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Francis C Waid.

Twin souvenir of Francis C. Waid : comprising his First, Second, and Third souvenirs online

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1164756



GENEALOGY COLLECT/ON



M



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY



3 1833 01394 4431



IN MEMORIAM.



"The path of sorrow, and that path ahjue,
Leads to the laud where sorrow is ucknown."

— Cowper.

Francis C. Waid, the author of the Souvenirs, is uo more.
Suddenly, "in the twinkling of an eye,'' while in his fifty-
ninth year, he was called to his long home, and the busy hand
that penned the thoughts of his active mind is forever at rest.
He died as he had lived — energetic and industrious in all his
undertakings — his characteristic activity continuing until his
last breath.

When sixteen years of age he commenced to keep a record
of the events of his life, in the form of a diary, and this he
zealously carried on till almost the last moment of his life,
the amount of his writing being remarkable for one who of
necessity was at all times busy with many other things. His
Souvenirs are simply gleanings from his records, and present
but a mere modicum of the bulk of his literary labors.

In 18SG he began the publication of these ''notes by the
wayside," under the title of "Souvenir;" in 1890 he issued
his second Souvenir, and in 1892 his '"Third " and " Twin"
Souvenirs, each combining family history with the biography
of his own life, essays, treatises and other kindred subjects,
all replete with apt allusions and gems of the loftiest thought.

In perusing Mr. Waid's book, the reader can not but be in-
terested in his peculiar attention to detail; his incessant care
to have truths recorded in intelligible simplicity; his modesty
of expression, in every sentence disclosing his humanity and
an unvarying consideration for his fellow creatures. He was
not loth to court criticism, and never turned a deaf ear to the



counsels of friends. For rhetorical embellisbrneiit be cared
little, and to any of the graces of what might be termed fine
writing he made no pretentions; he thought more of the
matter than of the manner, and yet his writings abound in tiie
most salutary, practical lessons, applicable to men of every
profession, and of every grade or condition of life. Of all
the passions that agitate the human mind, there is, perhaps,
no one more grateful in itself, or more useful to man, than
sympathy; and in contemplating its benign influence, Mr.
Waid perceived both the propriety and the excellency of the
divine aphorism: " It is more blessed to give than to re-
ceive." His Souvenirs, which he published at a very consid-
erable outlay, he distributed far and wide, "without money
and without price. "

Mr. Waid's death occurred about eight o'clock on the morn-
ing of February 20, 1892, while he was occupied in a kneel-
ing position in preparing a package of his last Souvenirs,
which he intended to convey to Meadville. He was con-
fronted with the Grim Reaper at the old homestead of his
father, Ira C. Waid, and in the very room in which his twin
brother, Franklin P., had died nearly thirty-eight years be-
fore. No languishing or painful sickness prostrated him, but
while he was yet busy in the beneficent work of his later life.
Death summoned him without a moment's warning, and his
soul fled from its earthly companion which now, in the
beautiful Blooming Valley Cemetery, peacefully awaits the
Resurrection Morn.

The memory of his dearly beloved wife, Eliza, the mother
of his three sons, always remained with him, and materially
influenced the bent of his later life, as is evidenced in his
writings. She was dear to all, and especially so to him who
with her shared equally the joys and sorrows of life for so
many years. She was an extreme sufferer for a long time
prior to her death, but fully believing God's precious prom-
ises, she endured her afflictions as " seeing Him who is invisi-
ble." When on July 4, 1888, she passed from things tem-
poral to things eternal, on the most faithful and loving of



wives, the most devoted of mothers, a true Christian woman,
kind-hearted, noble and amiable, fell the mantle of a blessed
immortality.

The heart of Mr. Waid was highly sensitive to the religious
impressions which were inculcated upon his mind from in-
fancy by God-fearing parents, and in early life he became a
follower of the lowly Nazarene. In later years he gave largely
of his means for Christian and charitable purposes, and he
will ever be remembered by those whom he aided in dark and
desolate days. As a farmer he was successful, always closely
adhering to the paths of industry and frugality. As a man
he was quiet and unobtrusive, and few had more warm friends
than he.

Francis C. Waid is not dead. The tenement of clay in
which the real man lived has returned to dust, and his spirit
has gone to its Giver, but his influence still remains. The
good seed he sowed with so liberal a hand is yet developing,
and has become a " harvest that grows the more with reap-
ing." His Souvenirs remain, enduring monuments to his
unceasing, unselfish, patient labors in the noble work of
doing good.

Chicago, 111., 1892. G. A. B.





'C^



TWIN SOUVENIR 9.^^ )J



FRANCIS C. WAID



IMI'I!ISIN(; HI.-



•f



FIRST



SECOND i^ND THIRD

SOUVENIRS.



A^FK^TI()^•ATKI,^ DKDICATEI)



TO THE MEMORY



TWIN BROTHER



FRANKLIN P. WAID.



CHICAGO, ILL.:

.7. H. BEERS c\c CO., rn-.i.isiiERs
1892.



'"The Lord garc, and the Lord hath taken airan; blessed
be the name of the Lord."'



1164756



HISTORICAL SKETCH



FRANCIS C. WAID.



FAMILY BIOGRAPHIES.



Essay on Farin Economy, Treatise on IVIoney JL,oaninjg;,
and. j^ddress to the Youth,



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF CHAS. R. SLOCUM



IXiXjTJSTE,-A.T:EID.



CHICAGO, ILL.:

WARNER, BEERS



Online LibraryFrancis C WaidTwin souvenir of Francis C. Waid : comprising his First, Second, and Third souvenirs → online text (page 1 of 60)