Copyright
Francis Trevelyan Miller.

The photographic history of the civil war in ten volumes online

. (page 8 of 40)
Online LibraryFrancis Trevelyan MillerThe photographic history of the civil war in ten volumes → online text (page 8 of 40)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


the table at the bottom of this page.

The tabular statement on page 154 must be
considered, therefore, as suggestive rather than
complete. The selection of fifty regiments- is an
arbitrary one ; for, of over two thousand regiments
in the Union army, 46 infantry regiments lost
over 200 men killed or mortally wounded in action
during the war. In fact. Colonel Fox has com-
piled a list of 300 fighting regiments, which lost
over 130 who were killed and died of wounds dur-
ing the war, or which, with a smaller enrollment,
suffered an equivalent percentage of casualties.



Regiment



1st Minnesota

141st Pennsylvania

101st New York

25th Massachusetts ...
36th Wisconsin (4 Cos.) .
20th Massachusetts. ...

8th Vermont

81st Pennsylvania

12th Massachusetts

1st Maine H. A

9th Louisiana Colored . .
5th New Hampshire



Battle



Gettysburg

Gettysburg

Bull Run

Cold Harbor

Bethesda Church .
Fredericksburg. .

Cedar Creek

Fredericksburg. . .

\ntietam

Petersburg

Milliken's Bend . .
Fredericksburg. . .



Killed


Wounded


Missing


47


168


_


25


103


21


6


101


17


53


130


28


20


108


38


25


138





17


66


23


15


141


20


40


165


10


115


489


28


62


130





20


154


19



Total



215*

149

124

220

166

163

106

176

224

632

192

193



Engaged



262
198
168
310
240
238
156
261
334
950
300
303



Per Cent.



82.0
75.7
73.8
70.0
69.0
68.4
67.9
67.4
67.0
66.5
64.0
63.6



♦Actionof July 2d,-



( compames engaged; total casualties at Gettysburg were 224.
1 1521



Digitized by



Google







p^


f,



CONFED-
ERATE
GENERALS



Richard B. Gabnett
Gettysburg
July 3, 1863.



W. R. Scurry
JenkiDS Ferry
AprU30, 1864.



Paul J. Semmes

Gettysburg
July 10, 1863.



Carnot Poset

Bristoe Station

November 13, 1863.



KILLED

IN
BATTLE



Jamxs Deshler

Chickamauga

September 20. 1863.



Benjamin H. Helm

Chickamauga
September 20. 1863.



John M. Jones
Wilderness
May 2, 1864.



L. A. Stafford

Wilderness
May 11. 1864.



GROUP

No.
6



J. J. Pbttiorew
Falling Waters
July 17, 1863.



Thomas Green
Blair's Landing
April 12, 1864.



Alfred Mouton

Sabine Cross Roads

April 8, 1864.



PRF.8TON Smith

Chickamauga

September 20. 1863.



Digitized by



Google



Killed and Died of Wounds — Maximum Percentages of Enrollment
Compiled from Fox's "Regimental Losses in the Civil War"



regiment



2d Wisconsin

1st Maine H. A . . . .
57th Massachusetts .
140th Pennsylvania .
26th Wisconsin ....

7th Wisconsin

69th New York

11th Penn. Reserves
142d Pennsylvania .
141st Pennsylvania .

19th Indiana

121st New York

7th Michigan

148th Pennsylvania .
83d Pennsylvania . . ,
22d Massachusetts . .
36th Wisconsin ....

27th Indiana

5th Kentucky

27th Michigan

79thU.S. Colored. .

17th Maine

1st Minnesota

93d IlUnois

36th Illinois

8th Penn. Reserves.
126th New York . . .
49th Pennsylvania . .

9th Illinois

20th Indiana

15th Kentucky

2d Massachusetts . .

55th Illinois

4th Michigan

15th Massachusetts .
15th New Jersey . . .
145th Pennsylvania .
28th Massachusetts .

