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University of California Berkeley

From the book collection of
BERTRAND H. BRONSON

bequeathed by him
or donated by his wife

Mildred S. Bronson



THE ENGLISH AND SCOTTISH
POPULAE BALLADS



THE

ENGLISH AND SCOTTISH

POPULAR BALLADS





IN FIVE VOLUMES

VOLUME V

PART I



BOSTON AND NEW YORK

HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN AND COMPANY

tE^e Kiberstoe prestf, Cambridge

LONDON : HENRY STEVENS, SON AND STILES



One <9Q&mi#ant Copied $rinte&
No.....



COPYRIGHT, 1894, BY F. J. CHILD
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED



ADVERTISEMENT TO PART IX

NUMBERS 266-305



THE delay of the publication of this Ninth Part of the English and Scottish Ballads
has been occasioned partly by disturbances of health, but principally by the necessity of
waiting for texts. It was notorious that there was a considerable number of ballads among
the papers of Charles Kirkpatrick Sharpe, and it was an important object to get possession
of these, the only one of the older collections (with a slight exception) which I had not had
in my hands. An unexpected opportunity occurred upon the sale of Sharpe's manuscripts
last year. All the ballads, including, besides loose sheets, several sets of pieces, were secured
by Mr Macmath, and turned over to me (mostly in transcripts made by his own hand) with
that entire devotion to the interests of this undertaking which I have had so frequent occa-
sion to signalize. A particularly valuable acquisition was the " old lady's complete set of
ballads," mentioned by Scott in his correspondence with Sharpe, which was the original of
most of the pieces in the Skene MS.

This Ninth Part completes the collection of English and Scottish ballads to the extent
of my knowledge of sources, saving that William Tytler's Brown -MS. has not been

tr^T"

recovered. Copies, from Mrs Brown's recitation, of all the pieces in this MS. are, however,
elsewhere to be found, excepting in a single instance, and that of a ballad which is probably
a variety of one or another here given in several forms (No 99 or No 158).

I have to thank Mr MACMATH once more for his energetic and untiring co-operation ;
the Rev. WILLIAM FINDLAY, of Sabine, for permission to make use of his ballad-gatherings ;
the Rev. S. BARING-GOULD, Mr P. Z. ROUND, Mr WILLIAM WALKER, and Mr R. BRINLEY
JOHNSON, for texts; Professor WOLLNER, of Leipzig, for the most liberal assistance in
Slavic matters ; Mr KAARLE KROHN, of the University of Helsingfors, for a minute and
comprehensive study of the Esthonian and Finnish forms of No 95 ; Dr AXEL OLRIK for
Scandinavian texts and information relating thereto ; Professor KITTREDGE for notes ; and
Mr R. B. ARMSTRONG, of Edinburgh, Dr AKE W:SON MUNTHE, of Upsala, Miss M. H.
MASON, of London, Mr ALFRED ROGERS, of the Library of the University of Cambridge,
Mr H. L. KOOPMAN, late of Harvard College, and Mrs MARIA ELLERY MACKAYE, for kind
help of various descriptions.

It is intended that Part X (completing the work) shall contain a list of sources, a full
and careful glossary, an index of titles and matters and other indexes, and a general preface.

F. J. C.

APKIL, 1894.



ADVERTISEMENT TO PART X



FOE texts, information, or correction of errors, I have the pleasure of expressing my
indebtedness to the following gentlemen in Europe : Mr ANDREW LANG ; Mr J. K. HUD-
SON of Manchester; Professsor J. ESTLIN CARPENTER of Oxford; Messrs W. MACMATH
and DAVID MAcRiTCHiE of Edinburgh ; Mr W. WALKER of Aberdeen ; Dr AXEL OLRIK
of Copenhagen ; and in America to the following ladies and gentlemen : Miss MARY C.
BURLEIGH of Massachusetts ; Miss LOUISE PORTER HASKELL of South Carolina ; Professor
KITTREDGE, Dr W. H. SCHOFIELD, Dr W. P. FEW and Mr E. E. GRIFFITH of Harvard Col-
lege ; Professor W. U. RICHARDSON of the Harvard Medical School ; Dr F. A. MORRISON
of Indiana, and Mr W. W. NEWELL, editor of the Journal of American Folk-Lore. The
services of Mr LEO WIENER of Harvard College have been at my full command in Slavic
matters, and had time been at my disposal would have been employed for a much wider
examination of the very numerous collections of Slavic popular songs. Mr G. F. ARNOLD,
late of Harvard College Library, obligingly undertook the general bibliographical index at
the end of this volume ; but the labor proving too great for his delicate health, this index
was completed by my friend Miss CATHARINE INNES IRELAND, who besides has generously
devoted a great deal of time to the compilation or correction of all the other indexes and
the preparation of them for the press. Still further favors are acknowledged elsewhere.
In conclusion I would recognize with thanks and admiration the patience, liberality and
consideration shown me by my publishers from beginning to end.

