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Francis Clater.

Every man his own farrier; or, the whole art of farriery laid open: containing ...the causes, symptoms, and most approved methods of cure, for every disease to which the horse is liable. With an appendix online

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Online LibraryFrancis ClaterEvery man his own farrier; or, the whole art of farriery laid open: containing ...the causes, symptoms, and most approved methods of cure, for every disease to which the horse is liable. With an appendix → online text (page 1 of 14)
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M




THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF CALIFORNIA

PRESENTED BY

PROF. CHARLES A. KOFOID AND

MRS. PRUDENCE W. KOFOID





J M.'</.r/i li,u;l{or.<. I /,',.,,,/.■/./•. <■„ /)nuu'ii/ lloiv,



EVERY MAN

HIS

OWN FAMIRIEM;

OR, THE WHOLE

Art of Farriery laid Open..

^•fCONTAINING
A DISTINCT AND AcdjRATE VIEW



CAUSES, SYMPTOMS, AND MOST APPROVED METHODS OF
CURE, FOR EVERY DISEASE

TO WHICH

THE HORSE IS LIABLE.

RE-WRITTEN, CORRECTED, AND GREATLY ENLARGED.
• In which are incorporated upwards of

One Hundred Original Recipes, never before published.



WITH AN APPENDIX,

CONTAINING A NUMBER OF VALUABLE RECIPES ;

And the proper Method of
PREPARING AND COMPOUNDING ALL THE DIFFERENT MEDI-
CINES RECOMMENDED IN THIS WORK. -



THE TWENTY-SECOND EDITION,



By FRANCIS CLATEK

(of RETFORD, LATE OF^lfElVARK)
AUTHOR OF '* EVERY MAX HIS OWV CATTtE DOCTOR."



LONDON :

Printed hy W. Lewis, St. Johri's Square,

For B. CROSBY and Co. Stationer's Court, Paternoster-RoTT ;
and sold by every Bookseller in the United Kingdom.

1813.



PRICE NINE SHILLINGS IN BOARDS.



INTRODUCTION.



Csfe



Upwards of twenty-five *years have
elapsed since the author published the
first edition of the present work ; and the
rapid sale of twenty-one impressions has
established its character upon a founda-
tion, and in a manner the most gratiifying
and most honourable to himself.*

The new and enlarged edition now of-
fered to the public has been undertaken

* It was intended to have published the Nevr Recipes and
iraprovements as an Appendix, to accommodate the purchasers
of the former editions of this work j without subjecting thein
to the expence of purchasing the present impression ; but as a
revision of the whole Work, and to incorporate the new matter
under its proper title was found to be indispensably necessary, it
was utterly impossible to give the numerous addilions and
improvements in that form.



7^. r*xco^>



IV INTRODUCTION.



at the solicitation of a great number of
respectable gentlemen, graziers in the
neighbourhood of Retford, and also of in-
dividuals from different parts of the king-
dom, and likewise with a sincere desire of
rendering every assistance that lies in the
author's power to young farriers, and to
the public in general.



Notwithstanding the great opposition
which was made seven and twenty years
ago by some interested farriers, who were
implacable enemies to the first publication
of his work, the author has had the sa-
tisfaction of seeing it rise superior to all
detraction ; and can confidently aver, that
if any person, who has the least skill in the
practical part of farriery, will give strict
attention to the symptoms which appear
on the afflicted horse ; and will further
compare them with the rules and exam-
ples laid down in the following treatise,,



INTRODUCTION,



he will, in a short time, be able to under-
stand their different diseases ; and by
carefully applying and administering such
medicines as are prescribed for their cure,
with good drugs, the author has no doubt
but that the practitioner will be enabled
to effect his intention in the most obsti-
4iate diseases.

In its now improved state, the present
treatise contains the result of more than
forty years established and extensive prac-
tice in the veterinary art : and, as some
account has been required of the means
by which the author obtained his know-
ledge, he trusts the following concise state-
ment will be favourably received by the
indulgent reader.