1st Michigan

8th New York H. A.
7th West Virginia . .
37th Wisconsin ....

5th Michigan

10th Penn. Reserves
13th Penn. Reserves
63d Pennsylvania . .

5th Vennont

6th Iowa

155th New York. . .
49th Ohio



division



Wadsworth's
Bimey's. . . .
Stevenson's .
Barlow's. . . .
Schurz's. . . .
Wadsworth's
Hancock's. . .
Crawford's. .
Doubleday's
Bimey's. . . .
Wadsworth's
Wright's....
Gibbon's . . . .
Bariow's. . . .

Griffin's

Griffin's

Gibbon's . . . .
Williams' . .
T. J. Wood's
Willcox's . . . .
Thayer's. . . .
Bimey's. . . .
Gibbon's . . . .
Quinby's ....
Sheridan's. . .
Crawford's. .
Barlow's. . . .

Wright's

Dodge's

Bimey's. . . .
Johnson's. . .
Williams' . . .

Blair's

Griffin's

Gibbon's^. . . .

Wright's

Barlow's. . . .
Barlow's. . . .
Morell's. . . .
Gibbon's. . . .
Gibbon's . . . .
Willcox's. . . .
Bimey's. . . .
Crawford's. .
Crawford's . .
Bimey's. . . .

Getty's

Corse's

Gibbon's. . . .
T. J. Wood's



CORPS



First

Second. . . .

Ninth

Second. . . .
Eleventh . . .

First

Second. . . .

Fifth

First

Third

First

Sixth

Second. . . .
Second. . . .

Fifth

Fifth

Second. . . .
Twelfth...

Fourth

Ninth

Seventh. . . .

Third

Second. . . .
Seventeenth
Fourth. . . .

Fifth

Second. . . .

Sixth

Sixteenth. .

Third

Fourteenth .
Twelfth....
Fifteenth . .

Fifth

Second. . . .

Sixth ......

Second. . . .

Second. . . .

Fifth

Second ....
Second. . . .

Ninth

Third

Fifth

Fifth

Third

Sixth

Sixteenth . .
Second. . . .
Fourth ....



Enrolled


KiUed


1,203


238


2,202


423


1,052


201


1,132


198


1,089


188


1,630


281


1,513


259


1,179


196


935


155


1,037


167


1,246


199


1,426


226


1,315


208


1,339


210


1,808


282


1,393


216


1,014


157


1,101


169


1,020


157


1,485


225


1,249


188


1,371


207


1,242


187


1,011


151


1,376


204


1,062


158


1,036


153


1,313


193


1,493


216


1,403


201


956


137


1,305


187


1,099


157


1,325


189


1,701


241


1,702


240


1,456


205


1,778


250


1,829


187


2,575


361


1,008


142


1,110


156


1,883


263


1,150


160


1,165


162


1,341


186


1,533


213


1,102


152


830


114


1,468


202



Per Cent.



19.7
19.2
19.1
17.4
17.2
17.2
17.1
16.6
16.5
16.1
15.9
15.8
15.8
15.6
15.5
15.5
15.4
15.3
15.3
15.1
15.0
15.0
15.0
14.9
14.8
14.8
14.7
14.6
14.4
14.3
14.3
14.3
14.2
14.2
14.1
14.1
14.1
14.0
14.0
14.0
14.0
14.0
13.9
13.9
13.9
13.8
13.8
13.7
13.7
13.7



[154]



Digitized by



Google




Abner Perrin

Spotsylvania

May 12. 1864.



W. E. Jones

Piedmont
June 5. 1864.



George Dolea

Bcthesda Church

May 30, 1864.



Robert H. Anderson

Antietain

October 6. 1862.



CONFEDERATE
GENERAI.S

KILLED
IN BATTLE
GROUP No. 7
BRIGADIER-
GENERALS




John il. Morgan

Greenville
September 4, 1864.



