Frances Jenkins Olcott.

The red Indian fairy book for the children's own reading and for story-tellers online

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THE RED INDIAN FAIRY BOOK




Page 229

\\IIKN 'HIE YELLOW HORNED SERPENT HEARD THE
STRANGE MUSIC, HE WAS CHARMED







!




"



The
j; Red Indian Fairy Book I

- . . i

For the Children's Own Reading ^
and for Story-Tellers



By Frances Jenkins Olcott



By Frederick Richardson







- With Illustrations '



Boston and New York

Houghton Mifflin Company

pcetf^ Cambcibgr jj

V.VV^V.VV\AAWtVA^



COPYRIGHT, 1917, BY FRANCES JENKINS OLCOTT AND HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY

/'

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO REPRODUCE
THIS BOOK OR PARTS THEREOF IN ANY FORM



Published September



W



6 * * C



. .




ROBERT YATES PHILLIPS

WHO LCVEC INDIAN STORIES



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS are due the following au-
thors and publishers for stories or themes taken
from their books:

To The Abingdon Press, for "Why Wild
Roses Have Thorns," and " How Maple Sugar
Came," from Algonquin Indian Tales, collected
by Egerton R. Young, copyrighted 1903.

To Mr. W. W. Canfield, for the " Legend of the
Violet," and the "Legend of the Trailing Arbu-
tus," from his Legends of the Iroqiwis, published
by A. Wessels Company.

To Mr. W. E. Connelley, for "The Singing
Maidens," and "The Star Maiden," from a pub-
lication of the Geological Survey of Canada, and
from his IVyandot Folk-Lore, published by Crane
and Company.

To the Haskell Institute, for " The Noisy Chip-
munk," from Indian Legends and Superstitions,
published by the Institute.

To Houghton Mifflin Company, for " Little
Burnt-Face," "The Summer Fairies," "How the



viii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Hunter Became a Partridge," " How Partridge
Built the Birds' Canoes," -The Wind-Blower,"
"Pitcher the Witch," "The Wishes," "The
Mikumwess," "The First Pine Trees," "How
Master Rabbit Went Fishing," "The Wood-
pecker Girls," and "Bad Wild Cat," from C. G.
Leland's Algonquin Legends of New England.

To the New York State Museum, for "The
Elves," "The Sky Elk," " Legend of the Morn-
ing Star," "Ahneah the Rose Flower," "The
Silver Brooches," "The Spirit of the Corn," "The
Nuts of Jonisgyont," "Jowiisand the Eagles,"
"The Discontented Rock," and "How the Four
Winds were Named," from Mrs. H. M. Con-
verse's Myths and Legends of the New York
State Iroquois.

To G. P. Putnam's Sons, for "The Ugly Wild
Boy," and "The Poor Turkey Girl," from F.
H. Cushing's Zuhi Folk-Tales.

To Mr. Walter McClintock, for "Scar- Face,"
"The Star Bride," and " The Hidden Waters,"
from his Old North Trail ; or, Life, Legends, and
Religion of the Blackfeet Indians, published by
The Macmillan Company.



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix

Thanks are also due the following for material
drawn from their publications: American Anti-
quarian, American Folk-Lore Society, American
Museum of Natural History, Bureau of American
Ethnology, Geological Survey of Canada, Car-
negie Institute of Washington, Field Columbian
Museum, Smithsonian Institution, University of
California; and also to the Brooklyn Public Lib-
rary for the use of its valuable folk-lore collec-
tion at the Montague Branch.



CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION xvii

April the Month of Spring and Rainbows

THE SPRING BEAUTY (Cbippewa) 3

LITTLE DAWN BOY AND THE RAINBOW TRAIL (Navabo") ... 7

THE MEADOW DANDELION (Cbippcwa) 14

LITTLE BURNT-FACE (Micmac~) 17

May the Month of Flowers and Birds

THE ELVES (Iroquois*) 25

WOODPECKER GRAY (Wyandof) 29

THE KIND HAWK ( Hop?) 31

THE BOY WHO BECAME A ROBIN ( Ckippewa) 33

LEGEND OF THE VIOLET (Iroquois*) . 37

THE STAR AND THE WATER LILIES ( Chippcwa} 40

June the Beautiful Month

WHY WILD ROSES HAVE THORNS (Salteaux*) 45

How THE FAIRIES CAME (Algonquin} 49

THE SUMMER FAIRIES (Algonquin} 54

LEELINAU THE FAIRY GIRL (Chippewa} 57

THE SKY ELK (Iroquois} 60

LEGEND OF THE MORNING STAR (Iroquois} 63



xii CONTENTS

July the Hot Month

THE FIREBIRD ( Wbullemoocb'} 69

YOUNG-BOY-CHIEF (Wichita} 73

THE STAR BRIDE {Blackfooi} 80

SCAR-FACE {Blackfoot} 84

AHNEAH THE ROSE FLOWER {Iroquois} 88

August the Month of Water and Forests

LEGEND OF NIAGARA AND THE GREAT LAKES {Cbippezua} 95

How THE HUNTER BECAME A PARTRIDGE {Passamaquoddj) ... 98
How PARTRIDGE BUILT THE BIRDS' CANOES {Passamaquoddy) . .102

THE NOISY CHIPMUNK (Yakima) 105

THE WIND-BLOWER (Micmac} 108

THE SILVER BROOCHES {Attributed to the Mohawk} . . . . 1 1 1

September the Corn Month

How INDIAN CORN CAME INTO THE WORLD ( Cbippewa) . . .117

THE SPIRIT OF THE CORN (Iroquois} 123

THE LITTLE CORN-BRINGER {Hopi} 126

October the Month of Nuts and Witches

THE NUTS OF JONISGYONT {Iroquois} 133

LITTLE OWL BOY (Arapabo} H 2

THE CHESTNUT KETTLE (Iroquois} IS 2



CONTENTS xiii

THE UGLY WILD BOY (Zuni) 158

PITCHER THE WITCH AND THE BLACK CATS {Algonquin) . . .165

November the Month of Fun and Rating

COYOTE THE HUNGRY {Caddo} 175

COYOTE THE PROUD (Pimd) 181

THE MAGIC WINDPIPE {Arikara} 183

THE BIRDS' BALL-GAME {Cherokee} .189

WHY THE TURKEY GOBBLES ( Cherokee'} 1 94

THE LAND OF THE NORTHERN LIGHTS {Algonquin} 196

THE POOR TURKEY GIRL (Z#/) 199 <

December the Month of Gifts

THE MUD PONY (Skidi Pawnee} 211

THE WISHES {Micmac} 220

THE MIKUMWESS {Micmac} . . . . . . . . .225

THE FIRST PINE TREES (Micmac} 234

THE HIDDEN WATERS {Iroquoii} 237

January the Cold Month

JOWIIS AND THE EAGLES (IroqUOts} 243

SHINGEBISS (Chippewa} 246

THE BOY IN THE JUG (//<?/>/) 250

THE BROTHER AND SISTER (Arapabo} 253

THE SNOW MAN (Menominee} 263



xiv CONTENTS

February the Month of the Sky and Rocks

THE ROLLING ROCK (Flatbead} 271

THE BOY IN THE MOON {Vuntaktttchtn) 276

THE DISCONTENTED ROCK {Iroquois} 278

LEGENDS OF THE PLEIADES

THE SINGING MAIDENS {Wyandof} 282

THE STAR MAIDEN (Wyandot} 285

March the Month of the Rabbit and Spring

How MAPLE-SUGAR CAME (Salteaux} 291

MlSHOSHA OR THE ENCHANTED SUGAR-MAPLE {CkippeWO) . . 2-9$

How MASTER RABBIT WENT FISHING {Micmac} 306

THE WOODPECKER GIRLS {Micmac) 309

BAD WILD CAT (Passamaquoddy) 312

How THE FOUR WINDS WERE NAMED (Iroquois^ 319

LEGEND OF THE TRAILING ARBUTUS (Iroquoii) 323

SUBJECT INDEX FOR STORY-TELLERS 329



ILLUSTRATIONS

WHEN THE YELLOW HORNED SERPENT HEARD THE STRANGE Music, HE
WAS CHARMED Frontispiece

LITTLE DAWN BOY ON THE RAINBOW BRIDGE (page 10) . Dedication-page
SHAWONDASEE AND THE MEADOW DANDELION (page 1 6) . . . . 3