The author was, in early life, appren-
ticed to a late eminent farrier,* with whom

* Mr. Frost, of Xottinghara.



ri INTRODUCTION.



he afterwards continued for many years ;
and by whom he was not only intrusted
with all the secrets of his profession, but
was also instructed in the practical part
thereof. His subsequent practice has
been carried on partly at Newark, and for
the last twenty-six years at Retford, in
the county of Nottingham, w^iere his ex-
tensive concern as a chemist and druggist
has afforded him great opportunity of
making such iraprojvement in the practice
€f farriery, as he trusts will give satisfac-
tion to a candid public.

The present edition will be found en-
tirely new, and on a plan entirely different
from any former treatise of a similar kind.
It exhibits.

First, The nature and symptoms of
every disorder to which that noble an<l
useful animal, the horse, is subject to, in
a plain and concise manner.



INTRODUCTION. VII



Secondly, The best methods of cure.

Thirdly, A particular method of prepar-
ing and compounding the medicines, the
extent of the several doses, and the pro^
per management subsequent to adminis-*
tering them, together with the proper
times necessary for giving the physic. .

Further, the work has been entirely re-
written, upwards of ot^e hundred new re-
cipes, (never before published) are now
added ; and a considerably larger number
of compound medicines is introduced than
appeared in any former edition. To the
whole is added an Appendix, containing
the preparation of the different com-
pound medicines, and a choice collection
of recipes. All superfluous matter is care-
fully omitted ; and the author has sedu-
lously studied (he hopes with success) to
lay down plain and familiar rules, as briefly



VIII INTRODUCTION.



as is consistent with perspicuity, so as to
be intelligible to the weakest capacity.

Before the present introduction is closed,
it may not be improper to caution prac-
titioners against using had drugs. If he is
accustomed to purchase his seeds and
roots in ?ipo%vdered ^i-^te, he must reckon on
being deceived ; for, in general, they are
either prepared from bad or damaged ar-
ticles, or are adulterated more than one
h^lf. Besides, as seeds mostly contain a
large portion of essential oil, if they are
kept in a pulverized state, they will soon
exhale the volatile matter ; in which
• their medical qualities chiefly reside.

Such is the design which the author has
attempted to accomplish ; with what suc-
cess, the intelligent practitioner and a can-
did public will now decide. That the fol-
lowing pages are entirely free fiom defi-
ciences, is more perhaps than he is en-r



INTRODUCTION. IX



titled to expect : but if in its present
improved state, it should again be ho-
noured by a portion of that approbation
which has been conferred on his former
labours, he will be abundantly compen-
sated for the time and attention which he
has bestowed upon the present edition, in
order to render it worthy of public ac-
ceptance.*

* The Author deems It necessary to state, that he had it
not in his power to make any improvement in some of the
former editions; the copyright of such former editions
being vested in a bookseller in the north of England, who
was utterly averse to any addition being made; but he
must state, in justice to the publishers of this impression,
that the moment they had purchased the copyright, and felt
themselves free from restrictions, they were assiduous to pro-
cure the additions and improvements which his very long
and extensive practice had enabled him to make ; and thej
have now, at a great expence, produced the present im-
proved edition, which the author flatters himself will be found
an indispensable Stable Directory to the Gentleman, Farmer,
Groom, and all persons interested in the health of that noble
animal, the Horse.



LATELY PUBLISHED, BY

F, CLATER,

EVERY MAN

HIS OWN

CATTLE DOCTOR

Being a concise and familiar
DESCRIPTION

OF ALL THE DISEASES INCIDENT TO

OXEN, COWS, AND SHEEP.

PRICE 10*. M.



•«• See a Review af^ihe above in the Agricultural Magazine for May
and June, 1810 j and also the Sporting Magazine for May, 1810.



CONTENTS.



VAOB



I. On Shoeing


1


II. Directions for the Management of Horses


5


III. On Bleeding


6


IV. On Purging


9


V. The Windy or Flatulent Cholic


92


VI. The Inflammatory Cholic, or Gripes


26


VII. The Dry Gripes, or Cholic


30


VIII. Of Colds and Coughs


32


IX. The Dry Cough


37


X. The Asthma


39


XL The Glanders


43


XII. Of the Farcy


64


XIII. Surfeits and Hidebound


66


XIV. Mange


n


XV. The Staggers, Convulsions, Lethargy,




Epilepsy, and Vertigo


77


XVI. Fevers


87


XVII. External Inflammation


94



XII CONTENTS.



