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University of California Berkeley

From the book collection of
BERTRAND H. BRONSON

bequeathed by him
or donated by his wife

Mildred S. Bronson



THE ENGLISH AND SCOTTISH
POPULAE BALLADS



THE

ENGLISH AND SCOTTISH

POPULAR BALLADS

EDITED BY

FRANCIS JAMES CHILD




IN FIVE VOLUMES

VOLUME IV

PAET I



BOSTON AND NEW YORK

HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN AND COMPANY

Ws^z Ifctoersfoe ^prestf, Cambridge

LONDON : HENRY STEVENS, SON AND STILES



(3Efooti0an& Copied Printed
Ab &.



COPYRIGHT, 1890, BY F. J. CHILD
ALL EIGHTS RESERVED



ADVERTISEMENT TO PART VII

NUMBERS 189-225



I WOULD acknowledge with particular gratitude the liberality of the HON. MRS MAX-
WELL-ScOTT in allowing the examination and use of the rich store of ballads accumulated
at Abbotsford by her immortal ancestor ; and also that of LORD ROSEBERY in sending to
Edinburgh for inspection the collection of rare Scottish broadsides formed by the late
David Laing, and permitting me to print several articles.

The REV. S. BARING-GOULD has done me the great favor of furnishing me with copies
of traditional ballads and songs taken down by him in the West of England.

I am much indebted to the REV. W. FoRBES-LEiTH for his good offices, and to MR MAC-
MATH, as I have been all along, for help of every description.

F. J. C.

OCTOBER, 1890.



ADVERTISEMENT TO PART VIII

NUMBERS 226-265



A CONSIDERABLE portion of this eighth number is devoted to texts from Abbotsford.
Many of these were used by Sir WALTER SCOTT in the compilation of the Minstrelsy of the
Scottish Border ; many, again, not less important than the others, did not find a place in that
collection. They are now printed either absolutely for the first time, or for the first time
without variation from the form in which they were written. All of them, and others which
were obtained in season for the Seventh Part, were transcribed with the most conscientious
and vigilant care by Mr MACMATH, who has also identified the handwriting, has searched the
numerous volumes of letters addressed to Sir WALTER SCOTT for information relating to the
contributors and for dates, and has examined the humbler editions of printed ballads in the
Abbotsford library ; this without remitting other help.

Very cordial thanks are offered, for texts or information, or for both, to the Rev. S. BAR-
ING-GOULD, the Rev. W. FORBES-LEITH, Mr ANDREW LANG, Dr GEORGE BIRKBECK HILL,
Mr P. Z. ROUND, Dr F. J. FURNIVALL, Mr JAMES BARCLAY MURDOCH, Dr GIUSEPPE
PITRE, of Palermo, Mr WILLIAM WALKER, of Aberdeen, Mr DAVID MAcRiTCHiE, of Edin-
burgh, Mr JAMES GIBB, of Joppa, Mr JAMES RAINE, of York, Rev. WILLIAM LESLIE
CHRISTIE, of London, Mrs MARY THOMSON, of Fochabers, and Mr GEORGE M. RICHARDSON,
late of Harvard College ; for notes on Slavic popular literature, to Mr JOHN KAREOWICZ,
of Warsaw, and Professor WILHELM WOLLNER; and for miscellaneous notes, to my col-
league, Professor G. L. KlTTREDGE.

So far as can be foreseen, one part more will bring this book to a close ; it is therefore
timely to say again that I shall be glad of any kind of assistance that will make it less
imperfect, whether in the way of supplying omissions or of correcting errors, great or small.

F. J. C.

FEBRUARY, 1892.



CONTENTS OF VOLUME IV



BALLAD


PAGE
1


190. JAMIE TELFER OF THE FAIR DODHEAD


4


(Additions and Corrections : IV, 518; V, 249, 300.)
191. HUGHIE GRAME


8


(Additions and Corrections : IV, 518 ; V, 300.)