SHE HAD PLAITED HER HAIR ABOUT THE NECK OF THE YOUNG MAN

(page 39) 25

NANAHBOOZHOO AND THE WILD ROSES (page 48) 45

As HE WENT UP HE SHOT MANY SlGHING ARROWS (page 62) . facing 6O

THE FIREBIRD AND THE POOR WOMAN (page 71) 69

THE YOUNG MAN AND THE WIND BIRD (page 109) . . . 95

WUNZH AND THE INDIAN CORN (page I 2O) 117

NUKDAGO PRONOUNCING JUDGMENT AGAINST THE FROG AND THE WoOD-

CHUCK (page 138) 133

THEY SAW HIM BEGIN TO GO ROUND AND ROUND THE ROBE . facing 150
COYOTE AND OPOSSUM (page 175) 175

A NUMBER OF YOUNG TURKEYS PLAYING ON A HILLSIDE (page 177)

facing 178

GLOOSKAP AND THE THREE BROTHERS (page 235) 211

JOWIIS AND THE BALD EAGLE (page 244) 243

IMMEDIATELY THE BEAR CAME PACING THROUGH THE TIMBER (page
261) facing 262

THE SEVEN MAIDENS DANCING ON THE BEACH (page 285) . . .271
THE BEAR WHO BECAME THE NORTH WIND (page 319) . . . .291
SPUTTERING, SHIVERING, AND ALMOST FROZEN (page 308) . facing 306



INTRODUCTION

HERE are sixty-four stories of the Red Men, tell-
ing of Magic, Mystery, and Fairies. Most of them
are Nature stories poetic fancies of the Indi-
ans about birds, beasts, flowers, and rocks of our
American meadows, prairies, and forests. Here
also are tales of the Wind, Rainbow, Sun, Moon,
and Stars. A few moral stories, tender and sim-
ple, like " Little Burnt-Face," are included. Indian
customs, and life in the wigwam and forest, are
all here.

The tales are arranged according to the Sea-
sons. There are some for early Spring, when the
maple sap mounts, and the arbutus blooms under
the snow ; for later Spring, when the birds nest,
and the wild flowers blow ; for Summer, with its
heat, storms, fishing, and canoeing ; for Autumn,
with its corn, nuts, Witch-Night, and harvest
feast ; for Winter, with its ice, snow, and adven-
tures.

In choosing themes for these stories, a large



xviii INTRODUCTION

body of folklore of many tribes has been gone
over. In retelling, all that is coarse, fierce, and
irrational has been eliminated as far as possible,
and the moral and fanciful elements retained. The
plots have been more closely constructed, and
retold in the direct manner interesting to children.
The character and spirit of the original stories
have been carefully preserved, as may be seen by
comparing the elemental tales of the Caddo and
Vuntakutchin Indians with the more highly de-
veloped, poetic ones of the Algonquin or Iroquois
tribes.

The reader may be surprised at the absence of
the benign " Great Spirit' who figures in many
modern Indian tales. But the truth is, he is not
to be found in aboriginal Red Indian mythology.
To quote from Mr. Leland's Algonquin Legends,
" I do not believe that the idea of a Great Spirit,
in the sense in which it is generally used by In-
dians, or is attributed to them, was ever known
till learned from the whites." The Second Annual
Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology
says, " The ' Great Spirit,' so popularly and poeti-
cally known as the god of the Red Man, and the



INTRODUCTION xix

'Happy Hunting-Ground,' generally reported to
be the Indian's idea of a future state, are both of
them but their ready conception of the white man's
God and Heaven.' 1

Most of these tales have been issued for story-
tellers, in the columns of the Saturday Magazine
of the New York Evening Post. So the stories are
not only for the children's own reading, but they
form a storehouse of Red Indian Nature myths,
suitable for story-telling in homes, schools, and
libraries. To aid the story-teller, a subject index
is appended on page 329.



APRIL THE MONTH OF SPRING
AND RAINBOWS




The Red Indian Fairy Book

THE SPRING BEAUTY
(C&ippewa)

AN old man was sitting in his lodge, by the side of
a frozen stream. It was the end of Winter, the air
was not so cold, and his fire was nearly out. He
was old and alone. His locks were white with
age, and he trembled in every joint. Day after



4 THE RED INDIAN FAIRY BOOK

day passed, and he heard nothing but the sound
of the storm sweeping before it the new-fallen
snow.

One day while his fire was dying, a handsome
young man entered the lodge. His cheeks were
red, his eyes sparkled. He walked with a quick,
light step. His forehead was bound with sweet-
grass, and he carried a bunch of fragrant flowers
in his hand.