E*. J. C.

[The manuscript of this Tenth and final Part of the English and Scottish Ballads
(including the Advertisement), was left by Professor Child substantially complete, with the
exception of the Bibliography, and nearly ready for the press. The Bibliography, which
Miss Ireland had in hand at the time of Professor Child's death, has been completed by
her, with some assistance. In accordance with Professor Child's desire, and at the request
of his family, I have seen the present Part through the press. My own notes, except in the
Indexes and Bibliography, are enclosed within brackets, and have been confined, in the main,
to entries in the Additions and Corrections. Acknowledgments are due to Mr MACMATH,
Professor LANMAN, and Dr F. N. ROBINSON for various contributions, and to Mr W. R.
SPALDING for reading the proof-sheets of the music. Mr LEO WIENER, Instructor in Slavic
Languages in Harvard University, has had the great kindness to revise the Slavic titles in the
List of Ballads, the List of Collections of Ballads, and the Bibliography. To Miss IRELAND
I am especially indebted for material assistance of various kinds, especially in the proof-
reading.

G. L. K.]

JANUARY, 1898.



CONTENTS OF VOLUME V



BALLAD PAGE

266. JOHN THOMSON AND THE TURK 1

(Additions and Corrections : V, 279.)

267. THE HEIR OF LINNE 11

268. THE TWA KNIGHTS 21

269. LADY DIAMOND 29

(Additions and Corrections : V, 303.)

270. THE EARL OF MAR'S DAUGHTER 38

271. THE LORD OF LORN AND THE FALSE STEWARD 42

(Additions and Corrections : V, 280.)

272. THE SUFFOLK MIRACLE 58

(Additions and Corrections : V, 303.)

273. KING EDWARD THE FOURTH AND A TANNER OF TAMWORTH 67

(Additions and Corrections : V, 303.)

274. OUR GOODMAN 88

(Additions and Corrections : V, 281, 303.)

275. GET UP AND BAR THE DOOR 96

(Additions and Corrections: V, 281, 304.)

276. THE FRIAR IN THE WELL 100

277. THE WIFE WRAPT IN WETHER'S SKIN 104

(Additions and "Corrections : V, 304.)

278. THE FARMER'S CURST WIFE 107

(Additions and Corrections : V, 305.)

279. THE JOLLY BEGGAR 109

280. THE BEGGAR-LADDIE 116

(Additions and Corrections : V, 305.)

281. THE KEACH i THE CREEL 121

282. JOCK THE LEG AND THE MERRY MERCHANT 126

283. THE CRAFTY FARMER 128

284. JOHN DORY 131

285. THE GEORGE ALOE AND THE SWEEPSTAKE 133

286. THE SWEET TRINITY (THE GOLDEN VANITY) 135

(Additions and Corrections : V, 305.)

287. CAPTAIN WARD AND THE RAINBOW 143

(Additions and Corrections : V, 305.)

288. THE YOUNG EARL OF ESSEX'S VICTORY OVER THE EMPEROR OF GERMANY . . . 145

289. THE MERMAID 148

290. THE WYLIE WIFE OF THE HIE TOUN HIE 153

291. CHILD OWLET 156

(Additions and Corrections : V, 305.)



Vlll CONTENTS OF VOLUME V

292. THE WEST-COUNTRY DAMOSEL'S COMPLAINT . . 157

293. JOHN OF HAZELGREEN . . . . 159

294. DUGALL QUIN 165

(Additions and Corrections : V, 305.)