16


(Additions and Corrections : V, 300.)


24


(Additions and Corrections : IV, 520.)
194. THE LAIRD OF WARISTON ..........


28




34


(Additions and Corrections : V, 251.)
196. THE FIRE OF FRENDRAUGHT .........


39


(Additions and Corrections: IV, 521 ; V, 251, 301.)


49


(Additions and Corrections : V, 251.)


51


(Additions and Corrections : V, 251.)


. 54


(Additions and Corrections : V, 252.)
200. THE GYPSY LADDIE . . . . . . . . . . .


61


(Additions and Corrections : IV, 522 ; V, 252, 301.)

201. BESSY BELL AND MARY GRAY .........


. 75


(Additions and Corrections : IV, 522 ; V, 253.)

202. THE BATTLE OF PHILIPHAUGH
203. THE BARON OF BRACKLEY

(Additions and Corrections : IV, 522 ; V, 253.)

204. JAMIE DOUGLAS
205. LOUDON HILL, OR, DRUMCLOG
206. BOTHWELL BRIDGE
207. LORD DELAMERE

208. LORD DERWENTWATER
(Additions and Corrections : IV, 522 ; V, 254.)
209. GEORDIE
210. BONNIE JAMES CAMPBELL
211. BEWICK AND GRAHAM .

(Additions and Corrections : IV, 522.)

212. THE DUKE OF ATHOLE'S NURSE
213. SIR JAMES THE ROSE


77
. 79

90
. 105
108
. 110
115

. 123
142
. 144

150

. 155



CONTENTS OF VOLUME IV

214. THE BRAES o YARROW 160

(Additions and Corrections : IV, 522 ; V, 255.)

215. RARE WILLIE DROWNED IN YARROW, OR, THE WATER o GAMRIE . . . . 178

(Additions and Corrections : V, 256.)

216. THE MOTHER'S MALISON, OR, CLYDE'S WATER 185

(Additions and Corrections : V, 256, 301.)

217. THE BROOM OF COWDENKNOWS 191

(Additions and Corrections : IV, 523 ; V, 257.)

218. THE FALSE LOVER WON BACK 209

219. THE GARDENER 212

(Additions and Corrections : V, 258.)

220. THE BONNY LASS OF ANGLESEY 214

221. KATHARINE JAFFRAY 216

(Additions and Corrections : IV, 523 ; V, 260.)

222. BONNY BABY LIVINGSTON 231

(Additions and Corrections : IV, 523 ; V, 261.)

223. EPPIE MORRIE 239

(Additions and Corrections : V, 262.)

224. THE LADY OF ARNGOSK 241

225. ROB ROY '. 243

(Additions and Corrections : IV, 523 ; V, 262.)

226. LIZIE LINDSAY 255

(Additions and Corrections : IV, 524 ; V, 264.)

227. BONNY LIZIE BAILLIE 266

(Additions and Corrections : V, 265.)

228. GLASGOW PEGGIE 270

(Additions and Corrections : V, 266.)

229. EARL CRAWFORD 276

(Additions and Corrections : V, 301.)

230. THE SLAUGHTER OF THE LAIRD OF MELLERSTAIN 281

231. THE EARL OF ERROL 282

(Additions and Corrections : V, 267.)

232. RICHIE STORY 291

(Additions and Corrections : V, 270.)

233. ANDREW LAMMIE 300

234. CHARLIE MACPHERSON 308

(Additions and Corrections : V, 301.)

235. THE EARL OF ABOYNE 311

(Additions and Corrections : V, 270, 301.)

236. THE LAIRD o DRUM 322

(Additions and Corrections : V, 272.)

237. THE DUKE OF GORDON'S DAUGHTER 332

(Additions and Corrections : V, 273.)

238. GLENLOGIE, OR, JEAN o BETHELNIE 338

(Additions and Corrections : V, 273, 302.)

239. LORD SALTOUN AND AUCHANACHLE 347

(Additions and Corrections : V, 273.)