John R. Chamblibs. Jr.

Deep Bottom

August 16. 1864.



Junius Daniel

Spotsylvania

Died May 13, 1864.



James B. Gordon
Yellow Tavern
May 11, 1864.



J. C. Saundbrs
Weldon Railroad
August 21, 1864.



Micah Jenkins

Wilderness

May 6, 1864.



C. H. Stbvbns

Peach Tree Creek

July 20, 1864.



Sakukl Benton
Esra Church
July 29, 1864.



Digitized by



Google



By General Marcus J. Wright, Confederate States Army



AT the time when Lieutenant-Colonel William
F. Fox, U. S. v., published his valuable and
exceedingly accurate work, entitled " Regimental
Losses of the American Civil War, 1861-1865,"
many regimental reports were missing or inacces-
sible, so that this work, in many respects a stand-
ard as far as Confederate material was con-
cerned, necessarily is incomplete.

No compilation of statistics exists correspond-
ing to that given for the Union armies on a pre-
ceding page, and but little exact statistical
information of a broad character is available.
Therefore, it seems desirable here to give on a fol-
lowing page a table from Colonel Fox's book,
which shows remarkable percentages of losses in
Confederate regiments at particular engagements.
This list contains only a few of the many instances
of regiments suffering a heavy percentage of loss.
The list is compiled from the few cases in which
the official Confederate reports on file in the
United States War Department mention the num-
ber of effectives taken into action as well as the
actual losses.

Because of these statistical deficiencies, no com-
plete catalogue of distinguished Confederate regi-
ments based on the records of battlefield casualties
is possible. This is especially regrettable to those
who recall the conspicuous services of many or-
ganizations from the very outset.

In addition to Colonel Fox's table we give a few
other notable instances. At the first battle of Bull
Run, the 33d Virginia lost 45 killed and 101
wounded, and the 27th Virginia lost 19 killed and
122 wounded. Hampton's Legion lost 19 killed
and 100 wounded.

The 2d Georgia had the longest service of any
infantry regiment from that State. In the Seven
Days' around Richmond, with 271 men in the field,
it lost 120. At Malvern Hill, it lost 81 men and
about the same number at Gettysburg.

At Mills Springs, Ky., the 15th Mississippi
Regiment lost 46 killed and 153 wounded. The
8th Kentucky regiment at Fort Donelson, Tenn.,
lost 27 killed and 72 wounded. The 4th Tennes-
see, at Shiloh, lost 36 killed and 183 wounded,
while the 4th Kentucky lost 30 killed and 183
wounded. The 12th Mississippi, at Fair Oaks,



Va., lost 41 killed and 152 wounded. Hampton's
Legion, a South Carolina organization, at Fair
Oaks lost 21 killed and 122 wounded. The 20th
North Carolina lost, at Gaines' Mill, 70 killed and
202 wounded. At Gaines' Mill and Glendale the
14th Alabama lost 71 killed and 263 wounded,
the 19th Mississippi 68 killed and 264 wounded,
the 14th Louisiana 51 killed and 192 wounded,
and the 12th Mississippi 34 killed and 186
wounded. At Malvern Hill, the 2d Louisiana lost
30 killed and 162 wounded. The 21st Virginia
lost, at Cedar Mountain, Va., 37 killed and 86
wounded.

At Manassas (Second Bull Run), Va., the 6th
Texas lost 15 killed and 224 wounded; the 2d
Louisiana lost 25 killed and 86 wounded. At
Richmond, Ky., the 2d Tennessee lost 17 killed
and 95 wounded. At Antietam, or Sharpsburg,
the 13th Georgia lost 48 killed and 169 wounded;
the 48th North Carolina lost 31 killed and 186
wounded. At luka, Miss., the 3d Texas, dis-
mounted cavalry, lost 22 killed and 74 wounded.
At Corinth, Miss., the casualties of the 36th Mis-
sissippi were 32 killed and 110 wounded, and of
the 6th Missouri, 31 were killed and 130 wounded.
At Chaplin Hills, Ky., from the 1st Tennessee
regiment, 49 were killed and 129 wounded.

