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Francis C Waid.

Twin souvenir of Francis C. Waid : comprising his First, Second, and Third souvenirs online

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tomac River and a vast stretch of country lie beneath you,
forming a feast for the eye. I love even now to re-
call the monument to memory. I may add to the above
description that history tells us the corner stone was laid
by President Polk July 4, 1848 ; and from the Knoxville
Trihunel read: "Completed; December 6, 1884, the cope-
stone was placed in position." The monument is made
of blocks of marble two feet thick, and it is said that
more than 18,000 were used, the total cost being $1,300,-
000. There are 900 steps. No wonder the Washington
Monument is great, the highest work of man! The skill
and ingenuity of man have ascended to their loftiest
height to honor George Washington, and the youth of



104

our country will ever be inspired by the name and mem-
ory of GEOEGE WASHINGTON. I will mention, with-
out lengthened description, some of the other points of
interest that we touched, before I speak of the Capitol.
First came the Agricultural Department, where Avere a
number of lady clerks doing up packages of seeds. Next
we saw the Smithsonian Institute and the National Mu-
seum, where there are so many relics of George Wash-
ington and Martha Washington and Gen. Grant. The
Patent Office, Fort Meyer and Arlington House came next
in the order of sight-seeing. The Arlington House was
once occupied by G. W. Parke Custis, the adopted son of
our first president, and later by Robert E. Lee, com-
mander of the Confederate forces during the Rebellion.
At Arlington Cemetery are buried over 16,000 soldiers,
and directlv in front of the mansion rests Gen. P. H.
Sheridan.

We attended, on the 4th of March, the inaugural
ceremonies. There were more people present at the in-
ducting into office of President Harrison than on any
similar occasion in the history of the country. The
parade was fully eight miles in length, and it is said that
there were fully 50,000 people in line. Mr. Hibbs and I
stood at Ninth Street and Pennsylvania Avenue from 1
o'clock until 5, or from the time that the presidential coach
had passed until the last cow boy from the West had
ridden by on his broncho.

In the waiting-room of the Baltimore & AVasliington
Railway depot President Garfield was shot at by the as-
sassin, Guiteau, and there is yet to be seen a stain of his
life blood upon the floor to mark the spot where he fell.
While in the city we visited both houses of Congress
while in session. It was certainly worth a great deal to
me to visit the capitol, and to hear the speeches of the




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Online LibraryFrancis C WaidTwin souvenir of Francis C. Waid : comprising his First, Second, and Third souvenirs → online text (page 19 of 60)