295. THE BROWN GIRL 166

296. WALTER LESLY 168

297. EARL KOTHES 170

298. YOUNG PEGGY 171

299. TROOPER AND MAID 172

(Additions and Corrections: V, 306.)

300. BLANCHEFLOUR AND JELLYFLORICE 175

301. THE QUEEN OF SCOTLAND 176

302. YOUNG BEARWELL 178

303. THE HOLY NUNNERY 179

304. YOUNG RONALD 181

305. THE OUTLAW MURRAY 185

(Additions and Corrections : V, 307.)

FRAGMENTS 201

(Additions and Corrections : V, 307.)

ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 205, 283

GLOSSARY 309

SOURCES OF THE TEXTS 397

INDEX OF PUBLISHED AIRS 405

BALLAD AIRS FROM MANUSCRIPT:

3. The Fause Knight upon the Road .......... 411

9. The Fair Flower of Northumberland 411

10. The Twa Sisters 411

11. The Cruel Brother * ... 412

12. Lord Randal 412

17. Hind Horn 413

20. The Cruel Mother 413

40. The Queen of Elfan's Nourice 413

42. Clerk Colvill 414

46. Captain Wedderburn's Courtship . . . . . . . . . . . 414

47. Proud Lady Margaret 414

53. Young Beichan "... 415

58. Sir Patrick Spens ............. 415

61. Sir Colin 415

63. Child Waters 415

68. Young Hunting 416

75. LordLovel 416

77. Sweet William's Ghost 416

84. Bonny Barbara Allan 416

89. Fause Foodrage 416

95. The Maid freed from the Gallows 417

97. Brown Robin 417

98. Brown Adam 417

99. Johnie Scot . . . 418



CONTENTS OF VOLUME V IX

100. Willie o Winsbury 418

106. The Famous Flower of Serving-Men 418

144. JohnieCock 419

157. Gude Wallace 419

161. The Battle of Otterburn 419

163. The Battle of Harlaw 419

164. King Henry Fifth's Conquest of France 420

169. Johnie Armstrong 420

173. Mary Hamilton 421

182. The Laird o Logie 421

222. Bonny Baby Livingston 421

226. Lizie Lindsay 421

228. Glasgow Peggie 422

235. The Earl of Aboyne 422

247. Lady Elspat 422

250. Andrew Bartin 423

256. Alison and Willie 423

258. Broughty Wa's 423

278. The Farmer's Curst Wife 423

281. The Keach i the Creel 424

286. The Sweet Trinity 424

299. Trooper and Maid 424

INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 425

TITLES OF COLLECTIONS OF BALLADS, OB BOOKS CONTAINING BALLADS, WHICH ARE VERY BRIEFLY

CITED IN THIS WORK 455

INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 469

BIBLIOGRAPHY 503

CORRECTIONS TO BE MADE IN THE PRINT 567



266

JOHN THOMSON AND THE TURK



A. 'John Thomson and the Turk,' Buchan's Ballads
of the North of Scotland, II, 159 ; Motherwell's Min-
strelsy, Appendix, p. ix. ' John Tamson,' Mother-
well's MS., p. 615.



B. Leyden's Glossary to The Complaynt of Scotland,
p. 371, four stanzas.



LBYDEN (1801) says that he had " heard
the whole song when very young." * Moth-
erwell's copy was probably given him by
Buchan.

John Thomson has been fighting against
the Turks for more than three years, when he
is surprised by receiving a visit from his wife,
who walks up to him in a rich dress, as if
Scotland were just round the corner. The
lady stays several days, and then gives her
husband to understand that she is going home.
He recommends her to take a road across the
lea, for by doing this she will escape wild Hind
Soldan and base Violentrie. It is not so much
an object with the lady to avoid these Turks
as John Thomson supposes. The Soldan, it
turns out, has been slain ; but she goes straight
to Violentrie. After a twelvemonth John
Thomson sends a letter to Scotland, "to see
about his gay lady." An answer is returned
that her friends have not laid eyes on her in
all that time. John Thomson disguises him-
self as a palmer and hies to Violentrie's cas-
tle, where he finds his lady established. Learn-
ing that the palmer has come from the Scots'
army in Greece, she asks whether one of the
chieftains has seen his wife lately, and is told
that it is long since the knight in question
parted with his wife, and that he has some