240. THE RANTIN LADDIE 351

(Additions and Corrections : V, 274.)



CONTENTS OF VOLUME IV ix

241. THE BARON o LETS . . 355

(Additions and Corrections : V, 275.)

242. THE COBLE o CARGILL 353

243. JAMES HARRIS (THE D^IMON LOVER) 360

(Additions and Corrections : IV, 524.)

244. JAMES HATLEY 370

245. YOUNG ALLAN 375

(Additions and Corrections : V, 275.)

246. REDESDALE AND WISE WILLIAM . . . 333

(Additions and Corrections : V, 276.)

247. LADY ELSPAT 387

248. THE GREY COCK, OR, SAW YOU MY FATHER ? 389

(Additions and Corrections : V, 302.)

249. AULD MATRONS 391

250. HENRY MARTYN 393

(Additions and Corrections : V, 302.)

251. LANG JOHNNY MORE 396

(Additions and Corrections : IV, 524.)

252. THE KITCHIE-BOY . . 400

(Additions and Corrections : V, 277.)

253. THOMAS o YONDERDALE 409

254. LORD WILLIAM, OR, LORD LUNDY . 411

255. WILLIE'S FATAL VISIT 415

256. ALISON AND WILLIE . 416

257. BURD ISABEL AND EARL PATRICK 417

(Additions and Corrections : V, 278.)

258. BROUGHTY WA'S 423

259. LORD THOMAS STUART 425

(Additions and Corrections : V, 279.)

260. LORD THOMAS AND LADY MARGARET 426

261. LADY ISABEL 429

262. LORD LIVINGSTON 431

263. THE NEW-SLAIN KNIGHT 434

(Additions and Corrections : V, 279.)

264. THE WHITE FISHER 435

265. THE KNIGHT'S GHOST 437

ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 439



189
HOBIE NOBLE

a. Caw's Poetical Museum, p. 193. b. ' Hobie Noble,' Percy Papers.



SCOTT'S MINSTRELSY, I, 164, 1802, II, 90,
1833. The source is not mentioned, but was
undoubtedly Caw's Museum, though there
are variations of text, attributable to the ed-
itor. A copy in the Campbell MSS, I, 230,
is again from the Museum, with several cor-
rections, two of which are also found in Scott.
Caw received the ballad, says Sir Walter, from
John Elliot of Reidheugh. b seems to have
been sent Percy (with 'Dick o the Cow') by
Roger Halt, in 1775.

Hobie Noble, though banished from Bew-
castle for his irregularities, will always com-
mand the hearty liking of those who live too
late to suffer from them, on account of his
gallant bearing in the rescue of Jock o the
Side. See especially No 187, A, of which
Hobie is the hero. All that we know of him
is so much as we are told in that ballad and
in this. He attached himself, after his ex-
pulsion from England, to the laird of Man-
gerton, who gives him the praise ' Thy coat
is blue, thou has been true.'

Sim o the Mains, an Armstrong of the
Whithaugh branch (the most important after
that of Mangerton), undertakes to betray
Hobie to the English land-sergeant. A tryst
is set at Kershope-foot, the junction of that
stream with the Liddel ; and Hobie, who
lives a little way up the Liddel, rides eagerly
down the water to keep it. He meets five
men, who ask him to join them in a raid into
England. Hobie dares not go by day ; the

* The hrother is Peter o Whitfield. ' Jock o the Side,' A,
begins, ' Peeter a Whifeild he hath slaine, and John a Side
he is tane.' 'The great Earl of Whitfield,' 10 8 , seemed to
Scott a corruption, and he suggested ' the great Ralph '
Whitfield ; but Surtees gave him information (which has