CHAP. PAGE

XVIII. Bruises . . - 95

XIX. Strangles, and Vives - 99

XX. Disease of the Eye - - 105

XXT. Moon Eyes - - - }}0

XXII. Pleurisy and Inflammation of the

Lungs - - 115

XXI II. Of the Broken Wind - 123

XXIV. Of the Yellows, or Jaundice - 129
XXV. Of Alterative Medicines - 133

XXVI, Moltengrcase . - 1S7
XX VII. Diseases J Hurts, and Strains in the

Kidneys - - 144;

XXVIII. Of Worms - - 151

XXIX. DiarrhcEn, or Looseness - 157

XXX. Of Strains in various Parts - ICl

XXXI. On Firing - - 170

XXXII. Wounds in various Parts - 174

XXXIII. Of Wounds in the Elbow, Stifle-

Joint, &c. - -188

XXXIV. Humours oozing from the Joints,

commonly called Joint-Oil (Sj^-
novia) - - 191

XXXV. Of Ulcers - • 19G

XXXVI. Of the Bone Spavin, Ring-Bonc, and

Splints . - 200

XXXVII. Of the Curb . . 20?



CONTENTS. Xm



PAGE



XXXVIII. Of Tumours, or Imposthumes - 211
XXXIX. On the Poll-Evil - 215

XL. Of Ihe Fistula, and Bruises in the

Wethers - - 221

XLI. Grease, Crown-scabj and llat-Tail 22G
XLIl. Wind-Galls, Blood or Bog Spavins 238
XLIII. Mallenders and Sallenders . - 245
XLiy. Lampas - - 247

XLV, Barbs - - 248

XLYl. Wolves-Teeth, (by some called Eye-
Teeth) - - 249
XLYII. The Teeth, or Grinders - 250
XLVllI. Canker in the Mouth - 251
XLIX. Narrow Heels - 252
L. Hoof- Bo and - - ibid»
LI. Quiltor - - 254
LII. Running-Thrush - 265
Llir. Canker in the Foot - 267
LIV", Bites and Stings of Venomous Crea-
tures - - 270
LV. Bite of a Mad Dog - 273
LVI. Gelding . - 275
LVII. Docking - - 277
LYllI. Nicking - . 279
LIX. Sand-Cracks and False Quarters - 28^;



Xir CONTENTS.



CHAP. I*AGE

LX. Wounds in the Feet from Nails,

Gravel, &c. &c. - - 286

LXI. Colt Evil - - - 291

LXII. Anlicor, or theTeltoric - - 295

LXIII. Founder in the Feet - - 298

LXiy. Rowelling - - -305

LXV. A Star in the Forehead - - 30S

LXVI. Mercurial Ointment, and its Use - 311

LX VII. Beasts that Stale-Blood - - 313

LXnil. Black Oils, and their Use - - 314



APPENDIX.



Intuoduction - - -


. 317


RECIPES.




CHAP.


PAGE


I. Balls for the Staggers


" 318


Fever Balls


- 319


Cordial Balls


. 320


Restorative Balls


- 321


Diuretic Balls


'. 322


11. Purging Clyster


- 323


Rcstringent Clyster


ibid.


Clyster, for Convulsions


- 324



CONTENTS. XV



CHAP.


PAGK


III. Fever Drink


325


A Drink for an Inflammatory Fever


ibid.


A Drink for the Staggers and Convul-




sions - - - -


3%(^


A Drink for the Cholic or Gripes


327


A Drink for the Cholic or Gripes when




on a Journey - - -


ibid.


A Cordial Drink - - .


328


An Ointment for Greasy Heds


ibid.



An Astringent for Strains m different

Parts - - - - 329

The Preparation of Compound Medi-

dicines - - - - 330

ly. Balsam of Sulphur - - . ibid.