"Ah, my Son," said the old man, "I am happy
to see you. Come in. Tell me your adventures,
and what strange lands you have seen. I will tell
you my wonderful deeds, and what I can perform.
You shall do the same, and we will amuse each
other."

The old man then drew from a bag a curiously
wrought pipe. He filled it with mild tobacco, and
handed it to his guest. They each smoked from
the pipe, and then began their stories.

"I am Peboan, the Spirit of Winter," said the
old man. " I blow my breath, and the streams
stand still. The water becomes stiff and hard as
clear stone."

"I am Seegwun, the Spirit of Spring," answered



THE SPRING BEAUTY 5

the youth. " I breathe, and flowers spring up in
the meadows and woods."

"I shake my locks," said the old man, "and the
snow covers the land. The leaves fall from the
trees, and my breath blows them away. The birds
fly to the distant land, and the animals hide them-
selves from the cold."

" I shake my ringlets," said the young man,
"and the warm showers of soft rain fall upon the
Earth. The flowers lift their heads from the ground,
and the grass grows thick and green. My voice re-
calls the birds, and they come flying joyfully from
the Southland. The warmth of my breath unbinds
the streams, and they sing the songs of Summer.
Music fills the groves wherever I walk, and all
Nature rejoices."

And while they were thus talking, a wonderful
change took place. The Sun began to rise. A gen-
tle warmth stole over the place. Peboan, the Spirit
of Winter, became silent. His head drooped, and
the snow outside the lodge melted away. Seegwun,
the Spirit of Spring, grew more radiant, and rose
joyfully to his feet. The Robin and the Bluebird
began to sing on the top of the lodge. The stream



6 THE RED INDIAN FAIRY BOOK

murmured past the door, and the fragrance of open-
ing flowers came softly on the breeze.

The lodge faded away, and Peboan sank down
and dissolved into tiny streams of water, that van-
ished under the brown leaves of the forest.

Thus the Spirit of Winter departed, and where
he melted away the Indian children gathered the
first blossoms, fragrant and delicately pink, the
modest Spring Beauty.



LITTLE DAWN BOY AND THE
RAINBOW TRAIL

(Navaboi)

WHEN the World first began in Red Indian Land,
Little Dawn Boy dwelt in Red Rock House by
the side of a deep canon. And there he lived with
his father, his mother, his brothers, his sisters, and
a big Medicine Man.

Every morning, when the Sun rose, Little Dawn
Boy sat on the edge of the canon, and looked far
across to the other side. He saw in the distance
a purple mountain and behind it a high, white
cliff like a tower, which hid its head in the
clouds.

And every morning he asked the Medicine Man,
"Who lives on the top of the white cliff?"

And the Medicine Man answered, " First learn
my magic songs, and then I will tell you/ 1

So Little Dawn Boy learned the magic songs,
and one day the Medicine Man said :

"Now that you know the songs, and are big
enough, you may visit the Great-Chief-of-All-



8 THE RED INDIAN FAIRY BOOK

Magic, who lives in the House of Evening Light
on the top of the white cliff.

"In the house are four rooms and four doors.
The first door is guarded by two bolts of bright
lightning; the second door is watched by two
fierce Bears; the third door, by two red-headed
Serpents; and the fourth door, by two angry
Rattlesnakes.

" If a visitor goes there who does not know
the magic songs, the lightning strikes him, and the
animal watchers eat him up. But you know the
magic songs so well that you may go safely to
the House of Evening Light and ask for good
gifts for your people."

"And how," asked Little Dawn Boy, "shall I
reach the top of the white cliff?'

" You must take with you presents for the Great-
Chief-of- All- Magic," replied the Medicine Man,
"and you must strew the Pollen of Dawn on your
trail. And when you get to the summit of the pur-
ple mountain, if you sing a magic song, you will
see how to reach the top of the white cliff."

So Little Dawn Boy rose up and painted him-
self beautifully, and decked his head with feathers.



LITTLE DAWN BOY 9

He took his bow and arrows, and made ready to
start. The Medicine Man gave him two bags. In
one were gifts of strings of wampum and sky-blue
turquoises, and in the other the golden Pollen of
Dawn which the Medicine Man had gathered from
the Larkspur flowers.

Little Dawn Boy set out on his way with
dew about his feet and Grasshoppers skipping all
around him. And as he went, he scattered the
golden pollen on his trail.