* He has introduced the main points of the story (in fact
B 2, 3) into his ballad of ' Lord Soulis,' Scott's Minstrelsy,
1833, IV, 244.

t Especially by A. Vesselofsky, Slavic Tales concerning
Solomon and Kitovras, etc., St Petersburg, 1872 (in Rus-
sian) ; Neue Beitrage zur Geschichte der Salomonssage,

VOL. V. 1



fear lest the lady should have been captured
by his foes. The lady declares that she is
where she is by her own will, and means to
stay. The palmer throws off his disguise,
begs to be hidden from Violentrie, and is
put down in a dark cellar. Violentrie soon
arrives and calls for his dinner, casually re-
marking that he would give ten thousand
sequins for a sight of the Scot who has so
often put him to flight. The lady takes him
at his word, and calls up John Thomson. The
Turk demands what he would do if their po-
sitions were exchanged. " Hang you up," the
Scot replies, with spirit, " and make you wale
your tree." Violentrie takes his captive to
the wood. John Thomson climbs tree after
tree, ties a ribbon to every branch, and puts
up a flag as a sign to his men : all which the
Turk thinks no harm. Then John Thomson
blows his horn. Three thousand men come
tripping over the hill and demand their chief.
The Turk begs for mercy, and gets such as
he would have given : they burn him in his
castle, and hang the lady.

This ridiculous ballad is a seedling from
an ancient and very notable story, which has
an extensive literature, and has of late been
subjected to learned and acute investigation.!
It may be assumed with confidence that the

Archiv fur Slavische Philologie, VI, 393 ff., 548 ff., 1882 ;
V. Jagid, Archiv, etc., I, 103 ff., 1876; F. Vogt, Salman
und Morolf, 1880, Znr Sal man-Morolf sage, Paul und
Braune's Beitrage, VIII, 313 ff., 1882. See these for tales
containing portions of the same matter in various combina-
tions, and for a discussion of an Oriental derivation.



266. JOHN THOMSON AND THE TURK



story was originally one of King Solomon and
his queen, of whom it is related in Russian,
Servian, and German. In the course of trans-
mission, as ever has been the wont, names
were changed, and also some subordinate cir-
cumstances; in Portuguese, Solomon is re-
placed by Ramiro II, king of Leon ; in a
French romance by the Bastard of Bouillon.
It is, however, certain that the Solomon story
was well known to the French, and as early
as the twelfth century.* Something of the
same story, again, is found in Konig Rother
and in the Clig&s of Crestien de Troies, both
works of the twelfth century, and. in various
other poems and tales.

The tale of the rape of Solomon's wife and
of the revenge taken by Solomon is extant in
Russian in three byliny (or, we may say, bal-
lads), taken down from recitation in this cen-
tury, and in three prose versions preserved in
MSS of the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eight-
eenth centuries. The byliny^ relate that
Tsar Vasily of Constantinople (or Novgorod),
while feasting with his nobles, demands of
them to find him a wife who shall be his fair
match in stature, beauty, wit, and birth. One
of the company undertakes to get for his mas-
ter Salamanija (Salomonida), the beautiful
wife of Salomon, Tsar of Jerusalem (or of Con-
stantinople), and effects the business by entic-
ing her on board of a ship to see fine things, an
artifice of frequent occurrence in ballads. Sal-
omon sets out to retrieve his wife, attended by
a large army (which he conceals in a grove),
presents himself at Vasily's palace as a pil-
grim (or other humble personage), is recog-
nized by his wife, and shut up in a box.
When Vasily comes back from hunting, Sala-
manija tells him what has chanced, and ad-
vises the instant execution of Salomon, which
is resolved on. Salomon is to be beheaded,
but he begs that he may be hanged, and that
three nooses, of rope, bast, and silk, may be
provided. Under the gallows Salomon asks
to be allowed to sound his horn. Salamanija
objects, but is overruled. He blows thrice ;

*G. Paris, in Romania, VET, 462, IX, 436; Cliges, ed.
Foerster, p. xix.