Syrup of Buckthorn - - - 331

Syrup of Garlick - - - ibid,

Oxymel of Squills - - -332

Honey of Roses - w - ibid,

Egyptiacum - - - - 333

Another Method to make Egyptiacum ibid,
A third Way to make Egyptiacum - 334
White Ointment - - ^335

Green Ointment - - - ibid.

Marsh mallows Ointment - - 336

Water of Acetated Litharge, or Goulard 337
Electuary of Senna - - - ibid.



XVI



CONTENTS.



CHAP.


PAGE


IV. Oxycroccum Plaster


- 338


Paracelsus Plaster


- 339


Compound Diachylon Plaster


- ibid.


Diapente Powders - '-


- 340


Antimonial Powders


- ibid.


Hiera Picra - - -


- 341


Tincture of Benzoin


- 342


Wound Balsam


- 343


Tincture of Opium


. 344


Tincture of Eupborbium ^


. 345


Tincture of Rhubarb


. ibid.


Tincture of Senna


. 346,


Tincture of Myrrh


. 347


Tincture of Assafcetida


. ibid.


' Soap Liniments, or Opodeldoc


- 348


Camphorated Spirit of Wine


. ibid.


Compound Powder of Chalk, com-


monly called Diascordiura


- 349


Distemper in Dogs


- 350



EVERY MAN



HIS OWN FARRIER.



CHAP. I.



ON SHOEING.



X HERE are few writers who have not offered
their respective opinions on the shoeing of horses,
and with various degrees of ability. The author
of these sheets is free to confess that he is by no
means convinced that any individual can give
such a regular systematical form as the operative
smith can take for his guide, in order to suit all
the differently-shaped feet, which necessarily oc-
cur among a number of horses. It is difficult to



B



2 ON SHOEING.



Where the Art of Shoeing is most required.

find even two whose ftet are exactly alike in
shape and make. The art of shoeing in such
great perfection is not required so much in some
parts of the country as in others : for instance,
amongst the farmers, and in small market-towns,
there is seldom any thing required out of the
common practice. But in large cities or towns,
where the streets are paved with stone, all the
skill of the shoeing-smith is necessary. In Not-
tingham, for instance, where the streets are fre-
quently hilly, and also paved with stone, the
horses' feet are severely tried. In one shop I
have known from eight to ten men to be con-
stantly employed in shoeing, or making shoes, all
Or ifiost of whom were clever at their business ;
yet all of these had different methods both of
making and of putting on shoes. Of this circum-
^'Htftnce the men were well apprised ; and, as most
^W them w^re accustomed to make shoes every
' fti^ht and morning, although these were promis-
'ttuou^y thrown together, every man knew Hii
own work. If, for instance, any one of them



ON" SHOEING.



Th:' Patent Shoe not a Standard to work by.

had shod a horse whose feet it was difficult to fit,
and he in the course of eight or ten days had
been obliged to be returned for alteration, these
men, after exan^ining the form of the foot and
the shoe, could, in general, tell the person who
had done the work. As all these men had dif-
ferent ways of working, they were thereby en-
abled to shoe some kinds of feet far better than
others. Thus much I have endeavoured to shew
the impropriety of attempting to lay before the
public a system that can never wholly be acted
upon. A number of patent shoes^ from different
parts of the kingdom, have been received at the
shop of the late Mr. Frost, at Nottingham, which
have been very neat, and well worthy of the at-
tention or notice of the shoeing-smith ; yet as a
standing rule to work by, all the men in the shop
have stated, that no such shoe could be formed,
unless nature had formed all horses feet alike.
The author has been informed that machines are
kept in town, whieh are worked by horses, for the
purpose of manufacturing shoes of this kind : but

b2



ON SHOEING.



How to ease the Horse by shoeing.

JL J— U- - - . ilJ i .n > I I II,, ■ ■' «

it should be known that iron, formed into moulds
for making of horse-shoes, when passed through
the machine in a white heat, will not wear nearly
so long as when forged with a hammer. All that
can be said in favour of any particular method of
shoeing will certainly fall short of its intended
purpose. Men of talents, who have worked at
the business for many years, and with whom the
author has been acquainted, still conclude that
there is abundant room left for improvement. It
were unnecessary, perhaps, to offer much more
on this subject, concerning which the working
smith alone is qualified to judge : w^e shall, there-
fore, conclude our strictures by remarking, that
Its many horses have very tender feet, and some
parts of the foot are more tender than others, it
is the province of the operative artist to give ease
to such parts, and to throw the weight more upon
those parts which are better calculated to sup-
port it,

r



MANAGEMENT OF HORSES.