All that day, and the second, and the third,
he travelled, and early on the morning of the
fourth day he climbed to the summit of the pur-
ple mountain. But still far off and high among
the clouds towered the white cliff, and around its
top flashed the red lightning.

But Little Dawn Boy was not afraid. He scat-
tered more pollen on his trail, and began to sing
his magic song : -

"Oh, Pollen Boy am I!
From Red Rock House I come!
With Pollen of Dawn on my trail!
With beauty before me,
With beauty behind me,
With beauty below me,



10 THE RED INDIAN FAIRY BOOK

With beauty above me,
With beauty all round me,

Over the Rainbow Trail I go!

Hither I wander, thither I wander,

Over the beautiful trail I go!'

And as he finished the song an arch of shim-
mering light, all rose, violet, blue, and every colour,
and delicate as a veil, began to stretch from the
summit of the purple mountain to the top of the
white cliff. And in a minute Little Dawn Boy
saw a bright Rainbow Bridge grow before his
eyes.

Singing with delight he hastened over the Rain-
bow Bridge, and as he ran a wind sprang up and
blew a many-coloured mist to the top of the cliff.
And it blinded the eyes of the animal watchers at
the four doors of the House of Evening Light.

And when Little Dawn Boy reached the house,
he went in and the watchers did not see him. As
he entered, he passed over a trail of daylight, and
sprinkled the golden pollen, while he sang his
magic song.

Then the Great-Chief-of- All- Magic looked at
him angrily, and called out like thunder: "Who
is this stranger who dares to come here unbidden?



LITTLE DAWN BOY 11

Is he one of the people from the Earth ? No one
has ever ventured to come here before."

And Little Dawn Boy answered and said, " See,
I bring you beautiful gifts, and I trust to find many
friends in this house." And he opened the gift-bag,
and took out the strings of wampum and sky-blue
turquoises.

And when the Great-Chief-of- All- Magic saw
these, he was well pleased, and looked kindly
at Little Dawn Boy, and welcomed him to the
House of Evening Light. And he asked him what
presents he would like in return.

And Little Dawn Boy answered : " Gifts for my
kindred I wish. Give me, I pray, yellow and white
and blue corn, green growing plants, fragrant flow-
ers, black clouds and thunderstorms with light-
ning; also the soft Spring showers and the gentle
Summer breezes, with pale mists, and golden Au-
tumn hazes."

And so the Great-Chief-of- All- Magic gave him
what he asked for, together with many other pres-
ents. He feasted him with good things to eat and
drink, and afterward sent him on his way.

And as the boy stepped out of the House of



12 THE RED INDIAN FAIRY BOOK

Evening Light, he began to sing another magic
song :

"Oh, Little Dawn Boy am I!

From the House of Evening Light!

On the Trail of Evening Light!

To Red Rock House I return!

Held fast in my hands are gifts!
With soft rains above me,
With sweet flowers below me,
With white corn behind me,
With green plants before me,
With pale mists all round me,

Over the Rainbow Trail I go!

Hither I wander, thither I wander,

Over the beautiful trail I go!'

And as he sang, the Rainbow, all rose, violet,
blue, and every colour, began to span with its bright
arch the space from the white cliff to the purple
mountain. And over the Rainbow Bridge Little
Dawn Boy hastened singing his magic song.

And for three days and three nights he trav-
elled, until early on the fourth day, just as the Sun
rose, he reached the edge of the deep canon, and
entered Red Rock House.

And there he saw his people waiting for him.
And joyfully they welcomed him, and spread a



LITTLE DAWN BOY 13

magic buckskin for him to sit upon. And he related
all his adventures, and gave them the many good
gifts that had come from the House of Evening
Light.

And ever since that day his people have sung
the magic song of Little Dawn Boy :

"With soft rains above us,

With sweet flowers below us,

With white corn behind us,

With green plants before us,

With pale mists all round us,
Over the Rainbow Trail we go !
Hither we wander, thither we wander,
Over the beautiful trail we go!"



THE MEADOW DANDELION

(Chippewd}

WHEN the Earth was very young, says the Chip-
pewa Grandmother, Mudjekeewis the Mighty kept
the West Wind for himself and gave the three
other winds to his sons. To Wabun he gave the
East Wind; to the rollicking Kabibonokka he
gave the Northwest Wind. But he made the lazy
Shawondasee ruler of the South Wind and of the
Southland. And very sad was Shawondasee to
leave the cool and pleasant Northland, and, sor-
rowing, he set out on his way.