At Fredericksburg, Va., the 67th North Caro-
lina lost 32 killed, 192 wounded, and the 48th
North Carolina 17 killed and 161 wounded. At
Stone's River, the 29th Mississippi lost 34 killed
and 202 wounded.

At Chancellorsville, Va., the losses of the 37th
North Carolina were 34 killed and 193 wounded;
the 2d North Carolina, 47 killed and 167 wounded.
At Vicksburg, Miss., the 3d Louisiana lost 49
killed, 119 wounded, and the 6th Missouri lost 33
killed and 134 wounded. At Helena, Ark., the
7th Missouri lost 16 killed and 125 wounded. At
Gettysburg, the 42d Mississippi lost 60 killed and
205 wounded, and the 1st Maryland, with 400
present for duty, had 52 killed and 140 wounded.

At Charleston Harbor, the 21st South Caro-
lina lost 14 killed and 112 wounded, and the 25th
South Carolina 16 killed and 124 wounded. At
the bloody battle of Chickamauga, Alabama regi-
ments suffered great losses.



[156]



Digitized by



Google



Abchibald Gracik, Jr.
Petersburg Trenches
December 2, 1864.



John Adams

Franklin

November 30, 18W.



H. B. GSANBERRY

Franklin
November 30, 1804.



James D earing
High Bridge
April 6, 1865.



CONFEDERATE
GENERALS
KILLED
IN
BATTLE-
GROUP No. 8—
BRIGADIER-
GENERALS



John Dunovant
Vaughn Road,
October 1, 1864.



John Grroo
Darbytown Road,
October 7, 1864.



Stephen Eluott, Jr.

Petersburg

Died in 1864.



OscAit F. Strahl

Franklin
November 30, 1864.



Archibald C. Godwin

Opequon

September 19, 1864.



S. R. Gist

Franklin

November 30, 1864.



Victor J. Girardet

Petersburg

August 16, 1864.



Digitized by



Google



fflajBuattt^fi of Jfftftg (HanfthnvitB S^gtm^tttja

From Fox's "Regimental Losses in the Civil War*'

Showing Remarkable Percentages of Losses at Particular Engagements Based on

Official Reports

Note — ^This list does not aim to include all the notable instances of remarkable casualties of regiments in the Confederate Army.

It was based by Colonel Fox on available records where the numbers taken into action as well as the casualties were

specified in official reports. The list is suggestive rather than complete, as many regiments omitted

^might with propriety claim to be included in any roll of "Fifty Fighting Regiments."



REGIMENT



1st Texas

21st Georgia

26th North Carolina. . .

6th Mississippi

8th Tennessee

10th Tennessee

Palmetto Sharpshooters
17th South Carolina. . .

23d South CaroUna

44th Georgia

2dN. C. Battalion

16th Mississippi

27th North CaroUna. . .

6th Alabama

15th Virginia

8th Georgia

IstS. C. Rifles

10th Georgia

18th North Carolina. . .

3d Alabama

17th Virginia

7th North Carolina ....

12th Tennessee

9th Georgia

5th Georgia

16th Tennessee

4th North Carolina. . . .

27th Tennessee

12th South Carolina. . .

4th Virginia

4th Texas

27th Tennessee

1st South Carolina. . . .

49th Virginia

12th Alabama

7th South CaroUna. . . .

7th Texas

6th South Carolina ....

15th Georgia

11th Alabama

17th Georgia

3d North Carolina

4th Virginia

1st Maryland

8th Mississippi

32d Virginia.

18th Mississippi

14th South CaroUna. . .
33d North CaroUna. . .
5th Alabama



BATTLE



Antietam

Manassas

Gettysburg ....

Shiloh...

Stone's River . .
Chiekamauga. .