VOL. TV. 1



land-sergeant is at feud with him on account
of a brother's death, in which Hobie must
have had a hand, and ' the great earl of Whit-
field' has suffered from his depredations;* but
he will be their guide if they will wait till
night. He takes them to the Foulbogshiel,
where they alight, and word is sent by Sim
to the land-sergeant at Askerton, his adver-
sary's residence ; the land-sergeant orders the
men of the neighborhood to meet him at day-
break. Hobie has a bad dream, wakes his
comrades in alarm, and sets out to guide them
across the Waste; but the sergeant's force
come before him, and Sim behind; his sword
breaks ; he is bound with his own bow-string
and taken to Carlisle. As he goes up the
quarter called the Rickergate, the wives say
one to the other, That's the man that loosed
Jock o the Side ! They offer him bread and
beer, and urge him to confess stealing " my
lord's " horses ; he swears a great oath that he
never had beast of my lord's. He is to die
the next day, and says his farewell to Man-
gerton ; he would rather be called ' Hobie
Noble ' and be hanged in Carlisle, than be
called ' Traitor Mains ' and eat and drink.

Mr R. B. Armstrong informs me that he
has found no notice of Hobie Noble except
that Hobbe Noble, with eight others, "lived
within the Nyxons, near to Bewcastle."

1569. " Lancy Armistrang of Quhithauch
obliged him . . . for Sym Armistrang of the
Mains and the rest of the Armistrangis of

not transpired) that led him to think that the reading 'Earl'
might be right. Whitfield, in Northumberland, is a few
miles southwest of Hexham, and about twenty-five, in a
straight line, from Kershope, or the border.



189. HOBIE NOBLE



his gang. Syme of the Mains was lodged in
Wester Wemys." (Register of the Privy
Council of Scotland.)

4. The Mains was a place a very little to
the east of Castleton, on the opposite, or north,
side of the Liddel. 13-17. Askerton is in
the Waste of Bewcastle, "about seventeen
miles " northeast of Carlisle. " Willeva and
Spear-Edom [otherwise Spade-Adam] are
small districts in Bewcastle dale, through
which also the Hartlie-burn takes its course.
Consoowthart-Green and Rodric-haugh and
the Foulbogshiel are the names of places in



the same wilds, through which the Scottish
plunderers generally made their raids upon
England." (Scott.)

Sim o the Mains fled into England from
the resentment of his chief, but was himself
executed at Carlisle about two months after
Hobie's death. " Such is at least the tradi-
tion of Liddesdale," says Scott. This is of
course, notwithstanding the precision of the
interval of two months, what Lord Bacon
calls " an imagination as one would " ; an ap-
pendage of a later generation, in the interest
of poetical justice.



1 FOUL fa the breast first treason bred in !

That Liddisdale may safely say,
For in it there was baith meat and drink,
And corn unto our geldings gay.
Fala la diddle, etc.

2 We were stout-hearted men and true,

As England it did often say ;
But now we may turn our backs and fly,
Since brave Noble is seld away.

3 Now Hobie he was an English man,

And born into Bewcastle dale,
But his misdeeds they were sae great,
They banishd him to Liddisdale.

4 At Kershope-foot the tryst was set,

Kersbope of the lily lee ;
And there was traitour Sim o the Mains,
With him a private companie.

5 Then Hobie has graithd his body weel,

I wat it was wi baith good iron and steel ;
And he has pulld out his fringed grey,

And there, brave Noble, he rade him weel.

6 Then Hobie is down the water gane,

Een as fast as he may drie ;
Tho they shoud a' brusten and broken their

hearts,
Frae that tryst Noble he would not be.

7 ' Weel may ye be, my f eiries five !

And aye, what is your wills wi me ? '
Then they cryd a' wi ae consent,

Thou 'rt welcome here, brave Noble, to me.



8 Wilt thou with us in England ride ?

And thy safe-warrand we will be,
If we get a horse worth a hundred punds,
Upon bis back that thou shalt be.

9 ' I dare not with you into England ride,

The land-sergeant has me at feid ;
I know not what evil may betide

For Peter of Whitfield his brother's
dead.