"Farewell, Brother," roared the Northwest
Wind Kabibonokka. "Many's the time in your
hot land you will long for my cooling breath."

But the lazy Shawondasee gave no answer, and
slowly making his way to the Southland, built
his lodge of branches. There in the flowery tangle
of the forest, he sat sleepy and lazy in his lodge.
He did not see the bright birds and flowers. He
did not feel the fragrant airs, but ever he looked



THE MEADOW DANDELION 15

toward the North, and longed and sighed for its
people and cool hills.

And when he sighed in the Springtime, flocks of
eager birds flew northward to feast in the grain-
fields. In the Summer when he sighed the hot
winds rushed to the North to ripen the waiting
ears of corn and to fill meadows and woods with
flowers. And in the Autumn when he sighed a
golden glow drifted northward, and the purple
haze of Indian Summer draped the hills.

But Shawondasee, too lazy to follow in the paths
of birds and winds, lay in his lodge and sighed with
longing.

One Spring, while looking northward, he beheld
a slender maiden, standing in a grassy meadow.
Her garments were green and waving, and her
hair was as yellow as gold.

And each night Shawondasee whispered, " To-
morrow I will seek her." And each morning he
said, " To-morrow I will win her for my bride."
But always on the morrow he looked and sighed
and said, " To-morrow I will go." But, sleepy and
lazy, he never left his lodge to travel northward.

One morning as he gazed he saw that the maid-



16 THE RED INDIAN FAIRY BOOK

en's hair was no longer yellow, but her head was
white like snow. Full of grief, he gave out many
short and rapid sighs. Then the air was filled with
something soft and silvery like thistledown, and
the slender maiden vanished forever.

And Kabibonokka, the Brother Northwest
Wind, came rollicking southward. Jolly and brisk
was he, and laughing loudly.

"Ho, lazy one!' cried he, as he blew around
the lodge of Shawondasee. "It was no maiden
that you gazed upon, but a Meadow Dandelion!"



LITTLE BURNT-FACE



ONCE upon a time, in a large Indian village on the
border of a lake, there lived an old man who was
a widower. He had three daughters. The eldest
was jealous, cruel, and ugly; the second was vain;
but the youngest of all was very gentle and
lovely.

Now, when the father was out hunting in the
forest, the eldest daughter used to beat the young-
est girl, and burn her face with hot coals; yes,
and even scar her pretty body. So the people
called her " Little Burnt- Face."

When the father came home from hunting he
would ask why she was so scarred, and the eldest
would answer quickly: "She is a good-for-noth-
ing ! She was forbidden to go near the fire, and
she disobeyed and fell in." Then the father would
scold Little Burnt-Face and she would creep away
crying to bed.

By the lake, at the end of the village, there
was a beautiful wigwam. And in that wigwam



i8 THE RED INDIAN FAIRY BOOK

lived a Great Chief and his sister. The Great
Chief was invisible ; no one had ever seen him
but his sister. He brought her many deer and
supplied her with good things to eat from the for-
est and lake, and with the finest blankets and gar-
ments. And when visitors came all they ever saw
of the Chief were his moccasins ; for when he took
them off they became visible, and his sister hung
them up.

Now, one Spring, his sister made known that
her brother, the Great Chief, would marry any
girl who could see him.

Then all the girls from the village except
Little Burnt-Face and her sisters and all the
girls for miles around hastened to the wigwam,
and walked along the shore of the lake with his
sister.

And his sister asked the girls, "Do you see
my brother?"

And some of them said, "No"; but most of
them answered, "Yes."

Then his sister asked, " Of what is his shoulder-
strap made ? '

And the girls said, " Of a strip of rawhide/ 1



LITTLE BURNT-FACE 19

" And with what does he draw his sled?" asked
his sister.

And they replied, "With a green withe."

Then she knew that they had not seen him at
all, and said quietly, " Let us go to the wigwam."

So to the wigwam they went, and when they
entered, his sister told them not to take the seat
next the door, for that was where her brother
sat.

Then they helped his sister to cook the supper,
for they were very curious to see the Great Chief
eat. When all was ready, the food disappeared,
and the brother took off his moccasins, and his
sister hung them up. But they never saw the


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Online LibraryFrances Jenkins OlcottThe red Indian fairy book for the children's own reading and for story-tellers → online text (page 1 of 13)