tRybnikof, II, Nos 52, 53, III, No 56. See Jagic, as



his army comes at the third sounding. Vasily
is hanged in the silken noose, Salamanija in
the rope, and the man that carried her off in
the bast,

One of the prose tales narrates these trans-
actions as follows. The wife of Solomon, king
of Jerusalem, is stolen from him by his bro-
ther Kitovras, through the agency of a magi-
cian, who, in the character of a merchant, ex-
cites Solomon's admiration for a magnificent
purple robe. Solomon buys the robe, and in-
vites the seeming merchant to his table. Dur-
ing the repast the magician envelops the king
and his people in darkness, brings a heavy
slumber upon the queen and her people, and
carries her off in his arms to his ship. Solo-
mon, learning that his wife is in the posses-
sion of Kitovras, proceeds against him with
an army, which he orders to come to his
help when they shall hear his horn sound the
third time. Clad as an old pilgrim or beggar,
he enters Kitovras's garden, where he comes
upon a girl with a gold cup, who is about to
draw water. He asks to drink from the
king's cup. The girl objects, for, if reported
to the king, such a thing would be the death
of both of them ; but the gift of a gold ring
induces her to consent. The queen sees the
ring on the girl's hand, and asks who gave it
to her. An old pilgrim, she replies. No pil-
grim, says the queen, but my husband, Solo-
mon. Solomon is brought before the queen,
and asked what he has come for. To take
off your head, he answers. To your own
death, rejoins the queen ; you shall be hanged.
Kitovras is sent for, and pronounces this doom.
Solomon reminds Kitovras that they are bro-
thers, and asks that he may die in regal style ;
that Kitovras and the queen shall attend the
execution, with all the people of the city ; and
that there shall be ample provision of food
and drink : all which is granted. At the gal-
lows he finds a noose of bast; he begs that
two other nooses may be provided, one of red
silk, one of yellow, so that he may have a
choice, and this whim is complied with. At

above, pp. 103-6 ; Miss I. F. Hapgood, Epic Songs of Russia,
p. 282, who combines the three texts.



366. JOHN THOMSON AND THE TURK



ways urging their brotherhood, Solomon, at
three successive stages, asks the privilege of
blowing his horn. The army is at hand upon
the third blast, and is ordered to kill every-
body. Kitovras and the queen are hanged in
the silken nooses, the magician in the bast.*

The variations of the other versions are
mostly not material to our purpose. In one,
King For takes the place of Kitovras ; in the
third, the king of Cyprus. In the latter, Solo-
mon asks to be hanged upon a tree, a great
oak. The king of Cyprus begs for a gentle
death, and his veins are opened. The queen
is dismembered by horses.

A Servian popular tale runs thus. Solo-



mon's wife fell in love with another king, and
not being able to escape to him on account
of the strict watch which was kept over her,
made an arrangement with him that he should
send her a drink which should make her seem
to be dead. Solomon, to test the reality of
her death, cut off her little finger, and seeing
no sign of feeling, had her buried. The other
king sent his people to dig her up, restored
animation, and took her to wife. When Solo-
mon found out what had been done, he set
out for the king's palace with a body of armed
men, whom he left in a wood, under orders to
hasten to his relief when they heard the blast
of a trumpet, each man with a green bough
in his hand. The king was out a-hunting,
the queen at home. She wiled Solomon into
a chamber and locked him up, and when the
king came back from the chase told him to
go into the room and cut Solomon down,
but to enter into no talk, since in that case
he would certainly be outwitted. Solomon
laughed at the king and his sword : that was
not the way for a king to dispose of a king.
He should take him to a field outside the city,
and let a trumpet sound thrice, so that every-
body that wished might witness the spectacle;
then he would find that the very greenwood
would come to see one king put another to
death. The king was curious to know whether
the wood would come, and adopted Solomon's
suggestion. At the first sound of the trum-

* Jagic, Archiv, 1, 107 f. ; Vesselofsky, the same, VI, 406.
t Cf. B 3*. Methinks I see a coming tree.



pet, Solomon's men set forward ; at the sec-
ond they were near at hand, but could not
be distinguished because of the green boughs
which they bore.f The king, convinced that
the wood was coming, ordered a third blast.
Solomon was rescued ; the king and his court
were put to the sword.J