Where Bleeding is recommended.



CHAP. II.

/

DIRECTIONS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF

HORSES. •

The proper method of treating horses depends
wholly on the use for which they may be kept.
Such as are kept by the farmer for husbandry
seldom require either bleeding or purging, except
in cases which evidently demand those operations.
The racer, hunter, and hack, require the particu-
lar care and attention of the groom in their ma-
nagement; as some of them are notable to stand
full feeding until they are properly cleansed with
physic. Bleeding should always be avoided, ex-
cept in those cases where there is a tendency to-
wards inflammation. It would be foreign to the
plan of this work to offer any remarks on the
subject of feeding and the management of horses.
Their food consists chiefly of grain and herbage,



ON BLEEDIN®,



Where Bleeding is necessary.



which, if good in quality, and dispensed with
judgment (not omitting proper exercfce and
dressing), will secure him from those compli-
cated disorders to which he is liable by improper
treatment.



CHAP. Ill



ON BLEEDING.



Bleeding is the taking away a certain quan-
tity of blood from some particular vessel of the
body : the parts most frequently resorted to by
farriers are, the jugular vein, the plate vein, the
thigh vein, and sometimes the vein at the toe ;
small quantities may also be taken from the pa-
late and otKer parts. The utility of bleeding
depends upon the following circumstances :



ON BLEEDING.



Recipe for Horses dry fed.



If the horse stands much in the stable, is full
fed, and has little or no exercise ; when his leg^
are swelled ; and his eyes look heavy, dull, red,
or inflamed ; also when he is thriving, and ruh$
off his hair ; and in all inflammatory fevers : and
in falls, bruises, hurts of the eye, and strains ac-
companied with inflammations. A horse should
never be suffered to bleed upon the ground^ but
into a measure^ in order that the proper quan-
tity may be taken, which, in general, is from two
to four quarts, according to size or strength, and
habit of body. The following powders will be
found excellent for such horses as are kept on
dry meat, whether they be in the stable, or travel
on tlie road.



(RECIPE, No. I.)

TAKE-~Crocus of antimony, finely levigated:

Nitre, cream of tartar, and flour of stilphur,

of each four ounces :
Powder and mix them w«ll together for use.



S ON BLEEDING.



Fowderf to keep the Body cool and open.

One table-spoonful of these powders may be
given every night and morning, in a mash of
scalded bran, or a feed of corn, moistened with
water, that the powders may adhere thereto.

These powders are excellent for stallions in the
spring of the year, as they not only keep his body
cool and open, but cause him to cast his coat, and
make his skin appear as bright as silk.



ON PURGING.



Where Purging is necessary.

7 ■ '



CHAP. IV.



ON PURGING.



Purging is necessary for horses of every de-
scription, from the race-horse down to the wag-
gon or cart-horse ; but in some measure it may
depend on the use for which they are kept,
and their manner of treatment. Horses that are
kept on dry meat, and are full fed, with little or
no exercise, require regular purging every six
months, with two or three doses each time, al-
lowing proper interval between each ; and those
horses which run in stage-coaches, or chaises,
(whose labour is often more than their natural
strength is able to bear) ; and such whose legs
are inclined to swell, — all require purgative me-
dicines ; the use of which would be a meaais of



10 ON PURGING.



Preparing a Horse for Physic.



preventing many of the diseases that attack this
noble and useful animal.

After violent exercise, horses are liable to lose
their appetite, and to have their stomach loaded
with crudities and indigested matter; the non»
removal of which, by the use of proper physic, is
the chief cause why so many die daily. Pre-
viously to administering a purge, the body should
be prepared, otherwise the consequences may be
fatal, from the powerful irritation, excessive grip-
ing, and cold sweats, which may probably chafe
away the mucus, or lining of the intestines, and
end in a mortification, and death.

