that all danger was over?

But one bright, beautiful summer day, when all the
world looked so lovely that there seemed to be no room
for trouble or sorrow in it, a terrible thing happened that
overwhelmed not only the Las Santas family, but many
another, in grief unutterablcc

It came in this way. The day opened with a gorgeous
sunrise, with splendid tints of rose and gold, which the Senora
lingered to admire as she walked back to the house from the
well in the fresh coolness of the early morning, carrying
on her head a huge oya,^ so nicely poised that not a drop
of its contents brimmed over. As much could not be said
* Sheep-huts ; pronounced hah-cals. ^ Earthen jar.



THE TIGER SPRINGS. 21

for Juan and Juanita, who, with smaller jugs, tried to imitate
her example; for, instead of following their mother and
making at least an attempt to achieve the same graceful,
erect, smooth way of gliding over the ground, they ran on
ahead, and kept turning and twisting their heads and looking
back at her, which caused small streams of water to pour
down their backs or laughing faces, while the Senora made
a mild pretence of scolding them, and really rejoiced in
their beauty, health, and happiness. The sun itself, now
fully revealed, was not as cheerful a sight to her as her
two merry, lovely children, and she watched all their move-
ments with fondest pride and delight. Breakfast over, the
gate of the court-yard was thrown open, and through it the
long procession of lowing, hooking, trampling cattle pushed
themselves and one another out into the open, followed by an
immense flock of sheep and goats trotting meekly, bleating
pitifully, running awkwardly to right or left in timorous
battalions as the herders cut at them with their long whips, or
as Don Jose's vicious little mustang bolted in among them,
and, feeling a pair of enormous rowels driven into its sensitive
sides, bolted out again. The gates were then shut again and
made fast, and those who were left behind at the hacienda
settled down to the usual peaceful and monotonously regular
duties of the day.

The Seiiora first made some preserves, and then betook
herself to a favorite employment, the manufacture of the
beautiful Mexican blankets, which is one of the great indus-
tries of the country. She had many difficulties to contend



25



JUAN AND JUANITA.




" DON JOSE'S vicious LITTLE MCSIANG BOLTED IN AMONG THSM."



mth in making them. Her only loom was a row of wooden
pegs driven in the walls, her spinning-wheel was almost as
primitive, the wool from her sheep of but an indifferent
q^ualityj but such were her energy and womanly skill that she



THE TIGER SFRINGS. 23

somehow contrived to clean, card, spin, and dye very beautiful
yarns, brilliant of hue, unfading, and of many shades. Of
these she made, from designs of her own, handsome, durable,
water-proof blankets, that, in spite of all the local comj^etition,
;f etched a third more than any others in the market of Santa
Rosa when she chose to sell them, which was not often. On
that particular morning she finished putting in the warp and
woof of a serajya^ for Don Jose, and, having filled her large
shuttle with yarn, went hopefully to work upon the border as
though it was to be the work of a day, instead of a year,
thrusting the shuttle patiently in and out, in and out, between
the threads with her slender, supple, brown fingers, and
singing " Mananitas Allegras " more through her nose than
ever.

When she saw by her clock (the broad band of sun-
shine streaming in at the door) that it was high noon,
she put by her weaving, got diimer, and, while the
children were eating, put up Don Jose's midday repast
in a rush basket and filled a gourd with fresh water.
She presently despatched Juan and Juanita with these,
following them to the door, and giving each a fond
embrace as well as maternal counsels and cautions. She
stood there watching them as they trotted briskly across
the sun-baked court-yard, carrying the basket between
them. Amigo, who had been taking life comfortably in
the shade on the other side of the hacienda, dashed after

1 A blanket having in the centre a hole through which the wearer slips Ma
head. The serapa is worn by the Mexicans wheii they go abroad.



24 JUAN AND JUANITA.

them at the last moment. The Seiiora got a last glimpse
of the children's laughing faces as they successively
stooped and patted Amigo, looked back at her, and
called out, " Adios Mamacita ! " (" Good-by, little'
mother!") ^^ Adios niTios adorados!^^ ("Good-by, dar-
lings ! " ') she replied affectionately, and kissed her hand
to them.

The gates closed on the outgoing trio.

The Senora went back to her dinner, and then settled
down to her work, well content to have some hours of
uninterrupted labor to give to the serajpa, which she in-
tended should be the handsomest she had ever made, —
a birthday gift for her husband.

The children walked away westward across the sun-
burnt, rock-bound plain toward the place where they knew
they should find their father and the flock. "Whenever
the basket got too heavy for them, they stopped j and
they were by no means in such haste as to feel debarred
from enjoying themselves. They picked many flowers on
their leisurely way; they spent almost three-quarters of
an hour in watching and thwarting the innumerable com-
panies of large red ants that were marching in long files
across the country; and they applied themselves seriously
to the work of thrusting their fingers into the large
fissures made in the prairie by many parching months
of excessive heat, and hollowing out a trench into which
Amigo's tail could be neatly fitted and then covered with

'Literally, '* Good-by, adored childrea 1 "



THE TIGER SPRINGS. 25

earth. This was a performance of which they never tired;
and when he had stood enough of these attempts to raise
him in the scale of animals by depriving him of his
caudal appendage, he would get up suddenly, shake him-
self violently, as likely as not sending a small cloud of
dust into their eyes, and stalk away good-humoredly, his
only rebuke the dignified one of refusing to come back
when called. It was not until Amigo had made this
stand that the children realized how late it was growing,
and when at last they came to the edge of the little
thicket of mesquite trees, where Don Jose had sought
refuge from the noonday glare, not all their voluble ex-
cuses saved them from a good scolding. Their father's
vexation, like his appetite, was soon appeased, however.
Juanita was soon allowed to light his pipe and to sit
down in his lap, and Juan fell to playing with the cord
of his father's immense sombrero, braided and coiled about


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