A Little^ jlussian story of Solomon and his
wife is given by Dragomanof, Popular Tradi-
tions and Tales, 1876, p. 103, translated in
Revue des Traditions Populaires, II, 518, by
E. Hins. Solomon takes a wife from the fam-
ily of a heathen tsar. She hates him, and con-
certs an elopement with a heathen tsarevitch.
She pretends to be dead. Solomon burns her
hands through and through with a red-hot
iron. She utters no sound, is buried in the
evening, and immediately disinterred and car-
ried off by her paramour. Solomon goes to
the tsarevitch's house, attended by three
armies, a black, a white, and a red (which
are, of course, kept out of sight), and furnished
with three pipes. The tsarevitch has a gal-
lows set up, and Solomon is taken out to be
hanged. He obtains liberty first to play on
his pipes. The sound of the first brings the
white army, that of the second the red, that
of the third the black. The tsarevitch is
hanged, the tsaritsa dragged at a horse's tail.

A like story is narrated in German in a^



passage of about two hundred and fifty verses,
which is appended to the Wit-Combat, or
Dialogue, of Solomon and Morolf ; and again,
with much interpolation and repetition, in a
later strophic poem of more than four thou-
sand lines. Both pieces are extant in manu-
scripts and print of the fifteenth century, but
their original is considerably earlier.

In the briefer and earlier of the two Ger-
man versions, Solomon's wife has bestowed
her love on a nameless heathen king, and
wishes to escape to him, but cannot bring
this about. She feigns to be sick, and the
heathen (with whom she has been in corre-
spondence) sends two minstrels to her, who
pretend to be able to cure sick folk with their
music. They obtain admission to the queen,

JKaradschitsch, Volksmarchen der Serben, 1854, No 4 2 f
p. 233.



66. JOHN THOMSON AND THE TURK



give her an herb which throws her into a
death-like sleep, and carry her off to their
master. Morolf, at King Solomon's entreaty,
sets forth to find the queen, and, after trav-
ersing many strange lands, succeeds. Solo-
mon, under his guidance and advice, and prop-
erly supported by an armed force, goes to the
castle where the queen is living ; leaves his
men in an adjoining wood, under command
to come to him when they hear his horn blow ;
and, disguised as a pilgrim, begs food at the
castle. His wife knows him the moment she
lays eyes on him, and tells the heathen that
it is Solomon. The heathen, overjoyed, says
to Solomon, If I were in your hands, what
should be my death ? Would God it were
so ! answers the king. I would take you to
the biggest wood, let you choose your tree,
and hang you. So shall it be, says the
heathen, calls his people, takes Solomon to
the wood, and bids him choose his tree. I
shall not be long about that, says Solomon ;
but, seeing that I am of kingly strain, grant
me, as a boon, to blow my horn three times.
The queen objects ; the heathen says, Blow
away. At the third blast Morolf arrives
with Solomon's men. The heathen and all
his people are slain ; the queen is taken back
to Jewry, and put to death by opening her
veins in a bath.*

The longer poem has several additional in-
cidents which recur in our ballad, and others
which link it with other forms of the story.
Salme, Solomon's wife, is daughter of an In-
dian king (Cyprian, cf. the third Russian
prose tale), and has been stolen from her
father by Solomon. Fore, a heathen king, in
turn steals Salme from the king of Jerusa-
lem. Morolf is not the sharp-witted boor of
the other piece, but Solomon's brother. When
Solomon goes to Fore's castle, he is kindly re-
ceived by that king's sister, and she remains
his fast friend throughout. He tells her that



he is a sinful man, upon whom has been
imposed a penance of perpetual pilgrimage.
Brought before the queen, Solomon tries to
make Salme come back to him. She lets
him know that she loves Fore three times as
well as him, and to Fore will she stick. Solo-
mon is put into some side room. Fore comes
home and sits down to table with Salme, and
she informs him that Solomon is in his power.
The army consists of three divisions, a black,
a white, and a wan (bleich), nearly as in the
Little Russian tale. The reason which Solo-
mon alleges for wishing to blow his horn is
to give notice to St Michael and the angels
to come and take his soul in charge. Fore
is hanged. Salme is disposed of as before,



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