10 * And Anton Shiel, he loves not me,
For I gat twa drifts of his sheep ;
The great Earl of Whitfield loves me not,
For nae gear frae me he eer coud



11 ' But will ye stay till the day gae down,

Until the night come oer the grund,
And I '11 be a guide worth ony twa
That may in Liddisdale be fund.

12 ' Tho dark the night as pick and tar,

I '11 guide ye oer yon hills fu hie,
And bring ye a' in safety back,
If you '11 be true and follow me.'

13 He 's guided them oer moss and muir,

Oer hill and houp, and mony ae down,
Til they came to the Foulbogshiel,

And there brave Noble he lighted down.

14 Then word is gane to the land-sergeant,

In Askirton wbere that he lay :
' The deer that ye hae hunted lang
Is seen into the Waste this day.'



189. HOBIE NOBLE



15 ' Then Hobie Noble is that deer ;

I wat he carries the style fu hie !
Aft has he beat your slough-hounds back,
And set yourselves at little ee.

16 ' Gar warn the bows of Hartlie-burn,

See they shaft their arrows on the wa !
Warn Willeva and Spear Edom,
And see the morn they meet me a'.

17 ' Gar meet me on the Rodrie-haugh,

And see it be by break o day ;
And we will on to Conscowthart Green,
For there, I think, w '11 get our prey.'

18 Then Hobie Noble has dreamd a dream,

In the Foulbogshiel where that he lay ;
He thought his horse was neath him shot,
And he himself got hard away.

19 The cocks could crow, and the day could dawn,

And I wat so even down fell the rain ;
If Hobie had no wakend at that time,
In the Foulbogshiel he had been tane or
slam.

20 ' Get up, get up, my f eiries five

For I wat here makes a f u ill day
And the warst clock of this companie
I hope shall cross the Waste this day.'

21 Now Hobie thought the gates were clear,

But, ever alas ! it was not sae ;
They were beset wi cruel men and keen,
That away brave Noble could not gae.

22 ' Yet follow me, my feiries five,

And see of me ye keep good ray,
And the worst clock of this companie
I hope shall cross the Waste this day.'

23 There was heaps of men now Hobie before,

And other heaps was him behind,
That had he been as wight as Wallace was
Away brave Noble he could not win.

24 Then Hobie he had but a laddies sword,

But he did more than a laddies deed ;
In the midst of Conscouthart Green,
He brake it oer Jers a Wigham's head.

25 Now they have tane brave Hobie Noble,

Wi his ain bowstring they band him sae ;



And I wat his heart was neer sae sair

As when his ain five band him on the brae.

26 They have tane him [on] for West Carlisle ;

They askd him if he knew the way ;
Whateer he thought, yet little he said ;
He knew the way as well as they.

27 They hae tane him up the Ricker-gate ;

The wives they cast their windows wide,
And ilka wife to anither can say,

That 's the man loosd Jock o the Side !

28 ' Fy on ye, women ! why ca ye me man ?

For it 's nae man that I 'm usd like ;
I 'm but like a forf oughen hound,
Has been fighting in a dirty syke.'

29 Then they hae tane him up thro Carlisle

town,

And set him by the chimney-fire ;
They gave brave Noble a wheat loaf to eat,
And that was little his desire.

30 Then they gave him a wheat loaf to eat

And after that a can o beer ;
Then they cried a', wi ae consent,

Eat, brave Noble, and make good cheer!

31 Confess my lord's horse, Hobie, they say,

And the morn in Carlisle thou 's no die ;
' How shall I confess them ? ' Hobie says,
' For I never saw them with mine eye.'

32 Then Hobie has sworn a fu great aith,

By the day that he was gotten or born,
He never had onything o my lord's
That either eat him grass or corn.

33 ' Now fare thee weel, sweet Mangerton !

For I think again I '11 neer thee see ;
I wad betray nae lad alive,
For a' the goud in Christentie.