Glendale

Manassas

Manassas

Mechanicsville .
Gettysburg ....

Antietam

Antietam

Seven Pines . . .

Antietam

Antietam

Gaines' Mill . . .

Antietam

Seven Days. . . .
Malvern Hill. . .

Antietam

Seven Days . . .
Stone's River . .
Gettysburg. . . .
Chiekamauga. .
Stone's River . .
Seven Pines . . .

Shiloh

Manassas

Manassas

Antietam

Perryville

Manassas

Fair Oaks

Fair Oaks

Antietam

Raymond

Fair Oaks

Gettysburg. . . .

Glendale

Manassas

Gettysburg. . . .
Chaneellorsville
Gettysburg. . . .
Stone's River . .

Antietam

Antietam

Gaines* Mill . . .
ChanceUorsville
Malvern Hill. . .



DIVISION


Present


KiUed


Wounded


Hood's


226


45


141


EweU's


242


38


146


Heth's


820


86


502


Hardee's


425


61


239


Cheatham's. . .


444


41


265


Johnson's. . . .


328


44


180


Longstreet's . .
Evans'


375

284


39

25


215
164


Evans'


225


27


122


D.H.HUl's...


514


71


264


Rodes'


240


29


124


Anderson's. . .


228


27


117


Walker's


325


31


168


D.H. Hill's...


632


91


277


McLaws'


128


11


64


Hood's


176


13


72


A. P. Hill's. . .


537


81


225


McLaws'


148


15


69


A. P.HiU's...


396


45


179


D.H.Hill's...


354


37


163


Pickett's


55


7


24


A. P.HUl's...


450


35


218


Cheatham's. . .


292


18


137


Hood's


340


27


162


Cheatham's. . .


353


27


167


Cheatham's. . .


377


36


155


D.H.HUl's..


678


77


286


Hardee's


350


27


115


A. P.Hill's...


270


23


121


Jackson's


180


18


79


Hood's


200


10


97


Cleburne's ....


210


16


84


A. P. Hill's. . .


283


25


126


D.H. Hill's...


424


32


170


D.H. Hill's...


408


59


156


McLaws'


268


23


117


John Gregg's. .
D.H. HiU's...


306
521


22
88


136
181


Hood's


335


19


152


Longstreet's. .
Hood's


357
200


49
10


121
91


Johnson's


312


29


127


Trimble's


355


14


155


Johnson's


400


52


140


Jackson's


282


20


113


McLaws'


158


15


57


McLaws'


186


10


73


A. P. Hal's...


500


18


197


A. P.Hill's ..


480


32


167


D.H.Hill's...


225


26


66



Missing



Per Cent.



16



16
6

48

2



12

22



11



82.3
76.0
71.7
70.5
68.2
68.0
67.7
66.9
66.2
65.1
63.7
63.1
61.2
59.0
58.5
57.3
56.9
56.7
56.5
56.4
56.3
56.2
56.1
55.0
54.9
54.9
54.4
54.2
54.0
53.8
53.5
53.3
53.3
52.8
52.6
52.2
51.6
51.6
51.0
50.7
50.5
50.0
48.4
48.0
47.1
45.5
44.6
43.0
41.4
40.8



[158]



Digitized by



Google



VI



FEDERAL ARMIES, CORPS
AND LEADERS



THE SECOND CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC

MARCHING DOWN PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE IN 1865 — THE SECOND CORPS HAD
A RECORD OF LONGER CONTINUOUS SERVICE, A LARGER ORGANIZATION,
HARDEST FIGHTING, AND GREATEST NUMBER OF CASUALTIES, THAN ANY OTHER
IN THE EASTERN ARMIES — IT CONTAINED THE REGIMENT WHICH SUSTAINED
THE LARGEST PERCENTAGE OF LOSS IN ANY ONE ACTION; THE REGIMENT
WHICH SUSTAINED THE GREATEST NUMERICAL LOaS IN ANY ONE ACTION; AND
THE REGIMENT WHICH SUSTAINED THE GREATEST NUMERICAL LOSS DURING
ITS TERM OF SERVICE — OF THE HUNDRED UNION REGIMENTS WHICH LOST
THE MOST MEN IN BATTLE, THIRTY-FIVE BELONGED TO THE SECOND CORPS



Digitized by



Google



Colonel Colonel Captain

Orderly Orderly Joseph J. Wiluam G. H. W.