The proper method of preparing a horse for
physic is, to give him two or three mashes of^
scalded bran and oats, and warm water, for three
or four days together. This will soften the fasces,
and promote the operation of the medicine. But
if a strong purge be given to a horse of a costive
habit, without preparation, it will probably occa-



OK PURGING. 11



Recipe — A Purging Ball.



sion a violent inflammation. This may be attri-
buted to the large tract of intestines (upwards of
thirty yards) through which it has to pass ; and
the time that physic takes in passing through the
bowels is seldom less than twenty-four hours. If
the above directions for preparing the horse for
physic be strictly observed, there will seldom any
danger ensue.



(RECIPE, No. 2.)

A Purging Ball.

Take — Barbadoes aloes, eight drachms ;

Jalap, ginger, and Castile soap, of each two
drachms ;

Oil of aniseeds, and oil of juniper, of each
twenty drops:

Mix, and make them into a ball, with a suffi-
cient quantity of syrup of buckthorn.

This will be found of a sufficient strength for a
common-sized hackney.



12 ON PURGING.



Recipe — A Purginj^ Bail.



(RECIPE, No. 3.)

1 Purging Bali,

Take — Tartarised antimony, one drachm ;

Barbadoes aloes, ginger, and Castile soap, of

each two drachms :
Mix, and beat into a ball with syrup.

This ball to be given at night, and the following
next morning.

Take — ^Barbadoes aloes, six or seven drachms ;
Kali prepared, one drachm ;
Ginger, Castile soap, of each two drachms ;
Oil of carraway, half a drachm :
Make them into a ball with syrup of buck-
thorn.

These will be found well-adapted for coach-
horses, or others, that have swelled legs or heels,
attended with inflammation. This dose is calcu-
lated for a moderately-sized horse, and may be
diminished or increased by lessening or augment-
ing the quantity of aloes.



ON PURGING. 13



Directions for physicing a Horse.



-;1 Either of these purges should be given early^in
the morning, on an empty stomach: in two hours
after give your horse a feed of scalded bran, new
milk warm, or rather warmer, and a little good
hay at a time, and often ; also two more mashes
the same day. If, however, he refuses them, give
him dry bran, with a handfull of oats mixed with
it. Take care the water you give him be new
inilk warm. Early the next morning give an-
other mash, and plenty of warm water.: clothe
him, and ride him gently about, two or three
times in the course of the day. If the physic
works too much, give him less water and less
exercise; if too little, give him more exercise,
and as much warm water as he will drink : at
night, when the physic has ceased to operate,
give him a good feed of oats, with a little dry
bran. While the physic is working, the horse
should on no account be suffered to go out in
the rain or wet, but should be gently walked
about in a dry and clean place ^ and warm water
should also be given him (if he will drink it), for



*14 ON PURGING.



Recipe — A Purging Ball.



two or three days after his physic has done work-
ing. The following is an excellent purge for a
tace-horse, hunter, or a hackney, to purify and
cleanse the blood.

(RECIPE, No. 4.)

Purging BalL

Take — Barbadoes aloes, from six to nine drachms

(according to the size and strength of the

constitution) ;
Rhubarb, ginger, and Castile soap, of each

two drachms ;
Precipitated sulphur of antimony, one drachm ;
Kali prepared, half a drachm ;
Oil of aniseeds, twenty drops ;
And oil of juniper, forty drops ;
Make the whole into one ball, with syrup of

buckthorn.

For a strong hunter, hackney, coach, or wag-
gon-horse, the aloes may be increased from seven
to eight, nine, or ten drachms, according to size
and strength. By adding a small quantity of pre-



ON PURGING. 15



Where Mercurial Physic is necessary.

pared kali, or salt of tartar, the griping quality
of the aloes will be taken away, and they will be
rendered much safer. When administered in
large doses, I have known some horses to take
from sixteen to eighteen drachms of good Barba-
does aloes to purge them, with the addition of


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Online LibraryFrancis ClaterEvery man his own farrier; or, the whole art of farriery laid open: containing ...the causes, symptoms, and most approved methods of cure, for every disease to which the horse is liable. With an appendix → online text (page 1 of 14)