34 ' And fare thee well now, Liddisdale,

Baith the hie land and the law !
Keep ye weel frae traitor Mains !
For goud and gear he '11 sell ye a'.

35 ' I 'd rather be ca'd Hobie Noble,

In Carlisle, where he suffers for his faut,
Before I were ca'd traitor Mains,

That eats and drinks of meal and maut.'



190. JAMIE TELFER OF THE FAIR DODHEAD



a. 9 4 . brother is dead : cf. b. (Dead is death.)
10 2 . For twa drifts of his sheep I gat : cor-
rected in Scott and in the Campbell MS.

15*. lee, b lye : corrected to fee in Campbell

MS. (ee = awe.)
16 2 . shaft is corrected to sharp in Scott and

the Campbell MS.
24 4 . Jersawigham's : cf. b.

b. There is a burden after the first, second, and

fourth line, variously given; as, Fa (La,
Ta) la didle, Ta la la didle, etc., after the
first and second ; Fala didle, lal didle, Tal
didle, tal diddle, after the fourth.
2 1 - 2 wanting. 2H I 6 - 6 in the MS.
2*. flee. 2 4 . he is. 3 1 . Then for Now.
5 s . hoth with. 5 8 . out a.
6 8 . If they should all have bursen.
6 4 . From. 7 4 . here wanting. 8 1 . Will.
8 2 . we shaU. 8 8 . pound. 8 4 . shall.
9 1 . in. 9 4 . brother 's dead (death).
10 2 . For twa drifts of his sheep I gott.
10 8 . not me. 10 4 . me that he can keep.
II 8 . worth other three. II 4 wanting.



12 1 ' 2 written as II 4 : The pick and tar was
never so dark but I 'le guide you over yon
hillies high.

12 8 ' 4 wanting. 15 1 . he was that. 15 8 . slooth.

15 4 . little lye. 16 2 . shaft. 16 8 . Gar warn.

17 1 . me the morn.

17 2 . see that it be by the.

17 8 . Corscowthart. 17 4 . ow? 18 8 . beneath.

19 1 . era : da. 19 8 . not. 19 4 . either tane.

21 1 . But H. : gates they had been. 21'. set.

21 4 . Noble he.

23 1 . lumps for heaps (heaps in 23 2 ).

24 8 . Corscothart. 24 4 . Jers a wighams.

25 1 . They have tane now H. N.

25 2 . bow-strings.

25 8 . his heart was never so wae.

26 1 . on for. 27 2 . cuist. 27 8 . Then every.

27 4 . John of. 28 8 . for fouchald.

29 8 . brave wanting : for to. 30 1 wanting.

32 s . had nothing. 33 1 . now for sweet.

33 4 . Crisenty. 34 8 . And keep.

35 1 . cald now.

35 4 . That eat and drank him a of.



190
JAMIE TELFER OF THE FAIR DODHEAD

Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, J, 80, 1802; II, 3, 1833.



SCOTT, by whom this ballad was first pub-
lished, and to whom alone it seems to be
known, gives us no information how he came
by it. He says, " There is another ballad,
under the same title as the following, in
which nearly the same incidents are narrated,
with little difference except that the honor
of rescuing the cattle is attributed to the
Liddesdale Elliots, headed by a chief, there
called Martin Elliot of the Preakin Tower,
whose son, Simon, is said to have fallen in
the action. It is very possible that both the
Teviotdale Scotts and the Elliots were en-
gaged in the affair, and that each claimed
the honor of the victory." Ed. 1833, II. 3.



Scott has suggested that an article in the
list of attempts upon England, fouled by the
commissioners at Berwick in the year 1587,
may relate to the subject of the ballad.

October, 1582.*

Thomas Musgrave, de- I Walter Scott, Laird ) 200 kine and
puty of Bewcastle, < of Buckluth, and his > oxen, 300 gait
and the tenants, against ( complices ; for ) and sheep.