R£YNOM>s Le Due Perkins

"FIGHTING JOE HOOKER" WITH HIS STAFF

"Fighting Joe Hooker" was a man of handsome physique and intense personal magnetism. He graduated at West Point in 1837 in
the same class with Jubal A. Early and Braxton Bragg. Having fought through the Mexican War, he resigned from the army in 1853.
On May 17, 1861, he was appointed brigadier-general of volunteers, and on May 5, 1862, major-general of volunteers. He was active
throughout the Peninsular campaign, and at Bristoe Station, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, South Mountain and Antietam. He com-
manded the center grand division of the Army of the Potomac at Fredericksburg. At last, on January 26, 1863, he was assigned by
President Lincoln to the command of the Army of the Potomac. On the 4th of May, 1863, his right flank was surprised by Jackson at
Chancellorsville, and his 90,000 soldiers were forced to recross the Rappahannock. While fighting in the East he was wounded at
1160]



Digitized by



Google



COPYRIOHTy Itn, REVIEW OF REVIEWS 00.

Walker, THK Artist Captain R. H. Hall General General Colonel

Lieutenant Major William Joseph Daniel James D.

Samuel W. Tatlob H. Lawrence Hooker Butterfibld Fessenden

ON THE SPOT WHENCE HE DIRECTED HIS "BATTLE ABOVE THE CLOUDS"

Antietam, and stunned at Chancellorsville by a cannon-ball which struck a pillar against which he was leaning. In September, 1863,
he was sent with the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps to reenf orce Rosecrans at Chattanooga. On November 24th, in the ** battle among
the clouds** at the head of his new command, he led a charge against the Confederate artillery and infantry posted on Lookout Moun-
tain. For his conduct on this occasion he was brevetted major-general in the regular army. He further distinguished himself under
Sherman at Dalton and Resaca, and in the attack on Atlanta. At his own request (July 30, 1864) he was placed on waiting orders
September 28th, when he was put in command of the Northern Department. He retired from active service October 15, 1868, with
the full rank of major-general in the regular army. General Hooker died at Garden City, Long Island, New York, October 31, 1879.



Digitized by



Google



COPYRIGHT, 1911, PATRIOT PUS CO.



THE ARMY OF GEORGIA— OX PARADE, GENERAL SLOCUM AT THE HEAD

Very diflFerent from the march through Georgia and the Carolinas was this magnificent parade of the Army of
Georgia down Pennsylvania Avenue. In front ride General Slocum and his staff. Behind come the long
straight lines of men who proved the Confederacy a hollow shell with all of its fighting men at the front.
Eagerly crowding close to the line of march are the citizens of Washington who had alternately clamored for
action, and shaken in their boots when the daring Confederate leaders pressed close to the Northern capital.
Many a heartfelt prayer of thanks and relief was offered when mothers saw their boys march past, unscathed
by the war and about to reenter civil life. Many a tear fell for those who could not be there to share the glorj'.

11621



Digitized by



Google



At Gaines' Mill, Slocum's Division of the Sixth Corps was sent
to the support of General Porter, and lost 2,021 out of less than
8,000 present in the hot engagement. It was in front of Fred-
ericksburg May 3, 1863, under General Sedgwick, that the
Corps made its most brilliant display of dash and daring. It
carried at the point of the bayonet Marye's Heights, the strong
position before which there had faDen, gloriously but in vain,
nearly 13,000 men the previous December. Most of the Corps
was held in reserve at Gettysburg, and its casualties there were
slight, but it added again to its laurels at Rappahannock Sta-



THE NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS



THE SIXTH ARMY CORPS IN THE GRAND

REVIEW— THE CORPS THAT SAVED

WASHINGTON FROM CAPTURE

tion. In the battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania it en-
countered its hardest fighting, the percentage of killed of the
Fifteenth New Jersey in the latter battle being equaled in only
one instance during the whole war. At Cold Harbor it suf-
fered heavily again, and the appearance of two of its divisions
at Fort Stevens checked Early *s advance on Washington. It
pursued Early up the Shenandoah, and fought at Opequon and
Cedar Creek. In the final assault on Petersburg it played
an important part. It was no less prominent in its
final appearance at the Grand Review in Washington.
»— 11



THE TWENTIETH ARMY CORPS



Digitized by



Google



tS^t Armt^B nt % Vinmh »lat?a tti % ffltml liar



BY THE PKO VISIONS of the Constitution, the
President of the United States is commander-
in-chief of the army and navy. During the Civil
War, this function was exercised in no small de-
gree by President Lincoln. As Secretaries of War,
he had in his cabinet Simon Cameron, from March
4, 1861, to January 14, 1862; and Edward M.
Stanton, who served from January 15, 1862,
throughout Lincoln's administration, and also
under Johnson until May 28, 1868, except for a
short interval during which he was suspended.
There were four generals-in-chief of the armies:
Brevet Lieutenant-General Scott, Major-Generals
McClellan and Halleck, and Lieutenant-General
Grant. The last named has been considered in
previous pages of this volume, but the lives and
services of the other three are summarized below,
in addition to the treatment received in other
volumes. (Consult Index.) This is true of all
the army leaders not separately described in the
pages that follow. The Lidex will refer to treat-
ment in other volumes.

Lieutenant-General Winfield Scott was
born near Petersburg, Virginia, June 18, 1786.
After being graduated from William and Mary
College, he studied law, was admitted to the bar,
and then entered the apny at the age of twenty-
two. His career was one of bravery and incident.
He was captured by the British, but exchanged in
1813, fought in the battle of Lundy's Lane, and
was severely wounded. After the close of the war
he was raised to the rank of major-general, and in
1841 succeeded General Macomb as commander
of the United States army. In the war with Mex-
ico, he won great fame and was nominated by the
Whigs for President in 1852 ; but he carried only
four States. In 1855, Congress revived the rank
of lieutenant-general and conferred it by brevet
upon Scott, the appointment being dated March
29, 1847, the day of his brilliant capture of Vera
Cruz. It was evident that his age and infirmities
would prevent his taking any active part in the
Civil War, and on November 1, 1861, he was re-
tired from the chief command of the army of the
United States. He wrote an autobiography, and
made a European trip in 1864, dying May 29,
1866, at West Point, New York.

Major-Geneeal Henry Wager Halleck
(U.S.M.A. 1839) was born in Westemville, New

[164



York, January 16, 1815. He served in California
and on the Pacific coast during the Mexican War.
He retired from the army with the rank of captain
in 1854 to practise law, but after the outbreak of
the Civil War reentered the regular service, with
the grade of major-general. He was in command
of the Department of Missouri ( afterward Depart-
ment of Mississippi) from November 19, 1861, to
July 11, 1862, when he became general-in-chief of
all the armies. Grant succeeded him, March 9,
1864, and Halleck was his chief-of-staff until the
close of the war. He continued in the army as
head, successively, of the Military Division of the
James, the Department of the Pacific, and Depart-
ment of the South until his death at Louisville,
Kentucky, January 9, 1872.

Major-General George Brinton McClel-
lan (U.S.M.A. 1846) was bom in Philadelphia,



Online LibraryFrancis Trevelyan MillerThe photographic history of the civil war in ten volumes → online text (page 8 of 40)