Bewcastle, of which Thomas Musgrave at
the above date was deputy and captain, was,
says Percy, a great rendezvous of thieves and
moss-troopers down to the last century. " It

* Nicolson and Burn, History of Westmorland and Cum-
berland, p. xxxi.



190. JAMIE TELFER OP THE FAIR DODHEAD



is handed down by report," he remarks, "that
there was formerly an Order of Council that
no inhabitant of Bewcastle should be returned
on a jury." That the deputy of the warden,
an officer of the peace, should be exhibited as
making a raid, not in the way of retaliation,
but simply for plunder, is too much out of
rule even for Bewcastle, and does not speak
favorably for the antiquity of the ballad.

Taking the story as it stands, the Captain
of Bewcastle, who is looking for a prey, is
taken by a guide to the Fair Dodhead, which
he pillages of kye and everything valuable.
Jamie Telfer, whose threat of revenge the
Captain treats with derision, runs ten miles
afoot to the Elliots of Stobs Hall, to whom
he says he has paid mail, st. 11, and asks
help. Gib Elliot denies the mail, and tells
him to go to the Scotts at Branksome where
he has paid it. Telfer keeps on to Coultart
Cleugh, and there makes his case known to
a brother-in-law, who gives him a mount
"to take the fray" to Catslockhill. There
William's Wat, who had often eaten of the
Dodhead basket, gives him his company and
that of two sons, and they take the fray to
Branksome. Buccleuch collects a body of
men of his name, and sends them out under
the command of Willie Scott, who overtakes
the marauders, and asks the Captain if he
will let Telfer's kye go back. This he will
not do for love or for fear. The Scotts set
on them ; Willie is killed, but two and thirty
of the raiders' saddles are emptied, and the
Captain is badly wounded and made prisoner.
Nor is that all, for the Scotts ride to the Cap-
tain's house and loose his cattle, and when
they come to the Fair Dodhead, for ten milk
kye Jamie Telfer has three and thirty.

Walter Scott of Harden and Walter Scott
of Goldielands, and, according to Scott of



Satchells, Scott of Commonside, st. 26, were
engaged with Buccleuch in the rescue of Kin-
mont Willie. So was Will Elliot of Gorrom-
bye, st. 27 4 .

The ballad was retouched for the Border
Minstrelsy, nobody can say how much. The
36th stanza is in Hardyknute style. St. 12
is not only found elsewhere (of. 'Young
Beichan,' E 6), but could not be more inap-
propriately brought in than here ; Scott, how-
ever, is not responsible for that.

Scott makes the following notes on the lo-
calities :

2. Hardhaughswire is the pass from Lid-
desdale to the head of Teviotdale. Borth-
wick water is a stream which falls into the
Teviot three miles above Hawick. 3. The
Dodhead was in Selkirkshire, near Singlee,
where there are still the vestiges of an old
tower. 7. Stobs Hall : upon Slitterick. 10.
Branksome Ha, the ancient family-seat of the
lairds of Buccleuch, near Hawick. 13. The
Coultart Cleugh is nearly opposite to Carlinrig,
on the road between Hawick and Mosspaul.
26. The estates mentioned in this verse be-
longed to families of the name of Scott re-
siding upon the waters of Borthwick and
Teviot, near the castle of their chief. 27.
The pursuers seem to have taken the road
through the hills of Liddesdale in order to
collect forces and intercept the forayers at
the passage of the Liddel on their return to
Bewcastle. 29. The Frostylee is a brook
which joins the Teviot near Mosspaul. 33,
38. The Ritterford and Kershopeford are
noted fords on the river Liddel. 36. The
Dinlay is a mountain in Liddesdale. 44.
Stanegirthside : a house belonging to the For-
esters, situated on the English side of the
Liddel.



1 IT fell about the Martinmas tyde,

Whan our Border steeds get corn and hay,
The Captain of Bewcastle hath bound him to



Online LibraryFrancis James ChildThe English and Scottish popular ballads (Volume v4:1) → online text (page 1 of 33)